UPSC Paper 2 (CSAT) Mock Test - 19


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This mock test of UPSC Paper 2 (CSAT) Mock Test - 19 for UPSC helps you for every UPSC entrance exam. This contains 80 Multiple Choice Questions for UPSC UPSC Paper 2 (CSAT) Mock Test - 19 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this UPSC Paper 2 (CSAT) Mock Test - 19 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. UPSC students definitely take this UPSC Paper 2 (CSAT) Mock Test - 19 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other UPSC Paper 2 (CSAT) Mock Test - 19 extra questions, long questions & short questions for UPSC on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Renu's mother was three times as old as Renu 5 years ago. After 5 years, she will be twice as old as Renu. Renu's present age in years is

Solution:

Given: 3(R - 5) = (M - 5)
and, 2(R + 5) = (M + 5)
∴ M = 35, R = 15

QUESTION: 2

The solution of x+y = 9 and x-9y = 0, is

Solution:

B is the correct option.
x+y=9
x-y=0
=> 10x=81
=> x= 81/10 or y= 9/10

QUESTION: 3

If 6a=4b and 2a=0, then

Solution:

2a = 0
or a = 0 as 2 ≠ 0
6a = 4b
or 3.(2a) = 4b
or 4b = 0
or b = 0 as 4 ≠ 0
∴ a and b are equal

QUESTION: 4

A string of three English letters is formed as per the following rules : 
(a) The first letter is any vowel. 
(b) The second letter is m, n or p. 
(c) If the second letter is m then the third letter is any vowel which is different from the first letter. 
(d) If the second letter is n then the third letter is e or u. 
(e) If the second letter is p then the third letter is the same as the first letter.

Q. How many strings of letters can possibly be formed using the above rules ?

Solution:

D is the correct option.There are exclusive cases:
(i) when m is the second letter(ii) when n is the second letter(i) when p is the second letter

Case (i): First letter can be selected in 5 ways out of t vowels. Since second letter is fixed (i.e., m) therefore no. of 
ways of selection of second letter is 1.
Third letter can be selected in 4 ways out of remaining 4 vowels (since the vowel which has been used at first place can 
not be used at the place of third letter.
∴ Total no. of ways =5×1×4=20

Case (ii): First letter can be selected in 5 ways.Second letter can be selected in 1 way.Third letter can be selected in 1 way.Since third letter will be same as the first letter. So if the first letter is selected, then there is no need to select 
the third letter.
∴ Total no. of ways =5×1×1=5
Hence , sum of all the possible no. of ways in which the string of letters can be formed
=20+10+5=35
 

QUESTION: 5

A string of three English letters is formed as per the following rules : 
(a) The first letter is any vowel. 
(b) The second letter is m, n or p. 
(c) If the second letter is m then the third letter is any vowel which is different from the first letter. 
(d) If the second letter is n then the third letter is e or u. 
(e) If the second letter is p then the third letter is the same as the first letter.

Q. How many strings of letters can possibly be formed using the above rules such that the third letter of the string is e ?

Solution:

C is the correct option.
1st letter 2nd letter 3rd letter     Total No of ways 
a,i,o,u     m     e                    4×1×1=4 
a,e,i,o,u     n     e         5×1×1=5 
  e          p          e              1×1×1=1 
Total no of ways =10

QUESTION: 6

(a) Six plays are to be organised from Monday to Sunday -one play each day with one day when there is no play. 'No play' day is not Monday or Sunday.
(b) The plays are held in sets of 3 plays each in such a way that 3 plays are held without any break, i.e. 3 plays are held in such a way that there is no 'No play' day between them but immediately before this set or immediately after this set is is 'No play' day.
(c) Play Z was held on 26th and play X was held on 31st of the same month.
(d) Play B was not held immediately after play A (but was held after A, not necessarily immediately) and play M was held immediately before Q.
(e) All the six plays were held in the same month.

Q. Which play was organised on Monday?

Solution:

E is the correct option.
Play schedule
25  MON    A
26  TUE     Z
27  WED    B
28  THU   NO PLAY
29  FRI      M
30  SAT     Q
31  SUN    X

A was organised on Monday

QUESTION: 7

(a) Six plays are to be organised from Monday to Sunday -one play each day with one day when there is no play. 'No play' day is not Monday or Sunday.
(b) The plays are held in sets of 3 plays each in such a way that 3 plays are held without any break, i.e. 3 plays are held in such a way that there is no 'No play' day between them but immediately before this set or immediately after this set is is 'No play' day.
(c) Play Z was held on 26th and play X was held on 31st of the same month.
(d) Play B was not held immediately after play A (but was held after A, not necessarily immediately) and play M was held immediately before Q.
(e) All the six plays were held in the same month.

Q. Which day was play Z organised?

Solution:

A is the correct option.
Play schedule
25  MON    A
26  TUE     Z
27  WED    B
28  THU   NO PLAY
29  FRI      M
30  SAT     Q
31  SUN    X

QUESTION: 8

(a) Six plays are to be organised from Monday to Sunday -one play each day with one day when there is no play. 'No play' day is not Monday or Sunday.
(b) The plays are held in sets of 3 plays each in such a way that 3 plays are held without any break, i.e. 3 plays are held in such a way that there is no 'No play' day between them but immediately before this set or immediately after this set is is 'No play' day.
(c) Play Z was held on 26th and play X was held on 31st of the same month.
(d) Play B was not held immediately after play A (but was held after A, not necessarily immediately) and play M was held immediately before Q.
(e) All the six plays were held in the same month.

Q. Which date was a 'No play' day?

Solution:

B is the correct option.
    Play schedule
25  MON    A
26  TUE     Z
27  WED    B
28  THU   NO PLAY
29  FRI      M
30  SAT     Q
31  SUN    X

QUESTION: 9

(a) Six plays are to be organised from Monday to Sunday -one play each day with one day when there is no play. 'No play' day is not Monday or Sunday.
(b) The plays are held in sets of 3 plays each in such a way that 3 plays are held without any break, i.e. 3 plays are held in such a way that there is no 'No play' day between them but immediately before this set or immediately after this set is is 'No play' day.
(c) Play Z was held on 26th and play X was held on 31st of the same month.
(d) Play B was not held immediately after play A (but was held after A, not necessarily immediately) and play M was held immediately before Q.
(e) All the six plays were held in the same month.

Q. Which of the following is true?

Solution:

D is the correct option.
Play schedule
25  MON    A
26  TUE     Z
27  WED    B
28  THU   NO PLAY
29  FRI      M
30  SAT     Q
31  SUN    X

First play was organised on the 25th.
 

