CAT Mock Test - 17


100 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2020 | CAT Mock Test - 17


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This mock test of CAT Mock Test - 17 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 100 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT CAT Mock Test - 17 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CAT Mock Test - 17 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this CAT Mock Test - 17 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CAT Mock Test - 17 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

The sum of the present ages of the father and the son is 60 yrs. Six yrs ago, the father was 5 times as old as his son. The age of the son after 6 yrs will be

Solution:

Let the age of son be x and the age of father be y
According to question,
x + y = 60 .....(1)
and
y - 6 = 5(x - 6)
⇒ y - 6 = 5x - 30
⇒ 5x - y = 24 .....(2)
Solving equation (1) and (2)
6x = 84
⇒ x = 14 years
Age of son after 6 yesrs
= (14 + 6) years = 20 years

QUESTION: 2

The digits of a three-digit number A are written in the reverse order to form another three digit number B. If B > A and B - A is perfectly divisible by 7, then which of the following is necessarily true ?

Solution:

Let A = 100x + 10y + z
⇒ B = 100z + 10y + x
B - A = 99 (z - x)
For B - A to be divided by 7, z - x has to be divisible by 7. Only possibility is z = 9, x = 2
∴ Biggest number A can be 299

QUESTION: 3

A telecom service provider engages male and female operators for answering 1000 calls per day. A male operator can handle 40 calls per day whereas a female operator can handle 50 calls per day. The male and the female operators get a fixed wage of Rs. 250 and Rs. 300 per day respectively. In addition, a male opeartor gets Rs. 15 per call he answers and a female operator gets Rs. 10 per call she answers. To minimize the total cost, how many male operators should the service provider employ assuming he has to employ assuming he has to employ more than 7 of the 12 female operators avilable for the job ?

Solution:

let x be no. of male and y be no. of female operators.
We have 40x + 50y = 1000
x = 25 - (5*y/4)
=> y = 7,12
So y can be 8 or 12
If y = 8 then x = 15
If y = 12 then x = 10
Cost is minimum in 2nd case when no. of males are 10.

QUESTION: 4

In the following questions two equations numbered I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer.

I. x2 + 28 = 11 x
II. 2y2 + 18 = 12y

Solution:

I. x2 - 11x + 28 = 0
⇒ x2 - 7x - 4x + 28 = 0
⇒ x(x - 7) - 4(x - 7) = 0
⇒ x = 7, 4
Also,
II. 2y2 + 12y + 18 = 0
⇒ 2y2 + 6y + 6y + 18 = 0
⇒ 2y(y + 3) + 6(y + 3) = 0
⇒ y = -3, -3
Hence, x > y

QUESTION: 5

I. x2 + 5x = 7x + 8
II. y2 + 7y = 12y + 6

Solution:

I. x2 - 2x - 8 = 0
⇒ x2 - 4x + 2x - 8 = 0
⇒ x(x - 4) + 2(x - 4) = 0
⇒ x = 4, -2
Also,
II. y2 - 5y - 6 = 0
⇒ y2 - 6y + y - 6 = 0
⇒ y(y - 6) + 1(y - 6) = 0
⇒ x = 6, - 1
Hence, x < y

QUESTION: 6

Three circles A, B and C have a common center O. A is the inner circle, B middle circle and C is outer circle. The radius of the outer circle C, OP cuts the inner circle at X and middle circle at Y such that OX = XY = YP. The ratio of the area of the region between the inner and middle circles to the area of the region between the middle and outer circle is

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

A plot of land is in the shape of a trapezium whose dimensions are given in the figure below :

Hence the perimeter of the field is

Solution:


The perimeter of the field =(13m+9m+20m+30m) = 72m

QUESTION: 8

Consider a sequence of seven consecutive integers. The average of the first five integers is n. The average of all the seven integers is :

Solution:

Let the seven consecutive integers be x−3,x−2,x−1,x,x+1,x+2,x+3
Given that average of first five integers is n
Therefore, n = [(x−3)+(x−2)+(x−1)+x+(x+1)]/5
⟹5x−5 = 5n
⟹x−1 = n
⟹x = n+1 ------(1)
Average of seven integers is  [(x−3)+(x−2)+(x−1)+x+(x+1)+(x+2)+(x+3)]/7
⇒ 7x/7 = x = n+1 (from (1))

QUESTION: 9

If f(x) = log x,then

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

In the figure given below, ABOP is a rectangle and O is the centre of the circle. It is also given that AB = BC and the measure of the angle ∠ABC is 60. Find the measure of the angle ∠OPN.

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

In ΔABC, ∠B is a right angle, AC = 6 cm, and D is the mid-point of AC. The length of BD is :

Solution:

In a right angled triangle, the length of the median to the hypotenuse is half the length of the hypotenuse.

QUESTION: 12

Consider the following two curves in the x-y plane
y = x3 + x2 + 5
y = x2 + x + 5
Which of the following statements is true for −2 ≤ x ≤ 2?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

A father left a will of Rs.35 lakhs between his two daughters aged 8.5 and 16 such that they may get equal amounts when each of them reach the age of 21 years. The original amount of Rs.35 lakhs has been instructed to be invested at 10% p.a. simple interest. How much did the elder daughter get at the time of the will?

Solution:

Let Rs x be the amount that the elder daughter got at the time of the will. Therefore, the younger daughter got (3500000 - x)
The elder daughter’s money earns interest for (21 - 16) = 5 years @ 10% p.a simple interest
The younger daughter’s money earns interest for (21 - 8.5) = 12.5 years @ 10% p.a simple interest
As the sum of money that each of the daughters get when they are 21 is the same,


QUESTION: 14

If   then minimum value of P/Q2

Solution:


Clearly, the minimum does not exist.

QUESTION: 15

There are 3 containers : A, B and C which contain water, milk and acid respectively in equal quantities. 10% of the content of A is taken out and poured into B. Then the same amount from B is transferred to C, from which again the same amount is transferred to A. What is the proportion of milk in container A at the end of the process?

Solution:

Suppose A contains 100 litre water,
B contains 100 litre milk,
C contains 100 litre acid.
10% from A (i.e., 10 litre) is poured to B. Then,
Quantity of milk in B 
= 100 litre
Total quantity of the mixture in B 
= 110 litre.
Concentration of milk in B = 100/110
= 10/11
10 litre from B is poured to C. Then,
Quantity of milk in C 
= (10×10/11)= 100/11 litre.
Total quantity of the mixture in C = 110 litre.
Concentration of milk in C 
= (100/11)/110
= 10/121
10 litre from C is poured to A. Then,
Quantity of milk in A 
= 10×(10/121) = 100/121 litre.
Total quantity of the mixture in A = 100 litre.
Concentration of milk in A 
= (100/121)/100
= 1/121

QUESTION: 16

Let a, b, c be distinct digits. Consider a two-digit number 'ab' and a three-digit number 'ccb', both defined under the usual decimal number system, if ab2 = ccb > 300, then the value of b is

Solution:

I am assuming that the question is (ab)*(ab) = ccb.
Ok so ab as well as (ab)*(ab) also has its unit's digit as b as (ab)*(ab) = ccb. This can only be possible when b is one of these: 1, 5, 6, 0.
25 is the only 2 digit number whose square 625 is 3 digit and is greater than 300. 15,35,45… don't satisfy the conditions.
Similarly 26*26=676 is the only one which satisfies the above conditions.
Similarly 20*20= 400 and 30*30= 900 are the only squares satisfying the above conditions.
Similarly 21*21= 441 is the only square satisfying the conditions.
Out of 625,676,400,900 and 441, only 441 is of the form ccb as the first digit and the second digit are same.
Hence ccb= 441 and b=1.
 

QUESTION: 17

A positive whole number M less than 100 is represented in base 2 notation, base 3 notation, and base 5 notation. It is found that in all three cases the last digit is 1, while in exactly two out of the three cases the leading digit is 1. Then M equals

Solution:

Since in all three cases the last digit is 1, the number should give remainder 1 when divided individually by 2,3,5
So the no. may be 31 or 91 
Now 31 in base 2,3 and 5 give first digit as 1 in all the 3 cases while 91 gives exactly two out of the three cases the leading digit as 1

QUESTION: 18

If a1 = 1 and an+1−3an+2 = 4n for every positive integer n, then a100 equals

Solution:

a1 = 1.
an+1 =  3an - 2 + 4n
a2 = 3 – 2 + 4 = 5
a3 = 15 – 2 + 8 = 21
a4 = 63 – 2 + 12 = 73.
Now, our options involve 3n followed by some addition or subtraction.
So a2 = 5, can be written as 31 + 2 and 32 - 4.
a3 = 21 can be written as 32 + 12 and 33 – 6.
a4 = 63 can be written as 33 + 36 and 34 – 8.
We see that the subtraction trend is repeating, as 3n – 2*n. So, a100 is 3100 – 200.

QUESTION: 19

A student took five papers in an examination, where the full marks were the same for each paper. His marks in these papers were in the proportion of 6:7:8:9:10. In all papers together, the candidate obtained 60% of the total marks then, the number of papers in which he got more than 50% marks is :

Solution:

Let the marks obtained in five subjects be 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x and 10x. 
Total marks obtained= 40x
Max. Marks of the five subjects = 40x/0.6 [40x is 60% of total marks] 
Max. Marks in each subject = 40x/0.6*5 = 13.33x
Hence, % of each subject = 6x*100/13.33 = 45.01%
Or, 7x*100/13.33 = 52.51
In same way other percentage are 60.01%, 67.52%, 75.01%.
Hence, number of subjects in which he gets more than 50% marks = 4.

