SSC CGL Tier-I Mock Test - 35


100 Questions MCQ Test SSC CGL Tier 1 Mock Test Series | SSC CGL Tier-I Mock Test - 35


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This mock test of SSC CGL Tier-I Mock Test - 35 for SSC helps you for every SSC entrance exam. This contains 100 Multiple Choice Questions for SSC SSC CGL Tier-I Mock Test - 35 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this SSC CGL Tier-I Mock Test - 35 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. SSC students definitely take this SSC CGL Tier-I Mock Test - 35 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other SSC CGL Tier-I Mock Test - 35 extra questions, long questions & short questions for SSC on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

A man walks 20 km towards East turns right and walks 25 km, further he turns right and walk 15 km and again walks 10 km after turning right. Finally, he runs 13 km after turning his left. What is the shortest distance between his initial point and final point?

Solution:


Distance between his initial point & final point = (AB)² + (BC)² = AC² 15² + 8² = AC² 289 = AC² AC = 17 km.

QUESTION: 2

The given equation has been solved on the basis of a certain rule. Find the correct answer for the unsolved equation on that basis.
If P X Q = PQ (P+Q) then (3 x 3) + (5x 5)

Solution:

9(3 + 3) + 25(5 + 5) 9(6) + 25(10) 54+250 304

QUESTION: 3

GIKM : JNRV ∷ IKMO : ?

Solution:

G + 3 = J
I + 5 = N
K + 7 = R
M + 9 = V
THEN, I + 3 = L K + 5 = P
M + 7 = T O + 9 = X

QUESTION: 4

E × I : 25 × 81 ∷ K × P : ?

Solution:

E = 5² = 25

I = 9² = 81

THEN, K = 11² = 121 P = 16² = 256

QUESTION: 5

In the following expression find the missing term:  

Solution:

18 ÷ 2 = 9 7 × 2 = 14 (9 + 14) = 23 20 ÷ 2 = 10 10 × 2 = 20 (10 + 20) = 30 22 ÷ 2 = 11 8 × 2 = 16 (11 + 16) = 27

QUESTION: 6

In a certain code RAINBOW is written as VNAMHZQ. How is SEMINAR written in that code?

Solution:

Solution : R A I N B O W = W O B N I A R

(REVERSE ORDER) W – 1 = V O – 1 = N B –

1 = A N – 1 = M I – 1 = H A – 1 = Z R – 1 = Q

THEN, S E M I N A R = R A N I M E S

(REVERSE ORDER) R – 1 = Q A – 1 = Z N –

1 = M I – 1 = H M – 1 = L E– 1 = D S – 1 = R

QUESTION: 7

Aman is brother of Priya who is married to Mehul. If Mehul is father of Amit who is father in law of Rahul, then how Priya is related to Rahul’s wife? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 8

What is the reflex angle between the hands of a clock at 15 minutes past 5?

Solution:

Angle traced by hour hand 21/4

hours = (360/12×21/4) = 157*1/2°

Angle traced by minute hand 15 minutes =

(360/60×15) = 90° ∴ Reflex angle = (360° –

(157*1/2° - 90°) = 292*1/2°

QUESTION: 9

Pick the odd one out from the given below: 

Solution:

Except Tathagrata Roy all are the C.M of different Indian states.

QUESTION: 10

Arrange the following in the English alphabetical order:

(i) Exploration                    (ii) Exploitative

(iii) Exploratory                   (iv) Exploitation  

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Unscramble the following letters to frame a meaningful  word, then find out the correct numerical position of the letters:

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

If CAT is coded as 8 and DEAF is coded as 4, then what is the code for FED?

Solution:

CAT - (3+1+20 )/3 = 24/3 = 8 DEAF - (4+5+1+6)/4 = 16/4 = 4 Then, FED - (6 +5+4 )/3 = 15/3 = 5

QUESTION: 13

Which can be formed by using the letters of the given word.GENERALIZATION 

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Which one set of the letters when sequentially placed at the gaps in the given letter series shall complete it? 
ab __ bcbca __ ___ c __  bab

Solution:

The first sequence begins with a, the second with b and the third with c. Each sequence consists of a letter followed by the pair of other two letters repeated twice.

QUESTION: 15

Which of the following is correct? 

Solution:

1) 8 × 4 – 18 ÷ 6 + 2 = 31

8 × 4 – 3 + 2 = 31 32 – 3 + 2 = 31

31 ≠ 34 2)

8 × 4 + 18 ÷ 6 + 2 = 28

8 × 4 + 3 + 2 = 28

32 + 3 + 2 = 28 37 ≠ 28 3)

8 ÷ 4 × 18 - 6 + 2 = 35 2 × 18 - 6 + 2 = 35

36 – 6 + 2 = 35 32 ≠ 35 4) 8 ÷ 4 × 18 + 6 – 2 =

40 2 × 18 + 6 – 2 = 40 36 + 6 – 2 = 40 40 = 40

QUESTION: 16

Which of the following diagram represents the correct relationship between students, intelligent, players.

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Arrange the following words in a meaningful order.
A. Continent          B. Country          C. States          D. Earth        E. District

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Which number will be on the face opposite to the face with number 4.          