QUESTION: 10

(a) Six plays are to be organised from Monday to Sunday -one play each day with one day when there is no play. 'No play' day is not Monday or Sunday.
(b) The plays are held in sets of 3 plays each in such a way that 3 plays are held without any break, i.e. 3 plays are held in such a way that there is no 'No play' day between them but immediately before this set or immediately after this set is is 'No play' day.
(c) Play Z was held on 26th and play X was held on 31st of the same month.
(d) Play B was not held immediately after play A (but was held after A, not necessarily immediately) and play M was held immediately before Q.
(e) All the six plays were held in the same month.

Q. Which day was play Q organised?

Solution:

C is the correct option.

Play schedule

25  MON    A

26  TUE     Z

27  WED    B

28  THU   NO PLAY

29  FRI      M

30  SAT     Q

31  SUN    X

 

play Q organised on saturday.

QUESTION: 11

Eight persons A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H belonging to different cities Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Kanpur, Lucknow, Hyderabad and Patna, not necessarily in the same order, went to Bangalore to attend an awareness programme to restrict AIDS from expanding. Each one had a different specialisation, viz Acting, Choreography, Literature, Science, Economics, Marketing, Designing and Information Technology.
E is from Kolkata. G does not have specialisation in Economics. Neither F nor G has specialization in Science or Marketing. One who is from Kolkata has specialization in Designing. A and B have specialization either in marketing or in Information technology. D does not have specialization in Choreography. One who is from Chennai has specialization in Acting and one who is from Delhi has specialization in Choreography. G and H belong either to Hyderabad or to Mumbai. A and G do not belong ton Patna and Hyderabad respectively. One who belong to Lucknow has specialization in Information Technology.

Q. Which of the following persons is from Chennai?

Solution:

Since most of the cluse are negative, thereforeyou are suggested to tabulate the information in the following table. Put a tick mark (√) if you get a positive clue. Put a cross mark (×)if you get a negative information.
Corel
D= Delhi; M = Mumbai; Ko = Kolkata,
C= Chennai; Kan = Kan = Kanpur; L = Lucknow, 
H = Hyderabad; P = Patna

QUESTION: 12

The sides of a triangle are in the ratio 1/2 : 1/3 : 1/4. If the perimeter of the triangle is 52 cm, the length of the smallest side is

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

A boy gets 91,88,86 and 78 marks in four papers. How many marks must he secure in the fifth paper to get an average of 85?

Solution:

Let the 5th paper be x,
Average=91+88+86+78+x/5
85=343+x/5
425=343+x
x=82

QUESTION: 14

The average age of a class is 15.8 yrs. The average age of the boys in the class is 16.4 yrs and that of the girls is 15.4 yrs. What is the ratio of boys to girls in the class?

Solution:

Let the ratio of boys to girls be x : y
⇒ Total no. of boys = 16.4 × x
⇒ Total no. of girls = 15.4 × x
⇒ Total no. of students = x + y
Hence ,

QUESTION: 15

Rahul and Robin are brothers. Pramod is Robin's father. Sheela is Pramod's sister. Prema is Pramod's niece. Shubha is Sheela's granddaughter. How is Rahul related to Shubha?

Solution:

Rahul is maternal uncle of shubha and shubha is niece of rahul as prema is cousin of rahul n robin

QUESTION: 16

If P is the husband of Q and R is the mother of S and Q, what is R to P?

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

A is B's sister. C is B's mother. D is C's father. E is D's mother. How is A related to D ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 18

Mr. J is a Police Officer. L is the brother-in-law of P's sister X. X is the wife of her brother's boss J. What is the relationship of P and L with J?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Pointing to Meena, Swarup says "she is the daughter of my grandfather's only child". How is Meena related to Swarup?

Solution:

Swarup's grandfather's only child means mother or father of Swarup.
Meena is daughter swarup's mother or father.
Therefore, Meena is sister of Swarup.

QUESTION: 20

Two pendulum clocks on two clock towers begin to strike 10 together. The first clock strikes its strokes in 45 seconds and the second strikes its strokes in 36 seconds. The time interval between the 4th stroke of the first and the 5th stroke of the second is

Solution:

The first clock strikes (10 - 1) = 9 strokes in 45 seconds and the second strikes (10 - 1) = 9 storkes in 36 seconds 
Time interval between any two strokes of the first clock is 5 seconds and that of the second clock is 4 seconds.
The 4th stroke of the first in after 
5×35×3 = 15 seconds 
The 5th strike of the second is after 4×4 = 16 seconds 
∴ required time interval = 1 second

QUESTION: 21

A, B, C, D, E, F and G are sitting around a circle facing at the centre. F is between C and A. B is second to the right of A. G is not an immediate neighbour of B. E is not an immediate neighbour of A.

Q. Who is the immediate left of C?

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

For achieving inclusive growth there is critical need to rethink the role of the State. The early debate among economists about the size of the Government can be misleading. The need of the hour is to have an enabling Government. India is too large and complex a nation for the State to be able to deliver all that needed. Asking the Government to produce all the essential goods, create all the necessary jobs, and keep a curb on the prices of all goods is to lead to a large cumbersome bureaucracy and widespread corruption. The aim must be to stay with the objective of inclusive growth that was laid down by the founding fathers of the nation and also to take a more modern view of what the State can realistically deliver. This is what leads to the idea of an enabling State, that is, a Government that does not try to directly deliver to the citizens everything that they need. Instead, it (1) creates an enabling ethos for the market so that individual enterprise can flourish and citizens can, for the most part, provide for the needs of one another, and (2) steps in to help those who do not manage to do well for themselves, for there will always be individuals, no matter what the system, who need support and help. Hence we need a Government that, when it comes to the market, sets effective, incentive-compatible rules and remains on the sidelines with minima interference, and, at the same time, plays an important role in directly helping the poor by ensuring that they get basic education and health services and receive adequate nutrition and food.

Q. 

According to the passage:
1. The objective of inclusive growth was laid down by the founding fathers of the nation.
2. Need of the hour is to have an enabling Government.
3. The Government should engage in maximum interference in market processes.
4. There is a need to change the size of the Government.

