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CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022)


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CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Nihilism is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history.

In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with anti-foundationalism.

It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. I am sure if we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.

For Nietzsche, there is no objective order or structure in the world except what we give it. Penetrating the façades buttressing convictions, the nihilist discovers that all values are baseless and that reason is impotent. "Every belief, every considering something-true," Nietzsche writes, "is necessarily false because there is simply no true world" (Will to Power [notes from 1883-1888]). For him, nihilism requires a radical repudiation of all imposed values and meaning: "Nihilism is . . . not only the belief that everything deserves to perish; but one actually puts one's shoulder to the plough; one destroys" (Will to Power).

The caustic strength of nihilism is absolute, Nietzsche argues, and under its withering scrutiny "the highest values devalue themselves. The aim is lacking, and 'Why' finds no answer" (Will to Power). Inevitably, nihilism will expose all cherished beliefs and sacrosanct truths as symptoms of a defective Western mythos. This collapse of meaning, relevance, and purpose will be the most destructive force in history, constituting a total assault on reality and nothing less than the greatest crisis of humanity.

Since Nietzsche's compelling critique, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Convinced that Nietzsche's analysis was accurate, for example, Oswald Spengler in The Decline of the West (1926) studied several cultures to confirm that patterns of nihilism were indeed a conspicuous feature of collapsing civilizations. In each of the failed cultures he examines, Spengler noticed that centuries-old religious, artistic, and political traditions were weakened and finally toppled by the insidious workings of several distinct nihilistic postures: the Faustian nihilist "shatters the ideals"; the Apollinian nihilist "watches them crumble before his eyes"; and the Indian nihilist "withdraws from their presence into himself." Withdrawal, for instance, often identified with the negation of reality and resignation advocated by Eastern religions, is in the West associated with various versions of epicureanism and stoicism. In his study, Spengler concludes that Western civilization is already in the advanced stages of decay with all three forms of nihilism working to undermine epistemological authority and ontological grounding.

In 1927, Martin Heidegger, to cite another example, observed that nihilism in various and hidden forms was already "the normal state of man" (The Question of Being). Other philosophers' predictions about nihilism's impact have been dire. Outlining the symptoms of nihilism in the 20th century, Helmut Thielicke wrote that "Nihilism literally has only one truth to declare, namely, that ultimately Nothingness prevails and the world is meaningless" (Nihilism: Its Origin and Nature, with a Christian Answer, 1969). From the nihilist's perspective, one can conclude that life is completely amoral, a conclusion, Thielicke believes, that motivates such monstrosities as the Nazi reign of terror. Gloomy predictions of nihilism's impact are also charted in Eugene Rose's Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age (1994). If nihilism proves victorious--and it's well on its way, he argues--our world will become "a cold, inhuman world" where "nothingness, incoherence, and absurdity" will triumph.

Q. It can be inferred from the description of nihilism portrayed in the passage that such a philosophy is most likely to cause which of the following emotions in a person?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 1 Since the philosophy propagates the meaninglessness and purposelessness of life, values and talks of absence of order and structure, it is clear that the philosophy would definitely awaken a sense of gloom and emptiness in a person. We can also infer this from the line: 'its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety and terror.' Summing up the said emotions in the sentence (gloom, anxiety, terror), the closest emotion given in the option is desolation, which is a state of complete emptiness, misery or destruction. B is incorrect as it is unclear what said person would regret doing. C is incorrect as nostalgia refers to a state of sadness that arises due to recollection of the past; the concept of such an emotion or of past and present is not explored in this passage. D is incorrect as this emotion may or may not arise depending on the nature of the person, so we cannot infer this to be definitely true. A is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Nihilism is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history.

In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with anti-foundationalism.

It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. I am sure if we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.

For Nietzsche, there is no objective order or structure in the world except what we give it. Penetrating the façades buttressing convictions, the nihilist discovers that all values are baseless and that reason is impotent. "Every belief, every considering something-true," Nietzsche writes, "is necessarily false because there is simply no true world" (Will to Power [notes from 1883-1888]). For him, nihilism requires a radical repudiation of all imposed values and meaning: "Nihilism is . . . not only the belief that everything deserves to perish; but one actually puts one's shoulder to the plough; one destroys" (Will to Power).

The caustic strength of nihilism is absolute, Nietzsche argues, and under its withering scrutiny "the highest values devalue themselves. The aim is lacking, and 'Why' finds no answer" (Will to Power). Inevitably, nihilism will expose all cherished beliefs and sacrosanct truths as symptoms of a defective Western mythos. This collapse of meaning, relevance, and purpose will be the most destructive force in history, constituting a total assault on reality and nothing less than the greatest crisis of humanity.

Since Nietzsche's compelling critique, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Convinced that Nietzsche's analysis was accurate, for example, Oswald Spengler in The Decline of the West (1926) studied several cultures to confirm that patterns of nihilism were indeed a conspicuous feature of collapsing civilizations. In each of the failed cultures he examines, Spengler noticed that centuries-old religious, artistic, and political traditions were weakened and finally toppled by the insidious workings of several distinct nihilistic postures: the Faustian nihilist "shatters the ideals"; the Apollinian nihilist "watches them crumble before his eyes"; and the Indian nihilist "withdraws from their presence into himself." Withdrawal, for instance, often identified with the negation of reality and resignation advocated by Eastern religions, is in the West associated with various versions of epicureanism and stoicism. In his study, Spengler concludes that Western civilization is already in the advanced stages of decay with all three forms of nihilism working to undermine epistemological authority and ontological grounding.

In 1927, Martin Heidegger, to cite another example, observed that nihilism in various and hidden forms was already "the normal state of man" (The Question of Being). Other philosophers' predictions about nihilism's impact have been dire. Outlining the symptoms of nihilism in the 20th century, Helmut Thielicke wrote that "Nihilism literally has only one truth to declare, namely, that ultimately Nothingness prevails and the world is meaningless" (Nihilism: Its Origin and Nature, with a Christian Answer, 1969). From the nihilist's perspective, one can conclude that life is completely amoral, a conclusion, Thielicke believes, that motivates such monstrosities as the Nazi reign of terror. Gloomy predictions of nihilism's impact are also charted in Eugene Rose's Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age (1994). If nihilism proves victorious--and it's well on its way, he argues--our world will become "a cold, inhuman world" where "nothingness, incoherence, and absurdity" will triumph.

Q. Which of the following best describes the tone of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 2 A is incorrect as the author presents no analysis of his own in the entire course of the passage. C and D are incorrect as the author only throws light on a particular school of philosophy; he does not in turn contemplate or present his own views regarding it. He only provides facts about the school of philosophy and the views of some prominent advocates of it. B is the right answer, as the author describes in detail the tenets of the philosophy and throws light on the views held by some of its philosophers.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Nihilism is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history.

In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with anti-foundationalism.

It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. I am sure if we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.

For Nietzsche, there is no objective order or structure in the world except what we give it. Penetrating the façades buttressing convictions, the nihilist discovers that all values are baseless and that reason is impotent. "Every belief, every considering something-true," Nietzsche writes, "is necessarily false because there is simply no true world" (Will to Power [notes from 1883-1888]). For him, nihilism requires a radical repudiation of all imposed values and meaning: "Nihilism is . . . not only the belief that everything deserves to perish; but one actually puts one's shoulder to the plough; one destroys" (Will to Power).

The caustic strength of nihilism is absolute, Nietzsche argues, and under its withering scrutiny "the highest values devalue themselves. The aim is lacking, and 'Why' finds no answer" (Will to Power). Inevitably, nihilism will expose all cherished beliefs and sacrosanct truths as symptoms of a defective Western mythos. This collapse of meaning, relevance, and purpose will be the most destructive force in history, constituting a total assault on reality and nothing less than the greatest crisis of humanity.

Since Nietzsche's compelling critique, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Convinced that Nietzsche's analysis was accurate, for example, Oswald Spengler in The Decline of the West (1926) studied several cultures to confirm that patterns of nihilism were indeed a conspicuous feature of collapsing civilizations. In each of the failed cultures he examines, Spengler noticed that centuries-old religious, artistic, and political traditions were weakened and finally toppled by the insidious workings of several distinct nihilistic postures: the Faustian nihilist "shatters the ideals"; the Apollinian nihilist "watches them crumble before his eyes"; and the Indian nihilist "withdraws from their presence into himself." Withdrawal, for instance, often identified with the negation of reality and resignation advocated by Eastern religions, is in the West associated with various versions of epicureanism and stoicism. In his study, Spengler concludes that Western civilization is already in the advanced stages of decay with all three forms of nihilism working to undermine epistemological authority and ontological grounding.

In 1927, Martin Heidegger, to cite another example, observed that nihilism in various and hidden forms was already "the normal state of man" (The Question of Being). Other philosophers' predictions about nihilism's impact have been dire. Outlining the symptoms of nihilism in the 20th century, Helmut Thielicke wrote that "Nihilism literally has only one truth to declare, namely, that ultimately Nothingness prevails and the world is meaningless" (Nihilism: Its Origin and Nature, with a Christian Answer, 1969). From the nihilist's perspective, one can conclude that life is completely amoral, a conclusion, Thielicke believes, that motivates such monstrosities as the Nazi reign of terror. Gloomy predictions of nihilism's impact are also charted in Eugene Rose's Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age (1994). If nihilism proves victorious--and it's well on its way, he argues--our world will become "a cold, inhuman world" where "nothingness, incoherence, and absurdity" will triumph.

Q. It can be understood from the passage that the main purpose of the author in the second paragraph is which of the following?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 3 A is incorrect as the author does not talk about the fall of nihilism, although this paragraph does talk briefly about its rise. C is incorrect as the author does not talk about whether nihilism shaped man's life or not; he simply demonstrates how the philosophy took form at different points of time. D is incorrect as this forms only one part of the paragraph and is not the main purpose. B is the right answer, as the second paragraph throws light on the evolution of the philosophy and how it advanced through time.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Nihilism is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history.

In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with anti-foundationalism.

It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. I am sure if we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.

For Nietzsche, there is no objective order or structure in the world except what we give it. Penetrating the façades buttressing convictions, the nihilist discovers that all values are baseless and that reason is impotent. "Every belief, every considering something-true," Nietzsche writes, "is necessarily false because there is simply no true world" (Will to Power [notes from 1883-1888]). For him, nihilism requires a radical repudiation of all imposed values and meaning: "Nihilism is . . . not only the belief that everything deserves to perish; but one actually puts one's shoulder to the plough; one destroys" (Will to Power).

The caustic strength of nihilism is absolute, Nietzsche argues, and under its withering scrutiny "the highest values devalue themselves. The aim is lacking, and 'Why' finds no answer" (Will to Power). Inevitably, nihilism will expose all cherished beliefs and sacrosanct truths as symptoms of a defective Western mythos. This collapse of meaning, relevance, and purpose will be the most destructive force in history, constituting a total assault on reality and nothing less than the greatest crisis of humanity.

Since Nietzsche's compelling critique, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Convinced that Nietzsche's analysis was accurate, for example, Oswald Spengler in The Decline of the West (1926) studied several cultures to confirm that patterns of nihilism were indeed a conspicuous feature of collapsing civilizations. In each of the failed cultures he examines, Spengler noticed that centuries-old religious, artistic, and political traditions were weakened and finally toppled by the insidious workings of several distinct nihilistic postures: the Faustian nihilist "shatters the ideals"; the Apollinian nihilist "watches them crumble before his eyes"; and the Indian nihilist "withdraws from their presence into himself." Withdrawal, for instance, often identified with the negation of reality and resignation advocated by Eastern religions, is in the West associated with various versions of epicureanism and stoicism. In his study, Spengler concludes that Western civilization is already in the advanced stages of decay with all three forms of nihilism working to undermine epistemological authority and ontological grounding.

In 1927, Martin Heidegger, to cite another example, observed that nihilism in various and hidden forms was already "the normal state of man" (The Question of Being). Other philosophers' predictions about nihilism's impact have been dire. Outlining the symptoms of nihilism in the 20th century, Helmut Thielicke wrote that "Nihilism literally has only one truth to declare, namely, that ultimately Nothingness prevails and the world is meaningless" (Nihilism: Its Origin and Nature, with a Christian Answer, 1969). From the nihilist's perspective, one can conclude that life is completely amoral, a conclusion, Thielicke believes, that motivates such monstrosities as the Nazi reign of terror. Gloomy predictions of nihilism's impact are also charted in Eugene Rose's Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age (1994). If nihilism proves victorious--and it's well on its way, he argues--our world will become "a cold, inhuman world" where "nothingness, incoherence, and absurdity" will triumph.

Q. It can be understood from the passage that nihilism is most closely represented by which of the following beliefs?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 4 A is incorrect as the passage does not talk about death as the final doom of mankind, or attribute this as the reason for man's meaningless life. B is incorrect as although nihilism does hold the view that morals are man-made, it should directly propagate the idea that one must live a life of lawlessness, although we can infer that it does imply the futility in living by morals. D is incorrect as although we can infer nihilism to hold both of the views given in this answer choice, we cannot say that this is the closest or the most accurate representation of nihilism. At best, we can say that nihilism would agree with these points. C is the right answer, as all the nihilist philosophers seem to imply this view and this view is most representative of the philosophy of nihilism.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Nihilism is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history.

In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with anti-foundationalism.

It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. I am sure if we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.

For Nietzsche, there is no objective order or structure in the world except what we give it. Penetrating the façades buttressing convictions, the nihilist discovers that all values are baseless and that reason is impotent. "Every belief, every considering something-true," Nietzsche writes, "is necessarily false because there is simply no true world" (Will to Power [notes from 1883-1888]). For him, nihilism requires a radical repudiation of all imposed values and meaning: "Nihilism is . . . not only the belief that everything deserves to perish; but one actually puts one's shoulder to the plough; one destroys" (Will to Power).

The caustic strength of nihilism is absolute, Nietzsche argues, and under its withering scrutiny "the highest values devalue themselves. The aim is lacking, and 'Why' finds no answer" (Will to Power). Inevitably, nihilism will expose all cherished beliefs and sacrosanct truths as symptoms of a defective Western mythos. This collapse of meaning, relevance, and purpose will be the most destructive force in history, constituting a total assault on reality and nothing less than the greatest crisis of humanity.

Since Nietzsche's compelling critique, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Convinced that Nietzsche's analysis was accurate, for example, Oswald Spengler in The Decline of the West (1926) studied several cultures to confirm that patterns of nihilism were indeed a conspicuous feature of collapsing civilizations. In each of the failed cultures he examines, Spengler noticed that centuries-old religious, artistic, and political traditions were weakened and finally toppled by the insidious workings of several distinct nihilistic postures: the Faustian nihilist "shatters the ideals"; the Apollinian nihilist "watches them crumble before his eyes"; and the Indian nihilist "withdraws from their presence into himself." Withdrawal, for instance, often identified with the negation of reality and resignation advocated by Eastern religions, is in the West associated with various versions of epicureanism and stoicism. In his study, Spengler concludes that Western civilization is already in the advanced stages of decay with all three forms of nihilism working to undermine epistemological authority and ontological grounding.

In 1927, Martin Heidegger, to cite another example, observed that nihilism in various and hidden forms was already "the normal state of man" (The Question of Being). Other philosophers' predictions about nihilism's impact have been dire. Outlining the symptoms of nihilism in the 20th century, Helmut Thielicke wrote that "Nihilism literally has only one truth to declare, namely, that ultimately Nothingness prevails and the world is meaningless" (Nihilism: Its Origin and Nature, with a Christian Answer, 1969). From the nihilist's perspective, one can conclude that life is completely amoral, a conclusion, Thielicke believes, that motivates such monstrosities as the Nazi reign of terror. Gloomy predictions of nihilism's impact are also charted in Eugene Rose's Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age (1994). If nihilism proves victorious--and it's well on its way, he argues--our world will become "a cold, inhuman world" where "nothingness, incoherence, and absurdity" will triumph.

Q. Which of the following can be understood about the author regarding his view on nihilism?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 5 Since Nietzsche argues that there is no belief that is true and reason and values are impotent; human life has no purpose or direction, the author is not likely to agree with this belief as shown by the following lines of the author: 'I am sure if we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.' This implies that the author considers nihilism to be just another interpretation of the world, which can be overcome. Given that Nietzsche talks about no purpose of life and no true beliefs, this would imply that there is no correct course for humankind to follow. So, this view of the author counters that of Nietzsche's. So, A and B would be incorrect. We have insufficient information to conclude C, as the author gives very little info about his own stance regarding the philosophy. D is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Nihilism is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history.

In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with anti-foundationalism.

It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. I am sure if we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.

For Nietzsche, there is no objective order or structure in the world except what we give it. Penetrating the façades buttressing convictions, the nihilist discovers that all values are baseless and that reason is impotent. "Every belief, every considering something-true," Nietzsche writes, "is necessarily false because there is simply no true world" (Will to Power [notes from 1883-1888]). For him, nihilism requires a radical repudiation of all imposed values and meaning: "Nihilism is . . . not only the belief that everything deserves to perish; but one actually puts one's shoulder to the plough; one destroys" (Will to Power).

The caustic strength of nihilism is absolute, Nietzsche argues, and under its withering scrutiny "the highest values devalue themselves. The aim is lacking, and 'Why' finds no answer" (Will to Power). Inevitably, nihilism will expose all cherished beliefs and sacrosanct truths as symptoms of a defective Western mythos. This collapse of meaning, relevance, and purpose will be the most destructive force in history, constituting a total assault on reality and nothing less than the greatest crisis of humanity.

Since Nietzsche's compelling critique, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Convinced that Nietzsche's analysis was accurate, for example, Oswald Spengler in The Decline of the West (1926) studied several cultures to confirm that patterns of nihilism were indeed a conspicuous feature of collapsing civilizations. In each of the failed cultures he examines, Spengler noticed that centuries-old religious, artistic, and political traditions were weakened and finally toppled by the insidious workings of several distinct nihilistic postures: the Faustian nihilist "shatters the ideals"; the Apollinian nihilist "watches them crumble before his eyes"; and the Indian nihilist "withdraws from their presence into himself." Withdrawal, for instance, often identified with the negation of reality and resignation advocated by Eastern religions, is in the West associated with various versions of epicureanism and stoicism. In his study, Spengler concludes that Western civilization is already in the advanced stages of decay with all three forms of nihilism working to undermine epistemological authority and ontological grounding.

In 1927, Martin Heidegger, to cite another example, observed that nihilism in various and hidden forms was already "the normal state of man" (The Question of Being). Other philosophers' predictions about nihilism's impact have been dire. Outlining the symptoms of nihilism in the 20th century, Helmut Thielicke wrote that "Nihilism literally has only one truth to declare, namely, that ultimately Nothingness prevails and the world is meaningless" (Nihilism: Its Origin and Nature, with a Christian Answer, 1969). From the nihilist's perspective, one can conclude that life is completely amoral, a conclusion, Thielicke believes, that motivates such monstrosities as the Nazi reign of terror. Gloomy predictions of nihilism's impact are also charted in Eugene Rose's Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age (1994). If nihilism proves victorious--and it's well on its way, he argues--our world will become "a cold, inhuman world" where "nothingness, incoherence, and absurdity" will triumph.

Q. Which of the following would be the most appropriate title for the above passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 6 A is incorrect as the author does not pass any comment on Nietzsche's philosophy or defend it. B is incorrect as this forms only a brief part of the passage, and is not directly reflective of its central idea. C is incorrect as we have already inferred from the tone that the author is not a nihilist himself; he is simply throwing light on this school of philosophy. D is the right answer, as it most accurately encapsulates the central idea and the essence of the passage.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

An umbrella tumbles from the old man's hands, a smile spreading slowly across his dripping face. He watches it fill with water. Men, women and children crowd the flooded streets, carrying pots, cups, and hats to gather the gift of water falling from the sky. In the midst of these idyllic images, a message scrolls across the bottom of the TV screen: "Rainwater belongs to each of us, but how do we keep and share?"

Water is a plentiful blessing in this depiction, produced by the Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a public interest organization that lobbies for environmental issues in India. The compelling image is a response to increasingly worrisome water supply issues in Delhi. The vast and crowded capital of India struggles to provide enough water to its neighbourhoods, where citizens rely on communal taps that draw from a limited municipal groundwater source. CSE promotes rainwater harvesting, the gathering of rainwater, to supplement the city's ever-dwindling water supply. The depiction presents a blunt conclusion in the final shot: "Rainwater harvesting: Solve your water problem yourself."

The current water supply system in Delhi begs for change, and it is becoming increasingly obvious that the government will do little to improve it. While the wealthy see running water gush to their sinks every day, most of Delhi must wait their turn at the communal taps, uncertain whether they will be able to gather enough water for basic needs. The Delhi Jal Board, the city's water municipality, supplies 696 million gallons of water per day, but some estimate Delhi consumes as much as 1,280 million gallons daily. In this parched city, access to water is a privilege, not a right.

The Basti, a predominantly Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi, stands disconnected from the modern world. No cars fit through its narrow, dirt alleyways, where women scrub laundry with rocks and young children wander the streets begging for a spare rupee. Here, most families share the public taps, yet cooperation is not always forged by this communal burden. "Women wait in line to get their share from the tap, but there are arguments if anyone takes someone's share." explained Praveen Abdul Kaleem, a 21-year-old resident of the Basti. "Sometimes the argument gets so heated, the police get called in." And sometimes, there is no water to share. "The biggest problem with the water supply happens in the hot and dry season," said Gauri Patel, a maidservant and mother of four who relies on a weak tap outside her home. "Sometimes it doesn't come until the night; sometimes not for a day or two. When it doesn't come, there's nothing to do but be patient."

Located in a region with few standing bodies of water, Delhi has always struggled to provide water for its 17 million inhabitants. The city still uses the colonial system of centralized distribution and pays the northern state of Uttar Pradesh to pipe water into Delhi. But centralized distribution is archaic and inefficient. "There are huge losses in centrally-operated systems," said Salahuddin Saiphy, assistant coordinator of community water management and rainwater harvesting at CSE. "It is extremely inefficient to import water 4,000 kilometres."

While the Delhi government perpetuates the inefficiencies of this colonial relic, CSE and other NGOs across the country have proposed rainwater harvesting as an organic solution to provide water to the citizens of Delhi. "Rainwater harvesting technology is very basic and decentralized to individual households. It facilitates a larger philosophy of water management," said Pradip Saha, also of CSE.

Still, the government remains only partially committed to the idea. Although laws ensure that rainwater harvesting facilities are installed on all new buildings, the city has been postponing the deadline for the rooftops of old buildings to be converted to harvesting systems since 2001. This lack of action comes as no surprise, said Saha at CSE. "We can't trust the government only, because it has failed miserably over the years." In a country known for a massive bureaucracy left over from British rule, people have learned not to expect change from the government.

When water fleetingly arrives at the taps, it is not easy to gather enough to last. People try to store it in large containers, but some of the poorest people don't even have those. What can they do? This dilemma is left unanswered by CSE's campaign. Television commercials and informative websites may encourage wealthy philanthropists to change their ways, and CSE must be lauded for its persistent and innovative advocacy. But rainwater harvesting, while promising, is not yet accessible to the citizens of the Basti. For those who need water the most, true change may remain a pipe dream for some time to come.

Q. It can be understood from the context of the passage that the image portrayed by the CSE suggests that people must solve the water problem themselves due to which of the following reasons?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 7 A is incorrect as this presumes that it is the responsibility of the people, whereas the passage indirectly implies that the govt. is reluctant to take responsibility for it. B is incorrect as although the passage does talk about the vastness of the crowds of Delhi, it does not attribute this as a cause for why people must solve the water problem on their own. D is incorrect as this suggests that water is available in abundance, which is countered by the passage. C is the right answer, as it is implied by the following paragraphs that the govt. cares little to solve the water problem.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

An umbrella tumbles from the old man's hands, a smile spreading slowly across his dripping face. He watches it fill with water. Men, women and children crowd the flooded streets, carrying pots, cups, and hats to gather the gift of water falling from the sky. In the midst of these idyllic images, a message scrolls across the bottom of the TV screen: "Rainwater belongs to each of us, but how do we keep and share?"

Water is a plentiful blessing in this depiction, produced by the Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a public interest organization that lobbies for environmental issues in India. The compelling image is a response to increasingly worrisome water supply issues in Delhi. The vast and crowded capital of India struggles to provide enough water to its neighbourhoods, where citizens rely on communal taps that draw from a limited municipal groundwater source. CSE promotes rainwater harvesting, the gathering of rainwater, to supplement the city's ever-dwindling water supply. The depiction presents a blunt conclusion in the final shot: "Rainwater harvesting: Solve your water problem yourself."

The current water supply system in Delhi begs for change, and it is becoming increasingly obvious that the government will do little to improve it. While the wealthy see running water gush to their sinks every day, most of Delhi must wait their turn at the communal taps, uncertain whether they will be able to gather enough water for basic needs. The Delhi Jal Board, the city's water municipality, supplies 696 million gallons of water per day, but some estimate Delhi consumes as much as 1,280 million gallons daily. In this parched city, access to water is a privilege, not a right.

The Basti, a predominantly Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi, stands disconnected from the modern world. No cars fit through its narrow, dirt alleyways, where women scrub laundry with rocks and young children wander the streets begging for a spare rupee. Here, most families share the public taps, yet cooperation is not always forged by this communal burden. "Women wait in line to get their share from the tap, but there are arguments if anyone takes someone's share." explained Praveen Abdul Kaleem, a 21-year-old resident of the Basti. "Sometimes the argument gets so heated, the police get called in." And sometimes, there is no water to share. "The biggest problem with the water supply happens in the hot and dry season," said Gauri Patel, a maidservant and mother of four who relies on a weak tap outside her home. "Sometimes it doesn't come until the night; sometimes not for a day or two. When it doesn't come, there's nothing to do but be patient."

Located in a region with few standing bodies of water, Delhi has always struggled to provide water for its 17 million inhabitants. The city still uses the colonial system of centralized distribution and pays the northern state of Uttar Pradesh to pipe water into Delhi. But centralized distribution is archaic and inefficient. "There are huge losses in centrally-operated systems," said Salahuddin Saiphy, assistant coordinator of community water management and rainwater harvesting at CSE. "It is extremely inefficient to import water 4,000 kilometres."

While the Delhi government perpetuates the inefficiencies of this colonial relic, CSE and other NGOs across the country have proposed rainwater harvesting as an organic solution to provide water to the citizens of Delhi. "Rainwater harvesting technology is very basic and decentralized to individual households. It facilitates a larger philosophy of water management," said Pradip Saha, also of CSE.

Still, the government remains only partially committed to the idea. Although laws ensure that rainwater harvesting facilities are installed on all new buildings, the city has been postponing the deadline for the rooftops of old buildings to be converted to harvesting systems since 2001. This lack of action comes as no surprise, said Saha at CSE. "We can't trust the government only, because it has failed miserably over the years." In a country known for a massive bureaucracy left over from British rule, people have learned not to expect change from the government.

When water fleetingly arrives at the taps, it is not easy to gather enough to last. People try to store it in large containers, but some of the poorest people don't even have those. What can they do? This dilemma is left unanswered by CSE's campaign. Television commercials and informative websites may encourage wealthy philanthropists to change their ways, and CSE must be lauded for its persistent and innovative advocacy. But rainwater harvesting, while promising, is not yet accessible to the citizens of the Basti. For those who need water the most, true change may remain a pipe dream for some time to come.

Q. Which of the following best sums up the central idea of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 8 A is incorrect as the author makes it clear that the future is not going to benefit those who need water the most. B is incorrect as the passage talks of an ongoing water crisis, not an impending one. D is incorrect as the government's apathy forms only a brief part of the passage, and is not the central idea. C is the right answer, as the passage seeks to examine the scope of CSE's campaign.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 9

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

An umbrella tumbles from the old man's hands, a smile spreading slowly across his dripping face. He watches it fill with water. Men, women and children crowd the flooded streets, carrying pots, cups, and hats to gather the gift of water falling from the sky. In the midst of these idyllic images, a message scrolls across the bottom of the TV screen: "Rainwater belongs to each of us, but how do we keep and share?"

Water is a plentiful blessing in this depiction, produced by the Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a public interest organization that lobbies for environmental issues in India. The compelling image is a response to increasingly worrisome water supply issues in Delhi. The vast and crowded capital of India struggles to provide enough water to its neighbourhoods, where citizens rely on communal taps that draw from a limited municipal groundwater source. CSE promotes rainwater harvesting, the gathering of rainwater, to supplement the city's ever-dwindling water supply. The depiction presents a blunt conclusion in the final shot: "Rainwater harvesting: Solve your water problem yourself."

The current water supply system in Delhi begs for change, and it is becoming increasingly obvious that the government will do little to improve it. While the wealthy see running water gush to their sinks every day, most of Delhi must wait their turn at the communal taps, uncertain whether they will be able to gather enough water for basic needs. The Delhi Jal Board, the city's water municipality, supplies 696 million gallons of water per day, but some estimate Delhi consumes as much as 1,280 million gallons daily. In this parched city, access to water is a privilege, not a right.

The Basti, a predominantly Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi, stands disconnected from the modern world. No cars fit through its narrow, dirt alleyways, where women scrub laundry with rocks and young children wander the streets begging for a spare rupee. Here, most families share the public taps, yet cooperation is not always forged by this communal burden. "Women wait in line to get their share from the tap, but there are arguments if anyone takes someone's share." explained Praveen Abdul Kaleem, a 21-year-old resident of the Basti. "Sometimes the argument gets so heated, the police get called in." And sometimes, there is no water to share. "The biggest problem with the water supply happens in the hot and dry season," said Gauri Patel, a maidservant and mother of four who relies on a weak tap outside her home. "Sometimes it doesn't come until the night; sometimes not for a day or two. When it doesn't come, there's nothing to do but be patient."

Located in a region with few standing bodies of water, Delhi has always struggled to provide water for its 17 million inhabitants. The city still uses the colonial system of centralized distribution and pays the northern state of Uttar Pradesh to pipe water into Delhi. But centralized distribution is archaic and inefficient. "There are huge losses in centrally-operated systems," said Salahuddin Saiphy, assistant coordinator of community water management and rainwater harvesting at CSE. "It is extremely inefficient to import water 4,000 kilometres."

While the Delhi government perpetuates the inefficiencies of this colonial relic, CSE and other NGOs across the country have proposed rainwater harvesting as an organic solution to provide water to the citizens of Delhi. "Rainwater harvesting technology is very basic and decentralized to individual households. It facilitates a larger philosophy of water management," said Pradip Saha, also of CSE.

Still, the government remains only partially committed to the idea. Although laws ensure that rainwater harvesting facilities are installed on all new buildings, the city has been postponing the deadline for the rooftops of old buildings to be converted to harvesting systems since 2001. This lack of action comes as no surprise, said Saha at CSE. "We can't trust the government only, because it has failed miserably over the years." In a country known for a massive bureaucracy left over from British rule, people have learned not to expect change from the government.

When water fleetingly arrives at the taps, it is not easy to gather enough to last. People try to store it in large containers, but some of the poorest people don't even have those. What can they do? This dilemma is left unanswered by CSE's campaign. Television commercials and informative websites may encourage wealthy philanthropists to change their ways, and CSE must be lauded for its persistent and innovative advocacy. But rainwater harvesting, while promising, is not yet accessible to the citizens of the Basti. For those who need water the most, true change may remain a pipe dream for some time to come.

Q. It can be understood that the passage is most likely to be an excerpt from which of the following sources?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 9 A is incorrect as the entire passage does not focus on a particular case or a particular section of society or neighbourhood which is undergoing a problem. Rather it picks up a social problem and talks of a possible solution for it that has recently emerged. B is incorrect as the passage contains no studies, findings or research. C is incorrect as the passage does not give us info on sociological relations between people or cultures, but rather talks on a social issue. D is the right answer, as the passage is likely to be taken from a newspaper editorial, which generally focus on discussions over current social issues by the means of examples, problems and their potential solutions.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 10

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

An umbrella tumbles from the old man's hands, a smile spreading slowly across his dripping face. He watches it fill with water. Men, women and children crowd the flooded streets, carrying pots, cups, and hats to gather the gift of water falling from the sky. In the midst of these idyllic images, a message scrolls across the bottom of the TV screen: "Rainwater belongs to each of us, but how do we keep and share?"

Water is a plentiful blessing in this depiction, produced by the Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a public interest organization that lobbies for environmental issues in India. The compelling image is a response to increasingly worrisome water supply issues in Delhi. The vast and crowded capital of India struggles to provide enough water to its neighbourhoods, where citizens rely on communal taps that draw from a limited municipal groundwater source. CSE promotes rainwater harvesting, the gathering of rainwater, to supplement the city's ever-dwindling water supply. The depiction presents a blunt conclusion in the final shot: "Rainwater harvesting: Solve your water problem yourself."

The current water supply system in Delhi begs for change, and it is becoming increasingly obvious that the government will do little to improve it. While the wealthy see running water gush to their sinks every day, most of Delhi must wait their turn at the communal taps, uncertain whether they will be able to gather enough water for basic needs. The Delhi Jal Board, the city's water municipality, supplies 696 million gallons of water per day, but some estimate Delhi consumes as much as 1,280 million gallons daily. In this parched city, access to water is a privilege, not a right.

The Basti, a predominantly Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi, stands disconnected from the modern world. No cars fit through its narrow, dirt alleyways, where women scrub laundry with rocks and young children wander the streets begging for a spare rupee. Here, most families share the public taps, yet cooperation is not always forged by this communal burden. "Women wait in line to get their share from the tap, but there are arguments if anyone takes someone's share." explained Praveen Abdul Kaleem, a 21-year-old resident of the Basti. "Sometimes the argument gets so heated, the police get called in." And sometimes, there is no water to share. "The biggest problem with the water supply happens in the hot and dry season," said Gauri Patel, a maidservant and mother of four who relies on a weak tap outside her home. "Sometimes it doesn't come until the night; sometimes not for a day or two. When it doesn't come, there's nothing to do but be patient."

Located in a region with few standing bodies of water, Delhi has always struggled to provide water for its 17 million inhabitants. The city still uses the colonial system of centralized distribution and pays the northern state of Uttar Pradesh to pipe water into Delhi. But centralized distribution is archaic and inefficient. "There are huge losses in centrally-operated systems," said Salahuddin Saiphy, assistant coordinator of community water management and rainwater harvesting at CSE. "It is extremely inefficient to import water 4,000 kilometres."

While the Delhi government perpetuates the inefficiencies of this colonial relic, CSE and other NGOs across the country have proposed rainwater harvesting as an organic solution to provide water to the citizens of Delhi. "Rainwater harvesting technology is very basic and decentralized to individual households. It facilitates a larger philosophy of water management," said Pradip Saha, also of CSE.

Still, the government remains only partially committed to the idea. Although laws ensure that rainwater harvesting facilities are installed on all new buildings, the city has been postponing the deadline for the rooftops of old buildings to be converted to harvesting systems since 2001. This lack of action comes as no surprise, said Saha at CSE. "We can't trust the government only, because it has failed miserably over the years." In a country known for a massive bureaucracy left over from British rule, people have learned not to expect change from the government.

When water fleetingly arrives at the taps, it is not easy to gather enough to last. People try to store it in large containers, but some of the poorest people don't even have those. What can they do? This dilemma is left unanswered by CSE's campaign. Television commercials and informative websites may encourage wealthy philanthropists to change their ways, and CSE must be lauded for its persistent and innovative advocacy. But rainwater harvesting, while promising, is not yet accessible to the citizens of the Basti. For those who need water the most, true change may remain a pipe dream for some time to come.

Q. It can be understood that the first paragraph of the passage describes an image most likely to be which of the following?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 10 B is unlikely to be the answer, as a documentary usually showcases educational or factual content, rather than content that would evoke emotions or carries an implicit message. C is incorrect as we know that the image has been depicted on a TV screen, so it is more likely to be a video rather than still photographs. D is incorrect as the image seeks to convey a social message to the audience, which a fictional short film usually wouldn't. A is the right answer, as the image is most likely to be a powerful television commercial which has been produced in order to send across a message to the audience. Also, the length of the incident described in the paragraph makes it too small for a short film, but appropriate for a tv ad.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 11

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

An umbrella tumbles from the old man's hands, a smile spreading slowly across his dripping face. He watches it fill with water. Men, women and children crowd the flooded streets, carrying pots, cups, and hats to gather the gift of water falling from the sky. In the midst of these idyllic images, a message scrolls across the bottom of the TV screen: "Rainwater belongs to each of us, but how do we keep and share?"

Water is a plentiful blessing in this depiction, produced by the Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a public interest organization that lobbies for environmental issues in India. The compelling image is a response to increasingly worrisome water supply issues in Delhi. The vast and crowded capital of India struggles to provide enough water to its neighbourhoods, where citizens rely on communal taps that draw from a limited municipal groundwater source. CSE promotes rainwater harvesting, the gathering of rainwater, to supplement the city's ever-dwindling water supply. The depiction presents a blunt conclusion in the final shot: "Rainwater harvesting: Solve your water problem yourself."

The current water supply system in Delhi begs for change, and it is becoming increasingly obvious that the government will do little to improve it. While the wealthy see running water gush to their sinks every day, most of Delhi must wait their turn at the communal taps, uncertain whether they will be able to gather enough water for basic needs. The Delhi Jal Board, the city's water municipality, supplies 696 million gallons of water per day, but some estimate Delhi consumes as much as 1,280 million gallons daily. In this parched city, access to water is a privilege, not a right.

The Basti, a predominantly Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi, stands disconnected from the modern world. No cars fit through its narrow, dirt alleyways, where women scrub laundry with rocks and young children wander the streets begging for a spare rupee. Here, most families share the public taps, yet cooperation is not always forged by this communal burden. "Women wait in line to get their share from the tap, but there are arguments if anyone takes someone's share." explained Praveen Abdul Kaleem, a 21-year-old resident of the Basti. "Sometimes the argument gets so heated, the police get called in." And sometimes, there is no water to share. "The biggest problem with the water supply happens in the hot and dry season," said Gauri Patel, a maidservant and mother of four who relies on a weak tap outside her home. "Sometimes it doesn't come until the night; sometimes not for a day or two. When it doesn't come, there's nothing to do but be patient."

Located in a region with few standing bodies of water, Delhi has always struggled to provide water for its 17 million inhabitants. The city still uses the colonial system of centralized distribution and pays the northern state of Uttar Pradesh to pipe water into Delhi. But centralized distribution is archaic and inefficient. "There are huge losses in centrally-operated systems," said Salahuddin Saiphy, assistant coordinator of community water management and rainwater harvesting at CSE. "It is extremely inefficient to import water 4,000 kilometres."

While the Delhi government perpetuates the inefficiencies of this colonial relic, CSE and other NGOs across the country have proposed rainwater harvesting as an organic solution to provide water to the citizens of Delhi. "Rainwater harvesting technology is very basic and decentralized to individual households. It facilitates a larger philosophy of water management," said Pradip Saha, also of CSE.

Still, the government remains only partially committed to the idea. Although laws ensure that rainwater harvesting facilities are installed on all new buildings, the city has been postponing the deadline for the rooftops of old buildings to be converted to harvesting systems since 2001. This lack of action comes as no surprise, said Saha at CSE. "We can't trust the government only, because it has failed miserably over the years." In a country known for a massive bureaucracy left over from British rule, people have learned not to expect change from the government.

When water fleetingly arrives at the taps, it is not easy to gather enough to last. People try to store it in large containers, but some of the poorest people don't even have those. What can they do? This dilemma is left unanswered by CSE's campaign. Television commercials and informative websites may encourage wealthy philanthropists to change their ways, and CSE must be lauded for its persistent and innovative advocacy. But rainwater harvesting, while promising, is not yet accessible to the citizens of the Basti. For those who need water the most, true change may remain a pipe dream for some time to come.

Q. Which of the following best describes the tone of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 11 A is incorrect as although the passage indeed criticises the government's inactive participation in the situation, the tone of the entire passage is not critical. C is incorrect as although parts of the passage do seek to evoke a response from people, the central purpose is not to evoke an emotion in the readers, but rather to illustrate a point and debate on its success. D is incorrect as the author does not simply describe the topic, instead he gives info on it, and also his own views which are somewhat doubtful about the success of the method. B is the right answer, as the author expresses scepticism towards the success and scope of the rainwater harvesting method.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 12

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

An umbrella tumbles from the old man's hands, a smile spreading slowly across his dripping face. He watches it fill with water. Men, women and children crowd the flooded streets, carrying pots, cups, and hats to gather the gift of water falling from the sky. In the midst of these idyllic images, a message scrolls across the bottom of the TV screen: "Rainwater belongs to each of us, but how do we keep and share?"

Water is a plentiful blessing in this depiction, produced by the Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a public interest organization that lobbies for environmental issues in India. The compelling image is a response to increasingly worrisome water supply issues in Delhi. The vast and crowded capital of India struggles to provide enough water to its neighbourhoods, where citizens rely on communal taps that draw from a limited municipal groundwater source. CSE promotes rainwater harvesting, the gathering of rainwater, to supplement the city's ever-dwindling water supply. The depiction presents a blunt conclusion in the final shot: "Rainwater harvesting: Solve your water problem yourself."

The current water supply system in Delhi begs for change, and it is becoming increasingly obvious that the government will do little to improve it. While the wealthy see running water gush to their sinks every day, most of Delhi must wait their turn at the communal taps, uncertain whether they will be able to gather enough water for basic needs. The Delhi Jal Board, the city's water municipality, supplies 696 million gallons of water per day, but some estimate Delhi consumes as much as 1,280 million gallons daily. In this parched city, access to water is a privilege, not a right.

The Basti, a predominantly Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi, stands disconnected from the modern world. No cars fit through its narrow, dirt alleyways, where women scrub laundry with rocks and young children wander the streets begging for a spare rupee. Here, most families share the public taps, yet cooperation is not always forged by this communal burden. "Women wait in line to get their share from the tap, but there are arguments if anyone takes someone's share." explained Praveen Abdul Kaleem, a 21-year-old resident of the Basti. "Sometimes the argument gets so heated, the police get called in." And sometimes, there is no water to share. "The biggest problem with the water supply happens in the hot and dry season," said Gauri Patel, a maidservant and mother of four who relies on a weak tap outside her home. "Sometimes it doesn't come until the night; sometimes not for a day or two. When it doesn't come, there's nothing to do but be patient."

Located in a region with few standing bodies of water, Delhi has always struggled to provide water for its 17 million inhabitants. The city still uses the colonial system of centralized distribution and pays the northern state of Uttar Pradesh to pipe water into Delhi. But centralized distribution is archaic and inefficient. "There are huge losses in centrally-operated systems," said Salahuddin Saiphy, assistant coordinator of community water management and rainwater harvesting at CSE. "It is extremely inefficient to import water 4,000 kilometres."

While the Delhi government perpetuates the inefficiencies of this colonial relic, CSE and other NGOs across the country have proposed rainwater harvesting as an organic solution to provide water to the citizens of Delhi. "Rainwater harvesting technology is very basic and decentralized to individual households. It facilitates a larger philosophy of water management," said Pradip Saha, also of CSE.

Still, the government remains only partially committed to the idea. Although laws ensure that rainwater harvesting facilities are installed on all new buildings, the city has been postponing the deadline for the rooftops of old buildings to be converted to harvesting systems since 2001. This lack of action comes as no surprise, said Saha at CSE. "We can't trust the government only, because it has failed miserably over the years." In a country known for a massive bureaucracy left over from British rule, people have learned not to expect change from the government.

When water fleetingly arrives at the taps, it is not easy to gather enough to last. People try to store it in large containers, but some of the poorest people don't even have those. What can they do? This dilemma is left unanswered by CSE's campaign. Television commercials and informative websites may encourage wealthy philanthropists to change their ways, and CSE must be lauded for its persistent and innovative advocacy. But rainwater harvesting, while promising, is not yet accessible to the citizens of the Basti. For those who need water the most, true change may remain a pipe dream for some time to come.

Q. Which of the following is the main purpose of the fourth paragraph?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 12 Both A and B are correct as the author brings up the example of Basti in order to explain the intensity of the problem, and also to tell us about the section of society worst hit by the crisis. C is incorrect as the author does not talk about how water is especially important for this section of society more than others. D is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 13

Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and answer the questions that follow.

In 1980, Wasal Khan, a brick kiln worker from Sirhind, a city in India's north-western state of Punjab, came to the capital city of New Delhi, driven by desperation and fear. His family members had been serving as bonded labourers in a brick kiln for 20 years in order to repay a debt owed to the kiln owner, who now threatened to sell Khan's adolescent daughter to a brothel. Exploited by his employer and ignored by the authorities, he chanced across the newsletter of an organization working for the socially marginalized and somehow managed to locate their office.

Khan found an unexpected source of help in an electrical engineer-turned journalist and human rights activist, Kailash Satyarthi, and his team of like-minded activists at Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), or Save the Children Mission. Soon after, Satyarthi the engineer and his team of like-minded activists rescued 34 brick kiln workers and the Khan's 15-year old daughter, Sabo. This episode laid the foundations of the India's largest grassroots movement against child labour and trafficking.

Today, Satyarthi is a world-renowned voice against the exploitation of children, making headlines in 2014 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai. Child labour activists are hopeful that BBA's Nobel Peace Prize will lead to a renewed discussion and initiative among all sections of Indian society to ultimately end child labour. "It is extremely overwhelming - the BBA receives dozens of calls every day from common people, asking us what they can do about child labour," a female activist working in victim assistance, who wished to remain anonymous, told me. "While everyone cannot dedicate their lives to ending child labour, at the very least they could boycott those places and goods that employ child labour."

Her statement carries weight. As I sipped a cup of piping hot masala chai, the characteristic Indian tea, I could see BBA activists busy at work on the lower level of the office. I thought of the number of times I have seen young children working at roadside tea stalls across India, seemingly content and happy with their lives. Several industries such as carpet-making, fire-cracker manufacturing, marble inlay work, filigree metal work, and many others are particularly notorious for using child labour as the children's small thin hands are better suited for the fine motor skills required by these processes. Since children generally accept lower wages than adult labourers, it is also cost-effective for many firms to employ child laborers. The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted. Even today, India has about 60 million child labourers waiting to be rescued.

In India and other nearby developing countries, child labour was not considered a pertinent issue until thirty years ago. Even today, the constant refrain heard from a large part of India's population is that children have no option but to work to financially support their impoverished families. Unfortunately, such people fail to recognize that the effects of child labour encompass all sections of society. A study conducted by Sathyarthi and BBA titled "Capital Corruption" estimates that the amount of illegal money generated by Indian firms employing child labourers could be as high as $20,000 million every year. The income earned by child labourers thus represents a huge leakage from the nation's economy, also impacting adult employment and income generation.

Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers. BBA rescues a large number of such children every day and takes some of them to its rehabilitation centres in Delhi and Rajasthan, as well as to rescue homes run by other organizations. But the response from these children is often negative. Some beg to be sent back. As the same female activist put it, "Many of them view their employer as their guru, their master, and what he says or does is sacrosanct. It takes intensive counselling to help them realize the exploitation they have been subject to."

Many people continue to live the experiences of Wasal Khan, the brick kiln worker whose daughter was rescued from a life of forced prostitution by Kailash Satyarthi and Bachpan Bachao Andolan. But increasingly, the work of such human rights activists has inspired other individuals to play their own part in the movement. Take Razia Sultan, an inhabitant of Meerut, a city in Uttar Pradesh, who worked as a child labourer in football stitching. When her village was transformed into a Bal Mitra Gram, she helped bring 75 children in the village to school through her work with the Bal Panchayat. She also initiated a campaign against schools that charged tuition fees. She was rewarded for her efforts in 2013 as the first recipient of the Malala Peace Prize. BBA has achieved much over thirty years, but perhaps its most commendable success is this: giving India's child labourers the power to dream and have these dreams realized.

Q. The author of the passage would clearly support how many of the following statements:

I. Effective abolition of child labour requires a concerted effort by all stakeholders in society: the police, local authorities, the source communities of child and bonded labour, as well as common citizens.

II. Child labour is a complex issue involving multiple stakeholders, and any strategy to address it will have to be multi-pronged, simultaneously targeting civil society, the affected communities and children and the traffickers themselves.

III. Not only do the laws against child labour have to be enforced better, the punishment and penalties against those who flout these laws, be it middlemen or police authorities, need to be much stricter.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 13 The author would clearly support I and II, as he/ she has emphasized on several instances in the passage how child labour is something that affects every stakeholder of the society and must be ended by collective effort of all, and that any strategy to end these must target all such sections of society: 'Child labour activists are hopeful that BBA's Nobel Peace Prize will lead to a renewed discussion and initiative among all sections of Indian society to ultimately end child labour', and 'Unfortunately, such people fail to recognize that the effects of child labour encompass all sections of society.'

There is insufficient information provided to us in the passage from which we may conclude that the author would agree (or disagree) with III, as the author does not attribute child labour to the lax laws that are prevalent in the country. As such, we can say that the author would most definitely agree with 2 statements, making C the right answer.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 14

Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and answer the questions that follow.

In 1980, Wasal Khan, a brick kiln worker from Sirhind, a city in India's north-western state of Punjab, came to the capital city of New Delhi, driven by desperation and fear. His family members had been serving as bonded labourers in a brick kiln for 20 years in order to repay a debt owed to the kiln owner, who now threatened to sell Khan's adolescent daughter to a brothel. Exploited by his employer and ignored by the authorities, he chanced across the newsletter of an organization working for the socially marginalized and somehow managed to locate their office.

Khan found an unexpected source of help in an electrical engineer-turned journalist and human rights activist, Kailash Satyarthi, and his team of like-minded activists at Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), or Save the Children Mission. Soon after, Satyarthi the engineer and his team of like-minded activists rescued 34 brick kiln workers and the Khan's 15-year old daughter, Sabo. This episode laid the foundations of the India's largest grassroots movement against child labour and trafficking.

Today, Satyarthi is a world-renowned voice against the exploitation of children, making headlines in 2014 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai. Child labour activists are hopeful that BBA's Nobel Peace Prize will lead to a renewed discussion and initiative among all sections of Indian society to ultimately end child labour. "It is extremely overwhelming - the BBA receives dozens of calls every day from common people, asking us what they can do about child labour," a female activist working in victim assistance, who wished to remain anonymous, told me. "While everyone cannot dedicate their lives to ending child labour, at the very least they could boycott those places and goods that employ child labour."

Her statement carries weight. As I sipped a cup of piping hot masala chai, the characteristic Indian tea, I could see BBA activists busy at work on the lower level of the office. I thought of the number of times I have seen young children working at roadside tea stalls across India, seemingly content and happy with their lives. Several industries such as carpet-making, fire-cracker manufacturing, marble inlay work, filigree metal work, and many others are particularly notorious for using child labour as the children's small thin hands are better suited for the fine motor skills required by these processes. Since children generally accept lower wages than adult labourers, it is also cost-effective for many firms to employ child laborers. The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted. Even today, India has about 60 million child labourers waiting to be rescued.

In India and other nearby developing countries, child labour was not considered a pertinent issue until thirty years ago. Even today, the constant refrain heard from a large part of India's population is that children have no option but to work to financially support their impoverished families. Unfortunately, such people fail to recognize that the effects of child labour encompass all sections of society. A study conducted by Sathyarthi and BBA titled "Capital Corruption" estimates that the amount of illegal money generated by Indian firms employing child labourers could be as high as $20,000 million every year. The income earned by child labourers thus represents a huge leakage from the nation's economy, also impacting adult employment and income generation.

Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers. BBA rescues a large number of such children every day and takes some of them to its rehabilitation centres in Delhi and Rajasthan, as well as to rescue homes run by other organizations. But the response from these children is often negative. Some beg to be sent back. As the same female activist put it, "Many of them view their employer as their guru, their master, and what he says or does is sacrosanct. It takes intensive counselling to help them realize the exploitation they have been subject to."

Many people continue to live the experiences of Wasal Khan, the brick kiln worker whose daughter was rescued from a life of forced prostitution by Kailash Satyarthi and Bachpan Bachao Andolan. But increasingly, the work of such human rights activists has inspired other individuals to play their own part in the movement. Take Razia Sultan, an inhabitant of Meerut, a city in Uttar Pradesh, who worked as a child labourer in football stitching. When her village was transformed into a Bal Mitra Gram, she helped bring 75 children in the village to school through her work with the Bal Panchayat. She also initiated a campaign against schools that charged tuition fees. She was rewarded for her efforts in 2013 as the first recipient of the Malala Peace Prize. BBA has achieved much over thirty years, but perhaps its most commendable success is this: giving India's child labourers the power to dream and have these dreams realized.

Q. Which of the following can be attributed to as the central purpose of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 14 A is incorrect as the author does not address the readers directly at any point, nor does he mention or imply anything that would urge the reader to feel guilty. C is incorrect as the author rather than taking a pessimistic tone, or focusing primarily on the weaknesses of the social system, provides a way forward into the future by means of which, child labour can be effectively curbed. D is incorrect as the author seeks to illustrate a broader question through a specific example; the passage is not concerned within the limits of the example itself. B is the right answer, as the passage seeks to describe in detail the finer aspects of this social evil, its causes and a way forward to curbing it.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 15

Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and answer the questions that follow.

In 1980, Wasal Khan, a brick kiln worker from Sirhind, a city in India's north-western state of Punjab, came to the capital city of New Delhi, driven by desperation and fear. His family members had been serving as bonded labourers in a brick kiln for 20 years in order to repay a debt owed to the kiln owner, who now threatened to sell Khan's adolescent daughter to a brothel. Exploited by his employer and ignored by the authorities, he chanced across the newsletter of an organization working for the socially marginalized and somehow managed to locate their office.

Khan found an unexpected source of help in an electrical engineer-turned journalist and human rights activist, Kailash Satyarthi, and his team of like-minded activists at Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), or Save the Children Mission. Soon after, Satyarthi the engineer and his team of like-minded activists rescued 34 brick kiln workers and the Khan's 15-year old daughter, Sabo. This episode laid the foundations of the India's largest grassroots movement against child labour and trafficking.

Today, Satyarthi is a world-renowned voice against the exploitation of children, making headlines in 2014 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai. Child labour activists are hopeful that BBA's Nobel Peace Prize will lead to a renewed discussion and initiative among all sections of Indian society to ultimately end child labour. "It is extremely overwhelming - the BBA receives dozens of calls every day from common people, asking us what they can do about child labour," a female activist working in victim assistance, who wished to remain anonymous, told me. "While everyone cannot dedicate their lives to ending child labour, at the very least they could boycott those places and goods that employ child labour."

Her statement carries weight. As I sipped a cup of piping hot masala chai, the characteristic Indian tea, I could see BBA activists busy at work on the lower level of the office. I thought of the number of times I have seen young children working at roadside tea stalls across India, seemingly content and happy with their lives. Several industries such as carpet-making, fire-cracker manufacturing, marble inlay work, filigree metal work, and many others are particularly notorious for using child labour as the children's small thin hands are better suited for the fine motor skills required by these processes. Since children generally accept lower wages than adult labourers, it is also cost-effective for many firms to employ child laborers. The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted. Even today, India has about 60 million child labourers waiting to be rescued.

In India and other nearby developing countries, child labour was not considered a pertinent issue until thirty years ago. Even today, the constant refrain heard from a large part of India's population is that children have no option but to work to financially support their impoverished families. Unfortunately, such people fail to recognize that the effects of child labour encompass all sections of society. A study conducted by Sathyarthi and BBA titled "Capital Corruption" estimates that the amount of illegal money generated by Indian firms employing child labourers could be as high as $20,000 million every year. The income earned by child labourers thus represents a huge leakage from the nation's economy, also impacting adult employment and income generation.

Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers. BBA rescues a large number of such children every day and takes some of them to its rehabilitation centres in Delhi and Rajasthan, as well as to rescue homes run by other organizations. But the response from these children is often negative. Some beg to be sent back. As the same female activist put it, "Many of them view their employer as their guru, their master, and what he says or does is sacrosanct. It takes intensive counselling to help them realize the exploitation they have been subject to."

Many people continue to live the experiences of Wasal Khan, the brick kiln worker whose daughter was rescued from a life of forced prostitution by Kailash Satyarthi and Bachpan Bachao Andolan. But increasingly, the work of such human rights activists has inspired other individuals to play their own part in the movement. Take Razia Sultan, an inhabitant of Meerut, a city in Uttar Pradesh, who worked as a child labourer in football stitching. When her village was transformed into a Bal Mitra Gram, she helped bring 75 children in the village to school through her work with the Bal Panchayat. She also initiated a campaign against schools that charged tuition fees. She was rewarded for her efforts in 2013 as the first recipient of the Malala Peace Prize. BBA has achieved much over thirty years, but perhaps its most commendable success is this: giving India's child labourers the power to dream and have these dreams realized.

Q. It can be understood that the passage is most likely to be an excerpt from which of the following sources?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 15 A is incorrect as a newspaper report would contain info on current events, while the passage talks of a social issue being prevalent since a long time, and specifically of a particular case. B is incorrect as the passage can be inferred to be taken from a pamphlet of the BBA, but note that the passage is not from the point of view of an activist from BBA, or talking from the perspective of the NGO itself. C is incorrect as the passage talks of a broader question in addition to a particular case. D is the right answer, as this would entail both a description of the case, and the social context surrounding it.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 16

Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and answer the questions that follow.

In 1980, Wasal Khan, a brick kiln worker from Sirhind, a city in India's north-western state of Punjab, came to the capital city of New Delhi, driven by desperation and fear. His family members had been serving as bonded labourers in a brick kiln for 20 years in order to repay a debt owed to the kiln owner, who now threatened to sell Khan's adolescent daughter to a brothel. Exploited by his employer and ignored by the authorities, he chanced across the newsletter of an organization working for the socially marginalized and somehow managed to locate their office.

Khan found an unexpected source of help in an electrical engineer-turned journalist and human rights activist, Kailash Satyarthi, and his team of like-minded activists at Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), or Save the Children Mission. Soon after, Satyarthi the engineer and his team of like-minded activists rescued 34 brick kiln workers and the Khan's 15-year old daughter, Sabo. This episode laid the foundations of the India's largest grassroots movement against child labour and trafficking.

Today, Satyarthi is a world-renowned voice against the exploitation of children, making headlines in 2014 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai. Child labour activists are hopeful that BBA's Nobel Peace Prize will lead to a renewed discussion and initiative among all sections of Indian society to ultimately end child labour. "It is extremely overwhelming - the BBA receives dozens of calls every day from common people, asking us what they can do about child labour," a female activist working in victim assistance, who wished to remain anonymous, told me. "While everyone cannot dedicate their lives to ending child labour, at the very least they could boycott those places and goods that employ child labour."

Her statement carries weight. As I sipped a cup of piping hot masala chai, the characteristic Indian tea, I could see BBA activists busy at work on the lower level of the office. I thought of the number of times I have seen young children working at roadside tea stalls across India, seemingly content and happy with their lives. Several industries such as carpet-making, fire-cracker manufacturing, marble inlay work, filigree metal work, and many others are particularly notorious for using child labour as the children's small thin hands are better suited for the fine motor skills required by these processes. Since children generally accept lower wages than adult labourers, it is also cost-effective for many firms to employ child laborers. The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted. Even today, India has about 60 million child labourers waiting to be rescued.

In India and other nearby developing countries, child labour was not considered a pertinent issue until thirty years ago. Even today, the constant refrain heard from a large part of India's population is that children have no option but to work to financially support their impoverished families. Unfortunately, such people fail to recognize that the effects of child labour encompass all sections of society. A study conducted by Sathyarthi and BBA titled "Capital Corruption" estimates that the amount of illegal money generated by Indian firms employing child labourers could be as high as $20,000 million every year. The income earned by child labourers thus represents a huge leakage from the nation's economy, also impacting adult employment and income generation.

Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers. BBA rescues a large number of such children every day and takes some of them to its rehabilitation centres in Delhi and Rajasthan, as well as to rescue homes run by other organizations. But the response from these children is often negative. Some beg to be sent back. As the same female activist put it, "Many of them view their employer as their guru, their master, and what he says or does is sacrosanct. It takes intensive counselling to help them realize the exploitation they have been subject to."

Many people continue to live the experiences of Wasal Khan, the brick kiln worker whose daughter was rescued from a life of forced prostitution by Kailash Satyarthi and Bachpan Bachao Andolan. But increasingly, the work of such human rights activists has inspired other individuals to play their own part in the movement. Take Razia Sultan, an inhabitant of Meerut, a city in Uttar Pradesh, who worked as a child labourer in football stitching. When her village was transformed into a Bal Mitra Gram, she helped bring 75 children in the village to school through her work with the Bal Panchayat. She also initiated a campaign against schools that charged tuition fees. She was rewarded for her efforts in 2013 as the first recipient of the Malala Peace Prize. BBA has achieved much over thirty years, but perhaps its most commendable success is this: giving India's child labourers the power to dream and have these dreams realized.

Q. Which of the following questions cannot be answered on the basis of the information given in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 16 A is answered in the sixth paragraph: 'Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers.' B is answered in the fourth paragraph: 'Several industries such as carpet-making, fire-cracker manufacturing, marble inlay work, filigree metal work, and many others are particularly notorious for using child labour as the children's small thin hands are better suited for the fine motor skills required by these processes. Since children generally accept lower wages than adult labourers, it is also cost-effective for many firms to employ child laborers. The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted.' D is answered in the fifth paragraph: 'A study conducted by Sathyarthi and BBA titled "Capital Corruption" estimates that the amount of illegal money generated by Indian firms employing child labourers could be as high as $20,000 million every year. The income earned by child labourers thus represents a huge leakage from the nation's economy, also impacting adult employment and income generation.' C is not discussed or answered in the passage, so it is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 17

Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and answer the questions that follow.

In 1980, Wasal Khan, a brick kiln worker from Sirhind, a city in India's north-western state of Punjab, came to the capital city of New Delhi, driven by desperation and fear. His family members had been serving as bonded labourers in a brick kiln for 20 years in order to repay a debt owed to the kiln owner, who now threatened to sell Khan's adolescent daughter to a brothel. Exploited by his employer and ignored by the authorities, he chanced across the newsletter of an organization working for the socially marginalized and somehow managed to locate their office.

Khan found an unexpected source of help in an electrical engineer-turned journalist and human rights activist, Kailash Satyarthi, and his team of like-minded activists at Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), or Save the Children Mission. Soon after, Satyarthi the engineer and his team of like-minded activists rescued 34 brick kiln workers and the Khan's 15-year old daughter, Sabo. This episode laid the foundations of the India's largest grassroots movement against child labour and trafficking.

Today, Satyarthi is a world-renowned voice against the exploitation of children, making headlines in 2014 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai. Child labour activists are hopeful that BBA's Nobel Peace Prize will lead to a renewed discussion and initiative among all sections of Indian society to ultimately end child labour. "It is extremely overwhelming - the BBA receives dozens of calls every day from common people, asking us what they can do about child labour," a female activist working in victim assistance, who wished to remain anonymous, told me. "While everyone cannot dedicate their lives to ending child labour, at the very least they could boycott those places and goods that employ child labour."

Her statement carries weight. As I sipped a cup of piping hot masala chai, the characteristic Indian tea, I could see BBA activists busy at work on the lower level of the office. I thought of the number of times I have seen young children working at roadside tea stalls across India, seemingly content and happy with their lives. Several industries such as carpet-making, fire-cracker manufacturing, marble inlay work, filigree metal work, and many others are particularly notorious for using child labour as the children's small thin hands are better suited for the fine motor skills required by these processes. Since children generally accept lower wages than adult labourers, it is also cost-effective for many firms to employ child laborers. The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted. Even today, India has about 60 million child labourers waiting to be rescued.

In India and other nearby developing countries, child labour was not considered a pertinent issue until thirty years ago. Even today, the constant refrain heard from a large part of India's population is that children have no option but to work to financially support their impoverished families. Unfortunately, such people fail to recognize that the effects of child labour encompass all sections of society. A study conducted by Sathyarthi and BBA titled "Capital Corruption" estimates that the amount of illegal money generated by Indian firms employing child labourers could be as high as $20,000 million every year. The income earned by child labourers thus represents a huge leakage from the nation's economy, also impacting adult employment and income generation.

Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers. BBA rescues a large number of such children every day and takes some of them to its rehabilitation centres in Delhi and Rajasthan, as well as to rescue homes run by other organizations. But the response from these children is often negative. Some beg to be sent back. As the same female activist put it, "Many of them view their employer as their guru, their master, and what he says or does is sacrosanct. It takes intensive counselling to help them realize the exploitation they have been subject to."

Many people continue to live the experiences of Wasal Khan, the brick kiln worker whose daughter was rescued from a life of forced prostitution by Kailash Satyarthi and Bachpan Bachao Andolan. But increasingly, the work of such human rights activists has inspired other individuals to play their own part in the movement. Take Razia Sultan, an inhabitant of Meerut, a city in Uttar Pradesh, who worked as a child labourer in football stitching. When her village was transformed into a Bal Mitra Gram, she helped bring 75 children in the village to school through her work with the Bal Panchayat. She also initiated a campaign against schools that charged tuition fees. She was rewarded for her efforts in 2013 as the first recipient of the Malala Peace Prize. BBA has achieved much over thirty years, but perhaps its most commendable success is this: giving India's child labourers the power to dream and have these dreams realized.

Q. Which of the following would best describe the tone of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 17 B is incorrect as the author does not present any analysis of the situation or state of affairs, rather he illustrates an example, and discusses an important social issue by means of that example. C is incorrect as the author does not narrate a story here; although an example does feature prominently in the passage, it serves as an instrument for the author to discuss a bigger topic. D is incorrect as the author not only provides us with factual data and statistics, he provides opinions of experts, in depth description of the issue and examples. A is the right answer, as the author seeks to explain or illustrate an important social issue by means of an example.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 18

Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and answer the questions that follow.

In 1980, Wasal Khan, a brick kiln worker from Sirhind, a city in India's north-western state of Punjab, came to the capital city of New Delhi, driven by desperation and fear. His family members had been serving as bonded labourers in a brick kiln for 20 years in order to repay a debt owed to the kiln owner, who now threatened to sell Khan's adolescent daughter to a brothel. Exploited by his employer and ignored by the authorities, he chanced across the newsletter of an organization working for the socially marginalized and somehow managed to locate their office.

Khan found an unexpected source of help in an electrical engineer-turned journalist and human rights activist, Kailash Satyarthi, and his team of like-minded activists at Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), or Save the Children Mission. Soon after, Satyarthi the engineer and his team of like-minded activists rescued 34 brick kiln workers and the Khan's 15-year old daughter, Sabo. This episode laid the foundations of the India's largest grassroots movement against child labour and trafficking.

Today, Satyarthi is a world-renowned voice against the exploitation of children, making headlines in 2014 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai. Child labour activists are hopeful that BBA's Nobel Peace Prize will lead to a renewed discussion and initiative among all sections of Indian society to ultimately end child labour. "It is extremely overwhelming - the BBA receives dozens of calls every day from common people, asking us what they can do about child labour," a female activist working in victim assistance, who wished to remain anonymous, told me. "While everyone cannot dedicate their lives to ending child labour, at the very least they could boycott those places and goods that employ child labour."

Her statement carries weight. As I sipped a cup of piping hot masala chai, the characteristic Indian tea, I could see BBA activists busy at work on the lower level of the office. I thought of the number of times I have seen young children working at roadside tea stalls across India, seemingly content and happy with their lives. Several industries such as carpet-making, fire-cracker manufacturing, marble inlay work, filigree metal work, and many others are particularly notorious for using child labour as the children's small thin hands are better suited for the fine motor skills required by these processes. Since children generally accept lower wages than adult labourers, it is also cost-effective for many firms to employ child laborers. The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted. Even today, India has about 60 million child labourers waiting to be rescued.

In India and other nearby developing countries, child labour was not considered a pertinent issue until thirty years ago. Even today, the constant refrain heard from a large part of India's population is that children have no option but to work to financially support their impoverished families. Unfortunately, such people fail to recognize that the effects of child labour encompass all sections of society. A study conducted by Sathyarthi and BBA titled "Capital Corruption" estimates that the amount of illegal money generated by Indian firms employing child labourers could be as high as $20,000 million every year. The income earned by child labourers thus represents a huge leakage from the nation's economy, also impacting adult employment and income generation.

Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers. BBA rescues a large number of such children every day and takes some of them to its rehabilitation centres in Delhi and Rajasthan, as well as to rescue homes run by other organizations. But the response from these children is often negative. Some beg to be sent back. As the same female activist put it, "Many of them view their employer as their guru, their master, and what he says or does is sacrosanct. It takes intensive counselling to help them realize the exploitation they have been subject to."

Many people continue to live the experiences of Wasal Khan, the brick kiln worker whose daughter was rescued from a life of forced prostitution by Kailash Satyarthi and Bachpan Bachao Andolan. But increasingly, the work of such human rights activists has inspired other individuals to play their own part in the movement. Take Razia Sultan, an inhabitant of Meerut, a city in Uttar Pradesh, who worked as a child labourer in football stitching. When her village was transformed into a Bal Mitra Gram, she helped bring 75 children in the village to school through her work with the Bal Panchayat. She also initiated a campaign against schools that charged tuition fees. She was rewarded for her efforts in 2013 as the first recipient of the Malala Peace Prize. BBA has achieved much over thirty years, but perhaps its most commendable success is this: giving India's child labourers the power to dream and have these dreams realized.

Q. Which of the following is confirmed from the facts provided in the passage?

I. A large number of people who work(ed) as child labourers can be encouraged to end their plight after being made aware of the prospects of better life.

II. Should society change its mindset towards familial responsibility, a large number of lives can be saved from child labour.

III. The fact that young children employed as labourers are unaware of the fact that the life they go through is undeserved, helps child labour to persist.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 18 I can be inferred from the example given towards the end of the passage about Razia Sultan: 'But increasingly, the work of such human rights activists has inspired other individuals to play their own part in the movement.' II can be inferred from the passage from the following lines: 'Societal attitudes towards child labour have ensured its perpetuation. The affected children have been conditioned into believing their work is a perfectly normal obligation to their families and employers.' III can be inferred from the following lines: 'The employed children are often unaware that they are victims of physical and mental abuse, denied access to opportunities that other children take for granted. Even today, India has about 60 million child labourers waiting to be rescued.'
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 19

Each question given below has five statements. The statements need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph. Choose the most appropriate option.

  1. This is only a document, a bit of real life, a document which can give to those who are really anxious to discover the truth about the Kornilov affair.

  2. I send you the stenographic copies of my fundamental statement on the Kornilovaffair which have been saved from destruction, with supplementary remarks and explanations which I have now made.

  3. This is necessary, though I myself see all its imperfections from a literary point of view.

  4. I place this manuscript at your disposal and ask you if possible to publish it, but exactly in its present form.

  5. But this is not a literary production, not "memoirs" for history, not the fruit of my unfettered creative faculty.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 19 24 is the link, 3 speaks of the necessity of getting the document published inspite of the imperfections. 243 is the links 51 follows naturally and hence 24351
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 20

The question consists of four or five statements labelled 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 which when logically ordered forms a cogent passage. Choose the option that represents the most logical order.

  1. One study found that rates more than doubled between 1999 and 2003 for women on Medicaid; at present, about six to seven per cent of pregnant women take these medications.

  2. For women with a history of depression, the rates are far higher.

  3. Some fifteen per cent of women suffer from depression during pregnancy, and the use of antidepressants in expectant women is on the rise.

  4. Pregnancy can easily trigger a relapse, and those who discontinue medications during pregnancy are nearly three times as likely to relapse as those who continue to take their medication.

  5. Sampling of cord blood at birth indicates that the level of these medications in the fetal bloodstream is more than half of the level in the mother's; the drugs are also present in amniotic fluid.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 20 This is question where you need to identify mandatory pairs. Two such pairs are 12 (linked by rates) and 45 (5 provides a continuation for the medication mentioned at the end of statement 4). Also, statement 3 forms the perfect opening sentence for the paragraph, and the topic mentioned in it is taken forward in statements 12.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 21

Five sentences are given below. Four of these, when rearranged properly, form a logical and meaningful paragraph. Identify the sentence which does not belong to the paragraph and enter its number as the answer.

  1. It was obvious that the separated churches were helpless against the demands arising in their midst for the right of individual interpretation where they themselves drew such widely differing conclusions.

  2. The Quakers appeared about a hundred years after the decentralization of authority in theological science.

  3. Within these communions the goal towards which the breaking away from the Roman centre had been an unconscious step was already well in view.

  4. But far away beneath the institutional confusions and doctrinal dilemmas of this post-Reformation century fresh life was welling up.

  5. The Reformers’ dream of a remade church had ended in a Europe where, over against an alienated parent, four young Protestant communions disputed together as to the doctrinal interpretation of the scriptures.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 21 After reading all the sentence, we know that the paragraph is about the decentralization of power of churches. Statement 2 introduces the idea and statement 5 expands the idea about decentralization mentioned in statement 2. Statement 3 provided additional details about the communions discussed in statement 5. Statement 1 illuminates the condition of churches after separation amid hostile circumstances. Thus, 2-5-3-1 is a paragraph. Statement 4 mentions a positive change which took place in the post-reform era. It is an odd sentence as all the other sentences are about the separation of churches and the dilution of power.

Hence, 4 is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 22

For Mark Twain as a writer profoundly concerned about authenticity in representation, but constantly troubled by uncertainties and unreliabilities in expression, the expressive body became a locus of concern and a theater for experiment. Nineteenth-century theories of acting enhanced this interest as they elaborated conceptions of the body as the actor's medium, and especially as they drew on advances in physiology and biology to characterize the body and its processes as privileged vehicles of expression

Q. Choose the option that best represents the summary of the text

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 22 2nd option does not state that the theories used advances in biology and physiology to make the body express actor's medium. 3rd option omits the details of the theories that used Mark twain's idea. 4th option simple restates the last line of the passage
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 23

Five sentences are given below. Four of these sentences, when rearranged properly, form a logical and meaningful paragraph. The fifth one does not belong to the same paragraph. Identify the one which does not belong to the paragraph and enter its number as the answer.

  1. But when the Navy heard that the Foreign Office was inclined to listen to Mr. Wilson's protests it made no attempt to conceal its opposition.

  2. So, the Navy kept sinking ships and relying upon the Foreign Office to make excuses and keep America out of the war.

  3. Gottlieb von Jagow, the Secretary of State, although he was an intimate friend of the Kaiser and an officer in the German Army, was at heart a pacifist.

  4. After the sinking of the 'Arabic', the German Foreign Office intimated to the United States Government and to the American correspondents that methods of submarine warfare would be altered and that ships would be warned before they were torpedoed.

  5. Every time an opportunity presented itself he tried to mobilise the peace forces of the world to make peace.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 23 On carefully reading the sentences, we see that the paragraph is about the relation between the German Foreign Office, Navy and America. Sentence 4, which introduces the subject should be the opening sentence of the passage. Sentences 4 and 1 form a pair. 1 mentions that the Navy did not pay heed to Foreign office's interests. Sentences 3 and 5 form a pair, which explain why the foreign office was willing to listen to Wilson's protests. Sentence 2, which starts with 'so' does not fit anywhere in the passage. It is the odd sentence. 4135 forms a meaningful paragraph.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 24

Five sentences labelled 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, when properly sequenced form a coherent paragraph. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given options

  1. Distances were measured with increasing accuracy 'on the ground'; then it was found that by applying trigonometrical principles, it was unnecessary to measure every requisite distance directly, though this method required the much more accurate measurement of a number of short lines, or bases.