QUESTION: 20

The period of sin3x + cos 3x is

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Number of triangles formed in a decagon by joining its vertices is

Solution:

 In a decagon, by joining one vertex to the remaining vertices you can have 8 triangles. If you are considering all the vertices independently you will have a total of 8*10 = 80 triangles.

QUESTION: 22

If S(n) is the set of all factors of n , then what is the probability that a randomly chosen element of S(1050) is a multiple of 5 ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

The cost of 13 kgs of sugar is Rs 195. The cost of 17 kg of rice is Rs 544 and the cost of 21 kgs of wheat is Rs 336. What is the total cost of 21 kgs of sugar, 26 kgs of rice and 19 kgs of wheat?

Solution:

Let the number be x,
13 kg sugar costs 195. So 1 kg costs 15.
17 kg rice costs 544, so 1 kg costs 32.
21 kg wheat costs 336, so 1 kg costs 16.
Hence 21 kg sugar + 26 kg rice + 19 kg wheat = (21 × 15) + (26 × 32) + (19 × 16) = 315 + 832 + 304 = Rs. 1451/-.

QUESTION: 24

if α, β are the roots of the equation ax² + bx + c = 0, then the value of α³ + β³ is

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

A circular running path is 726 mts in circumference. Two men start from the same point and walk in opposite directions at 3.75 km/hr and 4.5 km/hr respectively. When will they meet for the first time?

Solution:

Let both of them meet after T min.
4500 m are covered by Suresh in 60m
In T min = 4500T/60
In T min Suresh's wife will cover = 3750T/60
Given, 4500T/60 + 3750T/60 = 726
=> 8250T = 726
T = 5.28 min

QUESTION: 26

A group of workers can do a piece of work in 24 days. However as 7 of them were absent it took 30 days to complete the work. How many people actually worked on the job to complete it?

Solution:

Let the original number of workers in the group be 'x'
Therefore, actual number of workers = x - 7.
We know that the number of manhours required to do the job is the same in both the cases.
Therefore, x (24) = (x - 7).30 
24x = 30x - 210
6x = 210
x = 35.
Therfore, the actual number of workers who worked to complete the job = x - 7 = 35 - 7 = 28.

QUESTION: 27

Let S denote the infinite sum 2 + 5x + 9x2 + 14x3 + 20x4 + ...., where |x| < 1 and the coefficient of xn - 1 is 

Solution:

Let us assume 

By Taking x as common factor.
So, S = [2(1-x) + x)]  

QUESTION: 28

Let function f : R → R be defined by f (x) = 2x + sin x for x ∈ R. Then F is

Solution:

f(x) = 2x + sin x
Differentiating wrt x on both sides, we get
f'(x) = 2 + cos x
−1 ≤ cos x ≤ 1
−1 + 2 ≤ 2 + cos x ≤ 1 + 2
1 ≤ 2 + cos x ≤ 3
So, f'(x) > 0 , for all real values of x 
So, f(x) is one − one
f(x) → ∞ as x→∞ and f(x) → −∞ as x→−∞
So, f(x) is onto.
 

QUESTION: 29

f(x)= 2x3 + px2 + qx - 4 and f(2)= 0 , find the value of p + q , where p and q are non zero. If f(x)= 0 has three real roots, all of them being integers and further two of three roots are equal.

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

Rakesh traveled from city A to city B covering as much distance in the second part as he did in the first part of this journey. His speed during the second part was twice as that of the speed during the first part of the journey. What is his average speed of journey during the entire travel?

Solution:

The first part is 1/3rd of the total distance and the second part is 2/3rd of the total distance. He travels at s km/hr speed during the first half and 2s km/hr speed during the second half.
If 3 km is the total distance, then 1 km was travelled at s km/hr and 2 kms was travelled at 2s km/hr speed.
Hence, average speed = Total Distance/Total Time
= [3(1/s + 2/s)]
= 3/(4/2s) = 3s/2
This, however = s + 2s/2
= 3s/2
 which is the arithmetic mean of the speeds of the two parts.

QUESTION: 31

A red light flashes 3 times per minute and a green light flashes 5 times in two minutes at regular intervals. If both lights start flashing at the same time, how many times do they flash together in each hour?

Solution:

The red light flashes once in 60/3 = 20 seconds 
and the green light flashes once in 120/5 = 24 seconds
If both start flashing at the same time, they flash simultaneously for the first time after a number of seconds
that is the LCM of 20 and 24, is 120.
If the lights flash simultaneously every 120 seconds, they flash together every 2 minutes.
They therefore flash simultaneously for 60/2 = 30 times each hour.

QUESTION: 32

The value of sin (-870°) is

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

When the curves y = log10x and y = x−1 are drawn in the x-y plane, how many times do they intersect for values x > 1?

Solution:

y = log10x is a monotonic increasing function as  dy/dx = 1/x which is positive for all x ≥ 0 which is the domain of the function.The function tends to −∞ as x tends to 0 and towards ∞ as x gets very large.
xy = 1 is a rectangular hyperbola whose graph is well known. Also it is a decreasing function as  
dy/dx = -1/x2  which is always negative.
Hence they can only intersect once.
 

QUESTION: 34

A square tin sheet of side 12 inches is converted into a box with open top in the following steps-The sheet is placed horizontally. Then, equal sized squares, each of side x inches, are cut from the four corners of the sheet. Finally, the four resulting sides are bent vertically upwards in the shape of a box. If x is an integer, then what value of x maximizes the volume of the box?

Solution:

Volume of box = (12 - 2x) * (12 -2x) *  x
= 144x - 48 + 4
differentiate
=> 144 - 96x + 12
solve for x
=> 144 -96x + 12 = 0
=>  - 8x + 12 = 0
=> x = 6, 2
put x in volume
x = 6 , v = 0
x = 2, v = 128 ans

QUESTION: 35

An office is one of several in which all the furniture is to be repainted. The office contains exactly four pieces of furniture - a bookcase, two chairs, and a desk - and no furniture is to be moved into or out of that office. The repainting specifications are as follows:
On completion of repainting, any piece of furniture in an office must be uniformly auburn, pink, xanadu, or white. 
On completion of repainting, at least one of the pieces of furniture in an office must be pink, and the desk must be either auburn or xanadu. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is either blue or violet, that piece must be white on completion of repainting. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is xanadu, that piece must remain xanadu on completion of repainting. 
All of the specifications above can and must be met in each office scheduled for repainting.

Q. If, prior to repainting, one chair in the office is blue and the other chair is xanadu, which of the following must be true of the furniture in the office on completion of repainting?

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

An office is one of several in which all the furniture is to be repainted. The office contains exactly four pieces of furniture - a bookcase, two chairs, and a desk - and no furniture is to be moved into or out of that office. The repainting specifications are as follows:
On completion of repainting, any piece of furniture in an office must be uniformly auburn, pink, xanadu, or white. 
On completion of repainting, at least one of the pieces of furniture in an office must be pink, and the desk must be either auburn or xanadu. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is either blue or violet, that piece must be white on completion of repainting. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is xanadu, that piece must remain xanadu on completion of repainting. 
All of the specifications above can and must be met in each office scheduled for repainting.

Q. If, prior to repainting, the desk in the office is pink and the other three pieces of furniture are white, then of these four pieces of furniture there must be how many that are painted a color that differs from its color prior to repainting?

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

An office is one of several in which all the furniture is to be repainted. The office contains exactly four pieces of furniture - a bookcase, two chairs, and a desk - and no furniture is to be moved into or out of that office. The repainting specifications are as follows:
On completion of repainting, any piece of furniture in an office must be uniformly auburn, pink, xanadu, or white. 
On completion of repainting, at least one of the pieces of furniture in an office must be pink, and the desk must be either auburn or xanadu. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is either blue or violet, that piece must be white on completion of repainting. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is xanadu, that piece must remain xanadu on completion of repainting. 
All of the specifications above can and must be met in each office scheduled for repainting.

Q.Prior to repainting, and given the repainting specifications, the desk in the office could have been any of the following colors EXCEPT

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

An office is one of several in which all the furniture is to be repainted. The office contains exactly four pieces of furniture - a bookcase, two chairs, and a desk - and no furniture is to be moved into or out of that office. The repainting specifications are as follows:
On completion of repainting, any piece of furniture in an office must be uniformly auburn, pink, xanadu, or white. 
On completion of repainting, at least one of the pieces of furniture in an office must be pink, and the desk must be either auburn or xanadu. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is either blue or violet, that piece must be white on completion of repainting. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is xanadu, that piece must remain xanadu on completion of repainting. 
All of the specifications above can and must be met in each office scheduled for repainting.

Q. If, prior to repainting, the bookcase is white, one chair is blue, one chair is xanadu, and the desk is pink, which of the following must be true of the furniture in the office on completion of repainting?

Solution:

Pink desk becomes auburn or Xanadu
one chair remains Xanadu
blue chair becomes white
white book case becomes pink because at least one furniture is pink.

QUESTION: 39

An office is one of several in which all the furniture is to be repainted. The office contains exactly four pieces of furniture - a bookcase, two chairs, and a desk - and no furniture is to be moved into or out of that office. The repainting specifications are as follows:
On completion of repainting, any piece of furniture in an office must be uniformly auburn, pink, xanadu, or white. 
On completion of repainting, at least one of the pieces of furniture in an office must be pink, and the desk must be either auburn or xanadu. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is either blue or violet, that piece must be white on completion of repainting. 
If, prior to repainting, a piece of furniture is xanadu, that piece must remain xanadu on completion of repainting. 
All of the specifications above can and must be met in each office scheduled for repainting.

Q. Which of the following could be true of the furniture in the office prior to repainting if, also prior to repainting, three of the pieces of furniture in the office are xanadu?

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Preferences of People in Playing Different Games Over the Years.

Q. In the year 2006, the people preferring to play Tennis is what percent of the people preferring to play Cricket, Football and Tennis together in that year ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 41

Preferences of People in Playing Different Games Over the Years.

Q. From 2001 to 2006, the total number of people who preferred to play Football was what (in millions) ?

Solution:

Total no. of people who preferred to play Football from 2001 to 2006
= (375 + 400 + 300 + 200 + 250 + 275) millions
= 1800 millions

QUESTION: 42

Preferences of People in Playing Different Games Over the Years.

Q. The number of people preferring to play Tennis in 2006, is how many millions fewer than the number of people preferring to play Tennis in 2005 ?

Solution:

Required difference
= (275 - 175) millions
= 100 millions

QUESTION: 43

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. 

Is x>y?
I. (x+y)2>0.
II. x is positive.

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. A large corporation has 7000 employees. What is the average yearly wage of an employee in the corporation?
I. 4,000 of the employees are executives.
II. The total wage bill for the company each year is Rs. 77,000,000.

Solution:

From statement II average yearly wage
= 77,000,000/7000
= 11000

QUESTION: 45

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. Is a quadrilateral ABCD a square?
I. A pair of adjacent sides are equal.
II. The angle enclosed by these equal adjacent sides is 90°.

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. What was Ram Gopal's income in 1990?
I. His total income for 1998, 1989 and 1990 was Rs. 3,00,000.
II. He earned 20% more in 1989 than what he did in 1988.

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. What is the area of the shaded part of the circle?
I. The radius of the circle is 4.
II. x is 60.

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

Q. Which month records the highest profit?

Solution:

Profit is given by (Sales - cost)
∴ Maximum profit is in July (37 - 34) = 3

QUESTION: 49

Q. In which month is the total increase in the cost highest as compared to two month ago?

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

Q. In which month is the percentage increase in sales two months before, the highest?

Solution:

The percentage increase in sales two months before is highest in the month of May = (36 - 32)/32 × 100 = 12.5%

QUESTION: 51

Q. Which month has the highest profit per employee?

Solution:

Profit per employee is highest in the month of July = 3/14 = 0.2142

QUESTION: 52

Lycopene, glutathione, and glutamine are powerful antioxidants that neutralize the free radicals that are produced in the body as a result of routine bodily processes. An excess of these free radicals in your system causes rapid aging because they accelerate the rate of cellular damage. Aging is simply the result of this damage. Thus, to slow down aging it is necessary to supplement your diet with these antioxidants on a daily basis. 
Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the author's contention?

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

Politician: There should be a mandatory prison sentence for everyone convicted of a violent crime. Some people object to such a policy on the grounds that it overlooks differences among individual cases that, if taken into consideration by judges and juries, could result in less prison overcrowding. But we can dismiss this objection since these critics would take a different view if they had themselves been victims of violent crime.
The politician’s argument is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that this argument

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

Archaeologist: The allegation that members of the excavation team recovered artifacts outside the authorized site is unfounded. Archaeologists, unlike most treasure hunters, excavate artifacts to publish the results of their findings. But material recovered illegally could not be used in a publication without the illegal act being discovered. So it would be of no use to an archaeologist.
The archaeologist’s reasoning is most vulnerable to criticism because it

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

A life insurance company allows people to prepay their endowment insurance at current rates. The policy holder then pays the premium every year. People should participate in the program as a means of decreasing the cost for their living after retirement. 
Which of the following, if true, is the most appropriate reason for people NOT to participate in the program?

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

Advertisement: The new Reflex computer represents a conceptual advance. Unlike traditional computers, the Reflex has a built-in monitoring function that continuously checks all other computer operations and lets you know if they are malfunctioning in any way, thus preventing the loss of data. With the Reflex, therefore, you’ll never lose data again!
Which one of the following is an assumption on which the advertisement’s argument depends?

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

Refer to the given line graph and the pie charts and answer these questions :

FNI-Distribution of Forest Land in North India
FSI-Distribution of Forest Land in South India.

Q. How many hectares of FSI has been distributed between 1994-2002 ?

Solution:

Number of hectares of FSI
= 40 + 60 + 80 + 120 + 100 + 110 + 120 + 150 + 120 
= 900 thousand hectares.

QUESTION: 58

Refer to the given line graph and the pie charts and answer these questions :

FNI-Distribution of Forest Land in North India
FSI-Distribution of Forest Land in South India.

Q. How many years witnessed decline in FNI and an increase in FSI ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

Refer to the given line graph and the pie charts and answer these questions :

FNI-Distribution of Forest Land in North India
FSI-Distribution of Forest Land in South India.

Q. During 1994-2002 the greatest proportion of FNI was put to commercial use in 

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

Percentage of students in various courses (A,B,C,D,E,F) and Percentage of girls out of these.
Total students : 1200 (800 girls + 400 boys)
Percentage in various courses


Q. For course D what is the respective ratio of boys and girls ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

Percentage of students in various courses (A,B,C,D,E,F) and Percentage of girls out of these.
Total students : 1200 (800 girls + 400 boys)
Percentage in various courses


Q. For which pair of courses is the number of boys the same ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

Percentage of students in various courses (A,B,C,D,E,F) and Percentage of girls out of these.
Total students : 1200 (800 girls + 400 boys)
Percentage in various courses


Q. For course E, the number of girls is how much percentage more than the boys for course E ?

Solution:

Total no. of students in course = 12% of 1200 = 144
No. of girls for course E = 14% of 800 = 112
No. of boys for course E = 144 – 112 = 32
Required % = (112 – 32)/32 × 100 = 250%

QUESTION: 63

In the table below is the listing of players, seeded from highest (#1) to lowest (#32), who are due to play in an Association of Tennis Players (ATP) tournament for women. This tournament has four knockout rounds before the final, i.e., first round, second round quarterfinals and semi-finals. In the first round, the highest seeded player plays the lowest seeded player (seed#32) which is designated match No. 1 of first round; the 2nd seeded player plays the 31st seeded player which is designated match No. 2 of the first round, and so on. Thus, for instance, match No. 16 to first round is to be played between 16th seeded player and the 17th seeded player. In the second round, the winner of match No.1 of first round plays the winner of match No. 16 of first round and is designated match No.1 of second round. Similarly, the winner of match No.2 of first round lays the winner of match No.15 of first round, and is designated match No. 2 of second round. Thus, for instance, match No. 8 of the second round is to be played between the winner of match No. 8 of first round and the winner of match No. 9 of first round. The same pattern is followed for later rounds as well.

Q. If there are no upsets (a lower seeded player beating a higher seeded player) in the first round and only match Nos. 6, 7 and 8 of the second round result in upsets, then who would meet Lindsay Davenport in quarter finals, in case Davenport reaches quarter finals ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

In the table below is the listing of players, seeded from highest (#1) to lowest (#32), who are due to play in an Association of Tennis Players (ATP) tournament for women. This tournament has four knockout rounds before the final, i.e., first round, second round quarterfinals and semi-finals. In the first round, the highest seeded player plays the lowest seeded player (seed#32) which is designated match No. 1 of first round; the 2nd seeded player plays the 31st seeded player which is designated match No. 2 of the first round, and so on. Thus, for instance, match No. 16 to first round is to be played between 16th seeded player and the 17th seeded player. In the second round, the winner of match No.1 of first round plays the winner of match No. 16 of first round and is designated match No.1 of second round. Similarly, the winner of match No.2 of first round lays the winner of match No.15 of first round, and is designated match No. 2 of second round. Thus, for instance, match No. 8 of the second round is to be played between the winner of match No. 8 of first round and the winner of match No. 9 of first round. The same pattern is followed for later rounds as well.

Q. If, in the first round, all even numbered matches (and none of the odd numbered ones) result in upsets, and there are no upsets in the second round, then who could be the lowest seeded player facing Maria Sharapova in semi-finals ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

In the table below is the listing of players, seeded from highest (#1) to lowest (#32), who are due to play in an Association of Tennis Players (ATP) tournament for women. This tournament has four knockout rounds before the final, i.e., first round, second round quarterfinals and semi-finals. In the first round, the highest seeded player plays the lowest seeded player (seed#32) which is designated match No. 1 of first round; the 2nd seeded player plays the 31st seeded player which is designated match No. 2 of the first round, and so on. Thus, for instance, match No. 16 to first round is to be played between 16th seeded player and the 17th seeded player. In the second round, the winner of match No.1 of first round plays the winner of match No. 16 of first round and is designated match No.1 of second round. Similarly, the winner of match No.2 of first round lays the winner of match No.15 of first round, and is designated match No. 2 of second round. Thus, for instance, match No. 8 of the second round is to be played between the winner of match No. 8 of first round and the winner of match No. 9 of first round. The same pattern is followed for later rounds as well.

Q. If Elena Dementieva and Serena Williams lose in the second round, while Justine Henin and Nadia Petrova make it to the semi-finals, then who would play Maria Sharapova in the quarterfinals, in the event Sharapova reaches quarter finals ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

In the table below is the listing of players, seeded from highest (#1) to lowest (#32), who are due to play in an Association of Tennis Players (ATP) tournament for women. This tournament has four knockout rounds before the final, i.e., first round, second round quarterfinals and semi-finals. In the first round, the highest seeded player plays the lowest seeded player (seed#32) which is designated match No. 1 of first round; the 2nd seeded player plays the 31st seeded player which is designated match No. 2 of the first round, and so on. Thus, for instance, match No. 16 to first round is to be played between 16th seeded player and the 17th seeded player. In the second round, the winner of match No.1 of first round plays the winner of match No. 16 of first round and is designated match No.1 of second round. Similarly, the winner of match No.2 of first round lays the winner of match No.15 of first round, and is designated match No. 2 of second round. Thus, for instance, match No. 8 of the second round is to be played between the winner of match No. 8 of first round and the winner of match No. 9 of first round. The same pattern is followed for later rounds as well.

Q.If the top eight seeds make it to the quarterfinals, then who, amongst the players listed below, would definitely not play against Maria Sharapova in the final, in case Sharapova reaches the final ?

Solution:

Top 8 seeds make it to quarters. So we have 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 in quarters.
Sharapova is 1.
We will have 1 vs 8 in quarters, 1 vs (4/5) in semis, and 1 vs (2/3/6/7) in finals.
 Out of the given options, the only one who doesn't fit is #4, Kim Clijsters.
 

QUESTION: 67

In each question, there are sentences with pair of italicized word(s)/phrase(s) . From the italicized word(s)/phrase(s), select the most appropriate word(s)/phrase(s) (P or Q) to form correct sentences. Then, choose the best one from the given options.

Q. The lawyer quoted many precedents(P)/presidents(Q) in support of his argument.
The Moon immersed(P)/emerged(Q) from behind a cloud.
Avoid using this lain(P)/lane(Q) as it is very narrow.
I have to replace the heal(P)/heel(Q) of my shoe.
Coffee is a mild stimulant(P)/stimulus(Q).

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

In each question, there are sentences with pair of italicized word(s)/phrase(s) . From the italicized word(s)/phrase(s), select the most appropriate word(s)/phrase(s) (P or Q) to form correct sentences. Then, choose the best one from the given options.

Q. The doctor has prescribed(P)/proscribed(Q) this medicine for my father.
Many Indians emigrants(P)/immigrants(Q) are settled in Sri Lanka.
Akbar was a man of deep insight(P)/incite(Q).
Avadesh Singh hales(P)/hails(Q) from the Punjab.
Param Vir Chakra is an reward(P)/award(Q) given for the highest gallantry in war.

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

In each question, there are sentences with pair of italicized word(s)/phrase(s) . From the italicized word(s)/phrase(s), select the most appropriate word(s)/phrase(s) (P or Q) to form correct sentences. Then, choose the best one from the given options.

Q. Tresspassers will be persecuted(P)/prosecuted(Q).
We went on an incursion(P)/excursion(Q) to Kashmir.
Kanpur is an industrious(P)/industrial(Q) city.
Constant worry affected(P)/effected(Q) his health.
We should not believe in cast(P)/caste(Q) system.

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

In each question, there are sentences with pair of italicized word(s)/phrase(s) . From the italicized word(s)/phrase(s), select the most appropriate word(s)/phrase(s) (P or Q) to form correct sentences. Then, choose the best one from the given options.

Q. My brother has no practical(P)/practicable(Q) experience of factory life.
Real felicity(P)/facility(Q) is found only in hard work.
This is a very idle(P)/ideal(Q) book.
John refused to altar(P)/alter(Q) to his decision.
Whenever I passed the cemetery(P)/symmetry(Q) I thought of my dead parents.

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

The teaching and transmission of North Indian classical music is, and long has been achieved by largely oral means. The raga and its structure, the often breathtaking intricacies of tala or rhythm, and the incarnation of rage and tala as bandish or composition, are passed thus, between guru and shishya by word of mouth and direct demonstration, with no printed sheet of notated music, as it were acting as a go-between. Saussure's conception of language as a communication between addresser and addressee is given, in this model a further instance, and a new, exotic complexity and glamour. 
These days, especially with the middle-class having entered the domain of classical music and playing not a small part in ensuring the continuation of this ancient tradition, the tape recorder serves as a handy technological slave and preserves, from oblivion, the vanishing, elusive moment of oral transmission. Hoary gurus, too, have seen the advantage of this device, and increasingly use it as an aid to instruct their pupils; in place of the shawls and other traditional objects that used to pass from shishya to guru in the past, as a token of the regard of the former for the latter, it is not unusual, today, to see cassettes changing hands. 
Part of my education in North Indian classical music was conducted via this rather ugly but beneficial rectangle of plastic, which I carried with me to England when I was an undergraduate. One cassette had stored in it various talas played upon the tabla, at various tempos, by my music teacher's brother in-law, Hazarilaji, who was a teacher of Kathak dance, as well as a singer and a tabla player. This was a work of great patience and prescience, a one and half hours performance without any immediate point or purpose, but intended for some delayed future moment when I'd practice the talas solitarily. 
This repeated playing out of the rhythmic cycles on the tabla was inflected by the noises - an irate auto driver blowing a horn; the sound of overbearing pigeons that were such a nuisance on the banister; even the cry of a kulfi seller in summer-entering from the balcony of the third floor flat we occupied in those days, in lane in a Mumbai suburb, before we left the city for good. These sounds, in turn, would invade, hesitantly, the edd and flow of silence inside the artificially heated room, in a borough of West London in which I used to live as an undergraduate. There, in the trapped dust, silence and heat, the theka of the tabla, qualified by the imminent but intermittent presence of the Mumbai suburb, would come to life again. A few years later, the tabla and, in the background, the pigeons and the itinerant kulfi seller would inhabit a small graduate room in Oxford. 
The tape recorder though remains an extension of the oral transmission of music, rather than a replacement of it. And the oral transmission of North Indian classical music remains, almost uniquely, a testament to the fact that the human brain can absorb, remember and reproduce structures of great complexity and sophistication without the help of the hieroglyph or written mark or a system of notation. I remember my surprise on discovering that Hazarilaji - who had mastered Kathak dance, tala and North Indian classical music, and who used to narrate to me, occasionally, composition meant for dance that were grand and intricate in their verbal prosody, architecture and rhythmic complexity-was near illiterate and had barely learnt to write his name in large and clumsy letters. 
Of course, attempts have been made, throughout the 20th century, to formally codify and even notate this music, and institutions set up and degrees created, specifically to educate students in this 'scientific' and codified manner. Paradoxically, however, this style of teaching has produced no noteworthy student or performer; the most creative musicians still emerge from the guru-shishya relationship, their understanding of music developed by oral communication. 
The fact that North Indian classical music emanates from, and has evolved through, oral culture, means that this music has a significantly different aesthetic, and that this aesthetic has a different politics, from that of Western classical music. A piece of music in the Western tradition, at least in its most characteristic and popular conception, originates in its composer, and the connection between the two, between composer and the piece of music, is relatively unambiguous precisely because the composer writes down, in notation, his composition, as a poet might write down and publish his poem. However far the printed sheet of notated music might travel thus from the composer, it still remains his property; and the notion of property remains at the heart of the Western conception of 'genius', which derives from the Latin gignere or 'to beget'. 
The genius in Western classical music is, then, the originator, begetter and owner of his work - the printed, notated sheet testifying to his authority over his product and his power, not only for expression or imagination, but of origination. The conductor is a custodian and guardian of this property. Is it an accident that Mandelstam, in his note - books, compares the conductor's baton to a policeman's, saying all the music of the orchestra lies mute within it, waiting for its first movement to release it into the auditorium? 
The raga - transmitted through oral means - is, in a sense, no one's property; it is no easy to pin down its source, or to know exactly where its provenance or origin lies. Unlike the Western classical tradition, where the composer begets his piece, notates it and stamps it with his ownership and remains in effect larger than or the father of his work in the North Indian classical tradition, the raga unconfined to a single incarnation, composer or performer - remains necessarily greater than the artist who invokes it. 
This leads to a very different politics of interpretation and valuation to an aesthetic that privileges the evanescent moment of performance and invocation over the controlling authority of genius and the permanent record. It is a tradition thus that would appear to value the performer as medium, more highly than the composer who presumes to originate what effectively, cannot be originated in a single person - because the raga is the inheritance of a culture.

Q. The author's contention that the notion of property lies at the heart of the Western conception of genius is best indicated by which one of the following?

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

The teaching and transmission of North Indian classical music is, and long has been achieved by largely oral means. The raga and its structure, the often breathtaking intricacies of tala or rhythm, and the incarnation of rage and tala as bandish or composition, are passed thus, between guru and shishya by word of mouth and direct demonstration, with no printed sheet of notated music, as it were acting as a go-between. Saussure's conception of language as a communication between addresser and addressee is given, in this model a further instance, and a new, exotic complexity and glamour. 
These days, especially with the middle-class having entered the domain of classical music and playing not a small part in ensuring the continuation of this ancient tradition, the tape recorder serves as a handy technological slave and preserves, from oblivion, the vanishing, elusive moment of oral transmission. Hoary gurus, too, have seen the advantage of this device, and increasingly use it as an aid to instruct their pupils; in place of the shawls and other traditional objects that used to pass from shishya to guru in the past, as a token of the regard of the former for the latter, it is not unusual, today, to see cassettes changing hands. 
Part of my education in North Indian classical music was conducted via this rather ugly but beneficial rectangle of plastic, which I carried with me to England when I was an undergraduate. One cassette had stored in it various talas played upon the tabla, at various tempos, by my music teacher's brother in-law, Hazarilaji, who was a teacher of Kathak dance, as well as a singer and a tabla player. This was a work of great patience and prescience, a one and half hours performance without any immediate point or purpose, but intended for some delayed future moment when I'd practice the talas solitarily. 
This repeated playing out of the rhythmic cycles on the tabla was inflected by the noises - an irate auto driver blowing a horn; the sound of overbearing pigeons that were such a nuisance on the banister; even the cry of a kulfi seller in summer-entering from the balcony of the third floor flat we occupied in those days, in lane in a Mumbai suburb, before we left the city for good. These sounds, in turn, would invade, hesitantly, the edd and flow of silence inside the artificially heated room, in a borough of West London in which I used to live as an undergraduate. There, in the trapped dust, silence and heat, the theka of the tabla, qualified by the imminent but intermittent presence of the Mumbai suburb, would come to life again. A few years later, the tabla and, in the background, the pigeons and the itinerant kulfi seller would inhabit a small graduate room in Oxford. 
The tape recorder though remains an extension of the oral transmission of music, rather than a replacement of it. And the oral transmission of North Indian classical music remains, almost uniquely, a testament to the fact that the human brain can absorb, remember and reproduce structures of great complexity and sophistication without the help of the hieroglyph or written mark or a system of notation. I remember my surprise on discovering that Hazarilaji - who had mastered Kathak dance, tala and North Indian classical music, and who used to narrate to me, occasionally, composition meant for dance that were grand and intricate in their verbal prosody, architecture and rhythmic complexity-was near illiterate and had barely learnt to write his name in large and clumsy letters. 
Of course, attempts have been made, throughout the 20th century, to formally codify and even notate this music, and institutions set up and degrees created, specifically to educate students in this 'scientific' and codified manner. Paradoxically, however, this style of teaching has produced no noteworthy student or performer; the most creative musicians still emerge from the guru-shishya relationship, their understanding of music developed by oral communication. 
The fact that North Indian classical music emanates from, and has evolved through, oral culture, means that this music has a significantly different aesthetic, and that this aesthetic has a different politics, from that of Western classical music. A piece of music in the Western tradition, at least in its most characteristic and popular conception, originates in its composer, and the connection between the two, between composer and the piece of music, is relatively unambiguous precisely because the composer writes down, in notation, his composition, as a poet might write down and publish his poem. However far the printed sheet of notated music might travel thus from the composer, it still remains his property; and the notion of property remains at the heart of the Western conception of 'genius', which derives from the Latin gignere or 'to beget'. 
The genius in Western classical music is, then, the originator, begetter and owner of his work - the printed, notated sheet testifying to his authority over his product and his power, not only for expression or imagination, but of origination. The conductor is a custodian and guardian of this property. Is it an accident that Mandelstam, in his note - books, compares the conductor's baton to a policeman's, saying all the music of the orchestra lies mute within it, waiting for its first movement to release it into the auditorium? 
The raga - transmitted through oral means - is, in a sense, no one's property; it is no easy to pin down its source, or to know exactly where its provenance or origin lies. Unlike the Western classical tradition, where the composer begets his piece, notates it and stamps it with his ownership and remains in effect larger than or the father of his work in the North Indian classical tradition, the raga unconfined to a single incarnation, composer or performer - remains necessarily greater than the artist who invokes it. 
This leads to a very different politics of interpretation and valuation to an aesthetic that privileges the evanescent moment of performance and invocation over the controlling authority of genius and the permanent record. It is a tradition thus that would appear to value the performer as medium, more highly than the composer who presumes to originate what effectively, cannot be originated in a single person - because the raga is the inheritance of a culture.

Q. Saussure's conception of language as a communication between addresser and addressee according to the author is exemplified by the :

Solution:

Refer to the lines "The teaching and transmission of North Indian classical music is, and long has been achieved by largely oral means. The raga and its structure, the often breathtaking intricacies of tala or rhythm, and the incarnation of rage and tala as bandish or composition, are passed thus, between guru and shishya by word of mouth and direct demonstration, with no printed sheet of notated music, as it were acting as a go-between. Saussure's conception of language as a communication between addresser and addressee is given, in this model a further instance, and a new, exotic complexity and glamour."This clearly indicates that the composition is passes to one another vacally, hence correct option is A.

QUESTION: 73

The teaching and transmission of North Indian classical music is, and long has been achieved by largely oral means. The raga and its structure, the often breathtaking intricacies of tala or rhythm, and the incarnation of rage and tala as bandish or composition, are passed thus, between guru and shishya by word of mouth and direct demonstration, with no printed sheet of notated music, as it were acting as a go-between. Saussure's conception of language as a communication between addresser and addressee is given, in this model a further instance, and a new, exotic complexity and glamour. 
These days, especially with the middle-class having entered the domain of classical music and playing not a small part in ensuring the continuation of this ancient tradition, the tape recorder serves as a handy technological slave and preserves, from oblivion, the vanishing, elusive moment of oral transmission. Hoary gurus, too, have seen the advantage of this device, and increasingly use it as an aid to instruct their pupils; in place of the shawls and other traditional objects that used to pass from shishya to guru in the past, as a token of the regard of the former for the latter, it is not unusual, today, to see cassettes changing hands. 
Part of my education in North Indian classical music was conducted via this rather ugly but beneficial rectangle of plastic, which I carried with me to England when I was an undergraduate. One cassette had stored in it various talas played upon the tabla, at various tempos, by my music teacher's brother in-law, Hazarilaji, who was a teacher of Kathak dance, as well as a singer and a tabla player. This was a work of great patience and prescience, a one and half hours performance without any immediate point or purpose, but intended for some delayed future moment when I'd practice the talas solitarily. 
This repeated playing out of the rhythmic cycles on the tabla was inflected by the noises - an irate auto driver blowing a horn; the sound of overbearing pigeons that were such a nuisance on the banister; even the cry of a kulfi seller in summer-entering from the balcony of the third floor flat we occupied in those days, in lane in a Mumbai suburb, before we left the city for good. These sounds, in turn, would invade, hesitantly, the edd and flow of silence inside the artificially heated room, in a borough of West London in which I used to live as an undergraduate. There, in the trapped dust, silence and heat, the theka of the tabla, qualified by the imminent but intermittent presence of the Mumbai suburb, would come to life again. A few years later, the tabla and, in the background, the pigeons and the itinerant kulfi seller would inhabit a small graduate room in Oxford. 
The tape recorder though remains an extension of the oral transmission of music, rather than a replacement of it. And the oral transmission of North Indian classical music remains, almost uniquely, a testament to the fact that the human brain can absorb, remember and reproduce structures of great complexity and sophistication without the help of the hieroglyph or written mark or a system of notation. I remember my surprise on discovering that Hazarilaji - who had mastered Kathak dance, tala and North Indian classical music, and who used to narrate to me, occasionally, composition meant for dance that were grand and intricate in their verbal prosody, architecture and rhythmic complexity-was near illiterate and had barely learnt to write his name in large and clumsy letters. 
Of course, attempts have been made, throughout the 20th century, to formally codify and even notate this music, and institutions set up and degrees created, specifically to educate students in this 'scientific' and codified manner. Paradoxically, however, this style of teaching has produced no noteworthy student or performer; the most creative musicians still emerge from the guru-shishya relationship, their understanding of music developed by oral communication. 
The fact that North Indian classical music emanates from, and has evolved through, oral culture, means that this music has a significantly different aesthetic, and that this aesthetic has a different politics, from that of Western classical music. A piece of music in the Western tradition, at least in its most characteristic and popular conception, originates in its composer, and the connection between the two, between composer and the piece of music, is relatively unambiguous precisely because the composer writes down, in notation, his composition, as a poet might write down and publish his poem. However far the printed sheet of notated music might travel thus from the composer, it still remains his property; and the notion of property remains at the heart of the Western conception of 'genius', which derives from the Latin gignere or 'to beget'. 
The genius in Western classical music is, then, the originator, begetter and owner of his work - the printed, notated sheet testifying to his authority over his product and his power, not only for expression or imagination, but of origination. The conductor is a custodian and guardian of this property. Is it an accident that Mandelstam, in his note - books, compares the conductor's baton to a policeman's, saying all the music of the orchestra lies mute within it, waiting for its first movement to release it into the auditorium? 
The raga - transmitted through oral means - is, in a sense, no one's property; it is no easy to pin down its source, or to know exactly where its provenance or origin lies. Unlike the Western classical tradition, where the composer begets his piece, notates it and stamps it with his ownership and remains in effect larger than or the father of his work in the North Indian classical tradition, the raga unconfined to a single incarnation, composer or performer - remains necessarily greater than the artist who invokes it. 
This leads to a very different politics of interpretation and valuation to an aesthetic that privileges the evanescent moment of performance and invocation over the controlling authority of genius and the permanent record. It is a tradition thus that would appear to value the performer as medium, more highly than the composer who presumes to originate what effectively, cannot be originated in a single person - because the raga is the inheritance of a culture.

Q. The author holds that the 'rather ugly but a beneficial rectangle of plastic, has proved to be a 'handy technological slave' in :

Solution:

Refer to the lines of the para where it is written that "These days, especially with the middle-class having entered the
domain of classical music and playing not a small part in ensuring the continuation of this ancient tradition, the tape
recorder serves as a handy technological slave and preserves, from oblivion, the vanishing, elusive moment of oral.

QUESTION: 74

The teaching and transmission of North Indian classical music is, and long has been achieved by largely oral means. The raga and its structure, the often breathtaking intricacies of tala or rhythm, and the incarnation of rage and tala as bandish or composition, are passed thus, between guru and shishya by word of mouth and direct demonstration, with no printed sheet of notated music, as it were acting as a go-between. Saussure's conception of language as a communication between addresser and addressee is given, in this model a further instance, and a new, exotic complexity and glamour. 
These days, especially with the middle-class having entered the domain of classical music and playing not a small part in ensuring the continuation of this ancient tradition, the tape recorder serves as a handy technological slave and preserves, from oblivion, the vanishing, elusive moment of oral transmission. Hoary gurus, too, have seen the advantage of this device, and increasingly use it as an aid to instruct their pupils; in place of the shawls and other traditional objects that used to pass from shishya to guru in the past, as a token of the regard of the former for the latter, it is not unusual, today, to see cassettes changing hands. 
Part of my education in North Indian classical music was conducted via this rather ugly but beneficial rectangle of plastic, which I carried with me to England when I was an undergraduate. One cassette had stored in it various talas played upon the tabla, at various tempos, by my music teacher's brother in-law, Hazarilaji, who was a teacher of Kathak dance, as well as a singer and a tabla player. This was a work of great patience and prescience, a one and half hours performance without any immediate point or purpose, but intended for some delayed future moment when I'd practice the talas solitarily. 
This repeated playing out of the rhythmic cycles on the tabla was inflected by the noises - an irate auto driver blowing a horn; the sound of overbearing pigeons that were such a nuisance on the banister; even the cry of a kulfi seller in summer-entering from the balcony of the third floor flat we occupied in those days, in lane in a Mumbai suburb, before we left the city for good. These sounds, in turn, would invade, hesitantly, the edd and flow of silence inside the artificially heated room, in a borough of West London in which I used to live as an undergraduate. There, in the trapped dust, silence and heat, the theka of the tabla, qualified by the imminent but intermittent presence of the Mumbai suburb, would come to life again. A few years later, the tabla and, in the background, the pigeons and the itinerant kulfi seller would inhabit a small graduate room in Oxford. 
The tape recorder though remains an extension of the oral transmission of music, rather than a replacement of it. And the oral transmission of North Indian classical music remains, almost uniquely, a testament to the fact that the human brain can absorb, remember and reproduce structures of great complexity and sophistication without the help of the hieroglyph or written mark or a system of notation. I remember my surprise on discovering that Hazarilaji - who had mastered Kathak dance, tala and North Indian classical music, and who used to narrate to me, occasionally, composition meant for dance that were grand and intricate in their verbal prosody, architecture and rhythmic complexity-was near illiterate and had barely learnt to write his name in large and clumsy letters. 
Of course, attempts have been made, throughout the 20th century, to formally codify and even notate this music, and institutions set up and degrees created, specifically to educate students in this 'scientific' and codified manner. Paradoxically, however, this style of teaching has produced no noteworthy student or performer; the most creative musicians still emerge from the guru-shishya relationship, their understanding of music developed by oral communication. 
The fact that North Indian classical music emanates from, and has evolved through, oral culture, means that this music has a significantly different aesthetic, and that this aesthetic has a different politics, from that of Western classical music. A piece of music in the Western tradition, at least in its most characteristic and popular conception, originates in its composer, and the connection between the two, between composer and the piece of music, is relatively unambiguous precisely because the composer writes down, in notation, his composition, as a poet might write down and publish his poem. However far the printed sheet of notated music might travel thus from the composer, it still remains his property; and the notion of property remains at the heart of the Western conception of 'genius', which derives from the Latin gignere or 'to beget'. 
The genius in Western classical music is, then, the originator, begetter and owner of his work - the printed, notated sheet testifying to his authority over his product and his power, not only for expression or imagination, but of origination. The conductor is a custodian and guardian of this property. Is it an accident that Mandelstam, in his note - books, compares the conductor's baton to a policeman's, saying all the music of the orchestra lies mute within it, waiting for its first movement to release it into the auditorium? 
The raga - transmitted through oral means - is, in a sense, no one's property; it is no easy to pin down its source, or to know exactly where its provenance or origin lies. Unlike the Western classical tradition, where the composer begets his piece, notates it and stamps it with his ownership and remains in effect larger than or the father of his work in the North Indian classical tradition, the raga unconfined to a single incarnation, composer or performer - remains necessarily greater than the artist who invokes it. 
This leads to a very different politics of interpretation and valuation to an aesthetic that privileges the evanescent moment of performance and invocation over the controlling authority of genius and the permanent record. It is a tradition thus that would appear to value the performer as medium, more highly than the composer who presumes to originate what effectively, cannot be originated in a single person - because the raga is the inheritance of a culture.

Q. The oral transmission of North Indian classified music is an almost unique testament of the :

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

The teaching and transmission of North Indian classical music is, and long has been achieved by largely oral means. The raga and its structure, the often breathtaking intricacies of tala or rhythm, and the incarnation of rage and tala as bandish or composition, are passed thus, between guru and shishya by word of mouth and direct demonstration, with no printed sheet of notated music, as it were acting as a go-between. Saussure's conception of language as a communication between addresser and addressee is given, in this model a further instance, and a new, exotic complexity and glamour. 
These days, especially with the middle-class having entered the domain of classical music and playing not a small part in ensuring the continuation of this ancient tradition, the tape recorder serves as a handy technological slave and preserves, from oblivion, the vanishing, elusive moment of oral transmission. Hoary gurus, too, have seen the advantage of this device, and increasingly use it as an aid to instruct their pupils; in place of the shawls and other traditional objects that used to pass from shishya to guru in the past, as a token of the regard of the former for the latter, it is not unusual, today, to see cassettes changing hands. 
Part of my education in North Indian classical music was conducted via this rather ugly but beneficial rectangle of plastic, which I carried with me to England when I was an undergraduate. One cassette had stored in it various talas played upon the tabla, at various tempos, by my music teacher's brother in-law, Hazarilaji, who was a teacher of Kathak dance, as well as a singer and a tabla player. This was a work of great patience and prescience, a one and half hours performance without any immediate point or purpose, but intended for some delayed future moment when I'd practice the talas solitarily. 
This repeated playing out of the rhythmic cycles on the tabla was inflected by the noises - an irate auto driver blowing a horn; the sound of overbearing pigeons that were such a nuisance on the banister; even the cry of a kulfi seller in summer-entering from the balcony of the third floor flat we occupied in those days, in lane in a Mumbai suburb, before we left the city for good. These sounds, in turn, would invade, hesitantly, the edd and flow of silence inside the artificially heated room, in a borough of West London in which I used to live as an undergraduate. There, in the trapped dust, silence and heat, the theka of the tabla, qualified by the imminent but intermittent presence of the Mumbai suburb, would come to life again. A few years later, the tabla and, in the background, the pigeons and the itinerant kulfi seller would inhabit a small graduate room in Oxford. 
The tape recorder though remains an extension of the oral transmission of music, rather than a replacement of it. And the oral transmission of North Indian classical music remains, almost uniquely, a testament to the fact that the human brain can absorb, remember and reproduce structures of great complexity and sophistication without the help of the hieroglyph or written mark or a system of notation. I remember my surprise on discovering that Hazarilaji - who had mastered Kathak dance, tala and North Indian classical music, and who used to narrate to me, occasionally, composition meant for dance that were grand and intricate in their verbal prosody, architecture and rhythmic complexity-was near illiterate and had barely learnt to write his name in large and clumsy letters. 
Of course, attempts have been made, throughout the 20th century, to formally codify and even notate this music, and institutions set up and degrees created, specifically to educate students in this 'scientific' and codified manner. Paradoxically, however, this style of teaching has produced no noteworthy student or performer; the most creative musicians still emerge from the guru-shishya relationship, their understanding of music developed by oral communication. 
The fact that North Indian classical music emanates from, and has evolved through, oral culture, means that this music has a significantly different aesthetic, and that this aesthetic has a different politics, from that of Western classical music. A piece of music in the Western tradition, at least in its most characteristic and popular conception, originates in its composer, and the connection between the two, between composer and the piece of music, is relatively unambiguous precisely because the composer writes down, in notation, his composition, as a poet might write down and publish his poem. However far the printed sheet of notated music might travel thus from the composer, it still remains his property; and the notion of property remains at the heart of the Western conception of 'genius', which derives from the Latin gignere or 'to beget'. 
The genius in Western classical music is, then, the originator, begetter and owner of his work - the printed, notated sheet testifying to his authority over his product and his power, not only for expression or imagination, but of origination. The conductor is a custodian and guardian of this property. Is it an accident that Mandelstam, in his note - books, compares the conductor's baton to a policeman's, saying all the music of the orchestra lies mute within it, waiting for its first movement to release it into the auditorium? 
The raga - transmitted through oral means - is, in a sense, no one's property; it is no easy to pin down its source, or to know exactly where its provenance or origin lies. Unlike the Western classical tradition, where the composer begets his piece, notates it and stamps it with his ownership and remains in effect larger than or the father of his work in the North Indian classical tradition, the raga unconfined to a single incarnation, composer or performer - remains necessarily greater than the artist who invokes it. 
This leads to a very different politics of interpretation and valuation to an aesthetic that privileges the evanescent moment of performance and invocation over the controlling authority of genius and the permanent record. It is a tradition thus that would appear to value the performer as medium, more highly than the composer who presumes to originate what effectively, cannot be originated in a single person - because the raga is the inheritance of a culture.

Q. According to the passage in the North Indian classical tradition the raga remains greater than the artist who invokes it. This implies an aesthetic which :

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

Very early in our education we are made familiar with the distinction between verse and prose. The conviction gradually forces itself on us that when we mean what we say we write prose, and that verse is an ingenious but fundamentally perverse way of distorting ordinary prose statements. The conviction does not come to us from school so much as from our accumulated experience of observing prose and verse in action, and embedded in it is the assumption that prose is the language of ordinary speech. But this is not the case. In the history of literature we notice that developed techniques of verse normally precede, sometimes by centuries, developed techniques of prose.
Prose is the expression or imitation of directed thinking or controlled description in words, and its unit is the sentence. It does not follow that all prose is descriptive or thoughtful, much less logical, but only that prose imitates, in its rhythm and structure, the verbal expression of a rational mind. Prose, therefore, is not ordinary speech, but ordinary speech on its best behavior, aware of an audience and with its relation to that audience prepared beforehand. It is the habitual language of fully articulate people who have mastered its difficult idiom. Nonetheless, when they speak, even they will avoid stilted speech or “talking like a book”; their speech rhythm shows the influence of something that is not prose. If we are lost in a strange town and ask someone for directions, even the most articulate person will not respond in prose. We get instead a speech rhythm that is prolix and repetitive, and in which the verbal unit is no more a prose sentence than it is a poetic stanza.
Ordinary speech is concerned mainly with putting into words what is loosely called the stream of consciousness: the daydreaming, remembering, worrying, associating, brooding, and mooning that continually flow through the mind and which we often speak of as thought. This ordinary speech is mainly concerned with self-expression. Whether from immaturity, preoccupation, or the absence of a hearer, it is imperfectly aware of an audience. Full awareness of an audience makes speech rhetorical, and rhetoric means a conventionalized rhythm. The irregular rhythm of ordinary speech may be conventionalized in two ways. One way is to impose a pattern of recurrence on it; the other is to impose the logical and semantic pattern of the sentence. We have verse when the arrangement of words is dominated by recurrent rhythm and sound, prose when it is dominated by the syntactical relation of subject and predicate. Of the two, verse is much the simpler and more primitive type, which accounts for its being historically earlier than prose.

Q. Which one of the following most accurately states the main idea of the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

Very early in our education we are made familiar with the distinction between verse and prose. The conviction gradually forces itself on us that when we mean what we say we write prose, and that verse is an ingenious but fundamentally perverse way of distorting ordinary prose statements. The conviction does not come to us from school so much as from our accumulated experience of observing prose and verse in action, and embedded in it is the assumption that prose is the language of ordinary speech. But this is not the case. In the history of literature we notice that developed techniques of verse normally precede, sometimes by centuries, developed techniques of prose.
Prose is the expression or imitation of directed thinking or controlled description in words, and its unit is the sentence. It does not follow that all prose is descriptive or thoughtful, much less logical, but only that prose imitates, in its rhythm and structure, the verbal expression of a rational mind. Prose, therefore, is not ordinary speech, but ordinary speech on its best behavior, aware of an audience and with its relation to that audience prepared beforehand. It is the habitual language of fully articulate people who have mastered its difficult idiom. Nonetheless, when they speak, even they will avoid stilted speech or “talking like a book”; their speech rhythm shows the influence of something that is not prose. If we are lost in a strange town and ask someone for directions, even the most articulate person will not respond in prose. We get instead a speech rhythm that is prolix and repetitive, and in which the verbal unit is no more a prose sentence than it is a poetic stanza.
Ordinary speech is concerned mainly with putting into words what is loosely called the stream of consciousness: the daydreaming, remembering, worrying, associating, brooding, and mooning that continually flow through the mind and which we often speak of as thought. This ordinary speech is mainly concerned with self-expression. Whether from immaturity, preoccupation, or the absence of a hearer, it is imperfectly aware of an audience. Full awareness of an audience makes speech rhetorical, and rhetoric means a conventionalized rhythm. The irregular rhythm of ordinary speech may be conventionalized in two ways. One way is to impose a pattern of recurrence on it; the other is to impose the logical and semantic pattern of the sentence. We have verse when the arrangement of words is dominated by recurrent rhythm and sound, prose when it is dominated by the syntactical relation of subject and predicate. Of the two, verse is much the simpler and more primitive type, which accounts for its being historically earlier than prose.

Q. The passage provides an answer to each of the following questions EXCEPT:

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

Very early in our education we are made familiar with the distinction between verse and prose. The conviction gradually forces itself on us that when we mean what we say we write prose, and that verse is an ingenious but fundamentally perverse way of distorting ordinary prose statements. The conviction does not come to us from school so much as from our accumulated experience of observing prose and verse in action, and embedded in it is the assumption that prose is the language of ordinary speech. But this is not the case. In the history of literature we notice that developed techniques of verse normally precede, sometimes by centuries, developed techniques of prose.
Prose is the expression or imitation of directed thinking or controlled description in words, and its unit is the sentence. It does not follow that all prose is descriptive or thoughtful, much less logical, but only that prose imitates, in its rhythm and structure, the verbal expression of a rational mind. Prose, therefore, is not ordinary speech, but ordinary speech on its best behavior, aware of an audience and with its relation to that audience prepared beforehand. It is the habitual language of fully articulate people who have mastered its difficult idiom. Nonetheless, when they speak, even they will avoid stilted speech or “talking like a book”; their speech rhythm shows the influence of something that is not prose. If we are lost in a strange town and ask someone for directions, even the most articulate person will not respond in prose. We get instead a speech rhythm that is prolix and repetitive, and in which the verbal unit is no more a prose sentence than it is a poetic stanza.
Ordinary speech is concerned mainly with putting into words what is loosely called the stream of consciousness: the daydreaming, remembering, worrying, associating, brooding, and mooning that continually flow through the mind and which we often speak of as thought. This ordinary speech is mainly concerned with self-expression. Whether from immaturity, preoccupation, or the absence of a hearer, it is imperfectly aware of an audience. Full awareness of an audience makes speech rhetorical, and rhetoric means a conventionalized rhythm. The irregular rhythm of ordinary speech may be conventionalized in two ways. One way is to impose a pattern of recurrence on it; the other is to impose the logical and semantic pattern of the sentence. We have verse when the arrangement of words is dominated by recurrent rhythm and sound, prose when it is dominated by the syntactical relation of subject and predicate. Of the two, verse is much the simpler and more primitive type, which accounts for its being historically earlier than prose.

Q. The author uses the example of receiving directions in a strange town primarily to illustrate the point that prose is

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

Very early in our education we are made familiar with the distinction between verse and prose. The conviction gradually forces itself on us that when we mean what we say we write prose, and that verse is an ingenious but fundamentally perverse way of distorting ordinary prose statements. The conviction does not come to us from school so much as from our accumulated experience of observing prose and verse in action, and embedded in it is the assumption that prose is the language of ordinary speech. But this is not the case. In the history of literature we notice that developed techniques of verse normally precede, sometimes by centuries, developed techniques of prose.
Prose is the expression or imitation of directed thinking or controlled description in words, and its unit is the sentence. It does not follow that all prose is descriptive or thoughtful, much less logical, but only that prose imitates, in its rhythm and structure, the verbal expression of a rational mind. Prose, therefore, is not ordinary speech, but ordinary speech on its best behavior, aware of an audience and with its relation to that audience prepared beforehand. It is the habitual language of fully articulate people who have mastered its difficult idiom. Nonetheless, when they speak, even they will avoid stilted speech or “talking like a book”; their speech rhythm shows the influence of something that is not prose. If we are lost in a strange town and ask someone for directions, even the most articulate person will not respond in prose. We get instead a speech rhythm that is prolix and repetitive, and in which the verbal unit is no more a prose sentence than it is a poetic stanza.
Ordinary speech is concerned mainly with putting into words what is loosely called the stream of consciousness: the daydreaming, remembering, worrying, associating, brooding, and mooning that continually flow through the mind and which we often speak of as thought. This ordinary speech is mainly concerned with self-expression. Whether from immaturity, preoccupation, or the absence of a hearer, it is imperfectly aware of an audience. Full awareness of an audience makes speech rhetorical, and rhetoric means a conventionalized rhythm. The irregular rhythm of ordinary speech may be conventionalized in two ways. One way is to impose a pattern of recurrence on it; the other is to impose the logical and semantic pattern of the sentence. We have verse when the arrangement of words is dominated by recurrent rhythm and sound, prose when it is dominated by the syntactical relation of subject and predicate. Of the two, verse is much the simpler and more primitive type, which accounts for its being historically earlier than prose.

Q. The passage suggests that ordinary speech is probably less effective than prose at

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

Very early in our education we are made familiar with the distinction between verse and prose. The conviction gradually forces itself on us that when we mean what we say we write prose, and that verse is an ingenious but fundamentally perverse way of distorting ordinary prose statements. The conviction does not come to us from school so much as from our accumulated experience of observing prose and verse in action, and embedded in it is the assumption that prose is the language of ordinary speech. But this is not the case. In the history of literature we notice that developed techniques of verse normally precede, sometimes by centuries, developed techniques of prose.
Prose is the expression or imitation of directed thinking or controlled description in words, and its unit is the sentence. It does not follow that all prose is descriptive or thoughtful, much less logical, but only that prose imitates, in its rhythm and structure, the verbal expression of a rational mind. Prose, therefore, is not ordinary speech, but ordinary speech on its best behavior, aware of an audience and with its relation to that audience prepared beforehand. It is the habitual language of fully articulate people who have mastered its difficult idiom. Nonetheless, when they speak, even they will avoid stilted speech or “talking like a book”; their speech rhythm shows the influence of something that is not prose. If we are lost in a strange town and ask someone for directions, even the most articulate person will not respond in prose. We get instead a speech rhythm that is prolix and repetitive, and in which the verbal unit is no more a prose sentence than it is a poetic stanza.
Ordinary speech is concerned mainly with putting into words what is loosely called the stream of consciousness: the daydreaming, remembering, worrying, associating, brooding, and mooning that continually flow through the mind and which we often speak of as thought. This ordinary speech is mainly concerned with self-expression. Whether from immaturity, preoccupation, or the absence of a hearer, it is imperfectly aware of an audience. Full awareness of an audience makes speech rhetorical, and rhetoric means a conventionalized rhythm. The irregular rhythm of ordinary speech may be conventionalized in two ways. One way is to impose a pattern of recurrence on it; the other is to impose the logical and semantic pattern of the sentence. We have verse when the arrangement of words is dominated by recurrent rhythm and sound, prose when it is dominated by the syntactical relation of subject and predicate. Of the two, verse is much the simpler and more primitive type, which accounts for its being historically earlier than prose.

Q. The reasoning employed in which one of the following situations is most analogous to the author’s reasoning in explaining the fact that prose developed later than verse?

Solution:
QUESTION: 81

Fill in the blanks with appropriate pair of words.

There are different and ...... versions about what happened in the city, but one thing is certain: it is a dastardly act that must be condemned ...... .

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

By ...... celebrities from the sports, entertainment, or business arenas, the show narrates the stories of the ...... newsmakers from all walk of life.

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

Behind their strange appearance and ...... for carrion, which has long singled them out for fear and loathing hyenas present a ...... society in which females dominate.

Solution:

 "Behind their strange appearance and appetite for carrion, which has long singled them out for fear and loathing hyenas present a matriarchal society in which females dominate”.

QUESTION: 84

Choose the option in which the usage of the word is INCORRECT or INAPPROPRIATE.

Network

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

Choose the option in which the usage of the word is INCORRECT or INAPPROPRIATE.

Detail

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

Choose the option in which the usage of the word is INCORRECT or INAPPROPRIATE

Realise.

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

Choose the option in which the usage of the word is INCORRECT or INAPPROPRIATE.

Right

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R),(S),(T)and (U) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow:
(P) While these disadvantages of biofuels are serious, they are the only alternate energy source of the future and the sooner we find solutions to these problems the faster we will be able to solve the problems we are now facing with gasoline.
(Q) This fuel can also help to stimulate jobs locally since they are also much safer to handle than gasoline and can thus have the potential to turn around a global economy.
(R) These include dependence on fossil fuels for the machinery required to produce biofuel which ends up polluting as much as the burning of fossil fuels on roads and exorbitant cost of biofuels which makes it very difficult for the common man to switch to this option.
(S) This turnaround can potentially help to bring world peace and end the need to depend on foreign countries for energy requirements.
(T) Biofuels are made from plant sources and since these sources are available in abundance and can be reproduced on a massive scale, they form an energy source that is potentially unlimited.
(U) However everything is not as green with the biofuels as it seems as there are numerous disadvantages involved, which at times overshadow their positive impact.

Q. Which of the following should be the FIFTH sentences after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 89

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R),(S),(T)and (U) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow:
(P) While these disadvantages of biofuels are serious, they are the only alternate energy source of the future and the sooner we find solutions to these problems the faster we will be able to solve the problems we are now facing with gasoline.
(Q) This fuel can also help to stimulate jobs locally since they are also much safer to handle than gasoline and can thus have the potential to turn around a global economy.
(R) These include dependence on fossil fuels for the machinery required to produce biofuel which ends up polluting as much as the burning of fossil fuels on roads and exorbitant cost of biofuels which makes it very difficult for the common man to switch to this option.
(S) This turnaround can potentially help to bring world peace and end the need to depend on foreign countries for energy requirements.
(T) Biofuels are made from plant sources and since these sources are available in abundance and can be reproduced on a massive scale, they form an energy source that is potentially unlimited.
(U) However everything is not as green with the biofuels as it seems as there are numerous disadvantages involved, which at times overshadow their positive impact.

Q. Which of the following should be the THIRD sentences after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 90

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R),(S),(T)and (U) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow:
(P) While these disadvantages of biofuels are serious, they are the only alternate energy source of the future and the sooner we find solutions to these problems the faster we will be able to solve the problems we are now facing with gasoline.
(Q) This fuel can also help to stimulate jobs locally since they are also much safer to handle than gasoline and can thus have the potential to turn around a global economy.
(R) These include dependence on fossil fuels for the machinery required to produce biofuel which ends up polluting as much as the burning of fossil fuels on roads and exorbitant cost of biofuels which makes it very difficult for the common man to switch to this option.
(S) This turnaround can potentially help to bring world peace and end the need to depend on foreign countries for energy requirements.
(T) Biofuels are made from plant sources and since these sources are available in abundance and can be reproduced on a massive scale, they form an energy source that is potentially unlimited.
(U) However everything is not as green with the biofuels as it seems as there are numerous disadvantages involved, which at times overshadow their positive impact.

Q. Which of the following should be the FIRST sentences after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R),(S),(T)and (U) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow:
(P) While these disadvantages of biofuels are serious, they are the only alternate energy source of the future and the sooner we find solutions to these problems the faster we will be able to solve the problems we are now facing with gasoline.
(Q) This fuel can also help to stimulate jobs locally since they are also much safer to handle than gasoline and can thus have the potential to turn around a global economy.
(R) These include dependence on fossil fuels for the machinery required to produce biofuel which ends up polluting as much as the burning of fossil fuels on roads and exorbitant cost of biofuels which makes it very difficult for the common man to switch to this option.
(S) This turnaround can potentially help to bring world peace and end the need to depend on foreign countries for energy requirements.
(T) Biofuels are made from plant sources and since these sources are available in abundance and can be reproduced on a massive scale, they form an energy source that is potentially unlimited.
(U) However everything is not as green with the biofuels as it seems as there are numerous disadvantages involved, which at times overshadow their positive impact.

Q. Which of the following should be the SIXTH(LAST) sentences after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R),(S),(T)and (U) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow:
(P) While these disadvantages of biofuels are serious, they are the only alternate energy source of the future and the sooner we find solutions to these problems the faster we will be able to solve the problems we are now facing with gasoline.
(Q) This fuel can also help to stimulate jobs locally since they are also much safer to handle than gasoline and can thus have the potential to turn around a global economy.
(R) These include dependence on fossil fuels for the machinery required to produce biofuel which ends up polluting as much as the burning of fossil fuels on roads and exorbitant cost of biofuels which makes it very difficult for the common man to switch to this option.
(S) This turnaround can potentially help to bring world peace and end the need to depend on foreign countries for energy requirements.
(T) Biofuels are made from plant sources and since these sources are available in abundance and can be reproduced on a massive scale, they form an energy source that is potentially unlimited.
(U) However everything is not as green with the biofuels as it seems as there are numerous disadvantages involved, which at times overshadow their positive impact.

Q. Which of the following should be the SECOND sentences after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

Which of phrases given below each sentence should replace the phrase in italisized type to make grammatically correct?
With his sub-four minute mile Vijay broke a psychological barrier, inspiring thousands of others to attempt overcoming seemingly insurmountable hurdles.

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

Choose the grammatically correct option from the following.

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

Which of phrases given below each sentence should replace the phrase in italisized type to make grammatically correct?
The impostor eluded detection for so long because she conducted herself as though she were a licensed practitioner.

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. During the recession many companies will BE FORCED TO lay off workers.

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. He wanted NOTHING ELSE EXPECTING to sleep after a stressful day at work.

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. Ramesh took charge of the project, within a few days of HAVING APPOINTED?

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

Choose the italicised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. He was unable to give a satisfactory explanation for his absence from the meeting.

Solution:

absense is wrongly spelt.

QUESTION: 100

Choose the italicised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. Much countries are starting to turn their attention to new sources of energy.

Solution:

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