Which of the statements given above are correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

For achieving inclusive growth there is critical need to rethink the role of the State. The early debate among economists about the size of the Government can be misleading. The need of the hour is to have an enabling Government. India is too large and complex a nation for the State to be able to deliver all that needed. Asking the Government to produce all the essential goods, create all the necessary jobs, and keep a curb on the prices of all goods is to lead to a large cumbersome bureaucracy and widespread corruption. The aim must be to stay with the objective of inclusive growth that was laid down by the founding fathers of the nation and also to take a more modern view of what the State can realistically deliver. This is what leads to the idea of an enabling State, that is, a Government that does not try to directly deliver to the citizens everything that they need. Instead, it (1) creates an enabling ethos for the market so that individual enterprise can flourish and citizens can, for the most part, provide for the needs of one another, and (2) steps in to help those who do not manage to do well for themselves, for there will always be individuals, no matter what the system, who need support and help. Hence we need a Government that, when it comes to the market, sets effective, incentive-compatible rules and remains on the sidelines with minima interference, and, at the same time, plays an important role in directly helping the poor by ensuring that they get basic education and health services and receive adequate nutrition and food.

Q. Delivery of the basic services to the deprived sections of the society.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

For achieving inclusive growth there is critical need to rethink the role of the State. The early debate among economists about the size of the Government can be misleading. The need of the hour is to have an enabling Government. India is too large and complex a nation for the State to be able to deliver all that needed. Asking the Government to produce all the essential goods, create all the necessary jobs, and keep a curb on the prices of all goods is to lead to a large cumbersome bureaucracy and widespread corruption. The aim must be to stay with the objective of inclusive growth that was laid down by the founding fathers of the nation and also to take a more modern view of what the State can realistically deliver. This is what leads to the idea of an enabling State, that is, a Government that does not try to directly deliver to the citizens everything that they need. Instead, it (1) creates an enabling ethos for the market so that individual enterprise can flourish and citizens can, for the most part, provide for the needs of one another, and (2) steps in to help those who do not manage to do well for themselves, for there will always be individuals, no matter what the system, who need support and help. Hence we need a Government that, when it comes to the market, sets effective, incentive-compatible rules and remains on the sidelines with minima interference, and, at the same time, plays an important role in directly helping the poor by ensuring that they get basic education and health services and receive adequate nutrition and food.

Q. 

What constitutes an enabling Government?
1. A large bureaucracy.
2. Implementation of welfare programmes through representatives.
3. Creating an ethos that helps individual enterprise.
4. Providing resources to those who are underprivileged.
5. Offering direct help to the poor regarding basic services.

Select the correct answer from the codes given below:

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

For achieving inclusive growth there is critical need to rethink the role of the State. The early debate among economists about the size of the Government can be misleading. The need of the hour is to have an enabling Government. India is too large and complex a nation for the State to be able to deliver all that needed. Asking the Government to produce all the essential goods, create all the necessary jobs, and keep a curb on the prices of all goods is to lead to a large cumbersome bureaucracy and widespread corruption. The aim must be to stay with the objective of inclusive growth that was laid down by the founding fathers of the nation and also to take a more modern view of what the State can realistically deliver. This is what leads to the idea of an enabling State, that is, a Government that does not try to directly deliver to the citizens everything that they need. Instead, it (1) creates an enabling ethos for the market so that individual enterprise can flourish and citizens can, for the most part, provide for the needs of one another, and (2) steps in to help those who do not manage to do well for themselves, for there will always be individuals, no matter what the system, who need support and help. Hence we need a Government that, when it comes to the market, sets effective, incentive-compatible rules and remains on the sidelines with minima interference, and, at the same time, plays an important role in directly helping the poor by ensuring that they get basic education and health services and receive adequate nutrition and food.

Q. 

Why is the State unable to deliver “ all that is needed”?
1. It does not have sufficient bureaucracy.
2. It does not promote inclusive growth.

Select the correct answer from the codes given below:

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

For achieving inclusive growth there is critical need to rethink the role of the State. The early debate among economists about the size of the Government can be misleading. The need of the hour is to have an enabling Government. India is too large and complex a nation for the State to be able to deliver all that needed. Asking the Government to produce all the essential goods, create all the necessary jobs, and keep a curb on the prices of all goods is to lead to a large cumbersome bureaucracy and widespread corruption. The aim must be to stay with the objective of inclusive growth that was laid down by the founding fathers of the nation and also to take a more modern view of what the State can realistically deliver. This is what leads to the idea of an enabling State, that is, a Government that does not try to directly deliver to the citizens everything that they need. Instead, it (1) creates an enabling ethos for the market so that individual enterprise can flourish and citizens can, for the most part, provide for the needs of one another, and (2) steps in to help those who do not manage to do well for themselves, for there will always be individuals, no matter what the system, who need support and help. Hence we need a Government that, when it comes to the market, sets effective, incentive-compatible rules and remains on the sidelines with minima interference, and, at the same time, plays an important role in directly helping the poor by ensuring that they get basic education and health services and receive adequate nutrition and food.

Q. What is the essential message being conveyed by the author of the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

Successfully adjusting to one's environment leads to happiness. War at a universal level destroys the weaker people, who are the most unable to adjust to their environment. Thus, war at the universal level puts weaklings out of their misery and allows more space for their predators to enjoy life in a better manner. As those actions have to be performed, which maximize the level of happiness of the greatest number, war at a universal level should take place.

Q. 

What response would the author of the above discussion come up with, in the case of the / objection that the weaklings far exceed strong people?
1. He would respond with the statement that the person making the objection is a weakling.
2. He would respond by saying that weaklings will be miserable no matter what happens.
3. He would respond with the statement that the strong would be frustrated if the weaklings are destroyed.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Successfully adjusting to one's environment leads to happiness. War at a universal level destroys the weaker people, who are the most unable to adjust to their environment. Thus, war at the universal level puts weaklings out of their misery and allows more space for their predators to enjoy life in a better manner. As those actions have to be performed, which maximize the level of happiness of the greatest number, war at a universal level should take place.

Q. 

The author's discussion would be greatly influenced if he agreed to which of the following?
1. Technology could change the environment.
2. War at the universal level would be an integral part of the environment.
3. It is possible for the strong to survive without suppressing the weak.

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

It is essential that we mitigate the emissions of greenhouse gases .and thus avoid some of the worst impacts of climate change that would take place in coming years and decades. Mitigation would require a major shift in the way we produce and consume energy. A shift away from overwhelming dependence on fossil fuels is now long overdue, but unfortunately, technological development has been slow arid inadequate largely because government policies have not promoted investments in research and development, myopically as a result of relatively low prices of oil. It is now, therefore, imperative for a country like India treating the opportunity of harnessing renewable energy on a large scale as a national imperative. This country is extremely well endowed with solar, wind and biomass sources of energy. Where we have lagged, unfortunately, is in our ability to develop and to create technological solutions for harnessing these resources. 
One particular trajectory for carrying out stringent mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions assessed by the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) clearly shows the need for ensuring that global emissions of greenhouse gases peak no later than 2015 and reduce rapidly thereafter. The cost associated with such a trajectory is truly modest" and would amount, in the estimation of IPCC, to not more than 3 percent of the global GDP in 2030. In other words, the level of prosperity that the world would have reached without mitigation would at worst be postponed by a few months or a year at the most. This is clearly not a very high price to pay for protecting hundreds of millions of people from the worst risks associated with climate change. Any such effort, however, would require lifestyles to change appropriately also. Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions is not a mere technological fix, and clearly requires changes in lifestyles and transformation of a country's economic structure, whereby effective reduction in emissions is brought about, such as through the consumption of much lower quantities of animal protein. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has determined that the emissions from the livestock sector amount to 18 percent of the total. The reduction of emissions from this source is entirely in the hands of human beings, who have never questioned the impacts that their dietary habits of consuming more and more animal protein are bringing about. Mitigation overall has huge co-benefits, such as lower air pollution and health benefits, higher energy security and greater employment.