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

DirectionsFind the wrong number in the series:8, 20, 48, 108, 232, 482

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

DirectionsFind the wrong number in the series:
16, 18, 39, 111, 489, 2451 

Solution:

16 × 1 + 2 = 18
18 × 2 + 3 = 39
39 × 3 + 4 = 121
121 × 4 + 5 = 489
489 × 5 + 6 = 2451

QUESTION: 21

Find the number of triangles in the following figure: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

The columns and rows of Matrix I are numbered from 0 to 4 and that of Matrix II are numbered from 5 to 9. A letter from these matrices can be represented first by its row and next by its column. e.g. ‘B’ can be represented by 11, 30 etc. and ‘U’ can be represented by 89 etc. Identify the set for the word FISH.

Solution:

F = 02, 14, 21,

33, 40 I = 67, 79, 86,

98 S = 57, 69, 76, 88,

95 H = 03, 10, 22, 34, 41

QUESTION: 23

Find the odd one that does not belong to that group. 

Solution:

Except cargo, all others are vehicles

QUESTION: 24

DirectionsIn each question below a statement is given followed by two assumptions numbered I and II. An assumption is something supposed or taken for granted. You have to consider the statement and the following assumptions and decide which of the assumptions is implicit in the statement.
 

Statement: A construction worker was buried alive when mud from a 20-ft high pit collapsed on him and four others.

Assumption I: The other four people buried under the mud from the pit have been saved.

Assumption II: The 20-ft high pit collapsed owing to spurious quality of construction material used.

Solution:

Because it is mentioned that one worker was buried alive we can assume that others are safe. There is nothing mentioned about the reason of this accident, hence only Assumption I is implied and correct answer is 1.

QUESTION: 25

DirectionsIn each question below a statement is given followed by two assumptions numbered I and II. An assumption is something supposed or taken for granted. You have to consider the statement and the following assumptions and decide which of the assumptions is implicit in the statement.
 

Statement: The poor identification of vulnerable low lying areas was one of the many factors that led to the massive floods.

Assumption I: A lot of people lost their lives in the floods

Assumption II: There was a huge loss to houses and property in the massive floods.

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

At present, the Chairman of the 14th Finance Commission is:

Solution:

Finance Commission was established for the distribution of taxes between State and Centre.

At Present, The Chairman of 14 Finance Commission (2015-20) is Y.V. Reddy.

QUESTION: 27

Which of the following King built the Agra City? 

Solution:

In 1504 A.D, the Agra city was established by Sikandar Lodhi of the Lodhi Dynasty, After two years, He made Agra as his Capital.

QUESTION: 28

Twinkling of the Stars is due to the phenomenon of  

Solution:

When a ray of light travels from one medium to another it ‘bends’. This phenomenon is referred to as refraction. The atmosphere of the earth is made of different layers. It is affected by winds, varying temperatures and different densities as well. When light from a distant source (a star) passes through our turbulent (moving air) atmosphere, it undergoes refraction many times. When we finally perceive this light from a star, it appears to be twinkling.

QUESTION: 29

Red rot of Sugarcane is caused by 

Solution:

Red rot disease is caused by the fungus Glomerella tucumanensis. An older name, Collectotrichum falcatum is still preferred by some pathologists. The red rot fungus can be readily isolated from infected tissue.

QUESTION: 30

Match the following Functional group with their respective Chemical name.      

  Functional Group                    Chemical Name

                 (i) Alcohol                                A. Alkanone

                (ii) Aldehyde                             B. Alkanal

                (iii) Ketone                                C. Haloalkane

                (iv) Halogen                              D. Alkanol

    

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Which of the following Government official is the Chairman of the Rajya Sabha?

Solution:

The Vice- President of India is the ex-officio Chairman of the Rajya Sabha, who presides over its sessions.

QUESTION: 32

Which of the following Plains is not the West coastal Plain of India?

Solution:

Carnatic and Utkal Plains were found in East Coastal plains.

QUESTION: 33

The First Europeans arrived in India were :

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

Anti-Deflection law was described in  

Solution:

Schedule 10 was added by the 52 Amendment Act 1985 by Rajiv Gandhi. It describes the anti- deflection law which means the disqualification of MP’s and State legislators on the basis of deflection.

QUESTION: 35

The word ‘BUDGET’ was taken from the _________ word. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Which shape is there in a 2000 rupee notes through which blind people can identify them easily? 

Solution:

For visually impaired persons there is a rectangle with Rs. 2000 in raised print on right

QUESTION: 37

Which of the following is the First bank of India?

Solution:

Bank of Hindustan was the first bank of India. It was set up in 1770 by Alexander and Co.

QUESTION: 38

Oxytocin is also called love hormone secreted by

Solution:

Pituitary Gland is also known as Master Gland which secrets Oxytocin.

QUESTION: 39

Amalgam is a mixture of 

Solution:

An amalgam is an alloy of mercury with another metal. Almost all metals can form amalgams with mercury, the notable exceptions being iron, platinum, tungsten and tantalum.

QUESTION: 40

The word ‘Dhamma’ is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 41

Two Strands of DNA are held together by

Solution:

A number factors are responsible for the stability of the DNA double helix structure, among them are Hydrogen bonds.

QUESTION: 42

‘If God was a Banker’ is written by

Solution:

Ravi Subramanian’s debut book, if God was a Banker, is a good insight into the foreign banking system

QUESTION: 43

Who was the first woman to have received the Nobel Peace Prize? 

Solution:

In 1905, Bertha von Suttner was the first woman to be solely awarded the Nobel peace prize.