  2. Meanwhile the astronomers showed that the earth is spherical, and that the position of any place on its surface could be expressed by its angular distances from the Equator (latitude) and a prime meridian (longitude), though for many centuries an accurate and practical method of finding longitude baffled scientists.

  3. The history of cartography is largely that of the increase in the accuracy with which the elements of distance and direction are determined and in the comprehensiveness of the map content

  4. In this development cartography has called in other sciences to its aid.

  5. Similarly, instead of determining direction by observing the position of a shadow at midday, or of a constellation in the night sky, or even of a steady wind, use was made of terrestrial magnetism through the magnetic compass, and instruments were evolved which enabled horizontal angles to be measured with great accuracy.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 24 The answer is 34152. Sentence 3 begins the paragraph, sentence 4 follows it and then sentences 1 and 5 respectively explain how cartography has made use of other sciences mentioned in sentence 4. Thus, the correct sequence is 34152.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 25

If South-East becomes North, North-East becomes West and so on. What will the West become?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 25

It is clear from the diagrams that the new name of West will become South-East.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 26

Which amongst the following is kept at the topmost position?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 26

Boxes: P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W.

1) Only three boxes are kept above box R.

2) Two boxes are kept between box T and box R.

Here, we have two possible cases i.e. Case 1 and Case 2.

3) Box W is kept immediate below box T.

4) Four boxes are kept between box W and box U.

5) Box S is kept just above box Q but not at the topmost position.

6) Box V is kept above box P.

7) More than three boxes are kept between box V and box P.

Here, Case 1 will be eliminated hence, Case 2 will be our final arrangement:

Clearly, box T is kept at the topmost position.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 27

Rasik walked 20 m towards north. Then he turned right and walks 30 m. Then he turns right and walks 35 m. Then he turns left and walks 15 m. Finally he turns left and walks 15 m. In which direction and how many metres is he from the starting position?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 27

Required distance = A F

= 30 + 15 = 45 m

From the above diagram, F is in the East direction from A.

Hence the required answer is 45 m East'

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 28

In a certain code Language

134 means good and tasty

478 means see good picture

729 means picture are faint

Which number has been used here for faint?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 28

4 = good

7 = Picture

and 2 and 9 = are and faint respectively.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 29

Directions: Answer the question based on the following information given below:

(i) A+B means A is the father of' B

(ii) A-B means A is the wife of' B

(iii) A X B means A is the brother of' B

(iv) A÷B means A is the daughter of' B

Q. If A-C+B which of the following statements is true?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 29 A - C + B means that A is the wife of C who is the father of B i.e. A is the mother of B.

Hence, the correct option is (A).

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 30

Direction: Answer the questions based on the information given below.

A shopkeeper marked five different articles above the cost price and sold them after a certain discount. The table given below shows the distribution of the cost price, market price, markup percentage, discount percentage, and selling price of five different articles.

Q. What is the ratio of the cost price of article A to the cost price of article D?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 30

Desired ratio = 1250 : 1750 = 5 : 7

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 31

A is the son of P, P is the daughter of K, K is the husband of O and O is the mother of only son L. What is L to P?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 31 L is the brother of P.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 32

Direction: Answer the questions based on the information given below.

A shopkeeper marked five different articles above the cost price and sold them after a certain discount. The table given below shows the distribution of the cost price, market price, markup percentage, discount percentage, and selling price of five different articles.

Q. The cost price of article F is 20% more than the cost price of article D. Article F is marked somewhat higher than the cost price and sold after a discount of 20%. Article F is marked by how much percentage higher than the cost price if the selling price of article F is Rs. 560 more than the selling price of article D?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 32

Cost price of article F = 17501750 × 1.20 = Rs. 2100

The selling price of article F = 1960 + 560 = Rs. 2520

The marked price of article F = 2520 / 0.80 = Rs. 3150

So, the percentage markup = 3150 - 2100 / 2100 × 100 = 50%

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 33

If the position of box S and box W is interchanged, then which amongst the following is kept just above box S?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 33 Boxes: P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W.

1) Only three boxes are kept above box R.

2) Two boxes are kept between box T and box R.

Here, we have two possible cases i.e. Case 1 and Case 2.

3) Box W is kept immediate below box T.

4) Four boxes are kept between box W and box U.

5) Box S is kept just above box Q but not at the topmost position.

6) Box V is kept above box P.

7) More than three boxes are kept between box V and box P.

Here, Case 1 will be eliminated hence, Case 2 will be our final arrangement:

Clearly, box T is kept just above box S after interchanging the positions of box S and box W.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 34

Fill in the blank with suitable figures.

S 16 10 V

L 28 20 P

F __ __ J

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 34 The difference between S and L is

6 × 2 = 12 + 16 = 28

The difference between L and F is

5 × 2 = 10 + 28 = 38

The difference between V and P is

5 × 2 = 10 + 10 = 20

and the difference between P and J is also 5 × 2 = 10 + 20 = 30

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 35

The bar graph given below shows the foreign exchange reserves of a country (in million US $ ) from 1991− 92 to 1998 − 99. Answer the questions based on this graph. Foreign Exchange Reserves of A Country (in million US $ )

Q. The foreign exchange reserves in 1997−98 was how many times that in 1994 -95?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 35 Required ratio = 5040 / 3360 = 1.5
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 36

The bar graph given below shows the foreign exchange reserves of a country (in million US $ ) from 1991− 92 to 1998 − 99. Answer the questions based on this graph. Foreign Exchange Reserves of A Country (in million US $ )

Q. What was the percentage increase in the foreign exchange reserves in 1997−98 over 1993−94?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 36 Foreign exchange reserves in 1997− 98 = 5040 million US Foreign exchange reserves in 1993 − 94 = 2520 million US $ Increase = (5040 − 2520) = 2520 million US $ Percentage increase = (2520 /2520 × 100)% = 100%
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 37

Direction: Answer the questions based on the information given below:

The bar graph given below shows the percentage of markup and two consecutive percentage discounts (Discount1 & Discount2 both in % terms) over the marked price of five different articles.

Q. The cost price of article A is Rs. 32, 000 and the cost price of article B are Rs. 25, 000. Find the difference in the selling prices of article A and article B.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 37 Marked price of the article A = 1.4 x 32000 = Rs. 44, 800

Selling price of the article A = 0.8 x 0.85 x 44800 = Rs. 30, 464

Marked price of the article B = 1.35 x 25000 = Rs. 33, 750

Selling price of the article B = 0.95 x 0.88 x 33750 = Rs. 28, 215

So, required difference = 30464 – 28215 = Rs. 2249

So option C is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 38

Direction: Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

There are eight boxes i.e. P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W. All the boxes are arranged from top to bottom but not necessarily in same order. Only three boxes are kept above box R. Two boxes are kept between box T and box R. Box W is kept immediate below box T. Four boxes are kept between box W and box U. Box S is kept just above box Q but not at the topmost position. Box V is kept above box P. More than three boxes are kept between box V and box P.

Q. How many boxes are kept between box R and box V?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 38

Boxes: P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W.

1) Only three boxes are kept above box R.

2) Two boxes are kept between box T and box R.

Here, we have two possible cases i.e. Case 1 and Case 2.

3) Box W is kept immediate below box T.

4) Four boxes are kept between box W and box U.

5) Box S is kept just above box Q but not at the topmost position.

6) Box V is kept above box P.

7) More than three boxes are kept between box V and box P.

Here, Case 1 will be eliminated hence, Case 2 will be our final arrangement:

Clearly, no box is kept between box R and box V.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 39

Direction: Answer the questions based on the information given below.

A shopkeeper marked five different articles above the cost price and sold them after a certain discount. The table given below shows the distribution of the cost price, market price, markup percentage, discount percentage, and selling price of five different articles.

Q. What is the average selling price of articles A, C, and E?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 39

Desired selling price = 1500 + 840 + 1920 / 3 = Rs. 1420 = Rs. 220 more than the cost price of article C

Therefore, option B is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 40

If SISTER is coded as 535301, UNCLE is coded as 84670 and BOY is coded as 129. Find the code word for SON?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 40

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 41

Statement:

Anger is energy, in a more proactive way and how to channelize it is in itself a skill.

Assumptions:

I. Anger needs to be channelized.

II. Only skillful people can channelize anger to energy.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 41 In this the author has not clearly stated whether there is a need to channelize anger in to energy or not. So, I is irrelevant.

In the statement II it is given that channelizing anger to energy is a skill. Here the assumption of the author is that only those people who have the skill can channelize anger to energy.

Only II is implicit.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 42

The bar-graph provided gives the Sales of books (in thousand numbers) from six branches - B1, B2, B3, B4, B5 and B6 of a publishing company in 2000 and 2001.

Q. Total sales of branches B1, B3 and B5 together for both the years(in thousand numbers) is :


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 42 Total sales of branches B1, B3 and B5 for both the years(in thousand numbers)

= (80 + 105) + (95 + 110) + (75 + 95) = 560

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 43

Directions: In a game of card cricket, there are cards placed on a table, each card having an identifiable front(F) and a back(B) side. The first card has number 1 on F and 2 on B, the second card has number 3 on F and 4 on B, and so on..... The nth card has 2n-1 on F and 2n on B. These cards are shuffled, such that the F of each card is on the top and the B of each card is on the bottom. The batsman picks up any random card in each turn. If the number on either F or B of the card has a single digit, the batsman is termed OUT. Else if the number on either F or B has every digit as the same(ex: 555, 66, 1111), the batsman is termed OUT. If none of the above conditions is met, the batsman is awarded some runs in the following way:

S1 = Sum of digits of the number on F

S2 = Sum of digits of the number on B

R(Runs awarded to the batsman) = Maximum(S1, S2)

After every turn, the card is put back into the deck, so that it can be picked again.

Each time the batsman picks a card, it is termed as a delivery(similar to cricket). Runs scored in each delivery keeps on adding to the total score of the batsman. So, the total score of a batsman is the sum of the runs scored by him/her in all the deliveries faced. The batsman keeps picking up cards till he/she is termed OUT. After the batsman is out, the second player follows the same till he/she is termed out. The player with a higher total score wins the game. Based on the information provided, answer the questions that follow.

Q. Anuj, who was the batsman got out on the first delivery. What is the probability of this happening, given that the total number of cards was 393?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 43 Total number of cards = 393.

2 x 393 = 786 .i.e Highest number on any card

Cards on which he can get OUT are:

(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6), (7, 8), (9, 10), (11, 12), (21, 22), (33, 34), (43, 44), (55, 56), (65, 66), (77, 78), (87, 88), (99, 100), (111, 112), (221, 222), (333, 334), (443, 444), (555, 556), (665, 666), (777, 778)

Total = 21

Hence, probability = 21/393 = 7/131

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 44

Directions: In a game of card cricket, there are cards placed on a table, each card having an identifiable front(F) and a back(B) side. The first card has number 1 on F and 2 on B, the second card has number 3 on F and 4 on B, and so on..... The nth card has 2n-1 on F and 2n on B. These cards are shuffled, such that the F of each card is on the top and the B of each card is on the bottom. The batsman picks up any random card in each turn. If the number on either F or B of the card has a single digit, the batsman is termed OUT. Else if the number on either F or B has every digit as the same(ex: 555, 66, 1111), the batsman is termed OUT. If none of the above conditions is met, the batsman is awarded some runs in the following way:

S1 = Sum of digits of the number on F

S2 = Sum of digits of the number on B

R(Runs awarded to the batsman) = Maximum(S1, S2)

After every turn, the card is put back into the deck, so that it can be picked again.

Each time the batsman picks a card, it is termed as a delivery(similar to cricket). Runs scored in each delivery keeps on adding to the total score of the batsman. So, the total score of a batsman is the sum of the runs scored by him/her in all the deliveries faced. The batsman keeps picking up cards till he/she is termed OUT. After the batsman is out, the second player follows the same till he/she is termed out. The player with a higher total score wins the game. Based on the information provided, answer the questions that follow.

Q. If any card is picked once, it cannot be picked again. Virat scored a total of 53 in 2 deliveries. What can be the minimum number of cards they are playing with?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 44 We will try and divide 53 into 2 almost equal runs.

53 = 27 + 26

Now, for 27, the minimum number that can be possible = 999. But 999 means OUT. Hence, the card numbered (1899,1900). (997,998) will give 9 +9 + 8 = 26.

Hence, we can get 27 + 26 = 53.

Minimum number of cards needed = 1900/2 = 950.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 45

circular arch having width 12 cm and height 4.5 cm is to be constructed. What is the diameter of the circle of which the arch is an arc?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 45 Extend DP to D passing through center O.

We know that

PA x PB = PC x PD

6 x 6 = (2r - 4.5) x (4.5)

Solving for r we get

2r = 12.5

Hence the diameter = 12.5 cm

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 46

ABC is right angled triangle at A with sides 6, 8, 10. What is the side of the square that can be inscribed inside the ∆ABC such that one of the side of the square lies on the hypotenuses of the triangle?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 46

Consider the figure shown, Area of the triangle ABC, = 24

So, Altitude x + y = 48/10 = 4.8

Let DE = y

Again, ΔADE ≅ △ABC

DE / BC = x / x + y

or,

48 − x / 10 = x / 48( as DE = y = 4.8 − x)

or, 14.8x = 4.82 or, x = 1.56( approx )

Therefore y = 4.8 − 1.56 = 3.24. Hence the correct option is 4

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 47

In the following figure ABCD is a square, BFC is an equilateral triangle and F is the mid-point of DE. What is the ratio of area of ADE to that of the FEB?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 47

Consider the figure shown besides

since the triangle FBC is equilateral so,

The length of the altitude is

Now the length of the remaining portion

Also, since G and F are the midpoints of sides AD and ED.So,AE = 2GF⇒ y = 2z

⇒y = x(2 − √3)

Hence the Area of AED =

Also, EB = x − x(2 − √3) = (√3 − 1)x

again, AG is the height of the altitude for LFEB = x/2.

Hence the Area of the FEB =

So, the required ratio =

Hence the correct option is (c)

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 48

The figure shows a rectangle divided into 9 squares. The squares have integral sides and adjacent sides of the rectangle are co-prime. Find the perimeter of the rectangle?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 48

Let the sides of the squares be a, b, ..., i (in ascending order of size - 'a' is not marked in the diagram). We have a + b = c (1), a + c = d (2), c + d = e(3), d + e = f(4), b + c + e = g(5),

b + g = h(6), a + d + f i(7), f+ i = g + h (8). Using (1) - (7) we can solve in terms of a, h, then (8) gives 5a = 2b, so a = 2, b = 5 (must have no common factor). Hence f = 25, h 33, i = 36, sides are 61, 69. So the perimeter will be 2 (61 + 69) = 260 unit.

Hence the correct option is (a)

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 49

A bag contains 5 Red, 4 Green and 3 Blue balls. Three balls are drawn from the bag at one go. What is the probability that not all the three balls drawn are of the same colour?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 49

Three balls can be drawn from a total of 12 balls in 12C3 ways.

Probability that all three balls are of same colour = (5C3 + 4C3 + 3C3)/12C3

= (10 + 4 + 1)/220

= 15/220

= 0.068

Hence Probability that all three balls drawn are not of the same colour is = 1 - 0.068 = 0.932

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 50

Five towns A, B, C, D and E are there such that any four of them are non-collinear and are connected by roads such that a person can go from one city to any other city. What will be maximum number of ways in which a person can start from one city and return to the same city without visiting any city more than once in a trip?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 50

Consider all the ways from A to again return to A.

Case I: A to any one city and hack

A-B-A, A-C-A, A-D-A, A-E-A [4C1 = 4]

Case II: A to any two cities and hack

A-C-B-A, A-B-C-A etc. [4C2, * 2! = 12]

Case III: A to any three cities and back

A-C-B-D-A, A-D-B-C-A etc.[4C3, * 3! = 24]

Case IV: A to all the four cities and back

A-C-B-D-E-A etc..[4C4, * 4! = 24]

Hence answer is 64.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 51

N is a set of all four-digit numbers with all digits prime. If all the numbers in set N are increased by 5, then for how many of the numbers all the four digits are prime after the increase?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 51 A four-digit number having all the digits prime will have 2, 3, 5 or 7 as digits.

Case 1: If the unit digit of the original number is 2, then the unit digit of the resulting number will be 7 with no change in the tens and the hundreds places.

Number of three-digit numbers with unit digit as 2 = 4 x 4 x 4 x 1 = 64.

Case 2: If the unit digit of the original number is 3, then the unit digit of the resulting number will be 8 which is not prime. So no number is possible with unit digit 3.

Case 3: If the unit digit of original number is 5 then the unit digit of the resulting number will be 0 which is not prime. So no number is possible with unit digit 5.

Case 4: If the unit digit of the original number is 7 then the unit digit of the resulting number will be 2 and the tens digit will be T + 1 where T is the original value of the tens digit. T + 1 is prime only if T is 2.

The number of three-digit numbers with unit digits as 7 = 4 × 4 × 1 × 1 = 16

Total of the required numbers = 64 + 16 = 80 Hence, the answer is 80.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 52

What is the last digit in the finite decimal representation of the number 5-2014?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 52 5-2014 = 22014 / 102014

So the last digit will be the last digit of 22014 = 4

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 53

Glucose solution containing 6% glucose and rest water, is mixed with water. One third ofthe quantity of the solution obtained is drained out and replaced by juice which has 10% fruit concentrate and rest water. If water now accounts for 94% of the total solution, what isthe ratio of glucose and fruit concentrate?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 53 We start at the stage when one third of the solution is removed and replaced with fruit concentrate solution. Assume that the fruit concentrate solution is 100 ml in quantity, which is one third of the total solution so total solution must be 300 ml in volume. Also 10% i.e. 10 ml of this fruit concentrate solution added should be fruit concentrate. So the final solution has 10 ml of fruit concentrate. Also since final solution contains 94% water, which is 94 X 3 = 282 ml. Out of 300 ml, 282 ml is water and 10 ml is fruit concentrate, so glucose should be 300 - 282 - 10 = 8 ml. Required ratio therefore is 8 : 10 or 4 : 5.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 54

Ritesh invested one half of his money in an investment instrument that gave him simple interest for 2 years and he got Rs.680 as interest. He invested the remaining of his money in another investment instrument that gave him compound interest with interest being compounded annually, at the same rate of interest, for the same 2 years and he got Rs.730 as interest. What was the approximate total money invested by him in these two instruments?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 54 Ritesh got an extra amount of Rs 730 - 680 i.e. Rs 50 on his second investment instrument.

The interest earned in the first year (on each of the investment instrument) = 680/2 = 340.

⇒ Rate of interest = (50/340) x 100 = 14.70%

⇒ 14.70% of his money invested in one of the bonds = Rs 340

⇒ Total investment in one of the bonds = (340/14.70) x 100 = Rs. 2313

⇒ His total investment in two bonds = 2313 x 2 = Rs 4626

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 55

An ant starts building a net. Starting from the second day onwards, every day a new ant joins. With every new ant joining, the work that each ant can do per day doubles. The net gets ready in 5 days. On which day would they have finished the construction of the net, if the work that each of them could do per day had remained constant?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 55 Let the amount of work done by the 1st and be x. Everyday a new ant joins.

The total work done in five days = 1/x (1 + 4 + 12 + 32 + 80) = 129/x = 129/x = 1

So x =129

If each of the ant's efficiency had remained constant, the work done in the n days is n(n+1)/2 * 1/x

When the work is completed, n(n+1)/2 * 1/x = 1

Or, n(n + 1) = 2x = 2(129) = 258

Or, n2 @ 256

Observing 15(15 + 1) < 258="" />< 16(16="" +="" />

So the work gets completed on the 16th day.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 56

An escalator is moving up. Rohit and his girlfriend walk up the moving escalator. Rohit has a walking speed one and half times that of his girlfriend. Rohit reaches the top after taking 40 steps, while his girlfriend does so after taking 30 steps. If the escalator is switched off, how many steps would Rohit take to walk up to the top?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 56 Let the walking speed of Rohit be 1.5x and that of his girlfriend be x. Let the speed of the escalator be S steps/unit time, and the number of steps on the escalator be N.

As per information provided for Rohit, we can say that N = (40/1.5x) * (1.5x + S)

As per information provided for Rohit's girlfriend, N = (30/x) * (x + S)

Equating the two we get S = 3x

Hence the number of steps on the escalator is N = 120.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 57

What is the remainder when x276 + 12 is divided by x2 + x + 1 for x >3?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 57 Let's say the remainder is R.

x276 + 12 = (x2 + x + 1)f(x) + R

Now, w and w2 (Cube root of unity) are the roots of x2 + x + 1.

⇒ w2 + w + 1 and w4 + w2 + 1 both will be zero.

⇒ w276 + 12 = R

Or, R = 1 + 12 = 13 (w3 = 1)

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 58

Mr. Yarn owns a fabric store. He sells his cloth 40% above the wholesale price he pays. One day he discovers that the meter stick has been using to measure the cloth he sells is not exactly a meter. Because of this error, he is only earning a 39% profit. Approximately how long is Mr. Yarn's faulty meter stick? (Note that he uses the meter stick only to sell cloth; the amount he buys is correct)

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 58 Let CP for 100 cm cloth be Rs. 100.

SP = 140 for P cm of cloth. The CP for P cm of cloth will be P

We have (140 - P) x 100 = 39P

Or, P = 100.7cm.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 59

The integral part of log7341687 is?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 59 To find the integral part we need to see what power of 7 is just less than 341687.

Now, we know that 76 = 117649

Also 77 = 823543

Hence 341687 lies in between 76 and 77.

Thus the integral part of log7341687 = 6.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 60

2z = (0.2)w = 1000. Then the value of [(1/z) - (1/w)] is

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 60

2z = (0.2)w = 1000

2z = 1000

2 = 103/z (i)

(0.2)w = 1000

(0.2)w = 103

0.2 = 10(3/w)

2 = 10(3/w +1) (ii)

So from (i) & (ii)

103/z = 10 (3/w +1)

3/z = 3/w + 1

So 1/z - 1/w = 1/3.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 61

There are 10 train stops between Hyderabad and Vizag. How many types of tickets should be printed to service all kinds of passengers travelling either way on the train?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 61 The two train stops can be selected in 12C2

ways and the direction can be selected in 2 ways. So, total number of ways is 12 x 11 = 132

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 62

A five digit number divisible by 3 is to be formed using numerals 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 without any repetition. The total number of ways in which this can be done is


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 62 The sum of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 is 15. For the numbers to be divisible by 3, the sum of the digits should be a multiple of 3. We can have five-digits numbers by removing either 0 or 3 so that the number is divisible by 3. If we remove 0, we can have 5! = 120 five-digit numbers without repetitions. If we remove 3, we can have 4! ×4 = 96 five-digit numbers. So the total numbers possible = 120 + 96 = 216.
CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 63

If a number has only two prime factors 2 and 3 and only 24 divisors whereas its square has only 77 divisors, what could be the number?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 63 Since a positive integer contains only two prime factors i.e., 2x and 3y, and should be divided by 24 different numbers, so the number is in the form of x.

So the number of factors of this number = (1 + x) (1 + y) = 24 -----(1)

Also the square 77 into the product of two numbers = 7 x 11 = (1 + 2(3) (1 +2(5))

So x = 3 and y = 5 or x = 5 and y = 3

This pair also satisfies equation (1).

Therefore, the two possible integers are 23 x 35 = 1944 and 25 x 33= 864. Hence, the correct option is (2).

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 64

A work is done by three persons A, B and C. A alone takes 9 minutes to manufacture a single bolt, while B and C working together take 6 minutes to manufacture a single bolt. If the entire task requires manufacturing of 30 such bolts, and all three work together, then how many minutes does the trio need to work for?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 64 A alone takes 9 minutes to manufacture a single bolt, hence in 1 minute, 1/9th of a bolt is manufactured.

B and C working together take 6 minutes to manufacture a single bolt, hence in 1 minute, 1/6th of a bolt is manufactured.

If all three start working together, then in 1 minute, they can manufacture (1/9 + 1/6)th of a bolt or 5/18th of a bolt,

Hence 1 bolt takes the trio 18/5 or 3.6 minutes to manufacture.

Thus 30 bolts will take the trio 30*3.6 = 108 minutes to manufacture.

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 65

A man invested Rs. 80000 in a bond which gives 10% p.a interest compounded half yearly. If the annual rate of interest is increased by 20% at the end of every half year. What will be the interest earned (in Rs.) for one and a half years?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 65 As the rate of interest is increasing by 20% annually, the rate of interest per half year increased by 10% over previous year.

The required interest that has been accrued is 40,750

CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 66

If the ratio of the ages of two friends A and B are in the ratio 3 : 5 and that of B and C is 3 : 5 and the average of their ages 15 years earlier was 34, then how old will be B after 20 years from now?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 (02/10/2022) - Question 66 Ratio of ages of A and B = 3:5 = 9:15.

Ratio of ages of B and C = 3:5 = 15:25

Ratio of ages of A, B and C = 9:15:25.

15 years earlier their average age was 34 years.

Present average = (34+15) years = 49 years

Present sum = 49 X 3 years = 147 years.

A's age = (9/49) x 147 years = 27 years

B's age = (18/49) x 147 years = 45 years

C's age = (25/49) x 147 years = 75 years

After 20 years, B's age is 65 years.

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