Q. 

According to the passage, which of the following would help in the mitigation of greenhouse gases?
1. Reducing the consumption of meat 
2. Rapid economic liberalization 
3. Reducing the consumerism 
4. Modern management practices of livestock 

Select the correct answer using the code given below:

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

How many triangles are there in the following figure?

Solution:

The figure may be labelled as shown in the following figure:

It is clear from the figure that there are fourteen triangles in the upper half of the figure
ABGE - EIJ, EFM, AFE, HFI, FOP, OBP, PBG, PGQ, PMQ, PFM, FBM, BMG, FMG and FEG
There are four triangles in the lower half of the figure EGCD - EMD, JMK, DKL and DMN
There are two triangles in the main figure ABCD - DBC, ADB
Hence, there are a total of twenty triangles in the figure.

QUESTION: 31

One morning after sunrise Vikram and Shailesh were standing in a lawn with their back towards each other. Vikram's shadow fell exactly towards his left-hand side. Which direction Shailesh was facing?

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

P, Q, R and S are playing a game of carrom. P, R and S, Q are partners. S is to the right of R who is facing west. Then, Q is facing

Solution:

According to the data R faces west S is to the right of R 
So, S is facing South. Hence Q who is a partner of S will face North

QUESTION: 33

A child is looking for his father. He went 90 metres in the East before turning to his right. He went 20 metres before turning to his right again to look for his father at his uncle's place 30 metres from this point. His father was not there. From here he went 100 metres to the North before meeting his father in a street. How far did the son meet his father from the starting point ?

Solution:

B is the correct option.Explanation: Clearly, the child moves from A to B 90 metres eastwards upto B, then turns right and moves 20 metre upto C, then turns right and moves upto 30 metre upto D. Finally he turns right and moves upto 100 metre upto E. So from starting point his father was 100 metre away.

QUESTION: 34

A shopkeeper earns 15% profit on a shirt even after allowing 31% discount on the list price. If the list price is Rs 125, then the cost price of the shirt is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Length of the shadow of a person is x when the angle of elevation of the sun is 45°.If the length of the shadow increases by (√3-1)x,then the angle of elevation of the sun should become

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

In a Coded language C O N T R I B U T E is written as E T B U I R N T O C

how is P O P U L A R I S E Written in that code:

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

Many managers of mutual funds proclaim that they have been able to generate consistently higher rates of return on their investments than the general stock market by buying shares of undervalued companies. Classical economic theory, however, proposes the "efficient capital markets hypothesis," which indicates that stock prices accurately reflect the value of the underlying investments, incorporating all information available to the public. If the efficient capital markets hypothesis is correct, then it should be expected that __________.

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent on profits for their survival, there would be no teaching hospitals, because of the intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals. 
Ms. Nakai: I disagree. The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians. This, in turn, enables those hospitals to concentrate on non routine cases. 
Which of the following, if true, would most strengthen Ms. Nakai's attempt to refute Mr. Primm's claim?

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Advertisement: Fabric-Soft leaves clothes soft and fluffy, and its fresh scent is a delight. We conducted a test using over 100 consumers to prove Fabric-Soft is best. Each consumer was given one towel washed with Fabric-Soft and one towel washed without it. Ninety-nine percent of the consumers preferred the Fabric-Soft towel. So Fabric-Soft is the most effective fabric softener available.

The advertisement’s reasoning is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that it fails to consider whether

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Which of the following best completes the passage below? 
At large amusement parks, live shows are used very deliberately to influence crowd movements. Lunchtime performances relieve the pressure on a park's restaurants. Evening performances have a rather different purpose: to encourage visitors to stay for supper. Behind this surface divergence in immediate purpose there is the unified underlying goal of

Solution:
QUESTION: 41

Modern science is built on the process of posing hypotheses and testing them against observations—in essence, attempting to show that the hypotheses are incorrect. Nothing brings more recognition than overthrowing conventional wisdom. It is accordingly unsurprising that some scientists are skeptical of the widely accepted predictions of global warming. What is instead remarkable is that with hundreds of researchers striving to make breakthroughs in climatology, very few find evidence that global warming is unlikely.

The information above provides the most support for which one of the following statements?

Solution:
QUESTION: 42

Traffic Safety Expert: In order to achieve a substantial reduction in the extremely high number of car accidents in our country, we should implement a radical new safe driving plan. Seat belts and air bags would be eliminated from the driver's side of all automobiles to provide the driver with the strongest possible incentive to drive safely. Further, an electroshock system would administer shocks to the driver if he or she exceeds the speed limit or engages in other urtsafe driving practices.

In declaring that the radical new safe driving plan will help to reduce accident rates, the author assumes which of the following?

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

It is exceedingly difficult to make people realize that an evil is an evil. For instance, we seize a man and deliberately do him a malicious injury: say, imprison him for years. One would not suppose that it needed any exceptional clearness of wit to recognize in this an act of act of diabolical cruelty. But in England such a recognition provokes a stare of surprise, followed by an explanation that the outrange is punishment or justice or something else that is all right, or perhaps by a heated attempt to argue that we should all be robbed and murdered in our beds if such senseless villainies as sentences of imprisonment were not committed daily. It is useless to argue that even if this were true, which it is not, the alternative to adding crimes of our own to the crimes from which we suffer is not helpless submission. Chickenpox is an evil; but if I were to declare that we must either submit to it or else repress it by seizing everyone who suffers from it and punishing them by inoculation with smallpox, I should be laughed at; for though nobody could deny that the result would be to prevent chickenpox to some extent by making people avoid it much more carefully, and to effect a further apparent prevention by making them conceal it very anxiously, yet people would have sense enough to see that the deliberate propagation of smallpox was a creation of evil, and must therefore be ruled out in favour of purely humane and hygienic measures. Yet in the precisely parallel case of a man breaking into my house and stealing my diamonds I am expected as a matter of course to steal ten years of his life. If he tries to defeat that monstrous retaliation by shooting me, my survivors hang him. The net result suggested by the police statistics is that we inflict atrocious injuries on the burglars we catch in order to make the rest take effectual precautions against detection; so that instead of saving our diamonds from burglary we only greatly decrease our chances of ever getting them back, and increase our chances of being shot by the robber.
But the thoughtless wickedness with which we scatter sentences of imprisonment is as nothing compared to the stupid levity with which we tolerate poverty as if it were either a wholesome tonic for lazy people or else a virtue to be embraced as St Francis embraced it. If a man is indolent, let him be poor. If he is drunken, let him be poor. If he is not a gentleman, let him be poor. If he is addicted to the fine arts or to pure science instead of to trade and finance, let him be poor. If he chooses to spend his wages on his been and his family instead of saving it up for his old age, let him be poor. Let nothing be done for ‘the undeserving’ let him be poor. Serve him right! Also – somewhat inconsistently – blessed are the poor!