QUESTION: 44

The S.I. unit of the electric flux is 

Solution:

In electromagnetism, electric flux is the measure of flow of the electric field through a given area. Electric flux is proportional to the number of electric field lines going through a normally perpendicular surface.

QUESTION: 45

The duration of proclamation of Financial Emergency is 

Solution:

Financial Emergency under Article 360, if the President is satisfied that there is an economic situation in which the financial stability or credit of India is threatened, he or she can declare financial emergency. Such an emergency must be approved by the Parliament within two months.

QUESTION: 46

Which of the following Statement is correct?

Solution:

The thickness of the troposphere varies from about 7 to 8km at the poles to about 16 to 18 km at the Equator.

QUESTION: 47

Match the Following newspapers with their respective place of Publication
 

 Newspapers                           Place

          (i). Independent                   (A) Moscow

         (ii). Daily News                      (B) New York

         (iii). Pravda                            (C) Beijing

         (iv). People’s Daily               (D) London

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

Which of the Following State had received the UN public service award in June 2017?

Solution:

West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has received the highest prize in United Nations Public Service Award for the state government’s Kanyashree Prakalpa (Girl Child scheme in The Hague, Netherlands.

QUESTION: 49

The only snake which forms the nest is  

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

India signed a MoU on Cooperation in organic transplantation, cyber security, renewable energy and Technical cooperation in civil aviation with

Solution:

India and Spain have signed seven agreements following talks between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Spanish counterpart Mariano Rajoy at the Moncloa Palace in the Spanish capita

QUESTION: 51

Excluding the Stoppages i.e. Non-stop, the speed of a Bullet train is 540 kmph and including the stoppages, it is 450 kmph. Calculate for how many minutes does the train stop per hour? 

Solution:


Now, in 6 hours there is 1 hour stoppage Stoppage in 1 hour = 1/6 × 60 minutes = 10 minutes

QUESTION: 52

If ab + bc + ca = 0

Find the value of 1/(a^2-bc) + 1/(b^2-ca)  + 1/(c^2-ab)

Solution:

ab + bc + ca = 0 bc = - ab – ca

ca = - ab – bc ab = -bc –ca

Now, 1/(a^2-bc) + 1/(b^2-ca) + 1/(c^2-ab) = 1/(a^2-(-ab-ca)) + 1/(b^2-(-ab-bc)) + 1/(c^2-(-bc-ca)) =1/(a^2+ab+ca) + 1/(b^2+ab+bc) + 1/(c^2+bc+ca) = 1/(a(a+b+c)) + 1/(b(a+b+c)) + 1/(c(a+b+c)) = (bc+ca+ab)/(abc(a+b+c)) = 0/(abc(a+b+c)) = 0

QUESTION: 53

Find the area of maximum side of square that can be inscribed in a right angled triangle of side 15, 20 and 25 cm. 

Solution:


Let the side of the square be a Then,
AD = 15 – a and FC = 20 - a
Area of Triangle ABC = 1/2 × Base × Height = 1/2 × 15 ×20 = 150 cm² Now, Area of Triangles ADE and EFC + Area of Square BDEF = Area of Triangle ABC ∴ 1/2 ×a × (15 - a) + 1/2 × a × (20 - a) + a² = 150 15a/2 - a²/2 + 10a - a²/2 + a² = 150 (15a+20a)/2 = 150 35a = 300 a = 300/35 = 60/7 cm

QUESTION: 54

A sum of ₹ 31 was divided among 50 students. If each boy got 70 paisa and each girl got 45 paisa. Find the number of boys. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

In ∆ PQR, S is the midpoint of QR. T is the midpoint of line PS. Then, Area of ∆PTQ : Area of ∆ PQR is

Solution:


Let the area of the ∆ PQR = 100 Then the area of ∆ PSQ = 100/2 = 50 And the area of ∆ PQT = 50/2 = 25 Area of ∆PTQ : Area of ∆ PQR = 25 : 100 = 1 : 4

QUESTION: 56

If Sin 3A = Cos (A - 46°) where 3A is acute angle, then the Value of A is

Solution:

Sin 3A = Cos (A - 46°)

Sin 3A = Sin [90° -(A - 46°)]

3A = 90° - A + 46° 4A = 136° A = 34

QUESTION: 57

Divisor is 8 times of Quotient and 3 times of its remainder. If the remainder is 8. Find the dividend?

Solution:

Divisor = Remainder × 3 = 8 × 3 = 24 Quotient = 24/8 = 3 Now, Dividend = Divisor × Quotient + Remainder = 24 × 3 + 8 = 80

QUESTION: 58

Find the Perpendicular distance between two lines
 6x + 8y = 18, 12x + 16y =20 

Solution:

For finding the perpendicular distance between two lines ax + by = C1, ax + by = C2

Coefficients must be equal then Perpendicular

Distance = |C1-C2|/√(a^2+b²) 6x + 8y = 18 …………(i) 12x + 16y =20…………..(ii)

Multiplying equation (i) with 2 12x + 16y =36 Now the Perpendicular Distance = |36-20|/√(12²+16²) = 16/20 = 0.8

QUESTION: 59

A Solid Cone of height 18cm diameter of its base 36cm is cut from a wooden Solid sphere of radius 18cm. the percentage of wood wasted is ? 

