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CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022)


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CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) for CAT 2022 is part of CAT Mock Test Series preparation. The CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) MCQs are made for CAT 2022 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) below.
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CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. Which of the following examples best represent an outlier, as described in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 1 An outlier, as described in the passage is one 'whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.' This would mean someone with extraordinary talent, one who excels in a position, where others might fail. The character in option A does show talent and skill, but is not that extraordinary, as it shows the normal good outcome of hard work. Moreover, once the boy cracked the examination, everything else was bound to follow. B is incorrect as this is not very extraordinary or surprising, as we are given factors that led to his poor performance; this implies that the student himself was not lacking in hard work or intellect. C is incorrect as it presents a surprising situation, but is not extraordinary enough on the part of the student, with respect to his talent or skill. D presents the outlier as we can infer that most college dropouts do not go on to have rich or successful careers.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. Which of the following questions cannot be answered on the basis of the information given in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 2 B is incorrect as this question is answered throughout the passage: 'Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success.'

C is incorrect as this question is answered in the last few lines: 'The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.'

D is incorrect as this question is answered in the first few paragraphs: ', Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.'

A is the right answer, as the passage only tells us what outliers are, not the conditions that must be fulfilled in order to be characterised as one.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. It can be understood that the main purpose of the author in the third paragraph is to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 3 A is incorrect as the author does not directly say or imply that attention and respect should not be given to winners. Rather he focuses more on the suggestion that one must not fall into the trap of imitating them and expecting similar returns. C is incorrect as the passage talks of all winners, not only Gates, although it does talk of him as an example. D is incorrect as this is his primary purpose in later paragraphs, not the third one. B is the right answer, as the author seeks to clear the misconception that success cannot be achieved simply by imitating life's winners, as they did not succeed through performance alone.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. Which of the following statements best sum up the author's view of Bill Gates and his success?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 4 A is incorrect as the passage makes no mention of the fact the young people are misguided, he simply seeks to clear a misconception. B is incorrect as the author does acknowledge Gates' talent, and does not call him an opportunist. D is incorrect as it attributes all of his success to luck, and makes no mention of his own qualities. C is the right answer, as it best sums up the view the author has of Gates.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. Which of the following best describes the tone of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 5 A is incorrect as the author does not criticise anyone or anything. He acknowledges Gates' talent, while subtly suggesting that there were factors other than his talent that were at play. B is incorrect as the author does not speak in a pessimistic or negative way about anything. C is incorrect as this would be too strong a word to describe the author's tone. The author offers suggestion and advice rather than a warning. D is the right answer, as the author seeks to advise the readers to not imitate outliers, or reward them with too much of praise.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. It can be understood from the passage that the author believes which of the following statements?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 6 A is incorrect as the author neither mentions nor implies this. B is incorrect as the author does say that there is a case that winners should imitate Gates in his generous acts and how he has used his wealth and success for good things. D is incorrect as countered by the following lines: 'But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things.' These lines also make it clear that the author believes the statement given in option C.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. Which of the following statement(s) is/ are confirmed from the facts provided in the passage?

I. The lack of a strong and unifying political leader in Thailand has made the country stagger further when it comes to dealing with the recent acts of terrorism that have struck the country.

II. The recent terrorist attacks in Thailand are an example of how religion can play a major role in bringing people of a common culture together in difficult times.

III. Efforts to make Buddhism as the official religion of Thailand have so far not panned out, as the government does not let religion interfere with state matters.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 7 I is confirmed from the information given in the fifth paragraph, which tells us that the acts of terrorism have left the Thai people unsure and scared, especially since there is no unifying leader. III is confirmed from the information provided in the third paragraph which tells us that there have been movements to make Buddhism the official religion; however, the state has remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion, from which we infer that this is the reason why those movements have not been successful. II cannot be confirmed from the passage; on the contrary, it is contradicted by the information given in the fourth paragraph which tells us that the recent terrorism acts show how religion can play a divisive role. D is the right answer, as only I and III are correct.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. Which of the following questions cannot be answered on the basis of the information given in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 8 A can be answered from the information given in the second paragraph, which tells us about the presence of numerous Buddhist temples, which would show a physical presence of religion in the community. B can be answered from the info given in the fourth paragraph, which tells us that the king's death occurred at a moment of tension. The paragraph then goes into the details of this moment of tension. D can be answered from the information given in the fifth paragraph, which tells us that the attack was "more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees". C cannot be answered from the passage, as the only mention of religion and tourism is made in the third paragraph, which simply states that Buddhism is an important tourist element, but does not venture into the details of how it is so. C is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 9

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. Which of the following can be said to be the central idea of the sixth paragraph?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 9 A is incorrect as the paragraph does not talk of the government's role. B is incorrect as the paragraph does not talk about the role played by local people, rather we can say that it talks about the role of local community leaders. D is incorrect as it is too specific and restricts itself to the White Dragon Temple, while the paragraph only seeks to illustrate the role played by religious institutions by means of giving an example of one such institution. C is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 10

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. What is the main purpose behind the author's words when he says: "Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late"?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 10 A is incorrect as the author does not talk of hypocrisy of the Thai people; he does not in any way hold them responsible for not living up to their name. Instead, by means od examples in the next paragraph, he seeks to delicately suggest that it is ironical and contrary to expectation that a country known for its smiles is facing circumstances that would disable its people to remain happy or smile. B is incorrect as although it is partially correct - the author does claim that the epithet no longer holds true for Thailand, he does not give us the origins of this epithet. C is the right answer, as it best sums up the main purpose that the author has in mind while using these words.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 11

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. Which of the following options best describes the tone of the above passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 11 A is incorrect as the author is not at all one-sided; he explores both how religion can play a connecting and a divisive role in Thailand. B is incorrect as although the passage is narrative to a large extent, it is not critical; the author does not criticise any aspect of the Thai society. C is incorrect as although the passage can be considered illustrative, it is not introspective; the author does not examine his/ her own feelings or thought, he restricts the content to his experiences. D is the correct answer as the passage is both narrative (the author gives an account of his experiences), and illustrative (the author seeks to explain or illustrate an idea by means of examples and facts).
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 12

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. Which of the following best sums up the final note on which the author ends the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 12 B is incorrect as the author asserts that he does not see Thailand torn by conflict, rather he sees it actively fighting to secure its future, so the possibility of disintegration, as mentioned in B does not exist. C is incorrect as the author says that the country is already fighting back, not that it should fight back. D is incorrect as the author does not single out a specific section of the society that would rebuild the country. A is the right answer, as it best sums up the final note on which the author ends the passage.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 13

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

No language has spread as widely as English, and it continues to spread. Internationally the desire to learn it is insatiable. In the twenty-first century the world is becoming more urban and more middle class, and the adoption of English is a symptom of this, for increasingly English serves as the lingua franca of business and popular culture. It is dominant or at least very prominent in other areas such as shipping, diplomacy, computing, medicine and education. A recent study has suggested that among students in the United Arab Emirates "Arabic is associated with tradition, home, religion, culture, school, arts and social sciences," whereas English "is symbolic of modernity, respect, work, higher education, commerce, economics and science and technology."

Wherever English has been used, it has lasted. Cultural might outlives military rule. In the colonial period, the languages of settlers dominated the languages of the peoples whose land they seized. They marginalized them and in some cases eventually drove them to extinction. All the while they absorbed from them whatever local terms seemed useful. The colonists' languages practised a sort of cannibalism, and its legacy is still sharply felt. English is treated with suspicion in many places where it was once the language of the imperial overlords. It is far from being a force for unity, and its endurance is stressful. In India, while English is much used in the media, administration, education and business, there are calls to curb its influence. Yet even where English has been denigrated as an instrument of colonialism, it has held on - and in most cases grown, increasing its numbers of speakers and functions.

Today it is English, rather than any created alternative, that is the world's auxiliary tongue. There are more people who use English as a second language than there are native speakers. Estimates of the numbers vary, but even the most guarded view is that English has 500 million second-language speakers. Far more of the world's citizens are eagerly jumping on board than trying to resist its progress. In places where English is used as a second language, its users often perceive it as free from the limitations of their native languages. They associate it with power and social status, and see it as a supple and sensuous medium for self-expression. It symbolizes choice and liberty. But while many of those who do not have a grasp of the language aspire to learn it, there are many others who perceive it as an instrument of oppression, associated not only with imperialism but also with the predations of capitalism and Christianity.

There are challenges to the position of English as the dominant world language in the twenty-first century. The main ones seem likely to come from Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Both have more first-language users than English. But at present neither is much used as a lingua franca. The majority of speakers of Mandarin Chinese live in one country, and, excepting Spain, most Spanish-speakers are in the Americas. Two challenges stand out. I have mentioned India already; English is important to its global ambitions. The language's roots there are colonial, but English connects Indians less to the past than to the future. Already the language is used by more people in India than in any other country, the United States included. Meanwhile in China the number of students learning the language is increasing rapidly. The entrepreneur Li Yang has developed Crazy English, an unorthodox teaching method. It involves a lot of shouting. This, Li explains, is the way for Chinese to activate their "international muscles." His agenda is patriotic.

The embrace of English in the world's two most populous countries means that the language is changing. Some of the changes are likely to prove disconcerting for its native speakers. The "English-ness" of English is being diluted. So, more surprisingly, is its American flavour. English's centre of gravity is moving; in fact, in the twenty-first century the language has many centres. As this continues, native English-speakers may find themselves at a disadvantage.

At the same time, native speakers of English tend to assume that their ability in this potent language makes it unimportant to learn other languages. The reality is different. British companies often miss out on export opportunities because of a lack of relevant language skills. Moreover, there is a chance that a command of English will within twenty or thirty years be regarded as a basic skill for business, and native speakers of the language will no longer enjoy any competitive advantage. The consequences are complex. Some, it would seem, are not as intended. Even as vast amounts are spent on spreading British English, the reality is that English is taking on more and more local colour in the different places where it is used. Accordingly, while the number of languages in the world is diminishing, the number of Englishes is increasing.

Q. It can be understood from the context of the passage that when the author says: "the number of Englishes is increasing", he means which of the following?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 13 Note that the sentence prior to this one talks about English taking on more and more local colour in the different places where it is used. The context of the last and the second to last paragraph also talks along these lines where it illustrates how English is changing as more and more people are speaking it, and how local forms are not dominating the realm of spoken English. From this we can ascertain that B is most likely to be the meaning behind the author's words. B is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 14

No language has spread as widely as English, and it continues to spread. Internationally the desire to learn it is insatiable. In the twenty-first century the world is becoming more urban and more middle class, and the adoption of English is a symptom of this, for increasingly English serves as the lingua franca of business and popular culture. It is dominant or at least very prominent in other areas such as shipping, diplomacy, computing, medicine and education. A recent study has suggested that among students in the United Arab Emirates "Arabic is associated with tradition, home, religion, culture, school, arts and social sciences," whereas English "is symbolic of modernity, respect, work, higher education, commerce, economics and science and technology."

Wherever English has been used, it has lasted. Cultural might outlives military rule. In the colonial period, the languages of settlers dominated the languages of the peoples whose land they seized. They marginalized them and in some cases eventually drove them to extinction. All the while they absorbed from them whatever local terms seemed useful. The colonists' languages practised a sort of cannibalism, and its legacy is still sharply felt. English is treated with suspicion in many places where it was once the language of the imperial overlords. It is far from being a force for unity, and its endurance is stressful. In India, while English is much used in the media, administration, education and business, there are calls to curb its influence. Yet even where English has been denigrated as an instrument of colonialism, it has held on - and in most cases grown, increasing its numbers of speakers and functions.

Today it is English, rather than any created alternative, that is the world's auxiliary tongue. There are more people who use English as a second language than there are native speakers. Estimates of the numbers vary, but even the most guarded view is that English has 500 million second-language speakers. Far more of the world's citizens are eagerly jumping on board than trying to resist its progress. In places where English is used as a second language, its users often perceive it as free from the limitations of their native languages. They associate it with power and social status, and see it as a supple and sensuous medium for self-expression. It symbolizes choice and liberty. But while many of those who do not have a grasp of the language aspire to learn it, there are many others who perceive it as an instrument of oppression, associated not only with imperialism but also with the predators of capitalism and Christianity.

There are challenges to the position of English as the dominant world language in the twenty-first century. The main ones seem likely to come from Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Both have more first-language users than English. But at present neither is much used as a lingua franca. The majority of speakers of Mandarin Chinese live in one country, and, excepting Spain, most Spanish-speakers are in the Americas. Two challenges stand out. I have mentioned India already; English is important to its global ambitions. The language's roots there are colonial, but English connects Indians less to the past than to the future. Already the language is used by more people in India than in any other country, the United States included. Meanwhile in China the number of students learning the language is increasing rapidly. The entrepreneur Li Yang has developed Crazy English, an unorthodox teaching method. It involves a lot of shouting. This, Li explains, is the way for Chinese to activate their "international muscles." His agenda is patriotic.

The embrace of English in the world's two most populous countries means that the language is changing. Some of the changes are likely to prove disconcerting for its native speakers. The "English-ness" of English is being diluted. So, more surprisingly, is its American flavour. English's centre of gravity is moving; in fact, in the twenty-first century the language has many centres. As this continues, native English-speakers may find themselves at a disadvantage.

At the same time, native speakers of English tend to assume that their ability in this potent language makes it unimportant to learn other languages. The reality is different. British companies often miss out on export opportunities because of a lack of relevant language skills. Moreover, there is a chance that a command of English will within twenty or thirty years be regarded as a basic skill for business, and native speakers of the language will no longer enjoy any competitive advantage. The consequences are complex. Some, it would seem, are not as intended. Even as vast amounts are spent on spreading British English, the reality is that English is taking on more and more local colour in the different places where it is used. Accordingly, while the number of languages in the world is diminishing, the number of Englishes is increasing.

Q. The passage is most likely to be an excerpt taken from which of the following?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 14 B is unlikely to be the answer, as the passage lacks the use of personal pronouns (I, you, me, we, us, etc.), conversational language and it does not address the listeners. C is incorrect as the passage does not involve the author's own research, studies or experiments. It only cites some studies. D is incorrect as the passage does not discuss events or happenings. A is the most likely answer, as the passage revolves around a single topic, and uses examples, studies and facts to illustrate it.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 15

No language has spread as widely as English, and it continues to spread. Internationally the desire to learn it is insatiable. In the twenty-first century the world is becoming more urban and more middle class, and the adoption of English is a symptom of this, for increasingly English serves as the lingua franca of business and popular culture. It is dominant or at least very prominent in other areas such as shipping, diplomacy, computing, medicine and education. A recent study has suggested that among students in the United Arab Emirates "Arabic is associated with tradition, home, religion, culture, school, arts and social sciences," whereas English "is symbolic of modernity, respect, work, higher education, commerce, economics and science and technology."

Wherever English has been used, it has lasted. Cultural might outlives military rule. In the colonial period, the languages of settlers dominated the languages of the peoples whose land they seized. They marginalized them and in some cases eventually drove them to extinction. All the while they absorbed from them whatever local terms seemed useful. The colonists' languages practised a sort of cannibalism, and its legacy is still sharply felt. English is treated with suspicion in many places where it was once the language of the imperial overlords. It is far from being a force for unity, and its endurance is stressful. In India, while English is much used in the media, administration, education and business, there are calls to curb its influence. Yet even where English has been denigrated as an instrument of colonialism, it has held on - and in most cases grown, increasing its numbers of speakers and functions.

Today it is English, rather than any created alternative, that is the world's auxiliary tongue. There are more people who use English as a second language than there are native speakers. Estimates of the numbers vary, but even the most guarded view is that English has 500 million second-language speakers. Far more of the world's citizens are eagerly jumping on board than trying to resist its progress. In places where English is used as a second language, its users often perceive it as free from the limitations of their native languages. They associate it with power and social status, and see it as a supple and sensuous medium for self-expression. It symbolizes choice and liberty. But while many of those who do not have a grasp of the language aspire to learn it, there are many others who perceive it as an instrument of oppression, associated not only with imperialism but also with the predations of capitalism and Christianity.

There are challenges to the position of English as the dominant world language in the twenty-first century. The main ones seem likely to come from Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Both have more first-language users than English. But at present neither is much used as a lingua franca. The majority of speakers of Mandarin Chinese live in one country, and, excepting Spain, most Spanish-speakers are in the Americas. Two challenges stand out. I have mentioned India already; English is important to its global ambitions. The language's roots there are colonial, but English connects Indians less to the past than to the future. Already the language is used by more people in India than in any other country, the United States included. Meanwhile in China the number of students learning the language is increasing rapidly. The entrepreneur Li Yang has developed Crazy English, an unorthodox teaching method. It involves a lot of shouting. This, Li explains, is the way for Chinese to activate their "international muscles." His agenda is patriotic.

The embrace of English in the world's two most populous countries means that the language is changing. Some of the changes are likely to prove disconcerting for its native speakers. The "English-ness" of English is being diluted. So, more surprisingly, is its American flavour. English's centre of gravity is moving; in fact, in the twenty-first century the language has many centres. As this continues, native English-speakers may find themselves at a disadvantage.

At the same time, native speakers of English tend to assume that their ability in this potent language makes it unimportant to learn other languages. The reality is different. British companies often miss out on export opportunities because of a lack of relevant language skills. Moreover, there is a chance that a command of English will within twenty or thirty years be regarded as a basic skill for business, and native speakers of the language will no longer enjoy any competitive advantage. The consequences are complex. Some, it would seem, are not as intended. Even as vast amounts are spent on spreading British English, the reality is that English is taking on more and more local colour in the different places where it is used. Accordingly, while the number of languages in the world is diminishing, the number of Englishes is increasing.

Q. Which of the following would be the most suitable title for the above passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 15 A is incorrect as the passage does not highlight the importance of learning English, nor does it seek to advise the user to do so; it only talks about the importance the language is going to hold in coming years. B is incorrect as this is too specific and forms only one part of the passage, and is nowhere near the main idea around which the passage revolves. C is incorrect as the passage only talks briefly about the speakers of the language as an accessory to the main topic of discussion. D is the right answer, as it best sums up the central idea, and provides a suitable title for the passage.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 16

No language has spread as widely as English, and it continues to spread. Internationally the desire to learn it is insatiable. In the twenty-first century the world is becoming more urban and more middle class, and the adoption of English is a symptom of this, for increasingly English serves as the lingua franca of business and popular culture. It is dominant or at least very prominent in other areas such as shipping, diplomacy, computing, medicine and education. A recent study has suggested that among students in the United Arab Emirates "Arabic is associated with tradition, home, religion, culture, school, arts and social sciences," whereas English "is symbolic of modernity, respect, work, higher education, commerce, economics and science and technology."

Wherever English has been used, it has lasted. Cultural might outlives military rule. In the colonial period, the languages of settlers dominated the languages of the peoples whose land they seized. They marginalized them and in some cases eventually drove them to extinction. All the while they absorbed from them whatever local terms seemed useful. The colonists' languages practised a sort of cannibalism, and its legacy is still sharply felt. English is treated with suspicion in many places where it was once the language of the imperial overlords. It is far from being a force for unity, and its endurance is stressful. In India, while English is much used in the media, administration, education and business, there are calls to curb its influence. Yet even where English has been denigrated as an instrument of colonialism, it has held on - and in most cases grown, increasing its numbers of speakers and functions.

Today it is English, rather than any created alternative, that is the world's auxiliary tongue. There are more people who use English as a second language than there are native speakers. Estimates of the numbers vary, but even the most guarded view is that English has 500 million second-language speakers. Far more of the world's citizens are eagerly jumping on board than trying to resist its progress. In places where English is used as a second language, its users often perceive it as free from the limitations of their native languages. They associate it with power and social status, and see it as a supple and sensuous medium for self-expression. It symbolizes choice and liberty. But while many of those who do not have a grasp of the language aspire to learn it, there are many others who perceive it as an instrument of oppression, associated not only with imperialism but also with the predations of capitalism and Christianity.

There are challenges to the position of English as the dominant world language in the twenty-first century. The main ones seem likely to come from Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Both have more first-language users than English. But at present neither is much used as a lingua franca. The majority of speakers of Mandarin Chinese live in one country, and, excepting Spain, most Spanish-speakers are in the Americas. Two challenges stand out. I have mentioned India already; English is important to its global ambitions. The language's roots there are colonial, but English connects Indians less to the past than to the future. Already the language is used by more people in India than in any other country, the United States included. Meanwhile in China the number of students learning the language is increasing rapidly. The entrepreneur Li Yang has developed Crazy English, an unorthodox teaching method. It involves a lot of shouting. This, Li explains, is the way for Chinese to activate their "international muscles." His agenda is patriotic.

The embrace of English in the world's two most populous countries means that the language is changing. Some of the changes are likely to prove disconcerting for its native speakers. The "English-ness" of English is being diluted. So, more surprisingly, is its American flavour. English's centre of gravity is moving; in fact, in the twenty-first century the language has many centres. As this continues, native English-speakers may find themselves at a disadvantage.

At the same time, native speakers of English tend to assume that their ability in this potent language makes it unimportant to learn other languages. The reality is different. British companies often miss out on export opportunities because of a lack of relevant language skills. Moreover, there is a chance that a command of English will within twenty or thirty years be regarded as a basic skill for business, and native speakers of the language will no longer enjoy any competitive advantage. The consequences are complex. Some, it would seem, are not as intended. Even as vast amounts are spent on spreading British English, the reality is that English is taking on more and more local colour in the different places where it is used. Accordingly, while the number of languages in the world is diminishing, the number of Englishes is increasing.

Q. Which of the following questions cannot be answered on the basis of the information given in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 16 A is answered by the information given in the fifth paragraph, which tells us how English will change, and how its 'English-ness' will be diluted. B is answered by the information given in the fourth paragraph, which tells us that users of English in countries where it is a second language associate it with power and social status. It goes into further details on the same lines. C is answered by the information provided in the third paragraph, which tells us how the language strengthened and expanded its hold in colonial times. D is the right answer, as the passage does not provide sufficient information to answer this question.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 17

No language has spread as widely as English, and it continues to spread. Internationally the desire to learn it is insatiable. In the twenty-first century the world is becoming more urban and more middle class, and the adoption of English is a symptom of this, for increasingly English serves as the lingua franca of business and popular culture. It is dominant or at least very prominent in other areas such as shipping, diplomacy, computing, medicine and education. A recent study has suggested that among students in the United Arab Emirates "Arabic is associated with tradition, home, religion, culture, school, arts and social sciences," whereas English "is symbolic of modernity, respect, work, higher education, commerce, economics and science and technology."

Wherever English has been used, it has lasted. Cultural might outlives military rule. In the colonial period, the languages of settlers dominated the languages of the peoples whose land they seized. They marginalized them and in some cases eventually drove them to extinction. All the while they absorbed from them whatever local terms seemed useful. The colonists' languages practised a sort of cannibalism, and its legacy is still sharply felt. English is treated with suspicion in many places where it was once the language of the imperial overlords. It is far from being a force for unity, and its endurance is stressful. In India, while English is much used in the media, administration, education and business, there are calls to curb its influence. Yet even where English has been denigrated as an instrument of colonialism, it has held on - and in most cases grown, increasing its numbers of speakers and functions.

Today it is English, rather than any created alternative, that is the world's auxiliary tongue. There are more people who use English as a second language than there are native speakers. Estimates of the numbers vary, but even the most guarded view is that English has 500 million second-language speakers. Far more of the world's citizens are eagerly jumping on board than trying to resist its progress. In places where English is used as a second language, its users often perceive it as free from the limitations of their native languages. They associate it with power and social status, and see it as a supple and sensuous medium for self-expression. It symbolizes choice and liberty. But while many of those who do not have a grasp of the language aspire to learn it, there are many others who perceive it as an instrument of oppression, associated not only with imperialism but also with the predations of capitalism and Christianity.

There are challenges to the position of English as the dominant world language in the twenty-first century. The main ones seem likely to come from Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Both have more first-language users than English. But at present neither is much used as a lingua franca. The majority of speakers of Mandarin Chinese live in one country, and, excepting Spain, most Spanish-speakers are in the Americas. Two challenges stand out. I have mentioned India already; English is important to its global ambitions. The language's roots there are colonial, but English connects Indians less to the past than to the future. Already the language is used by more people in India than in any other country, the United States included. Meanwhile in China the number of students learning the language is increasing rapidly. The entrepreneur Li Yang has developed Crazy English, an unorthodox teaching method. It involves a lot of shouting. This, Li explains, is the way for Chinese to activate their "international muscles." His agenda is patriotic.

The embrace of English in the world's two most populous countries means that the language is changing. Some of the changes are likely to prove disconcerting for its native speakers. The "English-ness" of English is being diluted. So, more surprisingly, is its American flavour. English's centre of gravity is moving; in fact, in the twenty-first century the language has many centres. As this continues, native English-speakers may find themselves at a disadvantage.

At the same time, native speakers of English tend to assume that their ability in this potent language makes it unimportant to learn other languages. The reality is different. British companies often miss out on export opportunities because of a lack of relevant language skills. Moreover, there is a chance that a command of English will within twenty or thirty years be regarded as a basic skill for business, and native speakers of the language will no longer enjoy any competitive advantage. The consequences are complex. Some, it would seem, are not as intended. Even as vast amounts are spent on spreading British English, the reality is that English is taking on more and more local colour in the different places where it is used. Accordingly, while the number of languages in the world is diminishing, the number of Englishes is increasing.

Q. The study on UAE students cited in the first paragraph corroborates which of the following points later mentioned in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 17 The study talks about how English is associated with higher education, respect and modernity, while Arabic is associated with tradition and culture. A does not make any sense or relation to this finding. B talks about how English has grown, while this study does not talk in that respect. D is incorrect as the study does not talk about how or to what extent people around the world are more accepting of the language. C is the right answer, as the study corroborates this point to a large extent.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 18

No language has spread as widely as English, and it continues to spread. Internationally the desire to learn it is insatiable. In the twenty-first century the world is becoming more urban and more middle class, and the adoption of English is a symptom of this, for increasingly English serves as the lingua franca of business and popular culture. It is dominant or at least very prominent in other areas such as shipping, diplomacy, computing, medicine and education. A recent study has suggested that among students in the United Arab Emirates "Arabic is associated with tradition, home, religion, culture, school, arts and social sciences," whereas English "is symbolic of modernity, respect, work, higher education, commerce, economics and science and technology."

Wherever English has been used, it has lasted. Cultural might outlives military rule. In the colonial period, the languages of settlers dominated the languages of the peoples whose land they seized. They marginalized them and in some cases eventually drove them to extinction. All the while they absorbed from them whatever local terms seemed useful. The colonists' languages practised a sort of cannibalism, and its legacy is still sharply felt. English is treated with suspicion in many places where it was once the language of the imperial overlords. It is far from being a force for unity, and its endurance is stressful. In India, while English is much used in the media, administration, education and business, there are calls to curb its influence. Yet even where English has been denigrated as an instrument of colonialism, it has held on - and in most cases grown, increasing its numbers of speakers and functions.

Today it is English, rather than any created alternative, that is the world's auxiliary tongue. There are more people who use English as a second language than there are native speakers. Estimates of the numbers vary, but even the most guarded view is that English has 500 million second-language speakers. Far more of the world's citizens are eagerly jumping on board than trying to resist its progress. In places where English is used as a second language, its users often perceive it as free from the limitations of their native languages. They associate it with power and social status, and see it as a supple and sensuous medium for self-expression. It symbolizes choice and liberty. But while many of those who do not have a grasp of the language aspire to learn it, there are many others who perceive it as an instrument of oppression, associated not only with imperialism but also with the predations of capitalism and Christianity.

There are challenges to the position of English as the dominant world language in the twenty-first century. The main ones seem likely to come from Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Both have more first-language users than English. But at present neither is much used as a lingua franca. The majority of speakers of Mandarin Chinese live in one country, and, excepting Spain, most Spanish-speakers are in the Americas. Two challenges stand out. I have mentioned India already; English is important to its global ambitions. The language's roots there are colonial, but English connects Indians less to the past than to the future. Already the language is used by more people in India than in any other country, the United States included. Meanwhile in China the number of students learning the language is increasing rapidly. The entrepreneur Li Yang has developed Crazy English, an unorthodox teaching method. It involves a lot of shouting. This, Li explains, is the way for Chinese to activate their "international muscles." His agenda is patriotic.

The embrace of English in the world's two most populous countries means that the language is changing. Some of the changes are likely to prove disconcerting for its native speakers. The "English-ness" of English is being diluted. So, more surprisingly, is its American flavour. English's centre of gravity is moving; in fact, in the twenty-first century the language has many centres. As this continues, native English-speakers may find themselves at a disadvantage.

At the same time, native speakers of English tend to assume that their ability in this potent language makes it unimportant to learn other languages. The reality is different. British companies often miss out on export opportunities because of a lack of relevant language skills. Moreover, there is a chance that a command of English will within twenty or thirty years be regarded as a basic skill for business, and native speakers of the language will no longer enjoy any competitive advantage. The consequences are complex. Some, it would seem, are not as intended. Even as vast amounts are spent on spreading British English, the reality is that English is taking on more and more local colour in the different places where it is used. Accordingly, while the number of languages in the world is diminishing, the number of Englishes is increasing.

Q. Which of the following best describes the tone of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 18 A passage with a pedestrian tone would be lacking in imaginativeness or vitality, which cannot be said of the given passage. C is incorrect as although the passage at several instances cites scientific studies and theories, the tone of the entire passage cannot be said to be so. D is incorrect as the passage does not have a subjective tone; the author restrains himself from giving his own opinions and perspectives. B is the right answer as the author seeks to explain the topic in detail and from all possible angles.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 19

Directions: Read the passages given below and choose the best answers to the questions that follow.

Low carbohydrate diets have become popular as a weight loss technique; however, critics contend such diets may have harmful side effects. One concern has been that low carbohydrate diets, which replace calories from carbohydrates with more consumption of high-protein foods like meat and eggs, alter the body's acid balance. This imbalance could lead to increased bone turnover (more rapid depletion than formation of bone) -- increasing the risk for osteoporosis.

"That's not what our study found," said lead author John D. Carter, assistant professor in the Division of Rheumatology, USF College of Medicine. "Patients on the low carbohydrate diet did lose weight, but the diet did not appear to compromise bone integrity or lead to bone loss".

Earlier animal studies suggested that low carbohydrate-high protein diets could adversely affect bone quality. "I was surprised by the results," Dr. Carter said. "People on low carbohydrate diets absorb less calcium through the gut and excrete more calcium in the urine, so you'd expect they would be leaching their bones." Dr. Carter emphasized that he does not advocate strict low-carbohydrates for long-term weight management. "Such diets may adversely overload the kidneys with protein and lead dieters to consume more artery-clogging saturated fats and cholesterol", he said.

The USF study followed 30 overweight patients for three months. Half followed a strict low carbohydrate diet -- consuming less than 20 grams of carbohydrates a day the first month and then less than 40 grams a day for the remaining two months. The control half ate a normal diet with no restrictions. The researchers used blood tests to measure the patients' breakdown and formation of bone and checked urine for signs that the dieters were complying with their low-carbohydrate diets. The difference in bone turnover between the low carbohydrate dieters and the non-dieters was insignificant after three months. But, the dieters lost significantly more weight -- an average of 14 pounds than the patients on unrestricted diets. A potential limitation of the USF study was that the researchers looked for at least a 50 percent difference in bone turnover between the dieters and non-dieters. It's possible that more subtle effects on bone quality might have been found, Dr. Carter said, particularly if the low carbohydrate diet was maintained beyond three months. The basis of a sound weight reduction program should be nutritional education with respect to food and its use in achieving caloric balance and on the need for regular exercise and physical activity. Emphasis should be on the need for a long persistent effort in this most difficult problem. Calories still count -and it would seem that the most desirable metabolic mixture at a reduced calorie level would be the one that would represent all the basic categories of nutritional elements and provide a balanced contribution of all essential nutrients. The advocates of severely restricted carbohydrate diets must consider and share the responsibility related to the increased hazards of such diets.

Q. It can be inferred from the passage that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 19 We are told that low carbohydrate diets may lead to an increase in the intake of "artery-clogging saturated fats and cholesterol", from which it can be inferred that there will be a higher risk of heart attacks. Option 1 cannot be inferred from the passage because the information provided with respect to this particular point is insufficient. Options 2 and 4 are both extreme cases, in keeping with the idea discussed in the passage, but too far-fetched to be appropriate.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 20

Direction: Question given below has five statements. The statements need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph. Give the most appropriate order.

  1. Ensuring safe passage for these huge tow trucks through East Yorkshire's narrow village streets, with their ancient brick cottages, is a nerve-racking business.

  2. The images update so quickly that she is able to guide drivers in real time through tricky turnings and into suitable parking spaces.

  3. The weather-beaten cabin stands at the end of a road through fields, past high metal gates and a barking guard dog.

  4. Bell tracks her fleet's position on Google maps, flicking to the photographic street view

  5. Inside, Melanie Bell sits in front of a constantly updating computer screen - the nerve centre from which she controls her family's fleet of 17 articulated vehicles


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 20 The correct answer is 35142. 3 starts the paragraph, 'the weather beaten cabin' in 3 recurs in 5 'Inside' (it means inside the Cabin). The pronoun 'these' in 1 refers to the 'vehicles' in 5, hence 351 is the link, and the 'Google maps' in 4 should come before 'The images 'in 1.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 21

Direction: 3 out of the following 4 sentences form a coherent paragraph. Identify the sentence that is placed out of context.

  1. It's clear to me that they have a solid and complete understanding of the strengths and, more importantly, the weaknesses of the west.

  2. Attacking Isis directly, by air strikes or special operations forces, is a very tempting option available to policymakers, with immediate (but not always good) results.

  3. When it comes to regional insurgency with global implications, Isis leaders are canny strategists.

  4. They know how we tick in America and Europe - and they know what pushes us toward intervention and overreach.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 21 Three statements in the given case are inter-linked by a common subject, that is 'Isis leaders'. These statements are 3-1-4, and they form a sequence in the order given. Although statement 2 is about Isis only, it is the odd one out as it does not fit with the topic in the other 3 statements, that is Isis leaders.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 22

Direction: The following paragraph consists of four sentences, three of which form a coherent paragraph when arranged in the correct order. Identify the one that is not part of the paragraph.

  1. But in the case of humanitarian aid for education, there has been a long-term undervaluing of its importance: it forms only 2% of humanitarian aid budgets.

  2. Sadly, some have been forced into child labour, some girls have been forced to become child brides and some, tragically, are being recruited into militant organisations.

  3. And it is shameful that in the case of the current Syrian crisis in Lebanon there is a plan that can help all exiled children, but we do not have sufficient international aid to deliver it.

  4. Often the reason that help is not provided, and suffering not relieved, is that it is impossible to deliver aid in an emergency and the chaos makes coordination too difficult.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 22 In this case, the pair of connected statement is: 4-1-3 (in that order).

The first pair you should be easily able to spot is 4-1. Statement 4 presents a general scenario and statement 1 provides an explanation with respect to education. Statement 3 then taken this forward by explaining what is happening in Syrian.

Statement 2 is related to the context but it cannot be placed with any of the three statements. Also, while reading it, one should observe that it is making a reference to some children, and it seems that the part before this statement is missing in the given context.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 23

Modernity has long been obsessed with, perhaps even defined by, its epistemic insecurity, its grasping toward big truths that ultimately disappoint as our world grows only less knowable. New knowledge and new ways of understanding simultaneously produce new forms of non-knowledge, new uncertainties and mysteries. The scientific method, based in deduction and falsification, is better at proliferating questions than it is at answering them. For instance, Einstein's theories about the curvature of space and motion at the quantum level provide new knowledge and generates new unknowns that previously could not be pondered.

Q. Which of the following best summarizes the passage?

  1. Modernity has managed to aggravate the existing intellectual mess that we find ourselves in.

  2. Modernity has not managed to provide the answers it was searching for and in the process, found itself out of sync with reality.

  3. Modernity, in its quest for knowledge, has ended by raising questions instead of answering them.

  4. Modernity has not managed to add to the collective knowledge of mankind and this is its failure.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 23 Option 1 is too extreme an answer option.

Option 2 is ruled out at its second part is not mentioned in the passage.

Option 3 is the apt choice at is perfectly synthesizes the answer options.

Option 4 is a judgment that is not present in the given question.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 24

In order to boost the overall production, the use of pesticides in commercial farming is something that has become a necessity. But the overuse of pesticides has had a negative impact on the overall ecology of the area. One, pesticides lead to the killing of bees and butterflies. The bees and butterflies among others are pollinators and are needed in perpetuating plant cycles and evolution. Secondly, the overuse of pesticides gives rise to mutant pests, which develop resistance to pesticides and continue to breed.

Q. From the passage above, it can be inferred that:

  1. The use of pesticides does more harm than good in the overall scheme of things and there should be a rethink whether pesticides should be used.

  2. The use of pesticides needs to be limited to those chemicals which do not impact bees and butterflies so that these can flourish.

  3. The use of pesticides needs to be managed in such a way that no one species is targeted and no one species assumes a dominant position in any particular crop cycles.

  4. The use of pesticides needs to be limited to the ones that do not cause any mutation and do not lead to the creation of super-pests.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 24 In the given case, option 3 represents the perfect choice. It highlights the two aspects of the paragraph (bee/butterfly protection and prevention of mutant pests) in an indirect way. Effectively, the inference in this question is the unsaid conclusion of the paragraph. Option 4 is ruled out as it highlights only one aspect of the paragraph. Option 1 is not right as it counters the first line of the paragraph which states that pesticide use is required. Option 2 is ruled out as it only highlights one aspect of the paragraph.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 25

Direction: Study the following table carefully to answer these questions:

Number of students studying different disciplines at graduate level from State A over the years.

Q. Total number of students studying medicine for all the years together is approximately what percent of those studying Engineering for all the year together?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 25 Total no.of Medicine students = 13710

Total no.of Engineering students = 20440

Required percentage

= 13710 / 20440 × 100 = 13700 / 20400 × 100 = 67%

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 26

Direction: Study the following table carefully to answer these questions:

Number of students studying different disciplines at graduate level from State A over the years.

Q. What is the average number of students studying arts?(Rounded off to an integer)

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 26 Total no.of Arts students over the year = 16250

Total no.of years = 6

Average no.of students studying Arts = 16250 / 6 ≈ 2708

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 27

The angle between the minute hand and the hour hand of a clock when the time is 8.30, is

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 27 At 8 o' clock, the hour hand is at 240 degrees from the vertical.

In 30 minutes, Hour hand = 240 + 30 × (0.5) = 240 + 15 = 255 (The hour hand moves at 0.5dpm)

Minute hand = 30 × (6) = 180 (The minute hand moves at 6 dpm )

Difference or angle between the hands = 255 − 180 = 75 degrees.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 28

In the following question, various terms of an alphabet series are given with one or more missing terms as shown by (?). Choose the missing term out of the given alternatives.

XYA, XYC, XYB, XYD, XYC, ?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 28 In this series, XY remains constant while the third letter changes in the pattern +2,−1,+2,−1….

The next term should be XYE.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 29

Direction: Study the following table carefully to answer these questions:

Number of workers employed in six units of a factory over the years.

Q. For all the given years what is the difference between the average number of workers in units D and E?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 29 Average number of workers in unit

D = (120 + 112 + 124 + 135 + 118 + 128) / 6 = 737 / 6

Average number of workers in unit

E = (140 + 152 + 158 + 166 + 170 + 175) / 6 = 961 / 6

Hence, required difference

= 961 / 6 −737 / 6 = 224 / 6 =

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 30

Direction: Study the following table carefully to answer these questions:

Number of workers employed in six units of a factory over the years.

Q. What is the approximate ratio of the number of workers employed in all the units in 1998 to that in 1999 ?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 30 The number of workers in 1998 = 145 + 88 + 115 + 120 + 140 + 136 = 744

The number of workers in 1999 = 128 + 76 + 122 + 112 + 152 + 132 = 722

Required ratio = 744 : 722 = 37:36

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 31

Direction: Study the following table carefully to answer these questions:

Number of workers employed in six units of a factory over the years.

Q. In which year is the percentage increase/decrease in the number of workers employed the minimum for unit 'F'?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 31

In 1999, decrease % = 4 / 136 × 100 ≈ 2.94

In 2000, increase % = 8 / 132 × 100 ≈ 6.06

In 2001, decrease % = 14 / 140 × 100 = 10

In 2002, increase % = 20 / 126 × 100 ≈ 15.87

In 2003, increase % = 4 / 14 × 100 ≈ 2.74

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 32

Direction: Study the following table carefully to answer these questions:

Number of workers employed in six units of a factory over the years.

Q. For all the given years, in which unit the average number of workers employed was the maximum?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 32 The unit which shows the number of total workers the highest have an average number of workers employed maximum.

Hence the average number of workers in unit E is the maximum.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 33

Direction: Study the following table carefully to answer these questions:

Number of workers employed in six units of a factory over the years.

Q. In the year 2000 the number of workers employed by unit 'C' is what percent of the total number of workers employed by all the units in the same year(rounded off to two places of decimal)?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 33 The number of workers employed by unit C in year

2000 = 132

The number of workers employed by all the units in the same year

= 136 + 96 + 132 + 124 + 158 + 140 = 786

Hence, the required percentage

= 132 / 786 × 100 = 16.79

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 34

Direction: Study the information given below carefully, and answer the question that follow:

On a stage, D, N, A and P are standing as described below facing North.

(1) N is 2.5m to the west of A.

(2) K is 4m to the right of A.

(3) D is 6m to the south of K.

(4) P is 9m to the north of D.

Q. If a boy walks from N, meets A followed by K, D and then P, how many metres has he walked if he has travelled the straight distance all through?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 34

Required distance = NA + AK + KD + DP = 2.5 + 4 + 6 + (6 + 3) = 21.5m

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 35

Direction: Read the given information carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Eleven friends M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in the first row of the stadium watching a cricket match.

T is to the immediate left of P and third to the right of U.

V is the immediate neighbour of M and N and third to the left of S.

M is the second to the right of Q, who is at one of the ends.

R is sitting next to the right of P and P is second to the right of O.

Q. Which of the following people are sitting to the right of S?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 35 The arrangement of the persons is

Q W M V N U S O T P R

OTPR are sitting to the right of S.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 36

Direction: Read the given information carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Eleven friends M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in the first row of the stadium watching a cricket match.

T is to the immediate left of P and third to the right of U.

V is the immediate neighbour of M and N and third to the left of S.

M is the second to the right of Q, who is at one of the ends.

R is sitting next to the right of P and P is second to the right of O.

Q. Which of the following statements is true with respect to the above arrangement?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 36 The arrangement of the persons is

Q W M V N U S O T P R

Hence N is sitting between V and U.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 37

Direction: Read the given information carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Eleven friends M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in the first row of the stadium watching a cricket match.

T is to the immediate left of P and third to the right of U.

V is the immediate neighbour of M and N and third to the left of S.

M is the second to the right of Q, who is at one of the ends.

R is sitting next to the right of P and P is second to the right of O.

Q. Who are the immediate neighbours of T?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 37 The arrangement of the persons is

Q W M V N U S O T P R

O and P are the immediate neighbours of T.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 38

Direction: Read the given information carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Eleven friends M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in the first row of the stadium watching a cricket match.

T is to the immediate left of P and third to the right of U.

V is the immediate neighbour of M and N and third to the left of S.

M is the second to the right of Q, who is at one of the ends.

R is sitting next to the right of P and P is second to the right of O.

Q. If Q and P, O and N, M and T, and W and R interchange their positions then which of the following pairs of friends is sitting at the ends?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 38 The arrangement of the persons is

Q W M V N U S O T P R

If the persons as given in the question change their positions then we have the arrangement P R T V O U S N M Q W

Hence P and W are sitting at the ends.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 39

Direction: Read the given information carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Eleven friends M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in the first row of the stadium watching a cricket match.

T is to the immediate left of P and third to the right of U.

V is the immediate neighbour of M and N and third to the left of S.

M is the second to the right of Q, who is at one of the ends.

R is sitting next to the right of P and P is second to the right of O.

Q. Who is sitting in the center of the row?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 39 The arrangement of the persons is

Q W M V N U S O T P R

U is sitting in the center of the row.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 40

Direction: Complete the Series given below

_ yz _ zx _ xyx _ z _ zxzxy


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 40 The series is xyz/yzx/zxy /xyz/yzx/zxy. So, the letters change places in a cyclic manner.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 41

Direction: Complete the series given below

_ xx _ yx _ yy _ xy _ xxy


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 41 The series is yxxy/yxxy/yxxy/yxxy.

Thus, the pattern 'yxxy' is repeated.

yyxxy is the right fit here.

Hence option 3 is the correct option

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 42

Direction: Complete the series given below

BAZ, DBY, FCX, ?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 42 The third, sixth and ninth letters are in the reverse order of the alphabet i.e.Z, Y, X, W. Ist fourth and seventh letters are going up with a gap of one letter and II, V and VIIIth are moved ahead one letter.
CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 43

Direction: Akshat and Akanksha were given some toffees and a bar of chocolate. They could divide the toffees among themselves equally, but each wanted the complete bar of chocolate for themselves. So they decided to play a game.

Akshat took 12 toffees and arranged them in two columns as shown.

The rules of the game are as follows:

1. Each person will get a turn alternately. During a turn, a person has to pick up at least 1 toffee. A person can pick up any number of toffees during their turn as long as they all belong to the same column.

For example, the first person to play can pick up 7 toffees, but not 8 as the eighth would belong to the other column.

2. The last person to pick up a toffee will win. He/She will be given the chocolate bar as well as half of the remaining toffees, which were not used in the game. The loser of the game will get the remaining half of the unused toffees. A person is allowed to keep the toffees he/she picked up during the game.

Each person plays logically and to win.

Q. Akshat went first and picked up some toffees which ensured that he wins. What is the total number of toffees that Akanksha picks up during the game?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 43 In these types of games, one has to rely on backward induction.

Let (a,b) denote that there are 'a' and 'b' toffees in the two columns.

Since there is no constraint on how many toffees a person can pick up from a single column, the number of toffees left in a single column does not matter if the second column is empty. Hence to win, a player should never pick up all the toffees from a column. Since the players are playing logically and to win, they will never do this.

Hence on the second last turn, at least 1 toffee is left in each column.

But if a person wants to win, and leaves 1 toffee in one column and 2 or more toffees in the other, then the other player will just pick up one toffee from the column which has 2 toffees. Because of this, the first player will be forced to pick a toffee and a toffee will be left in the other column.

Hence if (1,1) toffees are left, the person whose turn it is next will lose.

But if he leaves 2 toffees two toffees in each column after his/her turn, then no matter how many toffees are picked up next, he/she will always win.

If the second person picks 1, the first has to pick 1 from the other column, leaving (1,1) toffees, which is a winning situation for the first.

The second player cannot pick up 2, as explained earlier that a logical player will not empty a column, as it means immediate defeat.

Hence if (2,2) toffees are left, the person whose turn it is next will lose.

Hence we can see the pattern that a person has to leave an equal number of toffees in each column after their turn to ensure winning. Hence a person must pick up the number of toffees which makes the toffees equal in both the columns.

Initially, the number of toffees were (7,5). So Akshat will pick up 2 toffees to make it (5,5).

After this, If Akanksha picks up 1 toffee, Akshat will also pick up 1 toffee, making it (4,4). The same will go on till (1,1) toffees are left. So after the first turn, Akshat will ensure that both of them pick up the same number of toffees. Hence Akshat will have picked up (2+5)=7 toffees and Akanksha will have picked up 5 toffees by the time the game ends.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 44

Direction: Alex, Cane and John are three drivers who drive a passenger bus, in shifts, from Paris to Luxembourg every day. Due to the heavy traffic at peak hours, the time it takes for them to travel between the two cities depends on their starting times at the originating city. If they start at 8:00 AM, 9:00 AM or 10:00 AM, it takes 18 hours to travel between the two cities. If they start at 7:00 PM, 8:00 PM or 9:00 PM, it takes them 20 hours to travel between the two cities. If they start at any other time, it takes them 15 hours to travel between the two cities. Each time they reach their destination city, they take rest for 1 hour before proceeding to the next city.

1 trip is defined as the journey from one city to another.

Q. If they start at 6:00 AM from Luxembourg, what is the average time/hours per trip for their first 25 trips?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 44 Let’s solve this set by converting the times into 24-hour format.

If they start at 8, 9, 10 hours, they will take 18 hours. If they start at 19, 20, 21 hours, they will take 20 hours. Else, they take 15 hours.

They start at 6:00 hours from Luxembourg. They’ll reach Paris at 21:00 hours.

Let’s represent their trips -

6:00 (P) - 21:00 (L) = 15 hours

22:00 (L) - 13:00 (P) = 15 hours

14:00 (P) - 5:00 (L) = 15 hours

6:00 (L) - 21:00(P) = 15 hours

22:00 (P) - 13:00 (L) = 15 hours

14:00 (L) - 5:00 (P) = 15 hours

6:00(P) -

Now, this cycle will repeat. Since all the trips take 15 hours, the average trip time will also be 15 hours.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 45

A and B are equally strong chess players. (Both have a 50% chance of winning when they play each other). Let 'X' be the probability that A will beat B in 3 games out of 4, 'Y' be the probability that A will beat B in 5 games out of 8. Which of the following is definitely true?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 45 X: The total number of outcomes is 24 = 16. For A to win 3 games, B has to win 1 game. This is possible in 4 ways. So, X = 4/16 = 1/4.

Y: The total number of outcomes is 24 = 256. For A to win 5 games, B has to win 3 games. This can happen in 8C3 ways = 56. So, Y = 56/256 = 7/32

1/4 > 7/32 or X > Y.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 46

Consider another example where a pack contains 4 blue, 2 red and 3 black pens. If a pen is drawn at random from the pack, replaced and the process repeated 2 more times, What is the probability of drawing 2 blue pens and 1 black pen?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 46 Here, the total number of pens = 9

Probability of drawing 1 blue pen = 4 / 9

Probability of drawing another blue pen = 4 / 9

Probability of drawing 1 black pen = 3 / 9

Probability of drawing 2 blue pens and 1 black pen =4 / 9 × 4 / 9 × 3 / 9 = 48 / 729 = 16 / 243

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 47

If the ratio of the population of town Timbuktoo to that of Gimbuktoo is 7 : 9. Total number of male population of Timbuktoo is equal to female population of Gimbuktoo and the ratio of the female population of Timbuktoo to the male population of Gimbuktoo be 2 : 3, then what is the ratio of the male population of Timbuktoo to the male population of Gimbuktoo?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 47 Let male population of Timbuktoo be m1 and male population of Gimbuktoo be m2

Let female population of Timbuktoo be f1 and female population of Gimbuktoo be f2

So (m1 + f1) : (m2 + f2) = 7 : 9

m1 = f2

f1 : m2 = 2 : 3

⇒ 3f1 = 2m2

So (m1 + (2/3)m2) : (m2 + m1) = 7 : 9

9m1 + 6m2 = 7m2 + 7m1

m1 : m2 = 1 : 2

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 48

What is the angle between the lines represented by (x + y)2 - 3k(x + y) - 28k2 = 0?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 48 (x + y)2 - 3k(x + y) - 28k2 = 0

Assume (x + y) = a

So, we get

a2 - 3ka - 28k2 = 0

or (a + 4k)(a - 7k) = 0

Thus the equations of the two lines represented are as follows (x + y + 4k) and (x +y - 7k) respectively.

As both the lines have the same slope = -1, they are parallel in nature.

Hence, the angle formed between the pair of lines is 0 degrees.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 49

The success rate of Hirak is 66.66% out of 201 lawn tennis matches he had played, find the minimum number of additional matches to be played so that he has a success rate of 80%.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 49 Since minimum number of matches is to be found out it implies that all the matches have been won by him. Let the minimum number of matches played be x.

(66.66% of 201 + x)/(201 + x) = 0.8

⇒ (134 + x)/(201 + x) = 0.8

⇒ 5x + 60 = 4x + 800

⇒ x = 134

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 50

There are 10 points in a plane, no three of which are in the same straight line, except 4 points which are collinear. The total number of triangles that can be formed with the vertices as these points is:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 50 Number of triangles formed joining the 10 points taken 3 at a time = 10C3 = 120

Number of triangles formed joining the 4 points taken 3 at a time = 4C3 = 4

But four collinear points cannot form a triangle when taken 3 at a time

So the total number of required triangle = 120 - 4 = 116.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 51

The domain of the definition of the function y(x) is given by the equation 2x + 2y = 2 is:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 51 It is given that 2x + 2y = 2 for all x,y € R

But 2x, 2y > 0 for all x,y € R

Therefore, 2x = 2 - 2y < 2 => 0 < 2x < 2

Taking log for both sides with base 2 ⇒ -∞ < x < 1

Hence (4) is the correct option.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 52

A rhombus, of side 6cm, is rotated around its longer diagonal, to make a solid. If the length of the longer diagonal is 4√5 cm, what will be the volume (in cm3) of the resultant solid thus formed?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 52 When the rhombus is rotated around its longer diagonal, the resultant solid will be of a shape similar to two identical cones which have been joined at their bases.

Thus the height of each of the cones will be half the length of the longer diagonal, while the radius of their bases will be half of the shorter diagonal.

Now let the shorter diagonal be 's' cm,

(4√5/2)2 + (s/2)2 = 62

or 20 + (s/2)2 = 36

or 's' = 8 cm

Hence the cones shall have a height of 2√5cm, and a base radius of 4 cm.

Thus the Volume of the solid = Twice Volume of each Cone = 2 x ⅓ π x (4)2 x 2√5 cm3

or Volume of Solid = 64√5π/3 cm3

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 53

Find the volume of a sphere whose radius is √2 times the radius of another sphere which exactly fits in a cube of side 18.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 53 Sphere fits exactly in the cube.

∴ Side of cube = diameter of sphere

∴ Radius of sphere = 9

∴ Radius of the sphere whose volume is required = 9√2

Volume = 4/3 x p x 2√2 x 729

= 8p x √2 x 243

= 1944 π√2

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 54

Vishnu, a money lender for the first year charges 2% p.a, for the second year he charges 4% p.a and so on. If suppose he lends a sum in this way at simple interest, the least integral number of years in which it will fetch an interest equal to itself is

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 54 Let the amount he lends be Rs x.

Let us assume that the least number of years it takes for the sum to fetch an interest at least equal to itself be m. so the rate of the interest for the mth year = 2m% p.a,

So x[2/100 + 4/100 + .. (2m/100)] ≥ x

Or, m(m + 1) ≥ 100

So if m = 10, m(m + 1) > 100

So m = 10.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 55

A can build a wall in 12 days. B can break it in 20 days and C can build it in 10 days. If they work in the order A, B, C and no two workers work on the same day, then on which day will the wall be built completely?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 55 Let us consider the total work to be done as 60 units (LCM of 12, 20 and 10). Now let us break it down into blocks of 3 days. On first day A builds 5 units of wall

On second day B breaks 3 unit of wall and on third day C builds 6 units of wall.

So in 3 days 8 units of wall are built.

Now in this way 56 units of wall will be built in 7 such blocks, i.e. 21 days.

On 22 day A will complete the construction of the wall.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 56

In a heptagon, all the vertices are joined to form a triangle. How many of the triangles thus formed will have not a single side common with the heptagon?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 56 A heptagon has 7 vertices.

Hence total number of triangles possible = 7C3 = 35

Out of these 35 triangles,

No. of triangles having 1 side common = 7 x 3 = 21

No. of triangles having 2 sides common = 7

Hence the number of triangles having no side common with the heptagon = 35 - 21 - 7 = 7.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 57

Let a, b, c be the lengths of the sides of a triangle ABC, while p, q, r be the lengths of the sides of another triangle PQR. If p2/a = q2/b = r2/c = Perimeter of Triangle ABC, then what can be inferred about the nature of the triangle PQR?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 57 p2/a = q2/b = r2/c = P, where P is the perimeter of Triangle ABC

Thus p2 + q2 = (a + b)P

Similarly r2 = cP

But we know that for any Triangle, sum of any two sides is greater than 3rd side, (a +b) > c

Thus we get p2 + q2 > r2

Similarly p2 + r2 > q2 and r2 + q2 > p2

Hence Triangle PQR is an acute angled Triangle.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 58

Which of the following numbers can never be a perfect square in any base system?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 58 If a number can be expressed in the form Nk or Nk + 1, where N and k are positive integers, then that number can be a perfect square.

For example: Consider 75x, x is the base. 75x can be expressed in decimal form as

75x = 7x + 5, since it is not in the form Nk or Nk + 1, 75 cannot be a perfect square in any base system

Consider, 56x

56x = 5x + 6 = 5x + 5 + 1 = 5(x + 1) + 1. Now if we substitute the value of x as 15, 56x is equivalent to 81 in the decimal system, which is a perfect square. Hence, 56 is a perfect square number in base 15.

Similarly considering for the given numbers,

35x = 3x + 5 = 3(x + 1) + 2 can never be a perfect square as every perfect square is of the form 3k or 3k + 1.

37x = 3x + 7 = 3(x + 2) + 1 can be a perfect square, e.g. for x = 31, it is a perfect square.

45x = 4x + 5 = 4(x + 1) + 1 can be a perfect square, e.g. for x = 19, it is a perfect square.

Hence, option A is a correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 59

In a school of 600 students, 350 students are boys and the rest are girls. Ravi and Shweta were standing for the post of General Secretary. 60% of the boys voted for Ravi and the rest of the boys voted for Shweta. 60% of the girls voted for Shweta and the rest of the girls voted for Ravi. It was later found out that the voting machine was faulty and 50% of the boys who voted for Ravi had actually voted for Shweta and 60% of the boys who voted for Shweta had actually voted for Ravi. Also, 39% of the girls who voted for Ravi had actually voted for Shweta and 1/3rd of the girls who voted for Shweta had actually voted for Ravi. What is the absolute difference between the votes received by Ravi and Shweta?

(Assume that all the students voted)


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 59 The number of boys in the school = 350 and the number of girls in the school = 250

Initially, 60% of the boys = 210 boys voted for Ravi and 140 boys voted for Shweta.

Also, 40% of the girls = 100 girls voted for Ravi and 150 girls voted for Shweta.

50% of the boys who voted for Ravi had actually voted for Shweta I.e. 105 boys who voted for Ravi had actually voted for Shweta

Thus, the vote count right now Ravi = 105 boys and 100 girls

Shweta = 140+105 boys and 150 girls.

60% of the boys who voted for Shweta had actually voted for Ravi.

Thus, the vote count now becomes Ravi = 189 boys and 100 girls

Shweta = 161 boys and 150 girls.

39% of the girls who voted for Ravi had actually voted for Shweta

Thus, the vote count now becomes Ravi = 189 boys and 61 girls

Shweta = 161 boys and 150+39 girls.

1/3rd of the girls who voted for Shweta had actually voted for Ravi

Thus, the final vote count becomes = 189 boys and 111 girls = 300 votes

Shweta = 161 boys and 139 girls = 300 votes.

Thus, the difference between the votes received by Ravi and Shweta = 0

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 60

There are 24 points on a plane such that 10 of them are collinear. No 4 points are vertices of a cyclic quadrilateral. Find the maximum number of circles that can be drawn through any three points.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 60 A circle can be drawn through any three points on a given plane, provided they are not collinear.

Now, there are 24 points, so the total number of ways three points can be chosen = 24C3

​However, if we choose any three of the given ten points that are collinear, we won't be able to form a circle.

Hence, those cases need to be excluded.

Total number of ways = 10C3

The total number of circles = 24C3 - 10C3

= 1904

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 61

The number of ways in which 16 sovereigns can be distributed among 3 applicants such that each applicant does not receive less than 3 sovereigns is:


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 61 Let x, y, z be the number of sovereigns received by the 3 applicants.

Then x ≥ 3, y ≥ 3, z ≥ 3 and x + y + z = 16.

Let u = x - 3, v = y - 3 and w = z - 3,then u ≥ 0, v ≥ 0, w ≥ 0

So, u + 3 + v + 3 + w + 3 = 16

Or, u + v + w = 7

The total number of the solutions of the given equation is 7+3-1C3-1 = 9C2 = 36.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 62

How many distinct triangles have all three sides in integer units, none of which is a part of any Pythagorean Triplet?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 62 Observe that each odd integer > 2 is part of at least one Pythagorean triplet. (Suppose k is an odd number then k2 is also odd. Let k2= m2+(m+ 1)2. Then, clearly, k, m and m+ 1 form a Pythagorean triplet). Numbers 1 and 2 are not part of any of the triplets. What remains is all even numbers > 3. See that an even number is either a power of 2 or a multiple of an odd number. So all those even numbers, which are multiples of odds are also involved in some triplet. 4 is also a member of one triplet i.e., (3, 4, 5) so all of its multiples; and thus all powers of 2 (excluding 2 itself) are also involved

in some triplet. So from the set of Natural Numbers, only 1 and 2 are not members of any triplet. So we need to draw triangles, having sides from {1,2}. Note that only three distinct triangles can be drawn.

Triangles with:

(I) Sides 1, 1, 1 (II) Sides 2, 2, 2 (III) Sides 1, 2, 2

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 63

Neeraj sells a LED TV to Siddarth for a profit of 10%. Siddarth sells it to Rahul for a loss of 15% and Rahul sells it to Akhil for Rs 33660. If Rahul earned a profit of 20% in the transaction, find the price at which Neeraj purchased the TV.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 63 In such questions it is always better to go backwards. Rahul earned 20% by selling at 33600, so CP for him would be 33660/1.2 = Rs 28050.

So SP for Siddarth was 28050

Now, he sold it at a loss of 15% so CP for him is 28050/.85 = 33000.

Now this was the SP for Neeraj. So CP for Neeraj = 33000/1.1 = 30000

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 64

The faces of a cube of n cm is first painted red and then the cube is cut into smaller cubes of 1cm. If the difference between the number of cubes with 1 face painted and the number with 2 faces painted is 90, what is the number of cubes with no face painted?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 64 For n cm sized cube the number of cubes with 3 faces painted = 8

Number of cubes with 2 faces painted = 12x(n - 2)

Number of cubes with 1 face painted = 6(n - 2)2

Number of cubes with 0 face painted = (n - 2)3

Given 6(n - 2)2 - 12(n - 2) = 90

So (n - 2)(n - 4) = 15

Or n = 7

Therefore number of cubes with 0 face painted = (7 - 2)3 = 125

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 65

What is the remainder when 52 + 53 + 54 + ..... +5n,where n = 257, is divided by 52?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 65 Take the first 4 terms 52 + 53 + 54+ 55 = 52(1 + 5 + 25 + 125) = 25 x 156.

Also 156 = 12 x 13 = 52 x 3

Hence the sum of the first 4 terms is divisible by 52. There are 256 terms in all, which can be arranged in a group of 4 terms and the sum of each group will be divisible by 52, hence the remainder is 0.

CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 66

A fruit seller sells oranges using a unique pricing strategy: if the number of oranges you buy is less than or equal to 100, you will have to pay Rs.10 per orange. However, the shopkeeper offers a discount such that for every additional orange above 100, a discount of Rs. (1/40) per orange is levied on the entire bunch. If the seller plans to put a box for sale having ‘n’ oranges, what should be the value of ‘n’ such that the revenue from this box is maximized?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 (30/10/2022) - Question 66 Revenue from the sale of 100 oranges = 100 x 10 = 1000

⇒ Let the revenue be maximum for kk additional oranges sold.

Hence the new revenue would be

⇒ The value will be maximum at the point where this function is differentiated and then equated to zero.

On solving, we get k = 150k = 150

Thus, the value of the function would be maximum at k = 150

Therefore, the value of ‘n’ for which the revenue would be maximum is given by

(100 + 150) = 250

Hence, the required answer is 250.

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