Q. 

Consider the following statements
1. It serves as an introduction to a more detailed discussion of poverty.
2. It censures imprisonment as a punitive measure.
3. It analyses the possible repercussions of social evils.
4. It continues a prior discussion of strong measures against social evils.

Which of the above are probably not the intentions of the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

It is exceedingly difficult to make people realize that an evil is an evil. For instance, we seize a man and deliberately do him a malicious injury: say, imprison him for years. One would not suppose that it needed any exceptional clearness of wit to recognize in this an act of act of diabolical cruelty. But in England such a recognition provokes a stare of surprise, followed by an explanation that the outrange is punishment or justice or something else that is all right, or perhaps by a heated attempt to argue that we should all be robbed and murdered in our beds if such senseless villainies as sentences of imprisonment were not committed daily. It is useless to argue that even if this were true, which it is not, the alternative to adding crimes of our own to the crimes from which we suffer is not helpless submission. Chickenpox is an evil; but if I were to declare that we must either submit to it or else repress it by seizing everyone who suffers from it and punishing them by inoculation with smallpox, I should be laughed at; for though nobody could deny that the result would be to prevent chickenpox to some extent by making people avoid it much more carefully, and to effect a further apparent prevention by making them conceal it very anxiously, yet people would have sense enough to see that the deliberate propagation of smallpox was a creation of evil, and must therefore be ruled out in favour of purely humane and hygienic measures. Yet in the precisely parallel case of a man breaking into my house and stealing my diamonds I am expected as a matter of course to steal ten years of his life. If he tries to defeat that monstrous retaliation by shooting me, my survivors hang him. The net result suggested by the police statistics is that we inflict atrocious injuries on the burglars we catch in order to make the rest take effectual precautions against detection; so that instead of saving our diamonds from burglary we only greatly decrease our chances of ever getting them back, and increase our chances of being shot by the robber.
But the thoughtless wickedness with which we scatter sentences of imprisonment is as nothing compared to the stupid levity with which we tolerate poverty as if it were either a wholesome tonic for lazy people or else a virtue to be embraced as St Francis embraced it. If a man is indolent, let him be poor. If he is drunken, let him be poor. If he is not a gentleman, let him be poor. If he is addicted to the fine arts or to pure science instead of to trade and finance, let him be poor. If he chooses to spend his wages on his been and his family instead of saving it up for his old age, let him be poor. Let nothing be done for ‘the undeserving’ let him be poor. Serve him right! Also – somewhat inconsistently – blessed are the poor!

Q. What is the meaning of the phrase, “steal ten years of his life”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

It is exceedingly difficult to make people realize that an evil is an evil. For instance, we seize a man and deliberately do him a malicious injury: say, imprison him for years. One would not suppose that it needed any exceptional clearness of wit to recognize in this an act of act of diabolical cruelty. But in England such a recognition provokes a stare of surprise, followed by an explanation that the outrange is punishment or justice or something else that is all right, or perhaps by a heated attempt to argue that we should all be robbed and murdered in our beds if such senseless villainies as sentences of imprisonment were not committed daily. It is useless to argue that even if this were true, which it is not, the alternative to adding crimes of our own to the crimes from which we suffer is not helpless submission. Chickenpox is an evil; but if I were to declare that we must either submit to it or else repress it by seizing everyone who suffers from it and punishing them by inoculation with smallpox, I should be laughed at; for though nobody could deny that the result would be to prevent chickenpox to some extent by making people avoid it much more carefully, and to effect a further apparent prevention by making them conceal it very anxiously, yet people would have sense enough to see that the deliberate propagation of smallpox was a creation of evil, and must therefore be ruled out in favour of purely humane and hygienic measures. Yet in the precisely parallel case of a man breaking into my house and stealing my diamonds I am expected as a matter of course to steal ten years of his life. If he tries to defeat that monstrous retaliation by shooting me, my survivors hang him. The net result suggested by the police statistics is that we inflict atrocious injuries on the burglars we catch in order to make the rest take effectual precautions against detection; so that instead of saving our diamonds from burglary we only greatly decrease our chances of ever getting them back, and increase our chances of being shot by the robber.
But the thoughtless wickedness with which we scatter sentences of imprisonment is as nothing compared to the stupid levity with which we tolerate poverty as if it were either a wholesome tonic for lazy people or else a virtue to be embraced as St Francis embraced it. If a man is indolent, let him be poor. If he is drunken, let him be poor. If he is not a gentleman, let him be poor. If he is addicted to the fine arts or to pure science instead of to trade and finance, let him be poor. If he chooses to spend his wages on his been and his family instead of saving it up for his old age, let him be poor. Let nothing be done for ‘the undeserving’ let him be poor. Serve him right! Also – somewhat inconsistently – blessed are the poor!

Q. 

Consider the following conclusions we can make regarding the people of the time when the passage was written 
1. They were inclined to consider poverty as a social evil.
2. They were anxious to take the right steps to ensure an orderly society.
3. They were inconsistent in their attitude to poverty.
4. They were in favour of unusually harsh punishment of all offenders.