Solution:

(Volume of Cone)/(Volume of Sphere) = (1/3 π r^2 h)/(4/3 π r³) = (1/3 × π ×(18)^2×18)/(4/3 × π ×(18)³) = 1/4 Wood that is wasted = 3/4 × 100 = 75%

QUESTION: 60

After selling 20 pens, a Shopkeeper earn a profit of the selling price of 6 books. While selling 20 books, a shopkeeper losses a selling price of 8 pens. The numerical value of the Profit and loss % is equal and the Cost price of pen is half the cost price of the book. Find the ratio of selling price of pen to book? 

Solution:

Let the cost price of a pen be x, then the cost price of a book is 2x And the Selling price of the pen and the book be a and b respectively Now according to the Question, Cost price of 20 pen = 20x and the profit = 6b Profit % = 6b/20x ×100 = 30b/x Similarly, Cost price of 20 books = 40x and the loss = 8a Loss % = 8a/40x × 100 = 20a/x Since the numerical values are equal ∴ 30b/x = 20a/x a/b = 3/2 The required ratio is 3:2

QUESTION: 61

Jack is twice efficient as Jill and Jill can do a piece of work in 30 days. Jill started the work and after a few days Jack joined him. They completed the work in 22 days. From the starting, for how many days they worked together? 

Solution:

JILL    JACK
Efficiency 1 : 2 Number of Days 30 15 Jill’s one day work = 1/30 Jack’s one day work = 1/15 (Jack + Jill) one day work = 1/30 + 1/15 = (1+2)/30 = 1/10 Now, let us assume Jack joined Jill after (22 - x) days then, (22-x)/30 + (x ×1)/10 = 1 ⇒ (22-x+3x)/30 = 1 ⇒ 22 + 2x = 30 ⇒ x = 4

QUESTION: 62

If tan θ = 8/3 , then the value of (3Sinθ+2 Cosθ )/(3 Sinθ-2Cosθ) is

Solution:

(3Sinθ+2 Cosθ )/(3 Sinθ-2Cosθ) By dividing numerator and denominator by cosθ (3 × Sinθ/Cosθ+2 × Cosθ/Cosθ)/(3 × Sinθ/Cosθ-2 × Cosθ/Cosθ) = (3 tanθ+2)/(3 tanθ-2) Put the value of Tanθ = (3 × 8/3+2)/(3 × 8/3-2) = (8+2)/(8-2) = 10/6 = 5/3

QUESTION: 63

The HCF of each pair of 5 numbers is 3 and their LCM is 159. Find the multiplication of all the number. 

Solution:

HCF = 3 Let the five numbers be 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d and 3e where a,b,c,d,e are co-prime to each

other LCM = 3 × a × b × c × d × e = 159 a × b × c × d × e = 53 The multiplication of all the number = 3a × 3b × 3c × 3d × 3e = 243 × 53 = 12879

QUESTION: 64

The difference between each Internal angle and each external angle of a polygon is 60°. Find the number of Sides. 

Solution:

Internal Angle of a Polygon = ((n-2)×180°)/n

External Angle of a Polygon = (360°)/n ((n-2)×180°)/n - (360°)/n = 60° ((n-2)×3)/n - 6/n = 1 (3n-6-6)/n = 1

3n – 12 = n n = 6

QUESTION: 65

If x² + x = 11find (x+4)³ +1/((x+4)³)

Solution:

Let x+4 = m x = m – 4 Now,

x² + x = 11 (m – 4)² + m – 4 = 11 m² + 16 - 8m + m – 4 – 11 = 0 m² + 1 - 7m = 0 m² + 1 = 7m

Dividing the equation by m We get, m + 1/m =

7 m³ + 1/m³ = (m + 1/m)³ - 3(m + 1/m) = 343 – 21 = 322

QUESTION: 66

Two buildings are collinear with the base of a tower and are at a distance 9m and 16m from the base of the tower. The angles of elevation from these two building of the top of the tower are complementary. What is the height of the tower? 

Solution:


Let the height of the tower be h And ∠CBD = θ and
∠ DAC = 90 – θ In ∆ BCD tan θ = CD/BC = h/9 …………(i) In ∆ ACD tan(90 - θ) = CD/AC cot θ = h/16 ……………………….(ii) On

multiplying Equation (i) and (ii) tan θ × cot θ = h/9 × h/16 1 = h²/144
Now h = 12 m

QUESTION: 67

O and C are the respectively orthocentre and circumcentre of ∆PQR. The line PO is extended which intersect line QR at S. such that, ∠QCR = 140°, ∠PQS = 58°. Find ∠RPS = ?

Solution:


In ∆ PQS ∠QPS + ∠PQS + ∠PSQ = 180° ∠QPS + 58° + 90° = 180° ∠QPS = 32°

∠RPS 70° = 32° + ∠RPS ∠RPS = 38°

QUESTION: 68

Sachin can complete a job in 15 days. Ankit alone can complete the same job in 10 days. Sachin works for 9 days and then the remaining job is completed by Ankit. How many days will it take Ankit to complete the remaining job alone?

Solution:

Sachin’s 1 day work = 1/15

Sachin’s 9 day work = 9/15 = 3/5 ,

Remaining work = 1 - 3/5 = 2/5 Ankit’s 1 day work = 1/10

This means Ankit does 1/10 work in 1 day Ankit will do 1 work in 10 days Ankit will do 2/5 work in 10 × 2/5 = 4 days Ankit will complete the remaining job alone in 4 days.

QUESTION: 69

The ratio of the speed of car to that of a train is 15:22. If the speed of the train is 35 Km/hr more than that of the car, what is the speed of the car? 

Solution:

Let the speed of car and train be 15x & 22x respectively. According to the question, 22 x - 15x = 35 ⇒ 7x = 35 ⇒ x = 5km/hr ∴ Speed of the car = 15x = 15 × 5 = 75 km/hr.

QUESTION: 70

DirectionsWhat should come in place of the question mark (?) in the following number series?
362   452     550    656      770         892         ?

Solution:

362 + 90 = 452

452 + 98 = 550

550 + 106 = 656

656 + 114 = 770

770 +122 = 892 892 +130 = 1022

QUESTION: 71

DirectionsWhat should come in place of the question mark (?) in the following number series?
3              4              10           33           136         ? 

Solution:

3 x 1 + 1 = 4
4 x 2 + 2 = 10
10 x 3 + 3 = 33
33 x 4 + 4 = 136
136 x 5 + 5 = 685

QUESTION: 72

Directions

Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of players from five  different states selected for a national level championship

What was the ratio of the number of the players from States C in the year 2015 to the State A in the year 2011?

Solution:

N umber of the players from State C in the year 2015 = 120 Number of the players from State A in the year 2011 = 30 Required ratio = 120 : 30 = 4 : 1

QUESTION: 73

Directions

Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of players from five  different states selected for a national level championship

Percentage increase / decrease in number of the selected players when compared to the previous year is maximum in which year from the State D ?

Solution:

Percentage increase from 2011 to 2012 = (70-50 )/50 × 100 = 40%

Percentage decrease from 2012 to 2013 = (70-30 )/70 × 100 = 57.14%

Percentage increase from 2013 to 2014 = (40-30 )/30 × 100 = 33.33%

Percentage decrease from 2014 to 2015 = (60-40 )/40 × 100 = 50%

Percentage increase from 2015 to 2016 = (75-60 )/60 × 100 = 25%

QUESTION: 74

Directions

Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of players from five  different states selected for a national level championship

What was the average number of players from State A over all the given years?

Solution:

Average number of players from State A over all the years = (30+50+70 +50+40+60)/6 = 50

QUESTION: 75

Directions

Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of players from five  different states selected for a national level championship

What was the total number of players from State B in 2013, State D in 2015 and State E in 2016 all together?

Solution:

Number of players from State B in 2013 = 30

Number of players of States D in 2015 = 60

Number of players of States E in 2016 = 60

Total = 30 + 60 + 60 = 150

QUESTION: 76

Directions

In each of the following questions, choose the word which can be substituted for the given phrase/sentence.

The rise and fall in the pitch of a voice

Solution:

Intonation – the rise and fall in the pitch of a

voice Annotation – explanation Relent – to

surrender Intransigent – uncompromising

QUESTION: 77

Directions

In each of the following questions, choose the word which can be substituted for the given phrase/sentence.

Unlawful taking of personal property

Solution:

Languor – exhaust Languish – to be or become weak or dull; lose strength or vigor; fail to make progress or be successful Largesse – generous acts of giving gifts or money to a large number of people Larceny – unlawful taking of personal property

QUESTION: 78

Directions

In each of the following questions, choose the word which can be substituted for the given phrase/sentence.

Something done in an unhappy manner

Solution:

Murky – dark and gloomy Hoary – incredibly old Morosely - something done in an unhappy manner Grisly – prompting panic or horror

QUESTION: 79

Directions

In each of the following questions four words are given, of which two words are most nearly the same or opposite in meaning. Find the two words which are most nearly the same or opposite in meaning and indicate the number of the correct letter combination.

A) dismal          B) Appellant           C) Plaintiff          D) Vile

Solution:

same, Appellant and Plaintiff - Litigant dismal - hopeless Vile - awful

QUESTION: 80

Directions

In each of the following questions four words are given, of which two words are most nearly the same or opposite in meaning. Find the two words which are most nearly the same or opposite in meaning and indicate the number of the correct letter combination.

A) Clang           B) Impudence          C) Peal          D) Scorn

Solution:

same, Impudence - boldness Clang & Peal – ringing sound of a bell Scorn - Mockery

QUESTION: 81

DirectionsIn each of the following questions four words are given, of which two words are most nearly the same or opposite in meaning. Find the two words which are most nearly the same or opposite in meaning and indicate the number of the correct letter combination.
A) Eccentric        B) Genuine         C) Ostensive         D) Consign

Solution:

opposite, Maverick – one of a kind Genuine - real Ostensive – perceived / superficial Consign - demote

QUESTION: 82

Directions

Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the part with the error as your answer. If there is no error, mark "No Error" as your answer. (Ignore the errors of punctuation).

The midnight session in Parliament that marked India’s transition to Goods and Services Tax was reminiscent of a similar occasion on the eve of India’s Independence.

Solution:

Replace ‘that’ with ‘which’. ‘That’ is used to show restriction and which is used to add information to the sentence. Here, information is being added to the parliament session which marked India’s transition. Thus, which should be used.

QUESTION: 83

Directions

Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the part with the error as your answer. If there is no error, mark "No Error" as your answer. (Ignore the errors of punctuation).

The present impasse between China and India, is a flare in of a long- standing eczema that is the result of incessant border scratching.

Solution:

Replace ‘in’ by ‘up’. Flare up is a phrasal verb meaning to heighten/increase

QUESTION: 84

Directions

Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the part with the error as your answer. If there is no error, mark "No Error" as your answer. (Ignore the errors of punctuation).

It is not difficult to sense country’s displeasure, even granting its rough diplomat disposition.

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

Directions

Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the part with the error as your answer. If there is no error, mark "No Error" as your answer. (Ignore the errors of punctuation).

The GST Council which will now oversees the new tax architecture must focus initially on stabilising the system and then improving on the current design to take it closer to the ideal.

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

Directions

Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the part with the error as your answer. If there is no error, mark "No Error" as your answer. (Ignore the errors of punctuation).

Many of us are employed and are living in places they are prejudiced to believe is not our home. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

Directions

In each question below, a sentence is given with a part of it printed in bold type. That part may contain a grammatical error. Each sentence is followed by phrases 1), 2) and 3). Find out which phrase should replace the phrase given in bold to correct the error, if there is any, and to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct. If the sentence is correct as it is and ‘ No correction is required’ , mark 4) as the answer.

The data for refrigerant consumption compiled by the European Union show that in the developing world, split air-conditioning units, car ACs and commercial refrigeration recording the highest use of Chlorofluorohydrocarbons.

Solution:

The sentence is in simple present tense, usage of recording is incorrect

QUESTION: 88

Directions

In each question below, a sentence is given with a part of it printed in bold type. That part may contain a grammatical error. Each sentence is followed by phrases 1), 2) and 3). Find out which phrase should replace the phrase given in bold to correct the error, if there is any, and to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct. If the sentence is correct as it is and ‘ No correction is required’ ,  mark 4) as the answer.

The government has been specifically told that the retired judge would not be eligible in the fresh selection process.  

Solution:

Sentence is grammatically correct.

QUESTION: 89

Directions

In each question below, a sentence is given with a part of it printed in bold type. That part may contain a grammatical error. Each sentence is followed by phrases 1), 2) and 3). Find out which phrase should replace the phrase given in bold to correct the error, if there is any, and to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct. If the sentence is correct as it is and ‘ No correction is required’ ,  mark 4) as the answer.

The president has built a impressive legacy spanning domestic and foreign policy.  

Solution:

Since impressive begins with a vowel sound, ‘an’ will be used before impressive.

QUESTION: 90

Directions

In the following questions four alternatives are given for the idiom/phrase printed in bold. Choose the alternative which best expresses the meaning of the idiom/phrase and mark it as your answer.

Charley Horse

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

DirectionsIn the following questions four alternatives are given for the idiom/phrase printed in bold. Choose the alternative which best expresses the meaning of the idiom/phrase and mark it as your answer.
Dead Ringer 

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

DirectionsIn the following questions four alternatives are given for the idiom/phrase printed in bold. Choose the alternative which best expresses the meaning of the idiom/phrase and mark it as your answer.
Down To The Wire 

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

DirectionsIn the following sentences, given blanks are to be filled with the appropriate words. Four alternatives are suggested for each question.  Choose the correct alternative and mark your answer:
The ____________recruit was ready to join the Army and signed up the day he turned eighteen. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

DirectionsIn the following sentences, given blanks are to be filled with the appropriate words. Four alternatives are suggested for each question.   Choose the correct alternative and mark your answer:
Jane used volunteering as an ___________  to help her come to terms with her husband’s death. 

Solution:

anodyne means something used to comfort or relief pain

QUESTION: 95

DirectionsIn the following sentences, given blanks are to be filled with the appropriate words. Four alternatives are suggested for each question.   Choose the correct alternative and mark your answer:
The _________ abused its power by overregulating price. 

Solution:

cartel means group of businesses or nations that collude to fix prices

QUESTION: 96

Directions

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow based on it.

The Centre would like us to believe that the Smart Cities Mission will transform urban life in the agglomerations that enter the elite club. With the latest inclusions, there are 90 cities in the list, each of which proposes to turn ‘smart’, utilizing core funding from the Centre and other resources. By all accounts, the provision of basic services in urban India has been worsening, and this is clearly reflected in the winning city proposals: 81 of the selected plans seek funds for affordable housing, new schools and hospitals, and redesign of roads. This is at best a partial list, and there are many more aspects to achieving inclusivity. There is a high-visibility campaign around the Smart Cities Mission, but there is little evidence to suggest that State and local governments have either the fine-grained data or the capability to analyze them in order to understand the evolving needs of their communities. The Centre has apparently decided to skirt such a fundamental problem by adopting a ‘managed urbanization’ approach in the chosen cities, with the powers of municipal councils delegated to a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), under the Companies Act, that will act in its own wisdom. Given that this is the model adopted by the two-year-old Mission, the Centre must present a status report on what the SPVs have achieved so far.

Any serious attempt at improving the quality of life in cities would depend on how governments approach data. It would be smart, for instance, to use sensors to estimate the flow of vehicles and pedestrians, and create smartphone applications for the public to report on a variety of parameters. Making such data open would enable citizens’ groups to themselves come up with analyses to help city administrators make decisions, boost transparency and make officials accountable. There are several international examples now, such as the Array of Things sensors being installed on Chicago streets, which let people download the raw data on air quality, transport, pedestrian movement and standing water. Although India’s Smart Cities Mission has identified more than 20 priority areas, interventions by the respective agencies are weak. Access to special funding should make it mandatory for all public transport providers — city bus corporations, Metro Rail and suburban trains — to provide real-time passenger information in the form of open data, an inexpensive global standard that raises both access and efficiency through smartphone applications. Making street-level waste management data public would lead to a heat map of the worst sites, compelling managers to solve the problem. Clearly, there is a lot of low-hanging fruit on the road to smartness, and a nimble policy approach can tap this quickly. More importantly, the ideology that guides the plan should recognize that the vibrant life of cities depends on variety and enabling environments, rather than a mere technology-led vision. Pollution-free commons, walkability and easy mobility, with a base of reliable civic services, is the smart way to go.

What model is adopted by the Smart Cities Mission?  
 

Solution:

It is stated in the passage that “by adopting a ‘managed urbanization’ approach in the chosen cities, with the powers of municipal councils delegated to a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), under the Companies Act, that will act in its own wisdom. Given that this is the model adopted by the two-year-old Mission, the Centre must present a status report on what the SPVs have achieved so far.”

QUESTION: 97

Directions

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow based on it.

The Centre would like us to believe that the Smart Cities Mission will transform urban life in the agglomerations that enter the elite club. With the latest inclusions, there are 90 cities in the list, each of which proposes to turn ‘smart’, utilizing core funding from the Centre and other resources. By all accounts, the provision of basic services in urban India has been worsening, and this is clearly reflected in the winning city proposals: 81 of the selected plans seek funds for affordable housing, new schools and hospitals, and redesign of roads. This is at best a partial list, and there are many more aspects to achieving inclusivity. There is a high-visibility campaign around the Smart Cities Mission, but there is little evidence to suggest that State and local governments have either the fine-grained data or the capability to analyze them in order to understand the evolving needs of their communities. The Centre has apparently decided to skirt such a fundamental problem by adopting a ‘managed urbanization’ approach in the chosen cities, with the powers of municipal councils delegated to a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), under the Companies Act, that will act in its own wisdom. Given that this is the model adopted by the two-year-old Mission, the Centre must present a status report on what the SPVs have achieved so far.

Any serious attempt at improving the quality of life in cities would depend on how governments approach data. It would be smart, for instance, to use sensors to estimate the flow of vehicles and pedestrians, and create smartphone applications for the public to report on a variety of parameters. Making such data open would enable citizens’ groups to themselves come up with analyses to help city administrators make decisions, boost transparency and make officials accountable. There are several international examples now, such as the Array of Things sensors being installed on Chicago streets, which let people download the raw data on air quality, transport, pedestrian movement and standing water. Although India’s Smart Cities Mission has identified more than 20 priority areas, interventions by the respective agencies are weak. Access to special funding should make it mandatory for all public transport providers — city bus corporations, Metro Rail and suburban trains — to provide real-time passenger information in the form of open data, an inexpensive global standard that raises both access and efficiency through smartphone applications. Making street-level waste management data public would lead to a heat map of the worst sites, compelling managers to solve the problem. Clearly, there is a lot of low-hanging fruit on the road to smartness, and a nimble policy approach can tap this quickly. More importantly, the ideology that guides the plan should recognize that the vibrant life of cities depends on variety and enabling environments, rather than a mere technology-led vision. Pollution-free commons, walkability and easy mobility, with a base of reliable civic services, is the smart way to go.

What kind of data does the author definitely wants to be made open to public?
 

Solution:

1 and 3 are evident from the passage, whereas 2, is an already existing example of a similar sensing system in Chicago.

QUESTION: 98

Directions

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow based on it.

The Centre would like us to believe that the Smart Cities Mission will transform urban life in the agglomerations that enter the elite club. With the latest inclusions, there are 90 cities in the list, each of which proposes to turn ‘smart’, utilizing core funding from the Centre and other resources. By all accounts, the provision of basic services in urban India has been worsening, and this is clearly reflected in the winning city proposals: 81 of the selected plans seek funds for affordable housing, new schools and hospitals, and redesign of roads. This is at best a partial list, and there are many more aspects to achieving inclusivity. There is a high-visibility campaign around the Smart Cities Mission, but there is little evidence to suggest that State and local governments have either the fine-grained data or the capability to analyze them in order to understand the evolving needs of their communities. The Centre has apparently decided to skirt such a fundamental problem by adopting a ‘managed urbanization’ approach in the chosen cities, with the powers of municipal councils delegated to a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), under the Companies Act, that will act in its own wisdom. Given that this is the model adopted by the two-year-old Mission, the Centre must present a status report on what the SPVs have achieved so far.

Any serious attempt at improving the quality of life in cities would depend on how governments approach data. It would be smart, for instance, to use sensors to estimate the flow of vehicles and pedestrians, and create smartphone applications for the public to report on a variety of parameters. Making such data open would enable citizens’ groups to themselves come up with analyses to help city administrators make decisions, boost transparency and make officials accountable. There are several international examples now, such as the Array of Things sensors being installed on Chicago streets, which let people download the raw data on air quality, transport, pedestrian movement and standing water. Although India’s Smart Cities Mission has identified more than 20 priority areas, interventions by the respective agencies are weak. Access to special funding should make it mandatory for all public transport providers — city bus corporations, Metro Rail and suburban trains — to provide real-time passenger information in the form of open data, an inexpensive global standard that raises both access and efficiency through smartphone applications. Making street-level waste management data public would lead to a heat map of the worst sites, compelling managers to solve the problem. Clearly, there is a lot of low-hanging fruit on the road to smartness, and a nimble policy approach can tap this quickly. More importantly, the ideology that guides the plan should recognize that the vibrant life of cities depends on variety and enabling environments, rather than a mere technology-led vision. Pollution-free commons, walkability and easy mobility, with a base of reliable civic services, is the smart way to go.

What among the following is not a function of Array of Strings sensors? 

Solution:

its stated in the passage ‘Array of Things sensors being installed on Chicago streets, which let people download the raw data on air quality, transport, pedestrian movement and standing water.’

QUESTION: 99

Directions

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow based on it.

The Centre would like us to believe that the Smart Cities Mission will transform urban life in the agglomerations that enter the elite club. With the latest inclusions, there are 90 cities in the list, each of which proposes to turn ‘smart’, utilizing core funding from the Centre and other resources. By all accounts, the provision of basic services in urban India has been worsening, and this is clearly reflected in the winning city proposals: 81 of the selected plans seek funds for affordable housing, new schools and hospitals, and redesign of roads. This is at best a partial list, and there are many more aspects to achieving inclusivity. There is a high-visibility campaign around the Smart Cities Mission, but there is little evidence to suggest that State and local governments have either the fine-grained data or the capability to analyze them in order to understand the evolving needs of their communities. The Centre has apparently decided to skirt such a fundamental problem by adopting a ‘managed urbanization’ approach in the chosen cities, with the powers of municipal councils delegated to a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), under the Companies Act, that will act in its own wisdom. Given that this is the model adopted by the two-year-old Mission, the Centre must present a status report on what the SPVs have achieved so far.

Any serious attempt at improving the quality of life in cities would depend on how governments approach data. It would be smart, for instance, to use sensors to estimate the flow of vehicles and pedestrians, and create smartphone applications for the public to report on a variety of parameters. Making such data open would enable citizens’ groups to themselves come up with analyses to help city administrators make decisions, boost transparency and make officials accountable. There are several international examples now, such as the Array of Things sensors being installed on Chicago streets, which let people download the raw data on air quality, transport, pedestrian movement and standing water. Although India’s Smart Cities Mission has identified more than 20 priority areas, interventions by the respective agencies are weak. Access to special funding should make it mandatory for all public transport providers — city bus corporations, Metro Rail and suburban trains — to provide real-time passenger information in the form of open data, an inexpensive global standard that raises both access and efficiency through smartphone applications. Making street-level waste management data public would lead to a heat map of the worst sites, compelling managers to solve the problem. Clearly, there is a lot of low-hanging fruit on the road to smartness, and a nimble policy approach can tap this quickly. More importantly, the ideology that guides the plan should recognize that the vibrant life of cities depends on variety and enabling environments, rather than a mere technology-led vision. Pollution-free commons, walkability and easy mobility, with a base of reliable civic services, is the smart way to go.

Find the word from the given options which has its meaning most similar to the word skirt as used in the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

Directions

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow based on it.

The Centre would like us to believe that the Smart Cities Mission will transform urban life in the agglomerations that enter the elite club. With the latest inclusions, there are 90 cities in the list, each of which proposes to turn ‘smart’, utilizing core funding from the Centre and other resources. By all accounts, the provision of basic services in urban India has been worsening, and this is clearly reflected in the winning city proposals: 81 of the selected plans seek funds for affordable housing, new schools and hospitals, and redesign of roads. This is at best a partial list, and there are many more aspects to achieving inclusivity. There is a high-visibility campaign around the Smart Cities Mission, but there is little evidence to suggest that State and local governments have either the fine-grained data or the capability to analyze them in order to understand the evolving needs of their communities. The Centre has apparently decided to skirt such a fundamental problem by adopting a ‘managed urbanization’ approach in the chosen cities, with the powers of municipal councils delegated to a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), under the Companies Act, that will act in its own wisdom. Given that this is the model adopted by the two-year-old Mission, the Centre must present a status report on what the SPVs have achieved so far.

Any serious attempt at improving the quality of life in cities would depend on how governments approach data. It would be smart, for instance, to use sensors to estimate the flow of vehicles and pedestrians, and create smartphone applications for the public to report on a variety of parameters. Making such data open would enable citizens’ groups to themselves come up with analyses to help city administrators make decisions, boost transparency and make officials accountable. There are several international examples now, such as the Array of Things sensors being installed on Chicago streets, which let people download the raw data on air quality, transport, pedestrian movement and standing water. Although India’s Smart Cities Mission has identified more than 20 priority areas, interventions by the respective agencies are weak. Access to special funding should make it mandatory for all public transport providers — city bus corporations, Metro Rail and suburban trains — to provide real-time passenger information in the form of open data, an inexpensive global standard that raises both access and efficiency through smartphone applications. Making street-level waste management data public would lead to a heat map of the worst sites, compelling managers to solve the problem. Clearly, there is a lot of low-hanging fruit on the road to smartness, and a nimble policy approach can tap this quickly. More importantly, the ideology that guides the plan should recognize that the vibrant life of cities depends on variety and enabling environments, rather than a mere technology-led vision. Pollution-free commons, walkability and easy mobility, with a base of reliable civic services, is the smart way to go.

Find the word from the given options which has its meaning most opposite to the word agglomerations as used in the passage.

Solution:

Diffusion means to spread randomly whereas agglomerations means collection/accumulation.

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