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CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022)


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66 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series | CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022)

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CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 1

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .

When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .

As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.

And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?

For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following is not responsible for language’s ability to change us?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 1 This is an easy question. By reading third last para of the passage, you should be able to answer all the questions.

Passage says “My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate”… this justifies option 2. Option 2 can be ruled out.

If you are welcomed because you speak a particular language, then it has intrinsic connection with your identity. You speak a language, as a result people identify you as someone similar to them, so they welcome you.

The third last para of the passage clearly mentions option 4.

Option 3 is the right choice because it has nothing to do with language’s ability to change us.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 2

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .

When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .

As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.

And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?

For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

Q. Which of the following can be inferred from the author’s claim, “Which way is Oriental?”

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 2 To answer this question we must understand the context in which Orientalism has been used. The word Orientalism has been used here in the sense of identity. The author says when we speak the same language and understand each other, there is nothing like Orientalism in that case. In effect, he wants to say that language breaks all the barriers of culture and identity.

Option 2 is correct because it mentions learning another language and thus captures the essence. Option 1 goes out because goodwill is not the intention, nor is globalization. Option 4 takes the word Orientalism literally, the author has used the word in a context, that context is identity defined by language.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 3

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .

When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .

As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.

And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?

For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

Q. The author’s critics would argue that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 3 This question too can be answered by keeping in mind the author’s key argument. The author says that language can help us overcome cultural barriers and barriers of identity you are born with. To weaken this point, the author’s critics would say something contrary to that point. Option 3 is the best choice.

Option 1 would support the author. Option 2 has nothing to do with language. Option 4 is simply out of scope.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 4

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .

When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .

As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.

And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?

For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

Q. A French ethnographer decides to study the culture of a Nigerian tribe. Which of the following is most likely to be the view of the author of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 4 This is an application based question. The answer to such questions cannot be found directly in the passage, but has to be gathered from the key ideas supported by the author. The author of this passage is in favour of learning a new language because he thinks it breaks cultural barriers. So, if a French ethnographer decides to study the culture of a Nigerian tribe, the author would unarguably want him to learn their language, as this will help the ethnographer better study the tribe.

This is a very easy question and option 3 is the right choice.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 5

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .

Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.

Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.

The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.

The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.

The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

Q. The “dilemma” mentioned in the passage refers to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 5 This question has come from the second last paragraph of the passage.

“The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new

jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure

and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . .”

In short, the dilemma is pick small towns or opt for larger cities.

Option 2 says keep government agencies in large cities, but the issue is opt x or opt y, not opt x or keep y

Option 3 does not even mention the two choices, while option 4 talks about private enterprise, which is definitely out of scope.

Option 1 is the best answer, relocate to remote areas or to relatively larger cities, opt x or opt y.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 6

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .

Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.

Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.

The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.

The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.

The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

Q. According to the author, relocating government agencies has not always been a success for all of the following reasons EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 6 This is a question that has double negative, you must carefully read the question, simplify it and then try to eliminate the options. According to the author, relocating government agencies has not always been a success. You have to mark the option that is not one of the reasons. The option that is the reason will go out, and the one that is not will be the right choice.

Once you understand the question, it becomes quite a simple one. The corruption point has been mentioned towards the end of the passage. So option 3 is the reason. Staff losses and difficulty of attracting talent are both mentioned in the passage.

Option 4 is nowhere mentioned and has to be the right choice.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 7

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .

Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.

Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.

The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.

The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.

The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

Q. The “long pedigree” of the aim to shift civil servants to improve their living standards implies that this move:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 7 This is primarily a vocabulary question. Pedigree means history. So a long pedigree means something that has a history. Thus option 4 becomes the right choice.
CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 8

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .

Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.

Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.

The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.

The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.

The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

Q. According to the passage, colonial powers located their capitals:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 8 You will not get a question easier than this.

In the first paragraph, we have the following lines: In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones…

Thus we get to know that colonial powers were focussed on trade. Option 2 is the right choice.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 9

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .

Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.

Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.

The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.

The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.

The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

Q. People who support decentralising central government functions are LEAST likely to cite which of the following reasons for their view?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 9 We have to choose an option that would not be used by people who support decentralizing of central government functions.

If the option supports decentralization, then it is out or else it is in.

Option 1 supports decentralization and has been discussed in the passage, the cost factor has been extensively discussed by the author.

New ideas and autonomy in regulation is given in the second paragraph. Thus options 2 and 3 are out,

Option 4 is not a reason given in support of decentralization.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 10

Three out of four sentences, when arranged, form a coherent paragraph. Find the odd sentence out.

  1. I am well aware of the difficulties that attend the subject, and from that consideration, had reserved it to a more advanced period of life.

  2. I intended it to be the last offering I should make to my fellow-citizens of all nations, and that at a time when the purity of the motive that induced me to it could not admit of a question, even by those who might disapprove the work.

  3. It has been my intention, for several years past, to publish my thoughts upon religion.

  4. Soon after I had published the pamphlet COMMON SENSE, in America, I saw the exceeding probability that a revolution in the system of government would be followed by a revolution in the system of religion.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 10 The paragraph talks about the intention of the author to write on the topic of religion. As option 3 introduces the subject, it would be the opening line of the paragraph. 1 logically proceeds from 3 by stating that the author appreciates the difficulties involved in the undertaking and 2 concludes the paragraph by saying that the author wanted it to be his last work Hence, the correct order is 3-1-2. Thus, option 4 is out-of-context.
CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 11

Given below are 4 sentences out of which 3 sentences form a proper paragraph and 1 sentence is out of context. Select the sentence which is out of context.

  1. The first half of the 19th century witnessed many brave ships and gallant men sent to the arctic regions.

  2. In those early days, few men being rich enough to pay for expeditions to the north out of their own pockets, practically every explorer was financed by the government under whose orders he acted.

  3. England hurled expedition after expedition, manned by the best talent and energy of her navy, against the ice which seemingly blocked every channel to her ambitions for an arctic route to the Orient.

  4. While most of these expeditions were not directed against the Pole so much as sent in an endeavour to find a route to the Indies round North America-the Northwest Passage-and around Asia-the Northeast Passage-many of them are intimately interwoven with the conquest of the Pole, and were a necessary part of its ultimate discovery.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 11 The passage starts with a where the examples of expeditions are mentioned. 1 is followed by 4 where the nature of expeditions is mentioned. 3 presents the conclusion by giving the example of England. 2 is an odd one out as the topic of financing of expeditions is out of context of the passage.
CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 12

Three out of four sentences, when arranged, form a coherent paragraph. Find the odd sentence out.

  1. Six mighty armies stood ready for the great invasion. Their estimated total was 1,200,000 men.

  2. The first great campaign on the western battle grounds in the European War began on August 4, 1914.

  3. The First Army was assembled at Aix-la-Chapelle in the north of Belgium, within a few miles of the Dutch frontier.

  4. On this epoch-making day the German army began its invasion of Belgium, with the conquest of France as its ultimate goal.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 12 2 introduces the topic of the paragraph and hence must be the opening line. 2-4 are connected where 4 elaborates on what occurred on the historic day. 1 adds more detail about the proposed invasion. Hence, 2-4-1 form the paragraph. Thus, option 3 is out of context.
CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 13

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences

  1. His popularity with the general mass of readers has been sufficient to satisfy the wildest dreams of an author ' s ambition; and his fame is, in a way, officially sanctioned by the receipt of honorary degrees from McGill University, from Durham, from Oxford, and from Cambridge; and in 1907 he was given the Nobel Prize, with the ratifying applause of the whole world.

  2. There is no indication that either the shouts of the mob or the hoods of Doctorates have turned his head; he remains to-day what he always has been—a hard, conscientious workman, trying to do his best every time.

  3. He has not yet attained the age of forty-five; but his numerous stories, novels, and poems have reached the unquestioned dignity of "works," and in uniform binding they make on my library shelves a formidable and gallant display.

  4. Mr. Rudyard Kipling is in the anomalous and fortunate position of having enjoyed a prodigious reputation for twenty years, and being still a young man.

  5. Foreigners read them in their own tongues; critical essays in various languages are steadily accumulating; and he has received the honour of being himself the hero of a strange French novel.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 13 We must trace the pronoun reference for ' them ' in statement 5. There is no plural noun in statement 4 to which it could point; nor there is any logical reference in statement 2; so, 4 and 2 cannot come before 5. This eliminates option 3 and 4. 2 must come after 1. Option 2 is the right choice.
CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 14

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences

  1. But all these latter-day pamphlets, good as they are, fail to reach the excellence of Bob, Son of Battle. It is the best dog story ever written, and it inspires regret that dogs cannot read.

  2. During the last half-century, since the publication of Dr. John Brown's Rab and his Friends (1858), the dog has approached an apotheosis.

  3. One of the most profoundly affecting incidents in the Odyssey is the recognition of the ragged Ulysses by the noble old dog, who dies of joy.

  4. Among innumerable sketches and stories with canine heroes may be mentioned Bret Harte's brilliant portrait of Boonder; Maeterlinck's essay on dogs; Richard Harding Davis ' s The Bar Sinister; Stevenson's whimsical comments on The Character of Dogs; Kipling's Garm; and Jack London's initial success, The Call of the Wild.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 14 Statement 3 obviously starts the paragraph. In statement 1, we have the phrase ' all these latter day pamphlets'. The pronoun ' these ' must have a reference. The reference is found in statement 4. 4, 2 is a strong pair. Statement 2 must come before 4. It says that ' the dog has reached an apotheosis', which means that the dog has reached a divine rank. 4 says how it has reached a divine rank. So, 3241 is the link. Hence 4 is the right choice.
CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 15

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.

Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .

In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .

Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .

The nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . . .

Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

Q. In the context of the passage, the author refers to Manaus in order to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 15 This is an easy question and can be answered by understanding the context in which the author discusses Manaus. We have to go to the first sentence of the last para.

The nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs.

Reading the above lines, we can shortlist two choices, one is 2 and the other is 3. But the purpose of giving jobs is to stop deforestation, which is the bigger issue. Option 3 is thus the right choice.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 16

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.

Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .

In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .

Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .

The nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . . .

Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

Q. From the passage it can be inferred that cities are good places to live in for all of the following reasons EXCEPT that they:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 16 This might prove to be a little challenging to most students as it asks to choose the one that cannot be inferred. In other words, we have to eliminate the ones that can be inferred and choose the as right answer the one that cannot be inferred.

The last paragraph helps us eliminate two choices. The first that cities indeed help create jobs, and the second that they help prevent destruction of environment. Both the choices can be inferred when the author gives example of Manaus. Option 1 and 3 can be ruled out.

So we are left with two choices, option 4 tells us that cities contribute to cultural transformation. This can be inferred from the last sentence of the para. The author has used the word transformative in the last sentence of the passage “the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan”, we can infer that this is cultural transformation, after all you are moving from metropolitan to cosmopolitan.

Many of you might say that option 2 can also be inferred from the last sentence of the passage. But this is not the reason why the author feels that cities are good places to live in.

The last para has clues to all the choices except 2.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 17

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.

Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .

In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .

Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .

The nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . . .

Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

Q. Which one of the following statements would undermine the author’s stand regarding the greenness of cities?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 17 This is an easy question, provided that you have understood the question well. The question wants us to undermine the author’s argument regarding the ‘greenness of cities’. We must restrict our answer to greenness only.

Option 1 talks about ‘violent crimes’, which has nothing to do with greenness of cities. It can be ruled out

Option 2 is the right choice. If population density is likely to increase CO2 and global warming, then the idea of greenness is futile as the carbon dioxide will neutralize it.

Option 3, like option 1, is out of scope. The high cost of utilities has nothing to do with greenness

Option 4 too is out of scope. It is not countering the idea of greenness.

We must understand that in spite of the ideas presented in choices 1, 3 and 4, author’s idea of greenness of cities can still be a valid point.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 18

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.

Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .

In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .

Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .

The nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . . .

Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

Q. We can infer that Calthorpe’s statement “still jars” with most people because most people:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 18 This is a difficult question. The options are so close that it is difficult to pick any with confidence. However, we can try the elimination method here.

The passage says:

In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.”

The right answer has to be opposite of what Calthorpe has to say, because what people believe in and what Calthorpe has to say are contradictory in nature (the verb jars means to disturb). Calthorpe says that cities are the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. So people’s belief would be the opposite of this. Thus option 4 is the right choice.

Option 1 is not specific. It is too broad and does not capture the people’s belief as precisely as option 4 does. Option 2 is indeed very close, the pollution idea is stated by Calthorpe, but the idea of crowdedness is not present in his statement.

Similarly option 3 talks about crimes and diseases, something which has not been mentioned in Calthorpe’s quote.

Both choice 2 and 4 are very close, but 2 goes out only because of idea of ‘crowdedness’.

A very close call indeed.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 19

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.

Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .

In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .

Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .

The nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . . .

Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

Q. According to the passage, squatter cities are environment-friendly for all of the following reasons EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 19 This question can be marked correctly by using a bit of common sense and by picking the one that has least impact on environment. Here the common sense comes into play.

Recycling material and energy efficient transportation can indeed have a huge impact on environment. Since this is an except question, both 1 and 2 can be ruled out.

We are left with two choices sorting out garbage and keeping streets clean. Sorting out garbage will have a greater impact on environment. Moreover, this idea has been discussed in the passage. Thus we can rule out option 3 as well.

Option 4 is the best choice.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 20

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.

But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."

When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.

But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.

The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.

Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .

[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.

Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

Q. Of the following arguments, which one is LEAST likely to be used by the companies that digitally scan cultural sites?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 20 This question can be answered by using a bit of common sense and by reading the lines of the passage in which Google and CyArk have put forth their defence. We should mark the choice that these companies would not use to support their actions.

Option 1, 2 and 4 provide valid reasons. Option 3 is not the valid reason because it implies authoritarian attitude on behalf of the companies. Someone who tries to be a protector of culture would be considered snobbish. You can be a promoter of culture but not a protector of culture. Option 3 is the right choice.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 21

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.

But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."

When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.

But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.

The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.

Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .

[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.

Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

Q. Based on his views mentioned in the passage, one could best characterise Dr. Watrall as being:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 21 By reading Watrall’s views, we get to know that he is against google’s intention, not against the technology. We can eliminate option 2. Also, he is not dismissive of laypeople’s access to those images. In fact being dismissive would put him in the wrong.

We have option 3 and 4 to choose from. Is he uneasy or is he outrightly critical? Maybe both, but google has nowhere claimed that it will use the images for commercial purposes. Google has said that it is going to give people free access to those images. It might get traffic and good advertisement as a result, but that is not commercial use of the images. Moreover, the advertisement part is just a conjecture or a guess. This is something that the critics think google might do, but has not yet done, and may never do.

Option 4 is the best choice.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 22

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.

But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."

When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.

But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.

The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.

Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .

[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.

Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

Q. Which of the following, if true, would most strongly invalidate Dr. Watrall’s objections?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 22 To answer this question correctly, we have to look for Dr. Watrall’s argument. In the passage we can see “Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission”.

If option 1 is true, it will unequivocally invalidate Dr Watrall’s objection.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 23

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.

But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."

When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.

But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.

The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.

Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .

[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.

Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

Q. By “digital colonialism”, critics of the CyArk–Google project are referring to the fact that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 23 We should always try to answer questions by looking for contextual references from the passage. The term ‘digital colonization’ has come in the very first paragraph. It says critics have raised question about “who should own the copyrights”. Some have referred to it as ‘digital colonization”. Thus digital colonization refers to the fact that countries where the scanned sites are located do not own the scan copyrights.

Option 4 is the other close choice, but this option can be true only if the host countries own the copyrights. Only if they own the copyrights can they give copyright permission.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 24

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.

But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."

When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.

But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.

The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.

Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .

[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.

Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

Q. In Dr. Thompson’s view, CyArk owning the copyright of its digital scans of archaeological sites is akin to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 24 Owning the copyright technically means possessing something. The site belongs to some other country, but the copyrights are owned by some other entity. This would be akin to Egyptian artefacts owned by Western museum. This is the right analogy. You must understand that ‘seizing’ means snatching something forcefully from someone.

Option 1 goes out because the illegal downloading will not make you the owner of it.

Option 3 too goes out because giving free access to others is not akin to giving the right to own

Option 4 too does not have the right analogy.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 25

5 friends Anay, Bhola, Chintu, Dinu and Eshwar spend their entire salary on Rent, Groceries and Travel. The following graph shows the amount of money spent by each of the 5 friends on a particular expense as a percentage of the total amount of money spent by all of the 5 friends on a particular expense. For example, if the amount spend by all the friends on Rent is ‘R’ then the amount spent by Anay on rent is 0.26R. The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

Q. If the total amount spent on Rent is 10000 rupees then how much money did Dinu spent on Travelling?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 25 Let R be the total amount spent by all the friends on Rent, G be the total amount spent by all the friends on Groceries and T be the total amount spent by all the friends on Travelling.

The given information in table form is as shown below:-

The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

There are 10 possible combinations for this.

But as can be observed the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Eshwar on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel.

Thus, Amount of money spent by Eshwar cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, only 4 possible combinations now remain.

Out of these 4, the amount of money spent by Anay and Bhola on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Dinu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel

Thus, Amount of money spent by Dinu cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu is equal.

Thus, 0.26R + 0.24G + 0.22T = 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T

⇒ 0.04R = 0.02T

Thus, 2R = T

Also, 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T = 0.18R + 0.28G + 0.24T

⇒ R = G

Thus, the table becomes:-

Thus, if R = 10000 then Dinu spent 0.36 * 1000 = 360 Rupees on Travelling.

Hence, option B is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 26

5 friends Anay, Bhola, Chintu, Dinu and Eshwar spend their entire salary on Rent, Groceries and Travel. The following graph shows the amount of money spent by each of the 5 friends on a particular expense as a percentage of the total amount of money spent by all of the 5 friends on a particular expense. For example, if the amount spend by all the friends on Rent is ‘R’ then the amount spent by Anay on rent is 0.26R. The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

Q. The amount spent on traveling is how much percent more than the amount spent on rent by all the friends combined?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 26 Let R be the total amount spent by all the friends on Rent, G be the total amount spent by all the friends on Groceries and T be the total amount spent by all the friends on Travelling.

The given information in table form is as shown below:-

The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

There are 10 possible combinations for this.

But as can be observed the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Eshwar on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel.

Thus, Amount of money spent by Eshwar cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, only 4 possible combinations now remain.

Out of these 4, the amount of money spent by Anay and Bhola on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Dinu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel

Thus, Amount of money spent by Dinu cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu is equal.

Thus, 0.26R + 0.24G + 0.22T = 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T

⇒ 0.04R = 0.02T

Thus, 2R = T

Also, 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T = 0.18R + 0.28G + 0.24T

⇒ R = G

Thus, the table becomes:-

Thus the amount spent on traveling is 100% is more than the amount spent on rent by all the friends combined

Hence, the Option A is the correct option.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 27

5 friends Anay, Bhola, Chintu, Dinu and Eshwar spend their entire salary on Rent, Groceries and Travel. The following graph shows the amount of money spent by each of the 5 friends on a particular expense as a percentage of the total amount of money spent by all of the 5 friends on a particular expense. For example, if the amount spend by all the friends on Rent is ‘R’ then the amount spent by Anay on rent is 0.26R. The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

Q. What is the ratio of the amount spent by Chintu on Rent and the amount spent by Eshwar on Travelling?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 27 Let R be the total amount spent by all the friends on Rent, G be the total amount spent by all the friends on Groceries and T be the total amount spent by all the friends on Travelling.

The given information in table form is as shown below:-

The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

There are 10 possible combinations for this.

But as can be observed the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Eshwar on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel.

Thus, Amount of money spent by Eshwar cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, only 4 possible combinations now remain.

Out of these 4, the amount of money spent by Anay and Bhola on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Dinu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel

Thus, Amount of money spent by Dinu cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu is equal.

Thus, 0.26R + 0.24G +0.22T = 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T

⇒ 0.04R = 0.02T

Thus, 2R = T

Also, 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T = 0.18R + 0.28G + 0.24T

⇒ R = G

Thus, the table becomes:-

Thus the required ratio is = 0.18R : 0.24R = 3 : 4

Hence, option D is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 28

5 friends Anay, Bhola, Chintu, Dinu and Eshwar spend their entire salary on Rent, Groceries and Travel. The following graph shows the amount of money spent by each of the 5 friends on a particular expense as a percentage of the total amount of money spent by all of the 5 friends on a particular expense. For example, if the amount spend by all the friends on Rent is ‘R’ then the amount spent by Anay on rent is 0.26R. The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

Q.If the amount spent on Groceries is 90000 then what is the amount spent by Anay on Travelling?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 28 Let R be the total amount spent by all the friends on Rent, G be the total amount spent by all the friends on Groceries and T be the total amount spent by all the friends on Travelling.

The given information in table form is as shown below:-

The total amount of money spent by exactly 3 friends is equal.

There are 10 possible combinations for this.

But as can be observed the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Eshwar on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel.

Thus, Amount of money spent by Eshwar cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, only 4 possible combinations now remain.

Out of these 4, the amount of money spent by Anay and Bhola on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel is greater than the amount spent by Dinu on each of Rent, Groceries and Travel

Thus, Amount of money spent by Dinu cannot be equal to the amount of money spent by 2 other friends.

Thus, the amount spent by Anay, Bhola and Chintu is equal.

Thus, 0.26R + 0.24G +0.22T = 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T

⇒ 0.04R = 0.02T

Thus, 2R = T

Also, 0.22R + 0.24G + 0.24T = 0.18R + 0.28G + 0.24T

⇒ R = G

Thus, the table becomes:-

Thus, the amount spent by Anay on Travelling = 0.44 * 90000 = 39600 rupees

Hence, option A is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 29

A survey was conducted among 1050 members of a locality. There were asked about the newspaper they read among Hindu, TOI and IE. Some of the results of the survey have been tabulated as under.

It is also known that:

I) The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI.

II) 20% of the people surveyed read all the three newspapers. The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

III) The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read only TOI and IE. The number of women surveyed is 150 less than the number of men surveyed.

IV) An equal number of women read TOI and IE. 495 people read Hindu and 435 people do not read IE. 10% of men read none of the newspapers.

How many women do not read any newspaper?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 29

The number of women is 150 less than than number of men. It means that the number of men is 600 and the number of women is 450. Also, 10% of the men do not read any newspaper i.e. 60 men do not read any newspaper. From the table we can draw the venn diagram for men as

Sum of all the values must be equal to the number of men i.e. 600

Or, (x - 30) + (120 - x) + x + x + (135 - x) + (150 - x) + (x + 75) + 60 = 600

⇒ x = 90

We get the venn diagram for men as:

It is given that 20% of all the people surveyed read all the three newspapers i.e. 210 people read all the three newspapers. Also, 90 men read all the three newspapers. So, 120 women must be reading all the three newspapers.

The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read both TOI and IE i.e. 60 women read only Hindu.

495 people read Hindu out of which 225 are men. So, 270 women must be reading Hindu.

The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI. Let us assume it to be x.

An equal number of women read TOI and IE. Let us assume it to be y.

Also, let us assume the number of women who do not read any newspaper be z. We can draw the venn diagram for women as:

x + a + b + 120 = x + c + b + 120

⇒ a = c..........(i)

435 people do not read IE out of which 240 are men. So, 195 women do not read IE.

⇒ x + a + z + 60 = 195

⇒ x + a + z = 135............(ii)

The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

⇒ (30 + 45 + 60) + (x + x + b) = 3 * 90 = 270

⇒ 2x + b = 135.................(iii)

Total number of women who read Hindu = 270

Or, (60 + x + x + 120) = 270

⇒ x = 45

Putting x = 45 in (iii), we get

b = 45

Putting x = 45 in (ii), we get

a + z = 90..................(iv)

Total number of women = 450

Or, 270 + a + a + 45 + z = 450

⇒ 2a+ z = 135............(v)

On solving (iv) and (v), we get

a = 45

On putting a = 45 in (iv), we get

z = 45

Thus, we get the venn diagram for women as:

From the venn diagram for women, we can see that 45 women do not read any newspaper.

Hence, 45 is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 30

A survey was conducted among 1050 members of a locality. There were asked about the newspaper they read among Hindu, TOI and IE. Some of the results of the survey have been tabulated as under.

It is also known that:

I) The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI.

II) 20% of the people surveyed read all the three newspapers. The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

III) The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read only TOI and IE. The number of women surveyed is 150 less than the number of men surveyed.

IV) An equal number of women read TOI and IE. 495 people read Hindu and 435 people do not read IE. 10% of men read none of the newspapers.

How many women read TOI and IE both?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 30 The number of women is 150 less than number of men. It means that the number of men is 600 and the number of women is 450. Also, 10% of the men do not read any newspaper i.e. 60 men do not read any newspaper. From the table we can draw the venn diagram for men as

Sum of all the values must be equal to the number of men i.e. 600

Or, (x - 30) + (120 - x) + x + x + (135 - x) + (150 - x) + (x + 75) + 60 = 600

⇒ x = 90

We get the venn diagram for men as:

It is given that 20% of all the people surveyed read all the three newspapers i.e. 210 people read all the three newspapers. Also, 90 men read all the three newspapers. So, 120 women must be reading all the three newspapers.

The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read both TOI and IE i.e. 60 women read only Hindu.

495 people read Hindu out of which 225 are men. So, 270 women must be reading Hindu.

The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI. Let us assume it to be x.

An equal number of women read TOI and IE. Let us assume it to be y.

Also, let us assume the number of women who do not read any newspaper be z. We can draw the venn diagram for women as:

x + a + b + 120 = x + c + b + 120

⇒ a = c..........(i)

435 people do not read IE out of which 240 are men. So, 195 women do not read IE.

⇒ x + a + z + 60 = 195

⇒ x + a + z = 135............(ii)

The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

⇒ (30 + 45 + 60) + (x + x + b) = 3 * 90 = 270

⇒ 2x + b = 135.................(iii)

Total number of women who read Hindu = 270

Or, (60 + x + x + 120) = 270

⇒ x = 45

Putting x = 45 in (iii), we get

b = 45

Putting x = 45 in (ii), we get

a + z = 90..................(iv)

Total number of women = 450

Or, 270 + a + a + 45 + z = 450

⇒ 2a+ z = 135............(v)

On solving (iv) and (v), we get

a = 45

On putting a = 45 in (iv), we get

z = 45

Thus, we get the venn diagram for women as:

From the venn diagram for women, we can see that 165 women read TOI and IE both.

Hence, 165 is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 31

A survey was conducted among 1050 members of a locality. There were asked about the newspaper they read among Hindu, TOI and IE. Some of the results of the survey have been tabulated as under.

It is also known that:

I) The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI.

II) 20% of the people surveyed read all the three newspapers. The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

III) The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read only TOI and IE. The number of women surveyed is 150 less than the number of men surveyed.

IV) An equal number of women read TOI and IE. 495 people read Hindu and 435 people do not read IE. 10% of men read none of the newspapers.

How many people read Hindu and TOI both?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 31 The number of women is 150 less than number of men. It means that the number of men is 600 and the number of women is 450. Also, 10% of the men do not read any newspaper i.e. 60 men do not read any newspaper. From the table we can draw the venn diagram for men as

Sum of all the values must be equal to the number of men i.e. 600

Or, (x - 30) + (120 - x) + x + x + (135 - x) + (150 - x) + (x + 75) + 60 = 600

⇒ x = 90

We get the venn diagram for men as:

It is given that 20% of all the people surveyed read all the three newspapers i.e. 210 people read all the three newspapers. Also, 90 men read all the three newspapers. So, 120 women must be reading all the three newspapers.

The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read both TOI and IE i.e. 60 women read only Hindu.

495 people read Hindu out of which 225 are men. So, 270 women must be reading Hindu.

The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI. Let us assume it to be x.

An equal number of women read TOI and IE. Let us assume it to be y.

Also, let us assume the number of women who do not read any newspaper be z. We can draw the venn diagram for women as:

x + a + b + 120 = x + c + b + 120

⇒ a = c..........(i)

435 people do not read IE out of which 240 are men. So, 195 women do not read IE.

⇒ x + a + z + 60 = 195

⇒ x + a + z = 135............(ii)

The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

⇒ (30 + 45 + 60) + (x + x + b) = 3 * 90 = 270

⇒ 2x + b = 135.................(iii)

Total number of women who read Hindu = 270

Or, (60 + x + x + 120) = 270

⇒ x = 45

Putting x = 45 in (iii), we get

b = 45

Putting x = 45 in (ii), we get

a + z = 90..................(iv)

Total number of women = 450

Or, 270 + a + a + 45 + z = 450

⇒ 2a+ z = 135............(v)

On solving (iv) and (v), we get

a = 45

On putting a = 45 in (iv), we get

z = 45

Thus, we get the venn diagram for women as:

From the venn diagram, we can see that 120 men and 165 women read Hindu and TOI both.

Hence, 285 is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 32

A survey was conducted among 1050 members of a locality. There were asked about the newspaper they read among Hindu, TOI and IE. Some of the results of the survey have been tabulated as under.

It is also known that:

I) The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI.

II) 20% of the people surveyed read all the three newspapers. The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

III) The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read only TOI and IE. The number of women surveyed is 150 less than the number of men surveyed.

IV) An equal number of women read TOI and IE. 495 people read Hindu and 435 people do not read IE. 10% of men read none of the newspapers.

How many people read exactly one newspaper?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 32 The number of women is 150 less than number of men. It means that the number of men is 600 and the number of women is 450. Also, 10% of the men do not read any newspaper i.e. 60 men do not read any newspaper. From the table we can draw the venn diagram for men as

Sum of all the values must be equal to the number of men i.e. 600

Or, (x - 30) + (120 - x) + x + x + (135 - x) + (150 - x) + (x + 75) + 60 = 600

⇒ x = 90

We get the venn diagram for men as:

It is given that 20% of all the people surveyed read all the three newspapers i.e. 210 people read all the three newspapers. Also, 90 men read all the three newspapers. So, 120 women must be reading all the three newspapers.

The number of women who read only Hindu is equal to the number of men who read both TOI and IE i.e. 60 women read only Hindu.

495 people read Hindu out of which 225 are men. So, 270 women must be reading Hindu.

The number of women who read only Hindu and IE is equal to the number of women who read only Hindi and TOI. Let us assume it to be x.

An equal number of women read TOI and IE. Let us assume it to be y.

Also, let us assume the number of women who do not read any newspaper be z. We can draw the venn diagram for women as:

x + a + b + 120 = x + c + b + 120

⇒ a = c..........(i)

435 people do not read IE out of which 240 are men. So, 195 women do not read IE.

⇒ x + a + z + 60 = 195

⇒ x + a + z = 135............(ii)

The number of people who read exactly two newspaper is thrice the number of men who read all the three newspapers.

⇒ (30 + 45 + 60) + (x + x + b) = 3 * 90 = 270

⇒ 2x + b = 135.................(iii)

Total number of women who read Hindu = 270

Or, (60 + x + x + 120) = 270

⇒ x = 45

Putting x = 45 in (iii), we get

b = 45

Putting x = 45 in (ii), we get

a + z = 90..................(iv)

Total number of women = 450

Or, 270 + a + a + 45 + z = 450

⇒ 2a+ z = 135............(v)

On solving (iv) and (v), we get

a = 45

On putting a = 45 in (iv), we get

z = 45

Thus, we get the venn diagram for women as:

From the venn diagram, we can see that 315 men and 150 women read exactly one newspaper.

Hence, 465 is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 33

R-city mall in Hyderabad keeps track of the number of customers entering and exiting the mall. The following is the report of one particular day. The mall opens at 10 am and closes at 3.50 pm sharp. Every customer stays at the mall for at least 1 hour.

How many people visited the mall in the entire day?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 33

The 101 people leaving between 11 - 12 must have left within 2 hours. Thus there is an excess of 53 people at the mall. To minimize the number of people leaving the mall in 2 hours we will have to assume that these 53 people will leave the mall in between 12 - 1.

Thus, the number of people entering the mall in between 11-12 and leaving with 2 hours = 89 - 53 = 36

The excess of people entering the mall in between 11 - 12 = 121 - 46 = 75.

They will leave the mall in between 1-2.

Thus, the number of people entering the mall in between 12 - 1 and leaving with 2 hours = 129 - 75 = 44.

The excess of people entering the mall in between 12 - 1 = 119 - 56 = 65

They will leave the mall in between 1-2.

Thus, the number of people entering the mall in between 1-2 and leaving with 2 hours = 148-65 = 73.

All the 66 people entering the mall in between 2-3 must have left within 2 hours

Thus, the required number = 101 + 36 + 44 + 73 + 66 = 320

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 34

Ronaldo, Messi, and Neymar participate in a football tournament consisting of Penalty shootouts. They try to score one after another in that order without any breaks. In every round, every player gets exactly 1 chance to score. The tournament has ‘n’ rounds. For any player 'P' the player taking the penalty just before him (not necessarily in the same round) is called as the preceding player for that round.

The following observations were made:-

  1. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also scores the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  2. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player misses the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  3. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also misses the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  4. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player scores the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  5. At least 1 player scored the penalty in every round.

What is the number of penalties that Neymar scores in the first 21 rounds if Ronaldo is the only player to score the penalty in Round 1?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 34

Let 1 denote penalty scored and 0 denote penalty missed.

Let only Ronaldo scores the penalty in Round 1 thus, in round 1 the table will be:-

In round 2, Ronaldo will score the penalty as he scored the penalty in round 1 and Neymar(preceding player) missed the penalty in round 1.

Messi will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Ronaldo(preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Neymar will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Messi(preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Let A represents the penalty missed or scored by a Player in the previous round, B represents the penalty missed or scored by the preceding player and C represents the penalty missed or scored by the Player in the next round.

Thus, as per the given conditions, we get

From this, the table for the first 9 rounds will be:-

As we can see that the pattern repeats after every 7 rounds.

In the first 7 rounds, Neymar will score the penalty 4 times.

Thus, in the first 21 rounds, Neymar will score the penalty 12 times.

Hence, option B is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 35

Ronaldo, Messi, and Neymar participate in a football tournament consisting of Penalty shootouts. They try to score one after another in that order without any breaks. In every round, every player gets exactly 1 chance to score. The tournament has ‘n’ rounds. For any player 'P' the player taking the penalty just before him (not necessarily in the same round) is called as the preceding player for that round.

The following observations were made:-

  1. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also scores the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  2. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player misses the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  3. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also misses the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  4. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player scores the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  5. At least 1 player scored the penalty in every round.

If Messi missed the penalty in Round 1 then what is the minimum number of penalties he can score in the next 13 rounds?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 35 Let 1 denote penalty scored and 0 denote penalty missed.

Let only Ronaldo scores the penalty in Round 1 thus, in round 1 the table will be:-

In round 2, Ronaldo will score the penalty as he scored the penalty in round 1 and Neymar (preceding player) missed the penalty in round 1.

Messi will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Ronaldo (preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Neymar will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Messi (preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Let A represents the penalty missed or scored by a Player in the previous round, B represents the penalty missed or scored by the preceding player and C represents the penalty missed or scored by the Player in the next round.

Thus, as per the given conditions, we get

From this, the table for the first 9 rounds will be:-

As we can see that the pattern repeats after every 7 rounds

In any 7 consecutive rounds Messi will score 4 penalties. In next 6 rounds, he will score a minimum of 3 goals.

Thus, if Messi missed the penalty in Round 1, then 7 is the minimum number of penalties he can score in the next 13 rounds.

Hence, option B is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 36

Ronaldo, Messi, and Neymar participate in a football tournament consisting of Penalty shootouts. They try to score one after another in that order without any breaks. In every round, every player gets exactly 1 chance to score. The tournament has ‘n’ rounds. For any player 'P' the player taking the penalty just before him (not necessarily in the same round) is called as the preceding player for that round.

The following observations were made:-

  1. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also scores the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  2. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player misses the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  3. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also misses the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  4. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player scores the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  5. At least 1 player scored the penalty in every round.

What is the maximum number of penalties scored in any 8 consecutive rounds?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 36 Let 1 denote penalty scored and 0 denote penalty missed.

Let only Ronaldo scores the penalty in Round 1 thus, in round 1 the table will be:-

In round 2, Ronaldo will score the penalty as he scored the penalty in round 1 and Neymar (preceding player) missed the penalty in round 1.

Messi will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Ronaldo (preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Neymar will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Messi (preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Let A represents the penalty missed or scored by a Player in the previous round, B represents the penalty missed or scored by the preceding player and C represents the penalty missed or scored by the Player in the next round.

Thus, as per the given conditions, we get

From this, the table for the first 9 rounds will be:-

As we can see that the pattern repeats after every 7 rounds

Thus, the maximum number of penalties scored in any 8 consecutive rounds will be when in the first and last round all the 3 players score the penalty.

In any 7 consecutive rounds total 12 penalties are scored.

If in the 8th round all the 3 scores then the total number of penalties will be 12+3 = 15.

Hence, option A is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 37

Ronaldo, Messi, and Neymar participate in a football tournament consisting of Penalty shootouts. They try to score one after another in that order without any breaks. In every round, every player gets exactly 1 chance to score. The tournament has ‘n’ rounds. For any player 'P' the player taking the penalty just before him (not necessarily in the same round) is called as the preceding player for that round.

The following observations were made:-

  1. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also scores the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  2. If P scores the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player misses the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  3. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player also misses the penalty, then P will miss the penalty in the current round.

  4. If P misses the penalty in the previous round and the preceding player scores the penalty, then P will score the penalty in the current round.

  5. At least 1 player scored the penalty in every round.

All the 3 players scored the penalties in a round. What is the total number of penalties scored in the next 51 rounds?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 37 Let 1 denote penalty scored and 0 denote penalty missed.

Let only Ronaldo scores the penalty in Round 1 thus, in round 1 the table will be:-

In round 2, Ronaldo will score the penalty as he scored the penalty in round 1 and Neymar (preceding player) missed the penalty in round 1.

Messi will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Ronaldo (preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Neymar will score the penalty as he missed the penalty in round 1 and Messi (preceding player) scored the penalty in round 2.

Let A represents the penalty missed or scored by a Player in the previous round, B represents the penalty missed or scored by the preceding player and C represents the penalty missed or scored by the Player in the next round.

Thus, as per the given conditions, we get

From this, the table for the first 9 rounds will be:-

As we can see that the pattern repeats after every 7 rounds

In any 7 consecutive rounds total 12 penalties are scored.

Thus, in the first 49 rounds, the total number of penalties scored will be 7*12 = 84.

In 50th and 51st round they would have scored 1 and 2 penalties respectively.

Thus, the required sum = 84+3 = 87.

hence, option D is the correct answer

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 38

Eight delegates namely - Amit, Aman, Rajesh, Rakesh, Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan are seated in two concentric circles, with four person around each circle in such a manner that each member of inner circle sits exactly opposite to one of the members of the outer circle. Each of the delegates represents a different nation namely India, China, Japan, Russia, Nepal, Malaysia, France and Spain not necessarily in the same order. Further it is given that:

  1. Amit, who is from Russia, faces the immediate neighbour of the person who is from Japan.

  2. Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles.

  3. Rakesh is not from either China or Nepal and faces Naman, who is neither from Malaysia nor from Spain.

  4. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India.

  5. The members sitting in the outer circle are Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan and all of them are facing towards the centre.

  6. The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan. Himesh, who is not from Japan, is not facing Amit.

  7. The delegates from Malaysia and Spain are immediate neighbours and one of them is facing Aman, who is from China.

  8. The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours.

  9. The members sitting in the inner circle are Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh and all of them are facing away from the centre.

Who is facing the Malaysian delegate?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 38 Let us first figure the nationality of delegates who are sitting in the same circle.

Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh are seated in inner circle. Amit is from Russia.(From statement:1)

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from France is seated in the inner circle.

The delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles. Hence, we cay say that they sit in different circle. Moreover, the delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence we can say that the delegate from Nepal sit in inner circle.

From statement 6, we can see that the delegate from Aman is from China. Hence we can say that the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to France, Russia, Nepal and China. Consequently the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to India, Malaysia, Spain and Japan.

Among the delegates who are seated in the inner circle, we know about the Amit and Aman's nationality. According to statement 3, Rakesh is not from Nepal. Hence, we can say that he is from France. Consequently we can say that Rajesh is from Nepal.

In statement (2), it is given that Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates. Hence, we can say that Naman and Nayan sit diametrically opposite to each other in the outer circle. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence, we can say that Naman is from India. .

The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan.

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from Russia is sitting opposite to Nayan. From statement 1, we can say that the person seated immediate right to Nayan is from Japan. Hence, we can say that Nayan is from Spain.

In statement 6, it is given that Himesh is not from Japan. Hence, we can say that Hitesh is from Japan and Himesh is from Malaysia. Also from statement 7, we can say that Himesh faces Aman, who is from China. Consequently Hitesh faces Rajesh, who is from Nepal.

From the arrangement we can see that Aman is facing the Malaysian delegate. Therefore, option B is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 39

Eight delegates namely - Amit, Aman, Rajesh, Rakesh, Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan are seated in two concentric circles, with four person around each circle in such a manner that each member of inner circle sits exactly opposite to one of the members of the outer circle. Each of the delegates represents a different nation namely India, China, Japan, Russia, Nepal, Malaysia, France and Spain not necessarily in the same order. Further it is given that:

  1. Amit, who is from Russia, faces the immediate neighbour of the person who is from Japan.

  2. Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles.

  3. Rakesh is not from either China or Nepal and faces Naman, who is neither from Malaysia nor from Spain.

  4. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India.

  5. The members sitting in the outer circle are Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan and all of them are facing towards the centre.

  6. The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan. Himesh, who is not from Japan, is not facing Amit.

  7. The delegates from Malaysia and Spain are immediate neighbours and one of them is facing Aman, who is from China.

  8. The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours.

  9. The members sitting in the inner circle are Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh and all of them are facing away from the centre.

Which of the following countries does Hitesh belong to?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 39 Let us first figure the nationality of delegates who are sitting in the same circle.

Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh are seated in inner circle. Amit is from Russia.(From statement:1)

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from France is seated in the inner circle.

The delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles. Hence, we cay say that they sit in different circle. Moreover, the delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence we can say that the delegate from Nepal sit in inner circle.

From statement 6, we can see that the delegate from Aman is from China. Hence we can say that the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to France, Russia, Nepal and China. Consequently the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to India, Malaysia, Spain and Japan.

Among the delegates who are seated in the inner circle, we know about the Amit and Aman's nationality. According to statement 3, Rakesh is not from Nepal. Hence, we can say that he is from France. Consequently we can say that Rajesh is from Nepal.

In statement (2), it is given that Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates. Hence, we can say that Naman and Nayan sit diametrically opposite to each other in the outer circle. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence, we can say that Naman is from India. .

The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan.

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from Russia is sitting opposite to Nayan. From statement 1, we can say that the person seated immediate right to Nayan is from Japan. Hence, we can say that Nayan is from Spain.

In statement 6, it is given that Himesh is not from Japan. Hence, we can say that Hitesh is from Japan and Himesh is from Malaysia. Also from statement 7, we can say that Himesh faces Aman, who is from China. Consequently Hitesh faces Rajesh, who is from Nepal.

From the arrangement we can see that Rajesh is from Japan. Hence, option D is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 40

Eight delegates namely - Amit, Aman, Rajesh, Rakesh, Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan are seated in two concentric circles, with four person around each circle in such a manner that each member of inner circle sits exactly opposite to one of the members of the outer circle. Each of the delegates represents a different nation namely India, China, Japan, Russia, Nepal, Malaysia, France and Spain not necessarily in the same order. Further it is given that:

  1. Amit, who is from Russia, faces the immediate neighbour of the person who is from Japan.

  2. Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles.

  3. Rakesh is not from either China or Nepal and faces Naman, who is neither from Malaysia nor from Spain.

  4. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India.

  5. The members sitting in the outer circle are Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan and all of them are facing towards the centre.

  6. The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan. Himesh, who is not from Japan, is not facing Amit.

  7. The delegates from Malaysia and Spain are immediate neighbours and one of them is facing Aman, who is from China.

  8. The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours.

  9. The members sitting in the inner circle are Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh and all of them are facing away from the centre.

Who among the following delegates is from Nepal?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 40 Let us first figure the nationality of delegates who are sitting in the same circle.

Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh are seated in inner circle. Amit is from Russia.(From statement:1)

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from France is seated in the inner circle.

The delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles. Hence, we cay say that they sit in different circle. Moreover, the delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence we can say that the delegate from Nepal sit in inner circle.

From statement 6, we can see that the delegate from Aman is from China. Hence we can say that the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to France, Russia, Nepal and China. Consequently the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to India, Malaysia, Spain and Japan.

Among the delegates who are seated in the inner circle, we know about the Amit and Aman's nationality. According to statement 3, Rakesh is not from Nepal. Hence, we can say that he is from France. Consequently we can say that Rajesh is from Nepal.

In statement (2), it is given that Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates. Hence, we can say that Naman and Nayan sit diametrically opposite to each other in the outer circle. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence, we can say that Naman is from India. .

The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan.

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from Russia is sitting opposite to Nayan. From statement 1, we can say that the person seated immediate right to Nayan is from Japan. Hence, we can say that Nayan is from Spain.

In statement 6, it is given that Himesh is not from Japan. Hence, we can say that Hitesh is from Japan and Himesh is from Malaysia. Also from statement 7, we can say that Himesh faces Aman, who is from China. Consequently Hitesh faces Rajesh, who is from Nepal.

From the arrangement we can see that Rajesh is from Nepal. Hence, option C is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 41

Eight delegates namely - Amit, Aman, Rajesh, Rakesh, Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan are seated in two concentric circles, with four person around each circle in such a manner that each member of inner circle sits exactly opposite to one of the members of the outer circle. Each of the delegates represents a different nation namely India, China, Japan, Russia, Nepal, Malaysia, France and Spain not necessarily in the same order. Further it is given that:

  1. Amit, who is from Russia, faces the immediate neighbour of the person who is from Japan.

  2. Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles.

  3. Rakesh is not from either China or Nepal and faces Naman, who is neither from Malaysia nor from Spain.

  4. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India.

  5. The members sitting in the outer circle are Hitesh, Himesh, Naman and Nayan and all of them are facing towards the centre.

  6. The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan. Himesh, who is not from Japan, is not facing Amit.

  7. The delegates from Malaysia and Spain are immediate neighbours and one of them is facing Aman, who is from China.

  8. The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours.

  9. The members sitting in the inner circle are Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh and all of them are facing away from the centre.

Which of the following is true about the delegate who is from Spain?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 41 Let us first figure the nationality of delegates who are sitting in the same circle.

Amit, Aman, Rajesh and Rakesh are seated in inner circle. Amit is from Russia.(From statement:1)

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from France is seated in the inner circle.

The delegates from Nepal and India are seated in different circles. Hence, we cay say that they sit in different circle. Moreover, the delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence we can say that the delegate from Nepal sit in inner circle.

From statement 6, we can see that the delegate from Aman is from China. Hence we can say that the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to France, Russia, Nepal and China. Consequently the delegates who are seated in the inner circle belong to India, Malaysia, Spain and Japan.

Among the delegates who are seated in the inner circle, we know about the Amit and Aman's nationality. According to statement 3, Rakesh is not from Nepal. Hence, we can say that he is from France. Consequently we can say that Rajesh is from Nepal.

In statement (2), it is given that Naman is sitting second to left of Nayan and the delegates. Hence, we can say that Naman and Nayan sit diametrically opposite to each other in the outer circle. The delegate from France faces the delegate from India. Hence, we can say that Naman is from India. .

The delegate who is from Malaysia is sitting immediate left of Nayan.

The delegates who are from France and Russia are seared in the same circle but they are not immediate neighbours. Hence, we can say that the delegate from Russia is sitting opposite to Nayan. From statement 1, we can say that the person seated immediate right to Nayan is from Japan. Hence, we can say that Nayan is from Spain.

In statement 6, it is given that Himesh is not from Japan. Hence, we can say that Hitesh is from Japan and Himesh is from Malaysia. Also from statement 7, we can say that Himesh faces Aman, who is from China. Consequently Hitesh faces Rajesh, who is from Nepal.

From the arrangement we can the delegate from Spain faces the delegate from Russia. Hence, option A is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 42

R-city mall in Hyderabad keeps track of the number of customers entering and exiting the mall. The following is the report of one particular day. The mall opens at 10 am and closes at 3.50 pm sharp. Every customer stays at the mall for at least 1 hour.

Let ‘x’ be the minimum number of people who left the mall within 2 hrs of entering, and let ‘y’ be the number of people who exited in the interval 3 pm

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 42

The 101 people leaving between 11-12 must have left within 2 hours. Thus there is an excess of 53 people at the mall. To minimize the number of people leaving the mall in 2 hours we will have to assume that these 53 people will leave the mall in between 12-1.

Thus, the number of people entering the mall in between 11-12 and leaving with 2 hours = 89-53 = 36

The excess of people entering the mall in between 11-12 = 121-36 = 85.

They will leave the mall in between 1-2.

Thus, the number of people entering the mall in between 12-1 and leaving with 2 hours = 129-85 = 44.

The excess of people entering the mall in between 12-1 = 119-44 =75

They will leave the mall in between 1-2.

Thus, the number of people entering the mall in between 1-2 and leaving with 2 hours = 148-75 = 93.

All the 66 people entering the mall in between 2-3 must have left within 2 hours

Thus, the minimum number of people who left the temple within 2 hrs of entering = 333.

The total number of people entering the mall = 154+121+119+91+66 = 551

The total number of people leaving the mall before 3 pm = 467

Thus, the number of people leaving the mall after 3 pm = 551-467 = 84

Thus, the required percentage = 84*100/333 = 25.22%

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 43

Five employees, Aneek, Balram, Chitra, Deepa and Esha of a company were sent to five different countries, USA, UK, China, Canada and Japan (not necessarily in that order), on different projects for two consecutive years (not necessarily to the same country in both the years). It is also known that:

I) One of the employees was sent to the same country, which is not Canada, for both the years. Chitra did not go to USA in the first year.

II) Esha was sent to two different countries, but the name of both the countries start with the same alphabet.

III) The employee with the highest income was sent to Japan in the first year and to USA in the second year.

IV) The employee with the least income was sent to China in the first year, but not in the second year.

V) Aneek did not go to either UK or Japan. Balram earns less than Chitra, who earns less than Esha.

Who went to Japan in the second year?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 43 Esha was sent to two different countries, but the name of both the countries start with the same alphabet. So, the countries can be China and Canada or USA and UK, in any order. Balram earns less than Chitra, who earns less than Esha. Also, the employee with the highest income went to Japan in the first year and to USA in the second year. So, Esha's income cannot be the highest. Also, Aneek did not go to Japan. So, Deepa's income must be the highest and she must have gone to Japan and USA in the first and the second year respectively.

Let us assume Esha went to USA and UK in any order. The country in which the same employee was sent for both the years can be either China or Canada. It cannot be Canada as given in statement I. Also, from statement IV, the employee who went to China in the first year did not go to China in the second year. So, China is also not possible. Therefore, we can reject this case. Thus, Esha went to China and Canada in any order. She must have gone to China in the second year as the employee with the least income went to China in the first year and Esha is definitely not the least earner as her income is higher than Chitra and Balram.

The country in which same employee was sent for both the years cannot be USA as Deepa went to USA in the second year. So, that country must be UK

Chitra did not go to USA in the first year. Also Chitra is not the least earner as she earns more than Balram. So. Chitra must have went to UK for both the years.

It is given that Aneek did not go to Japan. Thus, Balram must have gone to Japan in the second year.

Hence, option B is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 44

Five employees, Aneek, Balram, Chitra, Deepa and Esha of a company were sent to five different countries, USA, UK, China, Canada and Japan (not necessarily in that order), on different projects for two consecutive years (not necessarily to the same country in both the years). It is also known that:

I) One of the employees was sent to the same country, which is not Canada, for both the years. Chitra did not go to USA in the first year.

II) Esha was sent to two different countries, but the name of both the countries start with the same alphabet.

III) The employee with the highest income was sent to Japan in the first year and to USA in the second year.

IV) The employee with the least income was sent to China in the first year, but not in the second year.

V) Aneek did not go to either UK or Japan. Balram earns less than Chitra, who earns less than Esha.

Who went to the same country for both the years?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 44 Esha was sent to two different countries, but the name of both the countries start with the same alphabet. So, the countries can be China and Canada or USA and UK, in any order. Balram earns less than Chitra, who earns less than Esha. Also, the employee with the highest income went to Japan in the first year and to USA in the second year. So, Esha's income cannot be the highest. Also, Aneek did not go to Japan. So, Deepa's income must be the highest and she must have gone to Japan and USA in the first and the second year respectively.

Let us assume Esha went to USA and UK in any order. The country in which the same employee was sent for both the years can be either China or Canada. It cannot be Canada as given in statement I. Also, from statement IV, the employee who went to China in the first year did not go to China in the second year. So, China is also not possible. Therefore, we can reject this case. Thus, Esha went to China and Canada in any order. She must have gone to China in the second year as the employee with the least income went to China in the first year and Esha is definitely not the least earner as her income is higher than Chitra and Balram.

The country in which same employee was sent for both the years cannot be USA as Deepa went to USA in the second year. So, that country must be UK

Chitra did not go to USA in the first year. Also Chitra is not the least earner as she earns more than Balram. So. Chitra must have went to UK for both the years.

From the table, we can see that Chitra went to the same country for both the years.

Hence, option C is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 45

The average of 7 natural numbers is 23.142857. If one number which is 7, is removed, it is observed that the other numbers are in the ratio 1:3:4:5:7:11, then find the difference between the largest and the second largest number.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 45 Average of 7 numbers = 23.142857

Sum of the 7 numbers = 162

Sum of remaining 6 numbers + 7 = 162

Therefore, sum of other 6 remaining numbers = 155

Let the number be x, 3x, 4x, 5x, 7x, 11x.

Sum = 31x = 155

⇒ x = 5

Hence the largest number is 55, and the second largest number is 35, which has a difference of 20.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 46

If all the permutations of the letters of the word 'AGAIN' be arranged as in a dictionary, then the rank of the word 'NAAIG' shall be

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 46 In the dictionary the words at each stage are arranged in alphabetical order. Starting with the letter A, and arranging the other 4 letters GAIN we get 4! = 24 words

Now staring with G and arranging the other four letters A, A, I, N in different ways we get

4!/2! = 12 words

Similarly starting with G and arranging the other 4 letters we get 12 words

Similarly the words starting with I can be arranged in 12 ways. Till now we have arranged 48 words.

The 49th word is NAAGI and hence the 50th word is NAAIG.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 47

How many 4 digit numbers, having all distinct digits exist, such that the digits are all in ascending order?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 47 Basically, any 4 digits chosen from 1-9, can be arranged in exactly 1 way, such that all four digits are in ascending order. Hence total number of such numbers possible is 9C4 = 126.

For instance if the digits chosen are 7, 3, 4 and 8, we can arrange them in ascending order in exactly one way, as 3478.

Thus 126 such numbers are obtainable.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 48

How many three-digit numbers are greater than 100 and increase by 198 when the three digits are arranged in the reverse order?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 48 Let the numbers be of the form 100a+10b+c, where a, b, and c represent single digits.

Then (100c + 10b + a) - (100a + 10b + c) = 198

99c - 99a = 198

c - a = 2.

Now, a can take the values 1-7. a cannot be zero as the initial number has 3 digits and cannot be 8 or 9 as then c would not be a singledigit number.

Thus, there can be 7 cases.

B can take the value of any digit from 0-9, as it does not affect the answer. Hence, the total cases will be 7 × 10 = 70.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 49

Suppose hospital A admitted 21 less Covid infected patients than hospital B, and all eventually recovered. The sum of recovery days for patients in hospitals A and B were 200 and 152, respectively. If the average recovery days for patients admitted in hospital A was 3 more than the average in hospital B then the number admitted in hospital A was


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 49 Let the number of Covid patients in Hospitals A and B be x and x+21 respectively. Then, it has been given that

16x + 1400 = x (x + 21)

x2 + 5x − 1400 = 0

(x + 40)(x - 35) = 0

Hence, x = 35.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 50

A circle of diameter 8 inches is inscribed in a triangle ABC where. If BC = 10 inches then the area of the triangle in square inches is


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 50

We know that Inradius

h-p = 2 or h= p+2.

Now, p2 + 100 = h2

p2 + 100 = (p + 2)2

p2 + 100 = p2 + 4p + 4

4p = 96

p = 24.

Hence, Area

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 51

Siddharth hired a car to go from Bombay to Pune, a distance of 320 km. the charges of the hired car are Rs. 4 per km for the first 60 km, Rs. 5 per km for the next 60 km, and Rs. 8 for every 5 km of the remaining journey. If the amount left with him after paying for the journey is one-fourth less than what he paid, how much did he have with him initially?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 51 For 60 Kms, charges = Rs. 240

For the next 160 kms, charges = Rs. 300

For the next 200 kms, charges = 200 x (8/5) = Rs. 320

Total charges = 320 + 300 + 240 = 860

If he had X amount of money initially, then according to the conditions given,

X - 860 = (3/4) x 860; X = 645 + 860; X = Rs. 1505 Hence, the answer is option (4).

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 52

In how many ways 3 girls and 9 boys can be seated in two bus, each having numbered seats, 3 in the front and 4 at the back, if the 3 girls sit together in a back row on adjacent seats?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 52 Total number of numbered seats = 14

Total number of persons = 12

So the total number of ways in which 12 persons can be seated on 14 seats = Number of arrangements = 14P2

3 girls can be seated in a back row on adjacent seats in the following ways: 1, 2, 3 or 2, 3, 4 in the 1st bus.

Also they can be seated in 1, 2, 3 or 2, 3, 4 back seats of second bus.

In each way the three girls can interchange among themselves in 3! Ways, so the total number of ways in which 3 girls can be seated in together in a back row on adjacent seats = 4*3!

Now 9 boys can be seated on 11 remaining seats in 11P9 ways.

So the total number of arrangements = 11P9*4*3!

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 53

A circular pizza is cut into pieces by 7 straight knife cuts. What is the maximum number of pieces possible?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 53 According to Lazy caterer’s formula, maximum number of pieces with n straight cuts = (n2 + n + 2)/2

Hence, for 7 straight knife cuts,

Maximum number of pieces = (49+7+2)/2 = 29

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 54

There are seven points on a piece of paper. Exactly four of these points are on a straight line. No other line contains more than two of these points. Three of these seven points are selected to form the vertices of a triangle. How many triangles are possible?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 54 There are three cases to consider corresponding to zero vertices, one vertex or two vertices on the given line

Case 1 'zero vertices on the given line'

Since there are exactly three points not on the line, there can only be one triangle formed with these three points.

Case 2 'one vertex on the given line'

There are four choices for the point on the line and for each of these four points there are three ways of selecting the pair of vertices not on the line. Thus, there are 3 × 4 or 12 possible triangles

Case 3 '2 vertices on the given line'

There are six ways of choosing the pair of points on the line and for each of these six pairs there are three ways of selecting the vertex not on the line giving a total of 6 × 3 or 18 possibilities.

In total there are 1+12+18 or 31 triangles

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 55

What will be the remainder when (2565 + 1080) is divided by 45?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 55 2565 can be written as (254x16)25

Remainder when 254 is divided by 45 is 25, therefore remainder of 2564 will be 25 and remainder when 2565 is divided by 45 will be 40

Remainder when 102 is divided by 45 is 10 and 104 is divided by 45 is 10

Now it is clear that when 10n is divided by 45 the remainder is always 10

Therefore remainder when 1080 is divided by 45 will be 10

So the total remainder will be 40 + 10 = 50 which is greater than 45 so the final remainder will be 5

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 56

Find the value of x + y ?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 56

Let us compare 21 + 2 × 6√3 = (a + b)2

We get a2 + b2 = 21 and ab = 6√3

By inspection we have, a = 3 and b = 2√3

Applying the same method as above

By comparison x = 1 and y = 3 and x + y = 4

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 57

If x is a real number, then the total number of integral solutions of the inequality,

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 57 The given inequality is,

As can be seen the given inequality will be determined by Odd powers, since even powers will always be positive.

Also x ≠ 1 since denominator cannot be zero.

Now the odd powers are (x - 3)3 and (x + 5)5

So the possible integral values of x are 4, 3, 2, 0, -1, -2, -3, and -4, -5.

Hence the correct option is 3.

Note: If we take x < -5="" then="" (x-3)="" and="" (x+5)="" both="" will="" be="" negative="" and="" the="" final="" product="" will="" be="" positive.="" similarly="" if="" we="" take="" x="" />4 then all the terms will be positive and the product will remain positive.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 58

In a colony 40 people do not play cricket, 40 people do not play hockey and 35 people do not play football. 15 do not play football and hockey, 17 do not play cricket and hockey, 20 do not play football and cricket. 132 people play all the three sports. What is the maximum number of people who stay in the colony

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 58 Refer to the venn diagram

Let the number of people not playing cricket, Hockey and Football be denoted by nC, nH and nF respectively.

Also let x be the number of people who do not play any of the game.

From all the 7 different areas in the venn diagram we can say that none of the areas can be less than zero which means x <= 15="" or="" 0=""><= x=""><=>

The number of people not playing at least one game = 63 + x.

For the maximum number of people not playing atleast 1 sports, x has to be maximum i.e. x = 15 hence the maximum number of people who do not play atleast 1 sports = 63 + 15 = 78.

Therefore the maximum number of people staying in the colony = 78 + 132 = 210.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 59

Three boxes A, B, C each contain 4 white balls and 5 black balls. All the balls are identical except for the colour. A ball is shifted from box A to box B and then a ball is shifted from box B to box C and finally a ball is shifted from box C to box A. The probability that each of the boxes will contain again 4 white balls and 5 black balls is

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 59 Even after shifting the ball, if the boxes contain same number of black and white balls, then it can happen in two ways.

Either black ball is shifted from box A to box B and then from box B to box C and then from box C to box A, so that the same number of black and white balls remain in the boxes.

Or white ball is shifted from box A to box B, then from box B to box C and then box C to box A

Hence, we will consider each case to find the probability

Case 1: Black ball is shifted from box A to box B(5/9) and then from box B to box C(6/10) and then from box C to box A(6/10)

Case 2: white ball is shifted from box A to box B ( 4 /9), then from box B to box C(5/10) and then box C to box A(5/10)

Probability

Required probability

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 60

Let P(x) is a polynomial in x. When P(x) is divided by (x-2) the remainder is 8. When P(x) is divided by (x+2) the remainder is 4. What is the remainder when P(x) is divided by x2 - 4?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 60 Let P(x) = (x2 - 4)f(x) + ax + b

Using remainder theorem,

P(2) = 2a + b = 8

P(-2) = -2a + b = 4

Solving these, a = 1, b = 6

So required remainder is x + 6

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 61

Find the area of region common to y = |x-1| - 4 and between the axis?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 61 y = |x-1| - 4

For x>1; y = x-1-4 = x-5

For x<1; y="-(x-1)-4" =="">

Minimum value of y = -4 at x = 1.

Plot the graph on the x-y axis

Clearly the shaded region which is a triangle ABC is our required area

AB = 8 and the height = 4

Hence the area = 1/2 x 8 x 4 = 16 units

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 62

There are 3 brothers whose ages are in AP. 4 years ago, the age of the eldest brother was 3 times the age of youngest. 8 years from now the eldest would be 1.5 times the youngest. Find the sum of the ages of 3 brothers.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 62 Let their ages be a, a + d, a + 2d. Four years ago their ages were a - 4, a + d - 4, a + 2d - 4.

Now as per question: 3(a - 4) = a + 2d - 4

2a - 2d = 8

a - d = 4 (1)

From second condition given in the question:

3(a + 8) = 2(a + 2d + 8)

a - 4d = -8 (2)

On solving (1) and (2) we get a = 8 and d=4

Thus ages are 8, 12, 16. Sum of their ages = 36.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 63

In a rectangle, length of the smaller side is 16 cm. A line parallel to the smaller side is drawn such that the rectangle is divided into two rectangles P and Q such that one of the rectangles is similar to the original rectangle. How many distinct pairs of rectangles P and Q are possible? {given that the sides of both the rectangles P and Q are integral values}

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 63

Consider the given figure, Assume the rectangle 'P' to be similar to the original rectangle

So, x/ 16= 16/(x + y)= x(x + y)=256

Now, 256=16 x 16

From the factors of 256 we get 4 set of values for x & y satisfying the above

equation, they are, (1, 255), (2,126), (4, 60) and (8, 24)

Hence 8 distinct rectangles are possible that is option (3).

Alternative Method:In the given condition: "Only one of the inner rectangles can be similar to the g. original rectangle", so first we find all the factors of 16 which are 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16. Now we find the entire distinct possible ratio between these factors. The number of possible ratio will be the set of values for x and y.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 64

In the figure given below AG and BG are diameters of two circles with radii 2 cm and 6 cm respectively. G is the only point of contact of the two circles. BC is a tangent of length 12 cm to the bigger circle and BF is perpendicular to the line AC. Find the length of CF.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 64 In the ΔABC, ∠ABC = 90°

AB = 4 + 12 = 16cm,

BC = 12cm

∴ AC = √ (162 + 122) = 20 cm.

ΔABC and ΔAFB are similar (∠AFB = ∠ABC and ∠FAB = ∠BAC)

AF/AB = AB/AC => AF/16 = 16/20

AF = 12.8 cm

Therefore, CF = 20 - 12.8 = 7.2 cm

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 65

The figure below has been obtained by folding a rectangle. The total area of the figure (as visible) is 144 square meters. Had the rectangle not been folded, the current overlapping part would have been a square. What would have been the total area of the original unfolded rectangle?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 65 Folded part as shown in the first figure is a right angled triangle.

The two perpendicular sides of the right triangle measure 6m each. So, the triangle is a right isosceles triangle.

When unfolded the folded area becomes a square as shown in the following figure.

The side of the square will be the width of the larger rectangle and is therefore, 6m.

Area of the square = 6 * 6 = 36 sq.m

When folded, only the area of the right triangle gets counted. However, when unfolded the area of square gets counted.

The square comprises of two congruent right triangles.

In essence, when folded only half a square is counted. When unfolded the entire square gets counted.

The area of the rectangle when unfolded = area of the rectangle when folded + area of half a square.

So area after unfolding = 144 + 18 = 162 sq.m.

CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 66

Two designers can together patch a design on a saree in 24 minutes. If the first designer patches the design for the first 15 minutes alone, and then the second designer patches the design for the next 20 minutes alone, ¼ th of the design still remains to be patched. How long does the slower designer take to patch the design on the saree, all by herself?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 16 (23/10/2022) - Question 66 Let the 1st designer take 'A' minutes and the 2nd designer takes 'B' minutes to patch a design.

Then as per data provided in the question,

1/A + 1/B = 1/24 ... (i)

15/A + 20/B = 1 - ¼ ... (ii)

or 15/A + 15/B + 5/B = ¾

or 15/24 + 5/B = ¾ (Using Eq (i))

On solving we get B = 40 minutes.

Putting the value of B in Eq (i), we get A = 60 minutes.

Hence the slower designer takes 60 minutes to patch the design on the saree, all by herself.

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