Which of the above conclusions can be deduced from the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

It is exceedingly difficult to make people realize that an evil is an evil. For instance, we seize a man and deliberately do him a malicious injury: say, imprison him for years. One would not suppose that it needed any exceptional clearness of wit to recognize in this an act of act of diabolical cruelty. But in England such a recognition provokes a stare of surprise, followed by an explanation that the outrange is punishment or justice or something else that is all right, or perhaps by a heated attempt to argue that we should all be robbed and murdered in our beds if such senseless villainies as sentences of imprisonment were not committed daily. It is useless to argue that even if this were true, which it is not, the alternative to adding crimes of our own to the crimes from which we suffer is not helpless submission. Chickenpox is an evil; but if I were to declare that we must either submit to it or else repress it by seizing everyone who suffers from it and punishing them by inoculation with smallpox, I should be laughed at; for though nobody could deny that the result would be to prevent chickenpox to some extent by making people avoid it much more carefully, and to effect a further apparent prevention by making them conceal it very anxiously, yet people would have sense enough to see that the deliberate propagation of smallpox was a creation of evil, and must therefore be ruled out in favour of purely humane and hygienic measures. Yet in the precisely parallel case of a man breaking into my house and stealing my diamonds I am expected as a matter of course to steal ten years of his life. If he tries to defeat that monstrous retaliation by shooting me, my survivors hang him. The net result suggested by the police statistics is that we inflict atrocious injuries on the burglars we catch in order to make the rest take effectual precautions against detection; so that instead of saving our diamonds from burglary we only greatly decrease our chances of ever getting them back, and increase our chances of being shot by the robber.
But the thoughtless wickedness with which we scatter sentences of imprisonment is as nothing compared to the stupid levity with which we tolerate poverty as if it were either a wholesome tonic for lazy people or else a virtue to be embraced as St Francis embraced it. If a man is indolent, let him be poor. If he is drunken, let him be poor. If he is not a gentleman, let him be poor. If he is addicted to the fine arts or to pure science instead of to trade and finance, let him be poor. If he chooses to spend his wages on his been and his family instead of saving it up for his old age, let him be poor. Let nothing be done for ‘the undeserving’ let him be poor. Serve him right! Also – somewhat inconsistently – blessed are the poor!

Q. 

Consider the following conclusions which may be inferred from the passage
1. Most people don’t realize that by punishing offenders they are surrendering themselves to the vicious cycle of crime and punishment.
2. Sentences of imprisonment have little success in reducing the crime rate in society.
3. It would be ridiculous to inoculate people suffering from chickenpox with small pox.
4. If criminals were not strongly punished for their misdeeds there would be no law and order in society.

Which of the above conclusions does not the author agree with?

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

It is exceedingly difficult to make people realize that an evil is an evil. For instance, we seize a man and deliberately do him a malicious injury: say, imprison him for years. One would not suppose that it needed any exceptional clearness of wit to recognize in this an act of act of diabolical cruelty. But in England such a recognition provokes a stare of surprise, followed by an explanation that the outrange is punishment or justice or something else that is all right, or perhaps by a heated attempt to argue that we should all be robbed and murdered in our beds if such senseless villainies as sentences of imprisonment were not committed daily. It is useless to argue that even if this were true, which it is not, the alternative to adding crimes of our own to the crimes from which we suffer is not helpless submission. Chickenpox is an evil; but if I were to declare that we must either submit to it or else repress it by seizing everyone who suffers from it and punishing them by inoculation with smallpox, I should be laughed at; for though nobody could deny that the result would be to prevent chickenpox to some extent by making people avoid it much more carefully, and to effect a further apparent prevention by making them conceal it very anxiously, yet people would have sense enough to see that the deliberate propagation of smallpox was a creation of evil, and must therefore be ruled out in favour of purely humane and hygienic measures. Yet in the precisely parallel case of a man breaking into my house and stealing my diamonds I am expected as a matter of course to steal ten years of his life. If he tries to defeat that monstrous retaliation by shooting me, my survivors hang him. The net result suggested by the police statistics is that we inflict atrocious injuries on the burglars we catch in order to make the rest take effectual precautions against detection; so that instead of saving our diamonds from burglary we only greatly decrease our chances of ever getting them back, and increase our chances of being shot by the robber.
But the thoughtless wickedness with which we scatter sentences of imprisonment is as nothing compared to the stupid levity with which we tolerate poverty as if it were either a wholesome tonic for lazy people or else a virtue to be embraced as St Francis embraced it. If a man is indolent, let him be poor. If he is drunken, let him be poor. If he is not a gentleman, let him be poor. If he is addicted to the fine arts or to pure science instead of to trade and finance, let him be poor. If he chooses to spend his wages on his been and his family instead of saving it up for his old age, let him be poor. Let nothing be done for ‘the undeserving’ let him be poor. Serve him right! Also – somewhat inconsistently – blessed are the poor!

Q. 

Consider the following statements
1. Sentences of imprisonment are given increasingly rarely. 
2. Chickenpox and burglary are not analogous evils.
3. Imprisonment is not widely regarded as an act of cruelty.
4. Imprisonment does not cause malicious injury.

The author’s argument about imprisonment would be most weakened by showing which of the above statements to be true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

It is exceedingly difficult to make people realize that an evil is an evil. For instance, we seize a man and deliberately do him a malicious injury: say, imprison him for years. One would not suppose that it needed any exceptional clearness of wit to recognize in this an act of act of diabolical cruelty. But in England such a recognition provokes a stare of surprise, followed by an explanation that the outrange is punishment or justice or something else that is all right, or perhaps by a heated attempt to argue that we should all be robbed and murdered in our beds if such senseless villainies as sentences of imprisonment were not committed daily. It is useless to argue that even if this were true, which it is not, the alternative to adding crimes of our own to the crimes from which we suffer is not helpless submission. Chickenpox is an evil; but if I were to declare that we must either submit to it or else repress it by seizing everyone who suffers from it and punishing them by inoculation with smallpox, I should be laughed at; for though nobody could deny that the result would be to prevent chickenpox to some extent by making people avoid it much more carefully, and to effect a further apparent prevention by making them conceal it very anxiously, yet people would have sense enough to see that the deliberate propagation of smallpox was a creation of evil, and must therefore be ruled out in favour of purely humane and hygienic measures. Yet in the precisely parallel case of a man breaking into my house and stealing my diamonds I am expected as a matter of course to steal ten years of his life. If he tries to defeat that monstrous retaliation by shooting me, my survivors hang him. The net result suggested by the police statistics is that we inflict atrocious injuries on the burglars we catch in order to make the rest take effectual precautions against detection; so that instead of saving our diamonds from burglary we only greatly decrease our chances of ever getting them back, and increase our chances of being shot by the robber.
But the thoughtless wickedness with which we scatter sentences of imprisonment is as nothing compared to the stupid levity with which we tolerate poverty as if it were either a wholesome tonic for lazy people or else a virtue to be embraced as St Francis embraced it. If a man is indolent, let him be poor. If he is drunken, let him be poor. If he is not a gentleman, let him be poor. If he is addicted to the fine arts or to pure science instead of to trade and finance, let him be poor. If he chooses to spend his wages on his been and his family instead of saving it up for his old age, let him be poor. Let nothing be done for ‘the undeserving’ let him be poor. Serve him right! Also – somewhat inconsistently – blessed are the poor!

Q. How does the author justify the sentence, "If he is addicted to the fine arts or to pure science instead of to trade and finance, let him be poor"?

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

Individuals, groups and leaders who promote human development operate under strong institutional, structural and political constraints that affect policy options. But experience suggests broad principles for shaping an appropriate agenda for human development. One important finding from several decades of human development experience is that focusing exclusively on economic growth is problematic. While we have good knowledge about how to advance health and education, the causes of growth are much less certain and growth is often elusive. Further, an unbalanced emphasis on growth is often associated with negative environmental consequences and adverse distributional effects.
The experience of China, with its impressive growth record, reflects these broader concerns and underlines the importance of balanced approaches that emphasize investments in the non-income aspects of human development.

Q. 

With reference to the above passage, consider the following statements:
1. In developing countries, a strong institutional framework is the only requirement for human development and policy options
2. Human development and economic growth are not always positively inter-related.
3. Focusing only on human development should be the goal of economic growth

Which of the above statements is/are correct ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

Individuals, groups and leaders who promote human development operate under strong institutional, structural and political constraints that affect policy options. But experience suggests broad principles for shaping an appropriate agenda for human development. One important finding from several decades of human development experience is that focusing exclusively on economic growth is problematic. While we have good knowledge about how to advance health and education, the causes of growth are much less certain and growth is often elusive. Further, an unbalanced emphasis on growth is often associated with negative environmental consequences and adverse distributional effects.
The experience of China, with its impressive growth record, reflects these broader concerns and underlines the importance of balanced approaches that emphasize investments in the non-income aspects of human development.

Q. 

With reference to the above passage, the following assumptions have been made:
1. Higher economic growth is essential to ensure reduction in economic disparity.
2. Environmental degradation is sometimes a consequence of economic growth

Which of the above is/are valid assumption/assumptions?

Solution:
QUESTION: 51

India's sub standard performance in the farm sector are inadequate since India is placed favourably when compared to China in terms of quantity and quality of arable land, average farm size and farm mechanization. The reasons for China having out performed India are technological improvements accruing from research and development, investment in rural infrastructure research and an increasingly liberalized agricultural policy moving away from self-sufficiency to leveraging the competitive advantage with a focus on "efficiency as much as equity." Investment in rural infrastructure, roads, storage facilities, marketing facilities are also crucial but government support in India has mainly been through subsidies, not investment. Subsides are against the market reforms and distort the market as well as reduce resource efficiency. In contrast, to the large number of applications for registration of new plant varieties in China over the past few years, data reveals that despite India having the largest number of agricultural scientists in the world, India's current research track is abysmal, equivalent to what China achieved in the 1980s.

Q. 

Which of the following is/are area/s in which China has outdone India?
1. Development of urban infrastructure.
2. Activities allied infrastructure.
3. Agriculture.

Solution:
QUESTION: 52

India's sub standard performance in the farm sector are inadequate since India is placed favourably when compared to China in terms of quantity and quality of arable land, average farm size and farm mechanization. The reasons for China having out performed India are technological improvements accruing from research and development, investment in rural infrastructure research and an increasingly liberalized agricultural policy moving away from self-sufficiency to leveraging the competitive advantage with a focus on "efficiency as much as equity." Investment in rural infrastructure, roads, storage facilities, marketing facilities are also crucial but government support in India has mainly been through subsidies, not investment. Subsides are against the market reforms and distort the market as well as reduce resource efficiency. In contrast, to the large number of applications for registration of new plant varieties in China over the past few years, data reveals that despite India having the largest number of agricultural scientists in the world, India's current research track is abysmal, equivalent to what China achieved in the 1980s.

Q. The advantage that India holds over China with respect to the agricultural sector is

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

India's sub standard performance in the farm sector are inadequate since India is placed favourably when compared to China in terms of quantity and quality of arable land, average farm size and farm mechanization. The reasons for China having out performed India are technological improvements accruing from research and development, investment in rural infrastructure research and an increasingly liberalized agricultural policy moving away from self-sufficiency to leveraging the competitive advantage with a focus on "efficiency as much as equity." Investment in rural infrastructure, roads, storage facilities, marketing facilities are also crucial but government support in India has mainly been through subsidies, not investment. Subsides are against the market reforms and distort the market as well as reduce resource efficiency. In contrast, to the large number of applications for registration of new plant varieties in China over the past few years, data reveals that despite India having the largest number of agricultural scientists in the world, India's current research track is abysmal, equivalent to what China achieved in the 1980s.

Q. 

What arguments has been posed against implementation of subsidies?
1. Subsidies sacrifice equity for efficiency.
2. Subsidies hamper efficient resource utilization.
3. Subsidies distort the market.

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

Climate change is already making many people hungry all over the world, by disrupting crop yields and pushing up prices. And it is not just food but nutrients that are becoming scarcer as the climate changes. It is the poorest communities that will suffer the worst effects of climate change, including increased hunger and malnutrition as crop production and livelihoods are threatened. On the other hand, poverty is a driver of climate change, as desperate communities resort to unsustainable use of resources to meet current needs.

Q. Which among the following is the most logical corollary to the above passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

Accountability, or the lack of it, in governance generally, and civil services, in particular, is a major factor underlying the deficiencies in governance and public administration. Designing an effective framework for accountability has been a key element of the reform agenda. A fundamental issue is whether civil services should be accountable to the political executive of the day or to society at large. In other words, how should internal and external accountability be reconciled? Internal accountability is sought to be achieved by internal performance monitoring, official supervision by bodies like the ---Central-Vigilance Commission-and-Comptroller and Auditor—General, and judicial review of executive decisions. Articles 311 and 312 of the Indian Constitution provide job security and safeguards to the civil services, especially the All India Services. The framers of the Constitution had envisaged that provision of these safeguards would result in a civil service that is not totally subservient to the political executive but will have the strength to function in larger public interest. The need to balance internal and external accountability is thus built into the Constitution. The issue is where to draw the line. Over the years, the emphasis seems to have tilted in favour of greater internal accountability of the civil services to the political leaders of the day who in turn are expected to be externally accountable to the society at large through the election process. This system for seeking accountability to Society has not worked out, and has led to several adverse consequences for governance.
Some special measures can be considered for improving accountability in civil services. Provisions of articles 311 and 312 should be reviewed and laws and regulations framed to ensure external accountability of civil services. The proposed Civil Services Bill seeks to address some of these requirements. The respective roles of professional civil services and the political executive should he defined so that professional managerial functions and management of civil services are depoliticized. For this purpose, effective statutory civil service boards should be created at the centre and in the states. Decentralization and devolution of authority to bring government and decision making closer to the people also helps to enhance accountability.

Q. 

According to the passage, which of the following factor/factors led to the adverse consequences for governance/public administration? 
1. Inability of civil services to strike a balance between internal and external accountabilities 
2. Lack of sufficient professional training to the officers of All India Services
3. Lack of proper service benefits in civil services
4. Lack of Constitutional provisions to define the respective roles of professional civil services vis-a-vis political executive in this context 

Select the correct answer using the code given below :

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

Nikita bought 30 kg of wheat at the rate of Rs 4.75 per kg, 40 kg of wheat at the rate of Rs 4.25 per kg and mixed them. She sold the mixture at the rate of Rs 4.45 per kg. Her total profit or loss in the transaction was

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

The sum of squares of first twenty natural numbers is equal to

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

The difference of two numbers is 2. The difference of their squares is 28.What is the sum of the numbers?

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

A number is greater than the square of 44 but smaller than the square of 45. If one part of the number is the square of 6 and the number is a multiple of 5, then find the number.

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

The unit\'s digit in the product(771 × 659 × 365) is:

Solution:

The unit place in 74 is 1
∴ Unit place in 768 is 1
∴ The unit place in 768 × 73 = 3
Similarly, we can see that the unit place in 659 is 6
Finally, the unit place in 34 is 1
So, the unit place in 364 is also 1
∴ The unit place in 365 = 364 × 31 is 3
∴ The unit place in (771 × 659 × 365) is the unit
place in the product (3 × 6 × 3) = 4

QUESTION: 61

In a certain month. Mr. Khan's call charges were Rs 124.80. If in addition to the telephone rent of Rs.380, he has to pay 5% tax on the total amount, then what is his telephone bill for that month?

Solution:

Mr khan's call charges were Rs. 124.80
Telephone rent is Rs. 380.00
So Total amount = 380 + 124.80
= Rs. 504.80
He has to pay 5% tax on the total amount i.e. on Rs. 504.80

So Telephone bill for that month = Rs. 504.80 + Rs. 25.24
= Rs. 530.04

QUESTION: 62

Population of a village is 8,000. If 6% men and 10% women are added, the population becomes 8,600. Then the number of men in the village is

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

In a football championship 135 matches were played. Every team played match with each other. The number of teams which participated in championship is

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

If 1 × 2 × 3 × ....... × n is denoted by n!, (8! - 7! - 6!) is equal to

Solution:

8! - 7! - 6! = 8 × 7 × 6! - 7 × 6! - 6!
= 6!(56 - 7 - 1) = 48 × 6! = 6 × 8 × 6!

QUESTION: 65

3 pipes A, B and C working together can fill a cistern in 6 hrs. After working at it together for 2 hrs, C is closed and A and B filled it in 7 hrs more. C alone can fill the cistern in

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

If A and B are two events such that 

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

How many secs will a 500 metres long train take to cross a man walking with a speed of 3 km/hr in the direction of the moving train if the speed of the train is 63 km/hr?

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

A, B and C start on a circular track from the same point, in same direction and at same time. Speeds of A, B and C are 8m/sec, 9m/sec and 11m/sec respectively and track is 3km long. They will be together for the first time after

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

In a group of five friends A, B, C, D and E, 'B' is younger to 'C' but elder to 'A' If they are arranged in ascending order of age, then 'D' gets fifth rank, who is the youngest in age ?

Solution:

A < B < C >/<E >/< D or E >/< A < B < C >/< D 
The position of E is not provided. Either it could be before 'A' or after 'C' in both the conditions D will be holding fifth rank.

QUESTION: 70

Pointing to a photograph of Hari, Vijay said, 'The father of his sister is the husband of my wife's mother". How is Vijay related to Hari?

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

If (x + y):(x - y) = 7:3 ,then (x2 + y2) : (x2 - y2) is equal to

Solution:

QUESTION: 72

In how many years a certain sum doubles itself at 4% per annum simple interest ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

Below is given statement followed by two conclusions numbered I and II. You have to consider the statement and the following conclusions and decide which of the conclusions is follows in the statement :

Statement : 

All men should have equal opportunities but all did not have the same capacity. Some have the ability to earn more. Every one should use his ability for the benefit of the society. 

Conclusions : 

I. All men are not equal in all respects 
II. One can use one's talents

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

Below is three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I,II,III and IV. You have to consider the statement and the following conclusions and decide which of the conclusions is follows in the statement : 

Statement:

a.Some buses are horses. 
b. All horses are goats. 
c. All goats are dogs.

Conclusions: 

I. Some dogs are buses. 
II. Some dogs are horses. 
III. Some dogs are goats. 
IV. Some buses are goats.

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

Excluding stoppages, the speed of a bus is 54 kmph and including stoppages, it is 45 kmph. For how many minutes does the bus stop per hour?

Solution:

Due to stoppages, it covers 9 km less

Time taken to cover 9 km 

QUESTION: 76

A man can reach a certain place in 30 hours. If he reduces his speed by (1/15)th, he goes at 10 km less in that time. Find his speed.

Solution:

B is the correct option.
Let the man's speed be x km/hr.
Distance covered in 30 hours = 30x km
New speed = [x− x/15]km/hr= 14x/15km/hr

Distance covered in 30 hours =  14x/15×30= 28x km Given,30x−28x=10km ⇒ x=5km/hr

QUESTION: 77

If 'b' men can do a piece of work in 'c' days, then the number of days taken by 'd' men to do (1/m) th of the same piece of work will be

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

P can complete a work in 12 days working 8 hours a day. Q can complete the same work in 8 days working 10 hours a day. If both P and Q work together, working 8 hours a day, in how many days can they complete the work?

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

Ramesh is twice as good workman as Sunil and finished a piece of work in 3 hrs less than Sunil. In how many hrs, they together could finish that piece of work?

Solution:

Let's assume Sunil finishes the job in x hours
Then, Ramesh will finish the job in x/2 hours

∴ Sunil finishes a job in 6 hours and Ramesh does it in 3 hours
Work done by both of them in 1 hour 

∴ They together could finish a piece of work in 2 hours

QUESTION: 80

Consider the volumes of the following:
1. A parallelopiped of length 5 cm, breadth 3 cm and height 4 cm
2. A cube of each side 4 cm
3. A cylinder of radius 3 cm and length 3 cm
4. A sphere of radius 3 cm 

The volumes of these in the decreasing order is :

Solution: