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CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022)


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66 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series | CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022)

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CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 1

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions.

The recurring theme of equality in the United States has flared into a fervent moral issue at crucial stages: the Revolutionary and Jacksonian periods, the Civil War, the populist and progressive eras, the New Deal, and the 1960s and 1980s. The legitimacy of American society is challenged by some set of people unhappy with the degree of equality. New claims are laid, new understandings are reached, and new policies for political or economic equality are instituted. Yet the equality issue endures outside these moments of fervor. Ideologies in favor of extending equality are arrayed against others that would limit its scope; advocates of social justice confront defenders of liberty.

In the moments of egalitarian ascendancy, libertarians are on the defensive. In the moments of retrenchment, egalitarians cling to previous gains. And in either period the enemy is likely to be the "special interests " that have too much power. In egalitarian times, these are the moneyed interests. In times of retrenchment, these are labor or big government and its beneficiaries.

The moments of creedal passion, in Samuel Huntington's words, have usually been outbursts of egalitarianism. In part, the passion springs from the self—interest of those who would benefit from a more equal distribution of goods or political influence. But the passion also springs from ideology and values, including deep religious justifications for equality.

The passion accompanying the discovery or rediscovery that ideals do not match reality is particularly intense when the ideal is as deeply felt as is equality. Yet there can be passion on the nonegalitarian side as well. The self—interested passion to protect an established position may be even more powerful than the passion to redress inequality, though its expression may be more muted.

Devotion to inequality may also be based on ideals, such as liberty, individualism, and the free market, which are no less ancient and venerable. Like the ideals of equality, these alternative ideals serve as yardsticks for measuring whether society has moved away from its true principles.

Yet the spirit of reform during Reconstruction dissipated in the face of spent political struggles, sluggish social institutions, and outright mendacity. Society's entrepreneurial energy was channeled into economic activity, and the courts failed to endorse many of the reformers' grandest visions. The egalitarian thrust of the Populists around the turn of the century inspired an anti—egalitarian counterthrust over the next two decades.

Americans do not have an ideology that assigns clear priority to one value over any other. At every historical juncture where equality was an issue, its proponents failed to do all that they had set out to do. Swings in the equality of social conditions are restrained not just by institutional obstacles but by fundamental conflicts of values that are a traditional element of American politics. Faith in the individualistic work ethic and belief in the legitimacy of unequal wealth retard progression to the egalitarian left. As for conservatism, the indelible tenet of political equality firmly restrains the right and confirms a commitment to the disadvantaged. In seeking equal opportunity over equal result, Americans forego a ceiling, not a floor.

Q. A history professor contends that American egalitarian movements have been motivated entirely by selfish concerns. Which of the following best characterizes the relevance of this information to the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 1 Where does the author talk about motives? Check your map and go back to paragraph 3. If pushes for equality were always born out of selfish motives, the author's argument would be half wrong in that he cites selfish and unselfish reasons. Choice (D) says just that.

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. The author definitely takes on this subject in the passage, so it must have an effect on the argument.

(B): Distortion. It does support one of the two claims...

(C): Distortion. ...and contradicts the other.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 2

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions.

The recurring theme of equality in the United States has flared into a fervent moral issue at crucial stages: the Revolutionary and Jacksonian periods, the Civil War, the populist and progressive eras, the New Deal, and the 1960s and 1980s. The legitimacy of American society is challenged by some set of people unhappy with the degree of equality. New claims are laid, new understandings are reached, and new policies for political or economic equality are instituted. Yet the equality issue endures outside these moments of fervor. Ideologies in favor of extending equality are arrayed against others that would limit its scope; advocates of social justice confront defenders of liberty.

In the moments of egalitarian ascendancy, libertarians are on the defensive. In the moments of retrenchment, egalitarians cling to previous gains. And in either period the enemy is likely to be the "special interests " that have too much power. In egalitarian times, these are the moneyed interests. In times of retrenchment, these are labor or big government and its beneficiaries.

The moments of creedal passion, in Samuel Huntington's words, have usually been outbursts of egalitarianism. In part, the passion springs from the self—interest of those who would benefit from a more equal distribution of goods or political influence. But the passion also springs from ideology and values, including deep religious justifications for equality.

The passion accompanying the discovery or rediscovery that ideals do not match reality is particularly intense when the ideal is as deeply felt as is equality. Yet there can be passion on the nonegalitarian side as well. The self—interested passion to protect an established position may be even more powerful than the passion to redress inequality, though its expression may be more muted.

Devotion to inequality may also be based on ideals, such as liberty, individualism, and the free market, which are no less ancient and venerable. Like the ideals of equality, these alternative ideals serve as yardsticks for measuring whether society has moved away from its true principles.

Yet the spirit of reform during Reconstruction dissipated in the face of spent political struggles, sluggish social institutions, and outright mendacity. Society's entrepreneurial energy was channeled into economic activity, and the courts failed to endorse many of the reformers' grandest visions. The egalitarian thrust of the Populists around the turn of the century inspired an anti—egalitarian counterthrust over the next two decades.

Americans do not have an ideology that assigns clear priority to one value over any other. At every historical juncture where equality was an issue, its proponents failed to do all that they had set out to do. Swings in the equality of social conditions are restrained not just by institutional obstacles but by fundamental conflicts of values that are a traditional element of American politics. Faith in the individualistic work ethic and belief in the legitimacy of unequal wealth retard progression to the egalitarian left. As for conservatism, the indelible tenet of political equality firmly restrains the right and confirms a commitment to the disadvantaged. In seeking equal opportunity over equal result, Americans forego a ceiling, not a floor.

Q. According to the passage, none of the following statements are true EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 2 First keep track of all the negatives in the question! You're actually looking for the one true statement. Choice (B) summarizes the point of paragraph 6 that pushes towards equality lead to backlashes.

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. The author would argue that fervor for equality during the Civil War would lead to a backlash against it rather than an increase in support for it.

(C): Opposite. The point of paragraph 4 is that passion can exist equally on both sides of the debate.

(D): Out of Scope. The author mentions special interests in paragraph 2 but doesn't argue that they always have too much power. In fact, they seem to fluctuate in power and identity depending on the dominating ideal of the time.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 3

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions.

The recurring theme of equality in the United States has flared into a fervent moral issue at crucial stages: the Revolutionary and Jacksonian periods, the Civil War, the populist and progressive eras, the New Deal, and the 1960s and 1980s. The legitimacy of American society is challenged by some set of people unhappy with the degree of equality. New claims are laid, new understandings are reached, and new policies for political or economic equality are instituted. Yet the equality issue endures outside these moments of fervor. Ideologies in favor of extending equality are arrayed against others that would limit its scope; advocates of social justice confront defenders of liberty.

In the moments of egalitarian ascendancy, libertarians are on the defensive. In the moments of retrenchment, egalitarians cling to previous gains. And in either period the enemy is likely to be the "special interests " that have too much power. In egalitarian times, these are the moneyed interests. In times of retrenchment, these are labor or big government and its beneficiaries.

The moments of creedal passion, in Samuel Huntington's words, have usually been outbursts of egalitarianism. In part, the passion springs from the self—interest of those who would benefit from a more equal distribution of goods or political influence. But the passion also springs from ideology and values, including deep religious justifications for equality.

The passion accompanying the discovery or rediscovery that ideals do not match reality is particularly intense when the ideal is as deeply felt as is equality. Yet there can be passion on the nonegalitarian side as well. The self—interested passion to protect an established position may be even more powerful than the passion to redress inequality, though its expression may be more muted.

Devotion to inequality may also be based on ideals, such as liberty, individualism, and the free market, which are no less ancient and venerable. Like the ideals of equality, these alternative ideals serve as yardsticks for measuring whether society has moved away from its true principles.

Yet the spirit of reform during Reconstruction dissipated in the face of spent political struggles, sluggish social institutions, and outright mendacity. Society's entrepreneurial energy was channeled into economic activity, and the courts failed to endorse many of the reformers' grandest visions. The egalitarian thrust of the Populists around the turn of the century inspired an anti—egalitarian counterthrust over the next two decades.

Americans do not have an ideology that assigns clear priority to one value over any other. At every historical juncture where equality was an issue, its proponents failed to do all that they had set out to do. Swings in the equality of social conditions are restrained not just by institutional obstacles but by fundamental conflicts of values that are a traditional element of American politics. Faith in the individualistic work ethic and belief in the legitimacy of unequal wealth retard progression to the egalitarian left. As for conservatism, the indelible tenet of political equality firmly restrains the right and confirms a commitment to the disadvantaged. In seeking equal opportunity over equal result, Americans forego a ceiling, not a floor.

Q. In political discussions, the word enemy is bandied about with little regard for its precise meaning. In the context of the passage, the word, as used in the second passage, refers to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 3 Hit the passage to read the phrase in context. The author is using the phrase to refer to the opponents of the drives towards equality. Choice (C) fits perfectly.

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. The political left would promote equality, since equality is the progressive viewpoint of the times the author refers to in this paragraph.

(B): Opposite. This would also be in keeping with the proponents of equality rather than "the enemy " of that ideal.

(D): Faulty Use of Detail. This distorts the discussion of these keywords in paragraph 1, which have nothing to do with the contrast the author sets up here.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 4

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions.

The recurring theme of equality in the United States has flared into a fervent moral issue at crucial stages: the Revolutionary and Jacksonian periods, the Civil War, the populist and progressive eras, the New Deal, and the 1960s and 1980s. The legitimacy of American society is challenged by some set of people unhappy with the degree of equality. New claims are laid, new understandings are reached, and new policies for political or economic equality are instituted. Yet the equality issue endures outside these moments of fervor. Ideologies in favor of extending equality are arrayed against others that would limit its scope; advocates of social justice confront defenders of liberty.

In the moments of egalitarian ascendancy, libertarians are on the defensive. In the moments of retrenchment, egalitarians cling to previous gains. And in either period the enemy is likely to be the "special interests " that have too much power. In egalitarian times, these are the moneyed interests. In times of retrenchment, these are labor or big government and its beneficiaries.

The moments of creedal passion, in Samuel Huntington's words, have usually been outbursts of egalitarianism. In part, the passion springs from the self—interest of those who would benefit from a more equal distribution of goods or political influence. But the passion also springs from ideology and values, including deep religious justifications for equality.

The passion accompanying the discovery or rediscovery that ideals do not match reality is particularly intense when the ideal is as deeply felt as is equality. Yet there can be passion on the nonegalitarian side as well. The self—interested passion to protect an established position may be even more powerful than the passion to redress inequality, though its expression may be more muted.

Devotion to inequality may also be based on ideals, such as liberty, individualism, and the free market, which are no less ancient and venerable. Like the ideals of equality, these alternative ideals serve as yardsticks for measuring whether society has moved away from its true principles.

Yet the spirit of reform during Reconstruction dissipated in the face of spent political struggles, sluggish social institutions, and outright mendacity. Society's entrepreneurial energy was channeled into economic activity, and the courts failed to endorse many of the reformers' grandest visions. The egalitarian thrust of the Populists around the turn of the century inspired an anti—egalitarian counterthrust over the next two decades.

Americans do not have an ideology that assigns clear priority to one value over any other. At every historical juncture where equality was an issue, its proponents failed to do all that they had set out to do. Swings in the equality of social conditions are restrained not just by institutional obstacles but by fundamental conflicts of values that are a traditional element of American politics. Faith in the individualistic work ethic and belief in the legitimacy of unequal wealth retard progression to the egalitarian left. As for conservatism, the indelible tenet of political equality firmly restrains the right and confirms a commitment to the disadvantaged. In seeking equal opportunity over equal result, Americans forego a ceiling, not a floor.

Q. The existence of which of the following would most strongly challenge the author's view about the American public's ideology?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 4 The author talks about the American public's ideology throughout the passage, but most thoroughly in the last paragraph. When hitting the answer choices, start with the most likely paragraph and work from there. In this case, (A) rewards you immediately for the prediction: The point of the last paragraph is that America is bound by several more—or—less equal ideals, a view that (A) would certainly challenge.

Wrong answers:

(B): Opposite. The author mentions this in paragraph 6.

(C): Opposite. This is also suggested in paragraph 6 by the "commitment to the disadvantaged."

(D): Out of Scope. Increased tolerance of minority views would have no effect on the author's argument about balanced American ideologies.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 5

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions.

The recurring theme of equality in the United States has flared into a fervent moral issue at crucial stages: the Revolutionary and Jacksonian periods, the Civil War, the populist and progressive eras, the New Deal, and the 1960s and 1980s. The legitimacy of American society is challenged by some set of people unhappy with the degree of equality. New claims are laid, new understandings are reached, and new policies for political or economic equality are instituted. Yet the equality issue endures outside these moments of fervor. Ideologies in favor of extending equality are arrayed against others that would limit its scope; advocates of social justice confront defenders of liberty.

In the moments of egalitarian ascendancy, libertarians are on the defensive. In the moments of retrenchment, egalitarians cling to previous gains. And in either period the enemy is likely to be the "special interests " that have too much power. In egalitarian times, these are the moneyed interests. In times of retrenchment, these are labor or big government and its beneficiaries.

The moments of creedal passion, in Samuel Huntington's words, have usually been outbursts of egalitarianism. In part, the passion springs from the self—interest of those who would benefit from a more equal distribution of goods or political influence. But the passion also springs from ideology and values, including deep religious justifications for equality.

The passion accompanying the discovery or rediscovery that ideals do not match reality is particularly intense when the ideal is as deeply felt as is equality. Yet there can be passion on the nonegalitarian side as well. The self—interested passion to protect an established position may be even more powerful than the passion to redress inequality, though its expression may be more muted.

Devotion to inequality may also be based on ideals, such as liberty, individualism, and the free market, which are no less ancient and venerable. Like the ideals of equality, these alternative ideals serve as yardsticks for measuring whether society has moved away from its true principles.

Yet the spirit of reform during Reconstruction dissipated in the face of spent political struggles, sluggish social institutions, and outright mendacity. Society's entrepreneurial energy was channeled into economic activity, and the courts failed to endorse many of the reformers' grandest visions. The egalitarian thrust of the Populists around the turn of the century inspired an anti—egalitarian counterthrust over the next two decades.

Americans do not have an ideology that assigns clear priority to one value over any other. At every historical juncture where equality was an issue, its proponents failed to do all that they had set out to do. Swings in the equality of social conditions are restrained not just by institutional obstacles but by fundamental conflicts of values that are a traditional element of American politics. Faith in the individualistic work ethic and belief in the legitimacy of unequal wealth retard progression to the egalitarian left. As for conservatism, the indelible tenet of political equality firmly restrains the right and confirms a commitment to the disadvantaged. In seeking equal opportunity over equal result, Americans forego a ceiling, not a floor.

Q. Suppose there is a government plan to raise taxes to pay for more social programs for the disadvantaged. If the information that the author presents in the passage about libertarians is correct, how would libertarians be expected to react this plan?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 5 Why does the author talk about libertarians? To describe an ideal that tends to conflict with equality, the principle behind the action in the question. Libertarians would probably therefore attack the plan precisely because it was promoting equality. (B) says the same.

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. Libertarians as the author describes them think just the opposite.

(C): Opposite. The author clearly thinks that libertarians would have an opinion on an action that runs counter to their principles.

(D): Distortion. Though they'd support private enterprise, they wouldn't support private enterprise promoting an ideal contrary to their own.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 6

Direction: The passage given below is followed by four summaries. Choose the option that best captures the author's position.

North American walnut sphinx moth caterpillars (Amorpha juglandis) look like easy meals for birds, but they have a trick up their sleeves - they produce whistles that sound like bird alarm calls, scaring potential predators away. At first, scientists suspected birds were simply startled by the loud noise. But a new study suggests a more sophisticated mechanism: the caterpillar's whistle appears to mimic a bird alarm call, sending avian predators scrambling for cover. When pecked by a bird, the caterpillars whistle by compressing their bodies like an according and forcing air out through specialized holes in their sides. The whistles are impressively loud - they have been measured at over BO dB from 5cm away from the caterpillar - considering they are made by a two-inch long insect.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 6 According to the paragraph the North American walnut sphinx moth caterpillars produce whistles which are extremely loud considering their size. These whistles appear to mimic bird(predator) alarm calls which scares them to look for cover. Thus, these sounds act as acoustic deception and help the insect to defend themselves against predators.

Option A mentions about vocal tracts which is out of scope. Hence, it can be eliminated.

Option B though correct, fails to mention the use of sound to defend against the preators. Hence, it can be eliminated.

Option C captures all the main points and hence is right choice. Option D mentions 'camouflage' which is also out of context. Hence, it can be eliminated.

Hence, option C is the right answer.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 7

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The last ice age has left its telltales written quite clearly across the landscape. When Louis Agassiz first promulgated his theory that ice had once covered the Swiss countryside, he looked to the valleys there that retain glaciers to this day. Like other observers, he noted the presence of strange boulders, called "erratics, " tossed down in valleys like flotsam after a flood had drained away. He saw the strange polish along the bedrock—a sheen imparted as if by some massive swipe of sandpaper; he saw the debris of rocks and boulders fringing the margin of existing glaciers. He saw what can be seen still, markings in stone that indicated that ice once flowed over vast stretches of land now clear and verdant.

The first great glaciations must have scored the earth as deeply in their turn, and, in principle, we ought to be able to track the history of the early ice ages by following the same reasoning Agassiz used to persuade himself and his contemporaries that ice once covered the earth. But the marks left by these earlier glaciations are quite subtle, tracks turned ghostly with great age. There are, however, telltale deposits of ancient rocks that strongly suggest that they had been ground together and laid down by the spread of ice.

The Australian climate historian L.A. Frakes has prospected through various theories proposed to account for those early ice ages. He isn't terribly enthusiastic about any of the possible culprits, but his choice for the least unlikely of them all emerges out of the recent revival of what was once a radically unorthodox idea: that continents drift over the face of the planet. Frakes argues that the glaciers originated at sites near the poles and that the ice ages began because the continents of the early earth had drifted to positions that took more and more of their land nearer to the polar regions.

More land near the poles meant that more precipitation fell as snow and could be compacted on land to form glaciers. With enough glaciers, the increase in the amount of sunlight reflected back into space off the glistening white sheen of the ice effectively reduced the amount by which the sun warmed the earth, creating the feedback loop by which the growth of glaciers encouraged the growth of more glaciers. Rocks have been found in North America, Africa and Australia whose ages appear to hover around the 2.3 billion—year—old mark. That date and their spread are vague enough, however, to make it almost impossible to determine just how much of the earth was icebound during the possible range of time in which each of the glacial deposits was formed.

Uncertainties about both the timing and the extent of these glaciers also muddy the search for the cause of the ancient ice ages. The record is so spotty that geologists are not sure whether areas near the equator or nearer the poles were the coolest places on earth. It's also possible that volcanic eruptions had tossed enough dust into the atmosphere to screen out sunlight and cool the earth. While some of the glacial records in the rocks do indeed contain evidence of volcanic activity prior to the buildup of glacial debris, others do not.

Such traces are the currency of science—data—and like money, a richness of data both buys you some credibility and ties you down, eliminating at least some theoretically plausible explanations. For this early period, theorists have come up with a variety of ideas to explain the ancient ice ages, all elegant and mostly immune to both proof and criticism. For example, a change in the earth's orbit could have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching the planet. However, the only physical signature of such an event that would show in the rocks would be the marks of the glaciers themselves.

Q. Suppose that an advocate of the "change in orbit " theory of the ancient ice ages criticizes a defender of the "volcanic eruption " theory on the grounds that only some of the glacial records contain evidence of prior volcanic activity. The defender might justifiably counter this attack by pointing out that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 7 The author mentions both of these theories; paraphrase what is said about them: the volcanic theory has some evidence in glacial records; the orbital change theory has no evidence at all. The volcano—scientist would be quick to point this out in his defense; (C) says the same thing.

Wrong answers:

(A): Out of Scope. We have no way of knowing from the passage the consequences of a change of orbit.

(B): Opposite. The advocate of the volcano theory wouldn't help his cause with this.

(D): Distortion. While the author mentions that these theories are immune from proof, that's not necessarily something in their favor, nor would it distinguish the vulcanologist's argument from that of the orbital theorists.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 8

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The last ice age has left its telltales written quite clearly across the landscape. When Louis Agassiz first promulgated his theory that ice had once covered the Swiss countryside, he looked to the valleys there that retain glaciers to this day. Like other observers, he noted the presence of strange boulders, called "erratics, " tossed down in valleys like flotsam after a flood had drained away. He saw the strange polish along the bedrock—a sheen imparted as if by some massive swipe of sandpaper; he saw the debris of rocks and boulders fringing the margin of existing glaciers. He saw what can be seen still, markings in stone that indicated that ice once flowed over vast stretches of land now clear and verdant.

The first great glaciations must have scored the earth as deeply in their turn, and, in principle, we ought to be able to track the history of the early ice ages by following the same reasoning Agassiz used to persuade himself and his contemporaries that ice once covered the earth. But the marks left by these earlier glaciations are quite subtle, tracks turned ghostly with great age. There are, however, telltale deposits of ancient rocks that strongly suggest that they had been ground together and laid down by the spread of ice.

The Australian climate historian L.A. Frakes has prospected through various theories proposed to account for those early ice ages. He isn't terribly enthusiastic about any of the possible culprits, but his choice for the least unlikely of them all emerges out of the recent revival of what was once a radically unorthodox idea: that continents drift over the face of the planet. Frakes argues that the glaciers originated at sites near the poles and that the ice ages began because the continents of the early earth had drifted to positions that took more and more of their land nearer to the polar regions.

More land near the poles meant that more precipitation fell as snow and could be compacted on land to form glaciers. With enough glaciers, the increase in the amount of sunlight reflected back into space off the glistening white sheen of the ice effectively reduced the amount by which the sun warmed the earth, creating the feedback loop by which the growth of glaciers encouraged the growth of more glaciers. Rocks have been found in North America, Africa and Australia whose ages appear to hover around the 2.3 billion—year—old mark. That date and their spread are vague enough, however, to make it almost impossible to determine just how much of the earth was icebound during the possible range of time in which each of the glacial deposits was formed.

Uncertainties about both the timing and the extent of these glaciers also muddy the search for the cause of the ancient ice ages. The record is so spotty that geologists are not sure whether areas near the equator or nearer the poles were the coolest places on earth. It's also possible that volcanic eruptions had tossed enough dust into the atmosphere to screen out sunlight and cool the earth. While some of the glacial records in the rocks do indeed contain evidence of volcanic activity prior to the buildup of glacial debris, others do not.

Such traces are the currency of science—data—and like money, a richness of data both buys you some credibility and ties you down, eliminating at least some theoretically plausible explanations. For this early period, theorists have come up with a variety of ideas to explain the ancient ice ages, all elegant and mostly immune to both proof and criticism. For example, a change in the earth's orbit could have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching the planet. However, the only physical signature of such an event that would show in the rocks would be the marks of the glaciers themselves.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following is most likely to be true about the relationship between the amount of data one has about a phenomenon and the number of theoretically plausible explanations?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 8 Where does the author discuss this? All of paragraph 6; paraphrase the point: the less data one has the freer one is to form explanations. It may take a little scanning to get to (B); remember to look for the converses of your prediction in questions like this.

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. The author argues that a greater amount of data "ties you down. "

(C): Opposite. This is just the flip—side of (A), and also opposite.

(D): Opposite. The author spends paragraph 6 arguing that there is a connection.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 9

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The last ice age has left its telltales written quite clearly across the landscape. When Louis Agassiz first promulgated his theory that ice had once covered the Swiss countryside, he looked to the valleys there that retain glaciers to this day. Like other observers, he noted the presence of strange boulders, called "erratics, " tossed down in valleys like flotsam after a flood had drained away. He saw the strange polish along the bedrock—a sheen imparted as if by some massive swipe of sandpaper; he saw the debris of rocks and boulders fringing the margin of existing glaciers. He saw what can be seen still, markings in stone that indicated that ice once flowed over vast stretches of land now clear and verdant.

The first great glaciations must have scored the earth as deeply in their turn, and, in principle, we ought to be able to track the history of the early ice ages by following the same reasoning Agassiz used to persuade himself and his contemporaries that ice once covered the earth. But the marks left by these earlier glaciations are quite subtle, tracks turned ghostly with great age. There are, however, telltale deposits of ancient rocks that strongly suggest that they had been ground together and laid down by the spread of ice.

The Australian climate historian L.A. Frakes has prospected through various theories proposed to account for those early ice ages. He isn't terribly enthusiastic about any of the possible culprits, but his choice for the least unlikely of them all emerges out of the recent revival of what was once a radically unorthodox idea: that continents drift over the face of the planet. Frakes argues that the glaciers originated at sites near the poles and that the ice ages began because the continents of the early earth had drifted to positions that took more and more of their land nearer to the polar regions.

More land near the poles meant that more precipitation fell as snow and could be compacted on land to form glaciers. With enough glaciers, the increase in the amount of sunlight reflected back into space off the glistening white sheen of the ice effectively reduced the amount by which the sun warmed the earth, creating the feedback loop by which the growth of glaciers encouraged the growth of more glaciers. Rocks have been found in North America, Africa and Australia whose ages appear to hover around the 2.3 billion—year—old mark. That date and their spread are vague enough, however, to make it almost impossible to determine just how much of the earth was icebound during the possible range of time in which each of the glacial deposits was formed.

Uncertainties about both the timing and the extent of these glaciers also muddy the search for the cause of the ancient ice ages. The record is so spotty that geologists are not sure whether areas near the equator or nearer the poles were the coolest places on earth. It's also possible that volcanic eruptions had tossed enough dust into the atmosphere to screen out sunlight and cool the earth. While some of the glacial records in the rocks do indeed contain evidence of volcanic activity prior to the buildup of glacial debris, others do not.

Such traces are the currency of science—data—and like money, a richness of data both buys you some credibility and ties you down, eliminating at least some theoretically plausible explanations. For this early period, theorists have come up with a variety of ideas to explain the ancient ice ages, all elegant and mostly immune to both proof and criticism. For example, a change in the earth's orbit could have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching the planet. However, the only physical signature of such an event that would show in the rocks would be the marks of the glaciers themselves.

Q. There is an implicit assumption in the statement that geologists don't know whether the coolest places on earth were near the poles or near the equator. The assumption is that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 9 Try to get a basic prediction for assumption questions if possible. If scientists don't know whether the poles or the equator were the coolest, they must have some sort of evidence that both were awfully cold. (A) fits this. If unsure, try the denial test: If glacial deposits haven't been found at both, then one should be demonstrably colder than the other.

Wrong answers:

(B): Distortion. The argument that scientists are unsure doesn't depend on the idea that some geological information is forever gone. While this may be true, it's not why scientists are unsure.

(C): Out of Scope. This has nothing to do with the statement.

(D): Out of Scope. Even if this were true, it still wouldn't explain why geologists were unsure which part of the earth had been the coolest.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 10

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The last ice age has left its telltales written quite clearly across the landscape. When Louis Agassiz first promulgated his theory that ice had once covered the Swiss countryside, he looked to the valleys there that retain glaciers to this day. Like other observers, he noted the presence of strange boulders, called "erratics, " tossed down in valleys like flotsam after a flood had drained away. He saw the strange polish along the bedrock—a sheen imparted as if by some massive swipe of sandpaper; he saw the debris of rocks and boulders fringing the margin of existing glaciers. He saw what can be seen still, markings in stone that indicated that ice once flowed over vast stretches of land now clear and verdant.

The first great glaciations must have scored the earth as deeply in their turn, and, in principle, we ought to be able to track the history of the early ice ages by following the same reasoning Agassiz used to persuade himself and his contemporaries that ice once covered the earth. But the marks left by these earlier glaciations are quite subtle, tracks turned ghostly with great age. There are, however, telltale deposits of ancient rocks that strongly suggest that they had been ground together and laid down by the spread of ice.

The Australian climate historian L.A. Frakes has prospected through various theories proposed to account for those early ice ages. He isn't terribly enthusiastic about any of the possible culprits, but his choice for the least unlikely of them all emerges out of the recent revival of what was once a radically unorthodox idea: that continents drift over the face of the planet. Frakes argues that the glaciers originated at sites near the poles and that the ice ages began because the continents of the early earth had drifted to positions that took more and more of their land nearer to the polar regions.

More land near the poles meant that more precipitation fell as snow and could be compacted on land to form glaciers. With enough glaciers, the increase in the amount of sunlight reflected back into space off the glistening white sheen of the ice effectively reduced the amount by which the sun warmed the earth, creating the feedback loop by which the growth of glaciers encouraged the growth of more glaciers. Rocks have been found in North America, Africa and Australia whose ages appear to hover around the 2.3 billion—year—old mark. That date and their spread are vague enough, however, to make it almost impossible to determine just how much of the earth was icebound during the possible range of time in which each of the glacial deposits was formed.

Uncertainties about both the timing and the extent of these glaciers also muddy the search for the cause of the ancient ice ages. The record is so spotty that geologists are not sure whether areas near the equator or nearer the poles were the coolest places on earth. It's also possible that volcanic eruptions had tossed enough dust into the atmosphere to screen out sunlight and cool the earth. While some of the glacial records in the rocks do indeed contain evidence of volcanic activity prior to the buildup of glacial debris, others do not.

Such traces are the currency of science—data—and like money, a richness of data both buys you some credibility and ties you down, eliminating at least some theoretically plausible explanations. For this early period, theorists have come up with a variety of ideas to explain the ancient ice ages, all elegant and mostly immune to both proof and criticism. For example, a change in the earth's orbit could have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching the planet. However, the only physical signature of such an event that would show in the rocks would be the marks of the glaciers themselves.

Q. Based on the passage, with which of the following statements would the author most likely NOT disagree?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 10 What is the author's main purpose of writing the passage? It's a bit more difficult to paraphrase purposes in an objective passage, but the author clearly intends to show that data on the ancient ice ages is sketchy. The author argues throughout the first half the passage that it's hard to understand much about the earlier ice ages because the evidence is so much older than that of later glaciations. This would suggest that investigating later ice ages, and geologic events in general, is easier: (A).

Wrong answers:

(B): Distortion. Though ground—up rocks appear in the end of paragraph 2 as evidence of an ice age, there's nothing to suggest that the author believes they always indicate an ice age (note the extreme word "always ").

(C): Out of Scope. The author isn't concerned with the consequences of the theories, only the theories and evidences themselves.

(D): Distortion. While the author argues that there are different theories, each ice age didn't necessarily have a different cause.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 11

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The last ice age has left its telltales written quite clearly across the landscape. When Louis Agassiz first promulgated his theory that ice had once covered the Swiss countryside, he looked to the valleys there that retain glaciers to this day. Like other observers, he noted the presence of strange boulders, called "erratics, " tossed down in valleys like flotsam after a flood had drained away. He saw the strange polish along the bedrock—a sheen imparted as if by some massive swipe of sandpaper; he saw the debris of rocks and boulders fringing the margin of existing glaciers. He saw what can be seen still, markings in stone that indicated that ice once flowed over vast stretches of land now clear and verdant.

The first great glaciations must have scored the earth as deeply in their turn, and, in principle, we ought to be able to track the history of the early ice ages by following the same reasoning Agassiz used to persuade himself and his contemporaries that ice once covered the earth. But the marks left by these earlier glaciations are quite subtle, tracks turned ghostly with great age. There are, however, telltale deposits of ancient rocks that strongly suggest that they had been ground together and laid down by the spread of ice.

The Australian climate historian L.A. Frakes has prospected through various theories proposed to account for those early ice ages. He isn't terribly enthusiastic about any of the possible culprits, but his choice for the least unlikely of them all emerges out of the recent revival of what was once a radically unorthodox idea: that continents drift over the face of the planet. Frakes argues that the glaciers originated at sites near the poles and that the ice ages began because the continents of the early earth had drifted to positions that took more and more of their land nearer to the polar regions.

More land near the poles meant that more precipitation fell as snow and could be compacted on land to form glaciers. With enough glaciers, the increase in the amount of sunlight reflected back into space off the glistening white sheen of the ice effectively reduced the amount by which the sun warmed the earth, creating the feedback loop by which the growth of glaciers encouraged the growth of more glaciers. Rocks have been found in North America, Africa and Australia whose ages appear to hover around the 2.3 billion—year—old mark. That date and their spread are vague enough, however, to make it almost impossible to determine just how much of the earth was icebound during the possible range of time in which each of the glacial deposits was formed.

Uncertainties about both the timing and the extent of these glaciers also muddy the search for the cause of the ancient ice ages. The record is so spotty that geologists are not sure whether areas near the equator or nearer the poles were the coolest places on earth. It's also possible that volcanic eruptions had tossed enough dust into the atmosphere to screen out sunlight and cool the earth. While some of the glacial records in the rocks do indeed contain evidence of volcanic activity prior to the buildup of glacial debris, others do not.

Such traces are the currency of science—data—and like money, a richness of data both buys you some credibility and ties you down, eliminating at least some theoretically plausible explanations. For this early period, theorists have come up with a variety of ideas to explain the ancient ice ages, all elegant and mostly immune to both proof and criticism. For example, a change in the earth's orbit could have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching the planet. However, the only physical signature of such an event that would show in the rocks would be the marks of the glaciers themselves.

Q. Suppose paleobotanists discover that during geological periods of reduced sunlight, ancient forests died away, leaving fossilized remains. What is the relevance of this information to the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 11 What would cause reduced sunlight? Only an orbital change. Think back on what the author says about the orbital change theory: its only evidence is the glaciation itself. This new evidence would therefore weaken the author's argument about the orbital theory: (D).

Wrong answers:

(A): Out of Scope. Though volcanic eruptions can lead to a reduction in the amount of sunlight that reaches earth, it isn't necessarily the case here.

(B): Out of Scope. As above. This evidence is outside the scope of the volcanic theory.

(C): Opposite. The author never makes this claim.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 12

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

As opera becomes more popular in America the scarcity of theaters and the unconscionably costly logistics of the lyric stage make it difficult to meet the demand. Many a good—sized and well—to—do community would be able to operate and maintain a modest but live opera theater, but are unwilling to do so because it would unfavorably compare with the splendors of New York's Metropolitan Opera.

It is not realized that the rich operatic culture of Italy and Germany is mainly due to their many small municipal theaters which alternate repertory theater with opera. These circumstances have led to concert or "semi—staged " performances which, formerly an exception, now occupy entire companies expressly formed for this purpose. However, stage music, real operatic music, often fails to exert its full power in the frozen formality of the concert platform. In a true opera the particular charm and power of the music does not come through without staging and acting, for gesture is an expression of feeling, and the decor and costumes summarize the external aspects, providing a vision of the whole action. Both are to a considerable degree determined by the music, but they also complement it.

An opera is a play in music. If it is presented in concert version, then it should not offer a half—hearted gesture towards the theater. Indeed, the "partly staged " performances are even more unsatisfactory than the concert variety. The tenor is all excited, but you do not know why; the soprano is obviously dying, but she remains on her feet. Nor does the stationary chorus, its members turning the pages of their scores without looking at the person they sing about, contribute to the illusion.

Different aesthetic laws of governance apply to concert music and theatrical music, for they are incongruous worlds calling for an entirely different sort of imagination from both performers and audience. Opera is theater, the most involved, elaborate, and exciting form of theater. The Italian term "opera " is far more inclusive than its English interpretation, for it embraces not only the musical score but the whole theater, "the work. "

Without the stage, paucity of musical ideas immediately becomes evident, often painfully so. Take for instance Richard Strauss, some of whose late operas are being performed in concerts. Strauss was a composer who knew every facet of the lyric stage as few have known it, yet what can be quite pleasant on the stage, even if it is not particularly inventive, appears bare and contrived when removed from its natural habitat.

Some may say that the end justifies the means. I can see merit in the concert performance of an opera which otherwise could not hope to be heard, or of one deficient in true theatrical qualities yet of genuine musical value. But neither Strauss, nor Bellini, nor Donizetti qualifies for such a role. Even if we forget the vital function of staging, it is practically impossible, for purely musical reasons, to present such a work on the concert platform. The large orchestra belongs in the pit; when placed on the stage, together with the singers, it makes their position almost untenable, even when led by an experienced opera conductor.

Q. The author discusses "opera " in a very particular way in the fourth paragraph of the passage. Implicit in the author's discussion of the term is the idea that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 12 Look to the fourth paragraph for this information. The author argues that the term "opera " in English does not connote the full experience of the theatrical work (as it does in Italian); choice (B) mirrors this.

Wrong answers:

(A): Faulty Use of Detail. This could possibly be inferred from the passage, but the author is not trying to make this point.

(C): Faulty Use of Detail/Distortion. The author never goes so far as to limit the scope of the discussion to only two languages.

(D): Distortion. The author does not imply this, he is only saying that the way we think of opera is different.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 13

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

As opera becomes more popular in America the scarcity of theaters and the unconscionably costly logistics of the lyric stage make it difficult to meet the demand. Many a good—sized and well—to—do community would be able to operate and maintain a modest but live opera theater, but are unwilling to do so because it would unfavorably compare with the splendors of New York's Metropolitan Opera.

It is not realized that the rich operatic culture of Italy and Germany is mainly due to their many small municipal theaters which alternate repertory theater with opera. These circumstances have led to concert or "semi—staged " performances which, formerly an exception, now occupy entire companies expressly formed for this purpose. However, stage music, real operatic music, often fails to exert its full power in the frozen formality of the concert platform. In a true opera the particular charm and power of the music does not come through without staging and acting, for gesture is an expression of feeling, and the decor and costumes summarize the external aspects, providing a vision of the whole action. Both are to a considerable degree determined by the music, but they also complement it.

An opera is a play in music. If it is presented in concert version, then it should not offer a half—hearted gesture towards the theater. Indeed, the "partly staged " performances are even more unsatisfactory than the concert variety. The tenor is all excited, but you do not know why; the soprano is obviously dying, but she remains on her feet. Nor does the stationary chorus, its members turning the pages of their scores without looking at the person they sing about, contribute to the illusion.

Different aesthetic laws of governance apply to concert music and theatrical music, for they are incongruous worlds calling for an entirely different sort of imagination from both performers and audience. Opera is theater, the most involved, elaborate, and exciting form of theater. The Italian term "opera " is far more inclusive than its English interpretation, for it embraces not only the musical score but the whole theater, "the work. "

Without the stage, paucity of musical ideas immediately becomes evident, often painfully so. Take for instance Richard Strauss, some of whose late operas are being performed in concerts. Strauss was a composer who knew every facet of the lyric stage as few have known it, yet what can be quite pleasant on the stage, even if it is not particularly inventive, appears bare and contrived when removed from its natural habitat.

Some may say that the end justifies the means. I can see merit in the concert performance of an opera which otherwise could not hope to be heard, or of one deficient in true theatrical qualities yet of genuine musical value. But neither Strauss, nor Bellini, nor Donizetti qualifies for such a role. Even if we forget the vital function of staging, it is practically impossible, for purely musical reasons, to present such a work on the concert platform. The large orchestra belongs in the pit; when placed on the stage, together with the singers, it makes their position almost untenable, even when led by an experienced opera conductor.

Q. Bellini's works have historically been considered to possess both true theatrical quality and genuine musical value. What is the relevance of this information to the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 13 A tricky question. Think carefully, and reread the relevant text. Where is Bellini mentioned? Go through the last paragraph again, being sure to paraphrase. The author argues that concerts might be fine for operas that wouldn't be heard or that are up to snuff musically but not theatrically. He then argues that Bellini, among others, doesn't qualify for "such a role. " What is the role? The concert treatment. The author must therefore think that Bellini's operas have both the musical and theatrical quality needed for a fully staged opera. The information in the question has to therefore support this belief, ergo (B).

Wrong answers:

(A): Distortion. While the author says that some works might not be heard outside of concert, Bellini doesn't fit in this category (if you haven't heard of Bellini, note that as he is mentioned alongside Strauss, he is clearly a famous composer).

(C): Opposite. The author implies just the opposite when talking about Bellini.

(D): Opposite. The author would argue that if this is true about Bellini, presenting his operas in concert would cause all sorts of harm to the opera.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 14

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

As opera becomes more popular in America the scarcity of theaters and the unconscionably costly logistics of the lyric stage make it difficult to meet the demand. Many a good—sized and well—to—do community would be able to operate and maintain a modest but live opera theater, but are unwilling to do so because it would unfavorably compare with the splendors of New York's Metropolitan Opera.

It is not realized that the rich operatic culture of Italy and Germany is mainly due to their many small municipal theaters which alternate repertory theater with opera. These circumstances have led to concert or "semi—staged " performances which, formerly an exception, now occupy entire companies expressly formed for this purpose. However, stage music, real operatic music, often fails to exert its full power in the frozen formality of the concert platform. In a true opera the particular charm and power of the music does not come through without staging and acting, for gesture is an expression of feeling, and the decor and costumes summarize the external aspects, providing a vision of the whole action. Both are to a considerable degree determined by the music, but they also complement it.

An opera is a play in music. If it is presented in concert version, then it should not offer a half—hearted gesture towards the theater. Indeed, the "partly staged " performances are even more unsatisfactory than the concert variety. The tenor is all excited, but you do not know why; the soprano is obviously dying, but she remains on her feet. Nor does the stationary chorus, its members turning the pages of their scores without looking at the person they sing about, contribute to the illusion.

Different aesthetic laws of governance apply to concert music and theatrical music, for they are incongruous worlds calling for an entirely different sort of imagination from both performers and audience. Opera is theater, the most involved, elaborate, and exciting form of theater. The Italian term "opera " is far more inclusive than its English interpretation, for it embraces not only the musical score but the whole theater, "the work. "

Without the stage, paucity of musical ideas immediately becomes evident, often painfully so. Take for instance Richard Strauss, some of whose late operas are being performed in concerts. Strauss was a composer who knew every facet of the lyric stage as few have known it, yet what can be quite pleasant on the stage, even if it is not particularly inventive, appears bare and contrived when removed from its natural habitat.

Some may say that the end justifies the means. I can see merit in the concert performance of an opera which otherwise could not hope to be heard, or of one deficient in true theatrical qualities yet of genuine musical value. But neither Strauss, nor Bellini, nor Donizetti qualifies for such a role. Even if we forget the vital function of staging, it is practically impossible, for purely musical reasons, to present such a work on the concert platform. The large orchestra belongs in the pit; when placed on the stage, together with the singers, it makes their position almost untenable, even when led by an experienced opera conductor.

Q. Take, as an example, an opera that contains strong musical ideas throughout its score and suppose that it will be performed in concert. According to the passage, the presentation will:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 14 An application question. Break the situation down into pieces that can be evaluated against the author's argument. The performed—in—concert part of the situation is likely the easier to evaluate. The author will surely think that it will fail because of his idea that operas shouldn't be done in concert. While the author mentions musical ideas in paragraph 6, there's no reason to think that even if this were fixed the author would still think a concert was a good idea. (B) refers to a failure based on one of the author's criticisms in paragraph 6.

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. The author argues that operas are failures without staging.

(C): Faulty Use of Detail. Though the author mentions in paragraph 5 that Richard Strauss was such a composer, his point is that even this isn't enough to avoid failure if the opera is performed in concert.

(D): Distortion. While the author argues that staging is necessary, there's nothing in the passage to indicate that it's superior to the music.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 15

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

As opera becomes more popular in America the scarcity of theaters and the unconscionably costly logistics of the lyric stage make it difficult to meet the demand. Many a good—sized and well—to—do community would be able to operate and maintain a modest but live opera theater, but are unwilling to do so because it would unfavorably compare with the splendors of New York's Metropolitan Opera.

It is not realized that the rich operatic culture of Italy and Germany is mainly due to their many small municipal theaters which alternate repertory theater with opera. These circumstances have led to concert or "semi—staged " performances which, formerly an exception, now occupy entire companies expressly formed for this purpose. However, stage music, real operatic music, often fails to exert its full power in the frozen formality of the concert platform. In a true opera the particular charm and power of the music does not come through without staging and acting, for gesture is an expression of feeling, and the decor and costumes summarize the external aspects, providing a vision of the whole action. Both are to a considerable degree determined by the music, but they also complement it.

An opera is a play in music. If it is presented in concert version, then it should not offer a half—hearted gesture towards the theater. Indeed, the "partly staged " performances are even more unsatisfactory than the concert variety. The tenor is all excited, but you do not know why; the soprano is obviously dying, but she remains on her feet. Nor does the stationary chorus, its members turning the pages of their scores without looking at the person they sing about, contribute to the illusion.

Different aesthetic laws of governance apply to concert music and theatrical music, for they are incongruous worlds calling for an entirely different sort of imagination from both performers and audience. Opera is theater, the most involved, elaborate, and exciting form of theater. The Italian term "opera " is far more inclusive than its English interpretation, for it embraces not only the musical score but the whole theater, "the work. "

Without the stage, paucity of musical ideas immediately becomes evident, often painfully so. Take for instance Richard Strauss, some of whose late operas are being performed in concerts. Strauss was a composer who knew every facet of the lyric stage as few have known it, yet what can be quite pleasant on the stage, even if it is not particularly inventive, appears bare and contrived when removed from its natural habitat.

Some may say that the end justifies the means. I can see merit in the concert performance of an opera which otherwise could not hope to be heard, or of one deficient in true theatrical qualities yet of genuine musical value. But neither Strauss, nor Bellini, nor Donizetti qualifies for such a role. Even if we forget the vital function of staging, it is practically impossible, for purely musical reasons, to present such a work on the concert platform. The large orchestra belongs in the pit; when placed on the stage, together with the singers, it makes their position almost untenable, even when led by an experienced opera conductor.

Q. Which of the following statements seems most in agreement with the attitude of most "good—sized and well—to—do " communities regarding opera?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 15 Find the author's discussion of these communities: they appear in paragraph 1. The author argues that they don't produce operas because they won't be as good as New York's enormous opera. Looking for an attitude that would reflect this immediately yields (C). Paraphrasing in advance usually means quick points!

Wrong answers:

(A): Out of Scope. The author never says anything about education and opera.

(B): Opposite. This would more accurately reflect the opinion of a community that did produce opera..

(D): Out of Scope. There's nothing in the passage that reflects this distinction.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 16

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

As opera becomes more popular in America the scarcity of theaters and the unconscionably costly logistics of the lyric stage make it difficult to meet the demand. Many a good—sized and well—to—do community would be able to operate and maintain a modest but live opera theater, but are unwilling to do so because it would unfavorably compare with the splendors of New York's Metropolitan Opera.

It is not realized that the rich operatic culture of Italy and Germany is mainly due to their many small municipal theaters which alternate repertory theater with opera. These circumstances have led to concert or "semi—staged " performances which, formerly an exception, now occupy entire companies expressly formed for this purpose. However, stage music, real operatic music, often fails to exert its full power in the frozen formality of the concert platform. In a true opera the particular charm and power of the music does not come through without staging and acting, for gesture is an expression of feeling, and the decor and costumes summarize the external aspects, providing a vision of the whole action. Both are to a considerable degree determined by the music, but they also complement it.

An opera is a play in music. If it is presented in concert version, then it should not offer a half—hearted gesture towards the theater. Indeed, the "partly staged " performances are even more unsatisfactory than the concert variety. The tenor is all excited, but you do not know why; the soprano is obviously dying, but she remains on her feet. Nor does the stationary chorus, its members turning the pages of their scores without looking at the person they sing about, contribute to the illusion.

Different aesthetic laws of governance apply to concert music and theatrical music, for they are incongruous worlds calling for an entirely different sort of imagination from both performers and audience. Opera is theater, the most involved, elaborate, and exciting form of theater. The Italian term "opera " is far more inclusive than its English interpretation, for it embraces not only the musical score but the whole theater, "the work. "

Without the stage, paucity of musical ideas immediately becomes evident, often painfully so. Take for instance Richard Strauss, some of whose late operas are being performed in concerts. Strauss was a composer who knew every facet of the lyric stage as few have known it, yet what can be quite pleasant on the stage, even if it is not particularly inventive, appears bare and contrived when removed from its natural habitat.

Some may say that the end justifies the means. I can see merit in the concert performance of an opera which otherwise could not hope to be heard, or of one deficient in true theatrical qualities yet of genuine musical value. But neither Strauss, nor Bellini, nor Donizetti qualifies for such a role. Even if we forget the vital function of staging, it is practically impossible, for purely musical reasons, to present such a work on the concert platform. The large orchestra belongs in the pit; when placed on the stage, together with the singers, it makes their position almost untenable, even when led by an experienced opera conductor.

Q. Based on the information in the passage, with which of the following statements would the author most likely NOT agree?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 16 The author has a strong point throughout the passage: operas and concerts don't mix. Look for a statement that the author would actively dispute, or eliminate the three answers that he'd agree with. (B) turns up as a statement that distorts what the author spends paragraph 3 arguing.

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. This is the point of the passage.

(C): Opposite. This is implicit in the idea that communities stage concerts when they feel they can't do justice to an opera.

(D): Opposite. The author mentions this in paragraph 3.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 17

Direction: The passage given below is followed by four summaries. Choose the option that best captures the author's position.

Both Socrates and Bacon were very good at asking useful questions. In fact, Socrates is largely credited with coming up with a way of asking questions, 'the Socratic method," which itself is at the core of the 'scientific method,' popularised by Bacon. The Socratic method disproves arguments by finding exceptions to them, and can therefore lead your opponent to a point where they admit something that contradicts their original position. In common with Socrates, Bacon stressed it was as important to disprove a theory as it was to prove one - and real-world observation and experimentation were key to achieving both aims. Bacon also saw science as a collaborative affair, with scientists working together, challenging each other.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 17 According to the paragraph, language is like a gelatinous mass that changes shape to fit. Also, many times the only way to find meaning of word is to examine how it is used. It is stated that definitions are fixed to the word by dictionary. While Wittgenstein found that circulation of ordinary language was a free-floating currency of meaning. So the meanings are dynamic. Thus value of word arises from the exchange and then the lexicographer abstracts meaning from that exchange. Thus, definitions are picked up from the meaning in use.

Option A, which states that definitions are like dogmatic, cannot be found in the paragraph. Hence, it can be eliminated. The paragraph doesn't talk about why lexicographers fix meanings. Hence, option B can be eliminated.

Option C covers all the main points. Hence, it is the right choice. The purpose of the passage is not to compare meaning of words in dictionaries with meaning which arises from exchange. Hence, option D can be eliminated.

Hence, option C is the right choice.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 18

Direction: The passage given below is followed by four summaries. Choose the option that best captures the author's position.

A fundamental property of language is that it is slippery and messy and more liquid than solid, a gelatinous mass that changes shape to fit. As Wittgenstein would remind us, "usage has no sharp boundary." Oftentimes, the only way to determine the meaning of a word is to examine how it is used. This insight is often described as the "meaning is use" doctrine. There are differences between the "meaning is use" doctrine and a dictionary-first theory of meaning. "The dictionary's careful fixing of words to definitions, like butterflies pinned under glass, can suggest that this is how language works. The definitions can seem to ensure and fix the meaning of words, just as the gold standard can back a country's currency." What Wittgenstein found in the circulation of ordinary language, however, was a free-floating currency of meaning. The value of each word arises out of the exchange. The lexicographer abstracts a meaning from that exchange, which is then set within the conventions of the dictionary definition.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 18

After reading the above passage about Summary, we can infer that, the definition of a word comes from the various meanings in exchange. Meanings are dynamic as they change with exchange. Option C is the right answer.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 19

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

The temperate conifer forests flanking the Cascade Mountains of the Pacific Northwest are a product of the regional climate. Frequent rain and fog encourage the growth of lush vegetation in a part of the world where cool Pacific storms march relentlessly shoreward from the north and west.

A million years from now, a geoscientist examining the fossils and sediments of the rocks that are currently being formed in this region will be able to say confidently that the climate had been moist and cool. Unless, that is, that scientist happened to be looking at rocks formed near Mount St. Helens or another of the active volcanoes in the range. Looking at these rocks, the scientist might think that the Pacific Northwest was a savannah or even a desert. According to Judith Harris of the University of Colorado Museum and John Van Couvering of the American Museum of Natural History, volcanically influenced ecosystems may look, in retrospect, as if they developed in a much drier regional climate than actually existed.

They named the phenomenon "mock aridity. " Their idea may explain why computer models tend to predict wetter climates than those suggested by the fossils. And it may mean that some paleoecologists will have to reevaluate their evidence. Explains Harris, "Volcanic activity makes for a barren environment. " After an isolated volcanic episode, a pioneering biological community will develop, followed by successional communities and, eventually, a climax community. When an ecosystem has reached climatic climax, it is a steady—state community that reflects the regional climate. But if volcanism is persistent, the biological community will never have the chance to reach climatic climax. It will bounce around between several pioneer and successional stages.

The possible implications are that some well—established paleoclimate stories might have to be rewritten. The two most significant examples are equatorial East Africa from the Miocene epoch (about 23 million years ago) to the present and the North American Great Plains from the Oligocene epoch (about 38 million years ago) to the present. Both have been interpreted as having woodland or savannah mosaic ecologies throughout each period. A savannah mosaic may consist of woodlands, treed grasslands and grasslands. Both areas, however, experienced persistent volcanism throughout each period. Had there been no volcanic activity, both regions might have appeared wetter. There might have been deciduous forests in North America and deciduous rain forests in East Africa.

A test of this idea, asserts paleoanthropologist Richard Potts, is to look at the global climate record in places where volcanism is not a factor. In the oceans, global temperature fluctuations are recorded in the oxygen—isotope ratios of marine sediments. These records are relatively immune to the local effects of terrestrial volcanism. "There you see the climatic change occurring later than what people have been seeing on land, " says Potts. This is consistent with Harris's suggestions about the regional climates of the North American Great Plains and equatorial East Africa. However, Potts says, the change is not steady and, in fact, fluctuations in the global climate have increased over the past 50 million years.

The ecosystems in these two examples developed during the transition from globally warm and wet climates of the Cretaceous period, which ended about 65 million years ago, to the climatically fluctuating ice ages of the past few million years. A big question among paleoecologists, particularly those who study human evolution, has been, when did the climate become cool and dry enough for forests to give way to savannah environments?

Q. If a geoscientist were to discover fossils that indicated that the Pacific Northwest was a savannah environment a million years ago, what effect would this development have on the argument of Harris and Van Couvering?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 19 Review what Harris and Van Couvering argue about fossils: fossils provide a misleading record of actual climate when there is volcanic activity nearby. If fossils were found in the volcanic region of the Pacific Northwest, it stands to reason that the climate would appear drier than it actually was. No ground is gained or lost in their argument; the two scientists would make the same argument about these fossils as the others, without any additional evidence. A careful chain of thought will lead to (C).

Wrong answers:

(A): Opposite. The discovery adds no weight of evidence to the mock aridity theory.

(B): Opposite. As above.

(D): Opposite. Nor does the discovery weaken the theory, as it simply repeats the sort of findings that Harris and Van Couvering are challenging in the first place.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 20

Identify the odd word from

Cease, Launch, Initiate, Commence


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 20 Launch, initiate and commence all mean to begin or start something while cease means to bring to halt. Hence, it is the odd one out
CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 21

Identify the odd word from

Quell, Ruffle, Allay, Control


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 21 Quell means to put an end to something, ruffle means to destroy, allay means to put to rest and control means to prevent something from flourishing. Hence, ruffle is the odd one out
CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 22

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences

  1. The speaker told us that we should all live longer than Methuselah; fifty years of Europe are better than a cycle of Cathay, and twenty years of modern American life are longer and richer in content than the old patriarch's thousand.

  2. Ours will be the true age in which to live, when more will happen in a day than in a year of the flat existence of our ancestors.

  3. When I was a child at the West Middle Grammar School of Hartford, on one memorable April day, Mark Twain addressed the graduating-class.

  4. I was thirteen years old, but I have found it impossible to forget what he said; the subject of his "remarks" was Methuselah; he informed us that Methuselah lived to the ripe old age of nine hundred and sixty-nine.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 22 1 and 2 form a pair, and they must be kept together. The information presented in B must come after the information presented in 1. 21 is the right sequence. Option 1 is the correct choice.
CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 23

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences

  1. I do not believe there is a single large town in our country where the book is unknown, or where a reference to it fails to bring to the faces of intelligent people that glow of reminiscent delight aroused by the memory of happy hours passed in the world of imagination.

  2. It became one of the "best sellers"; unlike its companions, it has not vanished with the snows of yesteryear. At this moment it is being read and reread all over the United States.

  3. Unheralded by author's fame or by the blare of advertisement, it was at first unnoticed; but in about a twelvemonth everybody was talking about it.

  4. In the month of September, 1898, there appeared in America a novel with the attractive title, Bob, Son of Battle.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 23 In this question, too, we must keep in mind the sequence of events. Statement 4 obviously starts the paragraph. Statement 3 speaks about the book immediately after it was published. So, 3 must come immediately before 1 and 2. Statement 2 must come immediately after 3, with A in the end. Option 3 is the right choice.
CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 24

Identify the odd word from

Brink, Hub, Verge, Brim


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 24 Brink, verge and brim all mean the extreme edge of something while hub means the central part of a wheel. Hence, it is the odd one out.
CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 25

Directions: In a school, for class 10th the sections are allotted on the basis of the scores of the student in class 9th. There are four sections in class 9th namely A, B, C, D. A student obtaining highest marks will be allotted section P in class 10th. On the similar basis sections Q, R, S are allotted. P is the best section, Q, R and S are the 2nd, 3rd and 4th best section respectively.

A record of score of 10 students were kept.

Each year the lowest and highest score increases by 1.

Each student got distinct marks as per record of January, 2011, the minimum marks is 20 and the maximum marks is 29. The sections were to be continued for 1 year in class 10th. Different sets of number of students are there in class 9th for any two year. In class 10th, section P has 4 students and, Q, R, S have 2 students each.

The below table gives the number of students in each section of class 9th over the years:

Q. What was the highest marks obtained by the student of section B in the year 2013?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 25

Year 2011

Total score = 245

Year 2012

Total score = 255

Year 2013

Total score = 265

Individual scores of year 2011

Section Individual scores total

A different of set of students are present in any section for any two years

Individual scores of year 2012

Individual scores of year 2013

Highest score in section B in year 2013 is 26

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 26

Directions : In a school, for class 10th the sections are allotted on the basis of the scores of the student in class 9th. There are four sections in class 9th namely A, B, C, D. A student obtaining highest marks will be allotted section P in class 10th. On the similar basis sections Q, R, S are allotted. P is the best section, Q, R and S are the 2nd, 3rd and 4th best section respectively.

A record of score of 10 students were kept.

Each year the lowest and highest score increases by 1.

Each student got distinct marks as per record of January, 2011, the minimum marks is 20 and the maximum marks is 29. The sections were to be continued for 1 year in class 10th. Different sets of number of students are there in class 9th for any two year. In class 10th, section P has 4 students and, Q, R, S have 2 students each.

The below table gives the number of students in each section of class 9th over the years:

Q. The top scorer was present in which section in 2013?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 26 Year 2011

Total score = 245

Year 2012

Total score = 255

Year 2013

Total score = 265

Individual scores of year 2011

Section Individual scores total

A different of set of students are present in any section for any two years

Individual scores of year 2012

Individual scores of year 2013

The top scorer in 2013 was present in section A

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 27

Directions: In a school, for class 10th the sections are allotted on the basis of the scores of the student in class 9th. There are four sections in class 9th namely A, B, C, D. A student obtaining highest marks will be allotted section P in class 10th. On the similar basis sections Q, R, S are allotted. P is the best section, Q, R and S are the 2nd, 3rd and 4th best section respectively.

A record of score of 10 students were kept.

Each year the lowest and highest score increases by 1.

Each student got distinct marks as per record of January, 2011, the minimum marks is 20 and the maximum marks is 29. The sections were to be continued for 1 year in class 10th. Different sets of number of students are there in class 9th for any two year. In class 10th, section P has 4 students and, Q, R, S have 2 students each.

The below table gives the number of students in each section of class 9th over the years:

Q. Total number of students from section C moved in section Q in the year 2011 is what was the highest marks obtained by the student of section B in the year 2013?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 27 Year 2011

Total score = 245

Year 2012

Total score = 255

Year 2013

Total score = 265

Individual scores of year 2011

Section Individual scores total

A different of set of students are present in any section for any two years

Individual scores of year 2012

Individual scores of year 2013

For the year 2011, marks obtained by students of section C is 24 25 which is 5th and 6th highest respectively. Top 4 students will go in section P. So all the students of section C will go to Q

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 28

Directions: In a school, for class 10th the sections are allotted on the basis of the scores of the student in class 9th. There are four sections in class 9th namely A, B, C, D. A student obtaining highest marks will be allotted section P in class 10th. On the similar basis sections Q, R, S are allotted. P is the best section, Q, R and S are the 2nd, 3rd and 4th best section respectively.

A record of score of 10 students were kept.

Each year the lowest and highest score increases by 1.

Each student got distinct marks as per record of January, 2011, the minimum marks is 20 and the maximum marks is 29. The sections were to be continued for 1 year in class 10th. Different sets of number of students are there in class 9th for any two year. In class 10th, section P has 4 students and, Q, R, S have 2 students each.

The below table gives the number of students in each section of class 9th over the years:

Q. Students of how many sections showed a consistent increase in marks obtained?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 28 Year 2011

Total score = 245

Year 2012

Total score = 255

Year 2013

Total score = 265

Individual scores of year 2011

Section Individual scores total

A different of set of students are present in any section for any two years

Individual scores of year 2012

Individual scores of year 2013

Only the students of Section A showed consistent increase in marks across the years.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 29

Directions: In the 1st Semester at NIM, students have five papers, each of which is graded on a 9 point grading scale. The marks to grade conversion is as follows:-

The below table depicts the marks scored by each students in the 5 papers they had to appear for in Semester - 1. The values of X, Y and Z have been intentionally removed from the Table.

The following additional information is also known:-

(i) Only 2 of the six students have the same CQPI, and they are Shujoy and Pooja

(ii) The average of the CQPI obtained by Abhishek and Namrata is equal to that of Shujoy and Sanjay

(iii) Though Namrata's total marks obtained is not the lowest, she has the lowest CQPI of the six students

(iv) The total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

(v) The CQPI for the students are computed by dividing the total Grade Points obtained by the number of papers they appeared for in each semester

Q. What is the sum of the marks obtained by Shujoy in his five papers in Semester - 1?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 29 The Grades obtained by the students in the courses are as follows

The total marks obtained by the 6 students are as follows:-

Manish = 351

Shujoy = 276 + X

Pooja = 357

Abhishek = 301 + Y

Namrata = 321 + Z

Sanjay = 360

Now let us try to combine and compare the above results, based on the additional information provided.

From (i), we get that Pooja and Shujoy have the same CQPI(same Grade Point sum). Thus Shujoy's total Grade points must be 28, which means he must have got 6 Grade Points (B + grade) in Operations - I. Thus his marks will be in the range of X = 70 - 79 and x = 6. Thus Shujoy's total marks will be in the range of 346 - 355

From (iii), we get that Namrata has the lowest CQPI. Thus she must have got either 0 or 1 Grade Point in Accounting - 1. But since she did not get the lowest total marks, she must have got more than Shujoy's total (346 - 355). Thus Namrata must have scored at least 26 marks. Combining we get that Namrata got Grade - D (Grade Point - 1) in Accounting - I, with a score(Z) in the range of 26 - 29, and z = 1. Thus Shujoy's total must be less than 350, which means he must have obtained a score in the range of 70 - 73 in Operations - I.

The expression linking X and Z can be stated as follows,

276 + X < 321="" +="" />

or X < 45="" +="" />

Now from Point (ii), we get that (24 + y)/5 + (26 + z)/5 = (22 + x)/5 + 30/5

Multiplying throughout by 5, and replacing x = 6 & z = 1.

Thus we get y = 7, which translates to a score of 80-89 in HR - I.

The total mark obtained by all six students in each paper is as follows:-

Quants - I = 467

Operations - I = 421 - 424

Marketing - I = 422

HR - I = 455 - 464

Accounting - I = 377 - 380

Now from Point (iv), we get that the total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

Thus Operations - I total must be less than that of Marketing - I, and hence must be equal to 421. This also implies that X = 70. Thus Shujoy's total score = 346.

Shujoy's total score is 346.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 30

Directions: In the 1st Semester at NIM, students have five papers, each of which is graded on a 9 point grading scale. The marks to grade conversion is as follows:-

The below table depicts the marks scored by each students in the 5 papers they had to appear for in Semester - 1. The values of X, Y and Z have been intentionally removed from the Table.

The following additional information is also known:-

(i) Only 2 of the six students have the same CQPI, and they are Shujoy and Pooja

(ii) The average of the CQPI obtained by Abhishek and Namrata is equal to that of Shujoy and Sanjay

(iii) Though Namrata's total marks obtained is not the lowest, she has the lowest CQPI of the six students

(iv) The total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

(v) The CQPI for the students are computed by dividing the total Grade Points obtained by the number of papers they appeared for in each semester

Q. What is the minimum possible value of Z?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 30 The Grades obtained by the students in the courses are as follows

The total marks obtained by the 6 students are as follows:-

Manish = 351

Shujoy = 276 + X

Pooja = 357

Abhishek = 301 + Y

Namrata = 321 + Z

Sanjay = 360

Now let us try to combine and compare the above results, based on the additional information provided.

From (i), we get that Pooja and Shujoy have the same CQPI(same Grade Point sum). Thus Shujoy's total Grade points must be 28, which means he must have got 6 Grade Points (B + grade) in Operations - I. Thus his marks will be in the range of X = 70 - 79 and x = 6. Thus Shujoy's total marks will be in the range of 346 - 355

From (iii), we get that Namrata has the lowest CQPI. Thus she must have got either 0 or 1 Grade Point in Accounting - 1. But since she did not get the lowest total marks, she must have got more than Shujoy's total (346 - 355). Thus Namrata must have scored at least 26 marks. Combining we get that Namrata got Grade - D (Grade Point - 1) in Accounting - I, with a score(Z) in the range of 26 - 29, and z = 1. Thus Shujoy's total must be less than 350, which means he must have obtained a score in the range of 70 - 73 in Operations - I.

The expression linking X and Z can be stated as follows,

276 + X < 321="" +="" />

or X < 45="" +="" />

Now from Point (ii), we get that (24 + y)/5 + (26 + z)/5 = (22 + x)/5 + 30/5

Multiplying throughout by 5, and replacing x = 6 & z = 1.

Thus we get y = 7, which translates to a score of 80-89 in HR - I.

The total mark obtained by all six students in each paper is as follows:-

Quants - I = 467

Operations - I = 421 - 424

Marketing - I = 422

HR - I = 455 - 464

Accounting - I = 377 - 380

Now from Point (iv), we get that the total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

Thus Operations - I total must be less than that of Marketing - I, and hence must be equal to 421. This also implies that X = 70. Thus Shujoy's total score = 346.

The value of Z ranges in between 26 - 29. Thus minimum possible value of Z is 26..

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 31

Directions: In the 1st Semester at NIM, students have five papers, each of which is graded on a 9 point grading scale. The marks to grade conversion is as follows:-

The below table depicts the marks scored by each students in the 5 papers they had to appear for in Semester - 1. The values of X, Y and Z have been intentionally removed from the Table.

The following additional information is also known:-

(i) Only 2 of the six students have the same CQPI, and they are Shujoy and Pooja

(ii) The average of the CQPI obtained by Abhishek and Namrata is equal to that of Shujoy and Sanjay

(iii) Though Namrata's total marks obtained is not the lowest, she has the lowest CQPI of the six students

(iv) The total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

(v) The CQPI for the students are computed by dividing the total Grade Points obtained by the number of papers they appeared for in each semester

Q. Who has the second highest CQPI amongst the six students?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 31 The Grades obtained by the students in the courses are as follows

The total marks obtained by the 6 students are as follows:-

Manish = 351

Shujoy = 276 + X

Pooja = 357

Abhishek = 301 + Y

Namrata = 321 + Z

Sanjay = 360

Now let us try to combine and compare the above results, based on the additional information provided.

From (i), we get that Pooja and Shujoy have the same CQPI(same Grade Point sum). Thus Shujoy's total Grade points must be 28, which means he must have got 6 Grade Points (B + grade) in Operations - I. Thus his marks will be in the range of X = 70 - 79 and x = 6. Thus Shujoy's total marks will be in the range of 346 - 355

From (iii), we get that Namrata has the lowest CQPI. Thus she must have got either 0 or 1 Grade Point in Accounting - 1. But since she did not get the lowest total marks, she must have got more than Shujoy's total (346 - 355). Thus Namrata must have scored at least 26 marks. Combining we get that Namrata got Grade - D (Grade Point - 1) in Accounting - I, with a score(Z) in the range of 26 - 29, and z = 1. Thus Shujoy's total must be less than 350, which means he must have obtained a score in the range of 70 - 73 in Operations - I.

The expression linking X and Z can be stated as follows,

276 + X < 321="" +="" />

or X < 45="" +="" />

Now from Point (ii), we get that (24 + y)/5 + (26 + z)/5 = (22 + x)/5 + 30/5

Multiplying throughout by 5, and replacing x = 6 & z = 1.

Thus we get y = 7, which translates to a score of 80-89 in HR - I.

The total mark obtained by all six students in each paper is as follows:-

Quants - I = 467

Operations - I = 421 - 424

Marketing - I = 422

HR - I = 455 - 464

Accounting - I = 377 - 380

Now from Point (iv), we get that the total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

Thus Operations - I total must be less than that of Marketing - I, and hence must be equal to 421. This also implies that X = 70. Thus Shujoy's total score = 346.

Sanjay has the second highest CQPI, since his total grade points is the second highest amongst the six students.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 32

Directions: In the 1st Semester at NIM, students have five papers, each of which is graded on a 9 point grading scale. The marks to grade conversion is as follows:-

The below table depicts the marks scored by each students in the 5 papers they had to appear for in Semester - 1. The values of X, Y and Z have been intentionally removed from the Table.

The following additional information is also known:-

(i) Only 2 of the six students have the same CQPI, and they are Shujoy and Pooja

(ii) The average of the CQPI obtained by Abhishek and Namrata is equal to that of Shujoy and Sanjay

(iii) Though Namrata's total marks obtained is not the lowest, she has the lowest CQPI of the six students

(iv) The total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

(v) The CQPI for the students are computed by dividing the total Grade Points obtained by the number of papers they appeared for in each semester

Q. How many combinations of values of (X, Y, Z) are possible?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 32 The Grades obtained by the students in the courses are as follows

The total marks obtained by the 6 students are as follows:-

Manish = 351

Shujoy = 276 + X

Pooja = 357

Abhishek = 301 + Y

Namrata = 321 + Z

Sanjay = 360

Now let us try to combine and compare the above results, based on the additional information provided.

From (i), we get that Pooja and Shujoy have the same CQPI(same Grade Point sum). Thus Shujoy's total Grade points must be 28, which means he must have got 6 Grade Points (B + grade) in Operations - I. Thus his marks will be in the range of X = 70 - 79 and x = 6. Thus Shujoy's total marks will be in the range of 346 - 355

From (iii), we get that Namrata has the lowest CQPI. Thus she must have got either 0 or 1 Grade Point in Accounting - 1. But since she did not get the lowest total marks, she must have got more than Shujoy's total (346 - 355). Thus Namrata must have scored at least 26 marks. Combining we get that Namrata got Grade - D (Grade Point - 1) in Accounting - I, with a score(Z) in the range of 26 - 29, and z = 1. Thus Shujoy's total must be less than 350, which means he must have obtained a score in the range of 70 - 73 in Operations - I.

The expression linking X and Z can be stated as follows,

276 + X < 321="" +="" />

or X < 45="" +="" />

Now from Point (ii), we get that (24 + y)/5 + (26 + z)/5 = (22 + x)/5 + 30/5

Multiplying throughout by 5, and replacing x = 6 & z = 1.

Thus we get y = 7, which translates to a score of 80-89 in HR - I.

The total mark obtained by all six students in each paper is as follows:-

Quants - I = 467

Operations - I = 421 - 424

Marketing - I = 422

HR - I = 455 - 464

Accounting - I = 377 - 380

Now from Point (iv), we get that the total marks obtained by the six students in Marketing - I is more than what was obtained by them in exactly 2 of the remaining 4 papers

Thus Operations - I total must be less than that of Marketing - I, and hence must be equal to 421. This also implies that X = 70. Thus Shujoy's total score = 346.

X can assume only 1 value, Y can assume 10 different values (80 - 89) and Z can assume 4 different values (26 - 29).

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 33

Directions: The first bar graph shows no of mobile phones sold each year by 3 companies for 2012, 2013 & 2014. The 2nd graph shows the variation of avg. price per mobile for the three consecutive years.

Q. How much money (Rs. in million) did apple make for the year 2013?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 33 In the year 2013 no of mobiles sold by Apple = 460 thousand

In the year 2013 avg. price of Apple mobiles = 34 thousand Rs.

So the total money made by Apple in 2013 = 34 x 460 = 15640 million Rs.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 34

Directions: The first bar graph shows no of mobile phones sold each year by 3 companies for 2012, 2013 & 2014. The 2nd graph shows the variation of avg. price per mobile for the three consecutive years.

Q. What percent of the total money generated by selling mobile phones came from Apple in 2014?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 34 Total money generated by selling mobile phones in 2014 = 590 x 10 + 480 x 33 + 550 x 5 = 24490 million Rs.

Total money generated by only Apple in 2014 = 480 x 33 = 15840 million Rs.

Hence % of the total = (15840/24490) x 100 = 64% (approx.)

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 35

Directions: The first bar graph shows no of mobile phones sold each year by 3 companies for 2012, 2013 & 2014. The 2nd graph shows the variation of avg. price per mobile for the three consecutive years.

Q. What is the average no of mobiles sold per year over the 3 years? (Assuming there are no other sellers of mobiles in the market)

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 35 Total no of mobiles sold in 2012 = 560 + 440 + 450 = 1450

Total no of mobiles sold in 2013 = 510 + 460 + 490 = 1460

Total no of mobiles sold in 2014 = 590+480 + 550 = 1620

Total no of mobiles sold in 3 years = 1450 + 1460 + 1620 = 4530

Avg. no of mobiles sold per year= 4530/3 = 1510

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 36

Directions: The first bar graph shows no of mobile phones sold each year by 3 companies for 2012, 2013 & 2014. The 2nd graph shows the variation of avg. price per mobile for the three consecutive years.

Q. What is the % change in the avg. price of mobile phones in the year 2013 compared to the year 2012?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 36 Avg. price of mobile phone in the year 2012 = (10 + 35 + 7)/3 = 17.33

Avg. price of mobile phone in the year 2013 = (11 + 34 + 6)/3 = 17

Hence % change = (17.33 - 17)/17.33 x 100 = 1.9 decrement

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 37

Direction: Go through the graph and the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Mr. Suzuki, a car dealer, sold cars of only two brands, A and B, in the previous year. This year, he introduced a new brand C. The number of cars of brand A and brand B sold in the previous year were in the ratio 3 : 2, and the ratio of the number of cars sold in the previous year to that sold in this year is 2 : 3 for brand A and 2 : 5 for brand B. Further, the number of cars of brand C sold this year forms 81% of the total number of cars sold this year.

Q. In the next year, Mr. Suzuki wants to increase the total sales by 80%, compared to the total sales this year, by keeping the sales of each of A, B and C at the same level as that in this year and introducing a new brand D. By what percent will the number of cars of brand D (to be sold next year) be more than the total number of cars sold last year?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 37 Last year cars = 6x + 4x = 10x,

Present year cars = A = 9x , B = 10x , C = 81x, D = 80x

Required percentage = (80x – 10x)/10x * 100 = 700%

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 38

Direction: Go through the graph and the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Mr. Suzuki, a car dealer, sold cars of only two brands, A and B, in the previous year. This year, he introduced a new brand C. The number of cars of brand A and brand B sold in the previous year were in the ratio 3 : 2, and the ratio of the number of cars sold in the previous year to that sold in this year is 2 : 3 for brand A and 2 : 5 for brand B. Further, the number of cars of brand C sold this year forms 81% of the total number of cars sold this year.

Q. Find the number of cars of brand C sold this year, given that a total of 24 cars of brand A were sold in the previous year.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 38 Number of Cars I Previous year = 6x = 24

X = 4

Number of cars of brand ''C'' = 81 × 4 = 324

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 39

Direction: Go through the graph and the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Mr. Suzuki, a car dealer, sold cars of only two brands, A and B, in the previous year. This year, he introduced a new brand C. The number of cars of brand A and brand B sold in the previous year were in the ratio 3 : 2, and the ratio of the number of cars sold in the previous year to that sold in this year is 2 : 3 for brand A and 2 : 5 for brand B. Further, the number of cars of brand C sold this year forms 81% of the total number of cars sold this year.

Q. If a total of 380 cars were sold this year, and the sales of C this year were nil, instead of 81% of total sales, then how many cars of brand A were sold in the previous year?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 39 Number of cars this year is ''C'' is zero = 19x = 380 = x = 20

Number of cars of brand ''A'' previous year = 6 × 20 = 120

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 40

Directions : Nalanda University has 600 students. A survey was conducted to know how many of them like Indian dishes and how many of them like Chinese food. The following additional information is known:-

a. Girls who like Indian dishes they like Chinese dishes also.

b. 35% of boys like Indian dishes.

c. Total number of boys who like both dishes are same as total number of girls who like both dishes.

Q. Total number of girls who like Chinese.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 40

h = 600 (Total number of students)

g = 600 − 200 = 400 = Total number of boys.

Number of boys who like Indian = 35% ∗ 400 =140

So total number of students who like Indian =180

Girls who like Chinese = 340 − 180 = 160

Total number of girls who like Chinese also like Indian dishes also so m = 40

Total number of boys who like Chinese and Indian dishes are equal to total number of girls who Iike both dishes. So m = n = 40, o = 80

From the Venn diagram

a = 260, c = 100, b = 80

a + b + c + n = 600

n = 160

So the number of boys and girls who don't like any dishes = 160. So now we can find a number of boys and girls who do not like both dishes which are 40 and 120 respectively.

So number of students who like Chinese = 160

Number of students who do not like any dish = 160

Number of girls who like Chinese but not Indian = 120

Number of boys who like only Indian dishes = 100

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 41

Directions: Nalanda University has 600 students. A survey was conducted to know how many of them like Indian dishes and how many of them like Chinese food. The following additional information is known:-

a. Girls who like Indian dishes they like Chinese dishes also.

b. 35% of boys like Indian dishes.

c. Total number of boys who like both dishes are same as total number of girls who like both dishes.

Q. Total number of boys who like only Indian dishes is?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 41

h = 600 (Total number of students)

g = 600 − 200 = 400 = Total number of boys.

Number of boys who like Indian = 35% ∗ 400 = 140

So total number of students who like Indian = 180

Girls who like Chinese = 340 − 180 = 160

Total number of girls who like Chinese also like Indian dishes also so m = 40

Total number of boys who like Chinese and Indian dishes are equal to total number of girls who Iike both dishes. So m = n = 40, o = 80

From the Venn diagram

a = 260, c = 100, b = 80

a + b + c + n = 600

n = 160

So the number of boys and girls who don't like any dishes =160. So now we can find a number of boys and girls who do not like both dishes which are 40 and 120 respectively.

So number of students who like Chinese = 160

Number of students who do not like any dish = 160

Number of girls who like Chinese but not Indian = 120

Number of boys who like only Indian dishes = 100

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 42

Directions: Nalanda University has 600 students. A survey was conducted to know how many of them like Indian dishes and how many of them like Chinese food. The following additional information is known:-

a. Girls who like Indian dishes they like Chinese dishes also.

b. 35% of boys like Indian dishes.

c. Total number of boys who like both dishes are same as total number of girls who like both dishes.

Q. Total number of students who don't like any dishes.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 42

h = 600 (Total number of students)

g = 600 − 200 = 400 = Total number of boys.

Number of boys who like Indian = 35%∗400 = 140

So total number of students who like Indian = 180

Girls who like Chinese = 340 − 180 = 160

Total number of girls who like Chinese also like Indian dishes also so m = 40

Total number of boys who like Chinese and Indian dishes are equal to total number of girls who Iike both dishes. So m = n = 40, o = 80

From the Venn diagram

a = 260, c = 100, b = 80

a + b + c + n = 600

n = 160

So the number of boys and girls who don't like any dishes =160. So now we can find a number of boys and girls who do not like both dishes which are 40 and 120 respectively.

So number of students who like Chinese = 160

Number of students who do not like any dish = 160

Number of girls who like Chinese but not Indian = 120

Number of boys who like only Indian dishes = 100

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 43

Directions: Nalanda University has 600 students. A survey was conducted to know how many of them like Indian dishes and how many of them like Chinese food. The following additional information is known:-

a. Girls who like Indian dishes they like Chinese dishes also.

b. 35% of boys like Indian dishes.

c. Total number of boys who like both dishes are same as total number of girls who like both dishes.

Q. Total number of girls who like Chinese but are not Indian is


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 43

h = 600 (Total number of students)

g = 600 − 200 = 400 = Total number of boys.

Number of boys who like Indian = 35% ∗ 400 =140

So total number of students who like Indian =180

Girls who like Chinese = 340 − 180 = 160

Total number of girls who like Chinese also like Indian dishes also so m=40

Total number of boys who like Chinese and Indian dishes are equal to total number of girls who Iike both dishes. So m = n = 40, o = 80

From the Venn diagram

a = 260, c = 100, b = 80

a + b + c + n=600

n = 160

So the number of boys and girls who don't like any dishes =160. So now we can find a number of boys and girls who do not like both dishes which are 40 and 120 respectively.

So number of students who like Chinese = 160

Number of students who do not like any dish = 160

Number of girls who like Chinese but not Indian = 120

Number of boys who like only Indian dishes = 100

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 44

Direction: A toy-producing factory has a setup that requires 3 stages stage 1, stage 2, stage 3 and the manufacturing of toys must take place in the order of stage 1, stage 2, and stage 3. There is one machine each for every stage and the following things are known about the factory

1. Production happens in batches and 1 batch contains 50,000 toys

2. Machine for stage 1 takes 25 minutes to process 1 batch. Time taken for stage 2 and stage 3 is 40 minutes and 30 minutes respectively.

3. Stage 1 machine is stopped for maintenance for 15 minutes after completing every 3 batches.

4. Stage 2 machine is stopped for 10 minutes for maintenance after completing every 4 batches. Stage 3 machine is stopped for 20 minutes for maintenance after completing every 4 batches.

5. Even if the machine is idle between the batches, the maintenance has to happen only after the defined number of batches have been produced.

6. There is no time delay in switching to other batches or maintenance.

7. The factory is operating from 9 am to 5 pm. No machine is supposed to be running after 5 pm.

8. The production is carried out in such a way that all the stages are completed on the same day.

Q. What is the absolute difference (in minutes) in time when batch 6 was completed and when the factory began operating?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 44 Let us start by manufacturing the first batch.

First machine will take 25 minutes and finish at 09:25. the other 2 stages happen after that and the table for batch 1 will look as follows:

Thus Batch 2 will start at 09:25 and finish at 09:50. Stage 2 can start only after 10:05 and will go till 10:45. Stage 3 will start from 10:45 and go till 11:15

For Batch 3, stage 1 will start at 09:50 to 10:15. Stage 2 can start after 10:45 and go till 11:25. Stage 3 can start at 11:25 and go till 11:55

For Batch 4, stage 1 will start at 10:30 to 10:55 as there is 15-minute maintenance. Stage 2 can start after 11:25 and go till 12:05.

Stage 3 can start at 11:25 and go till 11:55

Now for batch 5, stage 1 will start at 10:55 and go till 11:20. Stage 2 machine will undergo maintenance for 10 minutes as it manufactured 4 batches and can only start from 12:15 and will go till 12:55. Stage 3 will also undergo maintenance but it will be done from 12:35 to 12:50

Now for batch 6, stage 1 will start at 11:20 and go till 11:45. Stage 2 machine will available after 12:55 and will go till 13:35. Stage 3 will start from 13:35 and go till 14:05

Now for batch 7, stage 1 will start at 12:00 as it underwent 15 minutes maintenance and go till 12:25. Stage 2 machine will be available after 13:35 and will go till 14:15. Stage 3 will start from 14:15 and go till 14:45

Now for batch 8, stage 1 will start at 12:25 and go till 12:50. Stage 2 machine will available after 14:15 and will go till 14:55. Stage 3 will start from 14:55 and go till 15:25

Since stage 2 and stage 3 machine has manufactured 4 batches each they will undergo maintenance. Stage 2 will be available from 15:05 and stage 3 will be available from 15:40.

For batch 9, stage 1 will go from 12:50 to 13:15. Stage 2 will start from 15:05 and go till 15:45. Stage 3 will start from 15:45 to 16:15

For batch 10, stage 1 will go from 13:30 to 13:55. as it went maintenance for 5 minutes. Stage 2 will start at 15:45 and go till 16:25. Stage 3 will start from 16:25 to 16:55

We see that Batch 10 ends at 16:55. Any more batch will lead to completion after 17:00. Thus a total of 10 batches are made.

Batch 6 starts from 11:20 and ends at 14:05 which is 165 minutes

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 45

In the given figure ABCD is a rectangle. A quarter circle with centre at B is drawn such that side DC is tangent to it. A circle with radius r is inscribed in the rectangle such that it touches the three sides and the inscribed quarter circle. What is the area of ABCD?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 45 Consider the figure shown below. As can be clearly seen from the figure, the line joining the centres of any two circles passes through the point of contact.

Note that the Diameter AD = 2r of smaller circle is the radius BC of the larger circle

So FB = r + 2r = 3r,then by Pythagoras theorem

and

Hence required area

=

Thus the correct option is 2

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 46

How many triangles can be drawn by using vertices of regular decagon, but not using the sides.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 46 The first vertex can be selected in 10 ways. The remaining two are to be

selected from 7 vertices so that they are not consecutive. This can be done in

7P2 - 6 ways.

The total number of ways = 10 x (7P2 - 6)=150

But in this method, each selection is repeated thrice.

Number of triangles = 150/3 = 50

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 47

In a right angled triangle ABC, AB = 6, BC = 8 & Angle B = 90°. A semi-circle is inscribed as shown below. AC is a tangent to the semi-circle. What is the radius of semi-circle?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 47 Let D be the point of contact of the semi-circle with AC and O be the center of the circle

Join OD

CD = CB = 8 (lengths of tangents drawn to a circle from a common point are equal)

Also ΔOAD and ΔABC are similar as ∠ODA = ∠ABC.

Thus, OD/BC = DA/BA

AB = 6 and BC = 8, therefore AC = 10

Hence, AD = AC - CD = 10 - 8 = 2

r/8 = 2/6

R = 8/3

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 48

What is the volume of a hollow box made from 21 x 28 cm rectangular cardboard by cutting 7 x 7 cm squares from the four corners and folding the piece along the cuts?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 48

Volume of the box (Cuboid) = lbh {l = 7, b =14 and h = 7}

= 7 x 14x 7 = 686 cm3

Hence the correct option is (4)

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 49

A natural number is selected from the set of all natural numbers between 61 and 1020 (both numbers inclusive). What is the probability that the number is a multiple of 3 or 4 or 5?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 49 The LCM of 3, 4 and 5 is 60.

Thus checking the remainder of 61 w.r.t. 3/4/5 is the same as checking the remainder of 1 w.r.t. 3/4/5.

Similarly 62 is akin to 2, 63 to 3 and so on.

So let us simply look at the 1st 60 numbers.

Divisible by 3 = |60/3| = 20

Divisible by 4 = |60/4| = 15

Divisible by 5 = |60/5| = 12

Divisible by 3 & 4 = |60/12| = 5

Divisible by 3 & 5 = |60/15| = 4

Divisible by 4 & 5 = |60/20| = 3

Divisible by 3 & 4 & 5 = |60/60| = 1

Thus total number of number divisible by 3 or 4 or 5 = (20 + 15 + 12) - (5 + 4 + 3) + 1

= 47 - 12 + 1

= 36

Thus for every 60 numbers, 36 of them will satisfy, hence probability = 36/60 = 12/20.

Now 61-1020 involves 960 numbers which is 16 sets of 60 numbers, hence Probability = 12/20.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 50

The profit percentage earned by selling an item for Rs. 1078 is equal to the percentage loss incurred by selling the same item for Rs. 882. What should be the Marked Price of the item if it is to be sold at approximately 15% profit, after giving 10% discount to the customer?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 50 Let CP be x.

As per the given condition,

(1078 - x)/x = (x - 882)/x

⇒ 1078 - x = x - 882

⇒ x = 980

Selling price in order to make 15% profit = 980 x 1.15 = Rs 1127.

Hence Marked Price of the item should be (10/9)*1127 = Rs. 1252.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 51

Akhil and Bineet are two typists can together type a certain novel named "Two States" in 8 days while Cia can type same novel "Two States" alone in 12 days. Bineet and Cia can type another novel "One Night At Call Centre" in 10 days while Akhil can type "One Night At Call Centre"in 18 days .In how many days Bineet alone can type "Two States"?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 51 Let Akhil, Bineet, Cia can do a, b, c amount of work per day respectively.

Let w1 denotes the work of typing novel "Two States" and w2 denotes the work of typing novel "One Night At Call Centre".

Then 8(a + b) = 12c = w1 and 10(b + c) = 18a = w2

Since 5b + 5c = 9a and 8a = 12c -8b

40b + 40c = 108c - 72b

112b = 68c

28b = 17c

Now 12c = w1

Putting value of c = w1/12 in 28b=17c, we have w1 = 28 x 12b/17

w1/b = 19.76

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 52

Gagan and Laxman started a business investing Rs. 64000 and Rs. 40000 respectively. After three months Sujit joined them investing Rs. 82000. 3 months after starting business Gagan and Laxman withdraw Rs. 15000 and Rs. 18000 respectively. At the end of the year find the sum of shares of Sujit and Laxman in total profit of Rs. 6450

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 52 Investment by Gagan is 64000 for first three months and (64000-15000) for next nine months.

Similarly, for others too.

Investment by Gagan = 64000 x 3 + 49000 x 9 = 633000

Investment by Laxman = 40000 x 3 + 22000 x 9 = 318000

Investment by Sujit = 82000 x 9 = 738000

Share of Sujit & Laxman = (318 + 738)/(633 + 318 + 738) x 6450 = Rs. 4032.68

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 53

A mixture contains two liquids A and B in the ratio 7 : 5. When 60 liter of the mixture is drawn off and the mixture is again replenished with the same volume of liquid B then the above ratio becomes 7: 9. What was the original volume of liquid A in the mixture?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 53 Let the original mixture be 120n liters.

Volume of liquid A in the mixture = 70n liter

Volume of liquid B in the mixture = 50n liter

Volume of liquid A in 60 liter of mixture = 60 X 7/12 = 35 liter

Volume of liquid B in 60 liter of mixture = 60 - 35 = 25 liter

After drawing 60 liter of mixture, volume of liquid A in the remaining mixture = (70n - 35) liter

Similarly, volume of liquid B left in the mixture = (50n - 25) liter

Now again 60 liter of liquid B is added then the new volume of liquid B = 50n - 25 + 60 = (50n + 35) liter

Now according to the question, (70n - 35)/(50n + 35) = 7/9

⇒ (10n - 5)/50n + 35 = 1/9

⇒ 90n - 45 = 50n + 35

⇒ 40n = 80

⇒ n = 2

Hence original volume of liquid A in the mixture = 70n liter = 140 liter

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 54

Find the ten thousand's place digit when 21234 X 54 X 32014 is written in the decimal form.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 54 Given N = 21234 X 54 X 32014

These factors can be rearrange as 24 X 54 X 21230 X 32014

Or 104 X 21230 X 32014

Last four digits of a number will contain all 4 zero's and we need to find the ten thousand's digit, that means the 5th last digit of a number. So, if we find the unit digit of 21230 X 32014. That will be the 5th last digit of a number N.

By using the cyclicity concept.

Unit digit of 21230 is 4 and unit digit of 32014 is 9.

21230 X 32014

Unit digit

4 x 9 = 36

∴Ten thousand's place digit of a number 21234 X 54 X 32014 is = 6.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 55

ABCD is a square such that A lies on the +ve y-axis, B on +ve x-axis. If D is (12,17), the coordinates of C will be?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 55 Consider a square drawn according to the given conditions i.e A lies on the +ve y-axis, B on +ve x-axis

Co-ordinates of D is (12,17)

Let OA = a and OB = b

OAB is a right angled triangle, with AB as hypotenuse

Since AB is a side of the sqaure ABCD, remaining lengths will be as shown in the diagram

Therefore, D’s co-ordinates will be of the form (a, a + b) = (12,17)

a = 12 and b = 5; hence C is (17, 5)

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 56

The range of the function tan (logx) must be

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 56 The value of logx for any value of x will be from (-∞, ∞).

Tangent of any value of the above domain gives a range of (-∞, ∞).

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 57

log x(1 + 8-1 + 8-2 + 8-3 + .... ∞) > log x(1 + 6-1 + 6-2 + 6-3 + .... ∞), then logx6921 - logx1296 will be

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 57 1 + 8-1 + 8-2 + 8-3 + .... ∞ = 1/(1-1/8) = 8/7

1 + 6-1 + 6-2 + 6-3 + .... ∞ = 1/(1-1/6) = 6/5

log x(8/7) > log x(6/5)

which is possible only when 0 < x < 1

Hence logx6921 - logx1296 is negative.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 58

Find the area of the circle passing through centers of three circles with radius 2 m, 3 m and 10 m placed in such a way that each circle touches the other two circles externally.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 58

As per the given condition above diagram will be formed. So lines joining the centers of three circles will form right angle triangle as 5, 12, and 13 which is a Pythagorean triplet. So the circle passing through the centers of these circles will be passing through the vertex of this right angle triangle. So the diameter of such circle is hypotenuse of triangle which is 13 cm. Thus radius 6.5 cm and hence area will be π (13/2)2 = 169 π /4

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 59

An escalator moves at a constant rate from one floor up to the next floor. Jack walks up 29 steps while traveling on the escalator between the floors. Jill takes twice as long to travel between the floors and walks up only 11 steps. When it is stopped, how many steps does the escalator has between the two floors?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 59 Suppose that the escalator was two floors long, instead of just one, and that Jack and Jill start walking at the same time. Then Jack will reach the second floor at the same time Jill reaches the first floor (since it takes Jill twice as long to climb one floor). In that time,

Jack will have climbed 2(29)steps and Jill will have climbed 11 steps, so there will be

47 = 2(29) − 11 steps between them on the escalator.

These 47 steps represent the distance between two floors, or the length of the escalator.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 60

In an examination, students had to find out the average of nine 3-digit natural numbers. Shweta by mistake copied down one of the numbers in her answer sheet, in the reverse order of the digits, and proceeded to calculate the average. She got an answer which was 22 more than that of the actual average. How many distinct values are possible for the 3-digit number that Shweta erroneously copied down?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 60 The average of the nine numbers increases by 22, hence the sum of the numbers increases by 22x9 = 198.

Let us assume that the number erroneously copied down by Shweta was actually 'abc', and she used 'cba' in her calculations,

Hence, 'cba' - 'abc' = 198

or 100c + 10b + a - 100a - 10b - c = 198

or 99(c - a) = 198

or c - a = 2.

Hence the 3rd digit must be 2 more than the 1st digit, while the 2nd digit can assume any value between 0 - 9.

Hence possible combinations of 1st and 3rd digits are (1, 3), (2, 4), (3, 5), (4, 6), (5, 7), (6, 8), (7, 9).

Thus there are 7 combinations, each of which contains 10 values, since 'b' can assume any value between 0-9.

Hence total possible values = 7 x 10 = 70 values.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 61

If n! has 4 zeros at the end and (n+1)! has six zeros at the end, then n can be:


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 61 If n! has 4 zeros at the end, then it will have 54 as a factor

Therefore, n can be 20 to 24 because 20 to 24 will have four 5s i.e 5, 5X2, 5X3, 5X4

(n + 1)! should have 6 zeros

Therefore, n + 1 = 25 or n = 24 [25 = 5 X 5, hence total 6 zeros]

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 62

If f(x/y) = f(x) - f(y), and it is given that f(2) = 2.4, f(3) = 3.7, f(7) = 7, then find the value of f(4536)?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 62 If f(x/y) = f(x) - f(y),

We can see that f(x) is similar to the Log function.

i.e. Log(x/y) = Log(x) - Log(y)

So we need to break 4536 into its prime factors as follows,

4536 = 23.34.7

Log(4536) = 3Log 2 + 4 Log 3 + Log 7

Similarly f(4536) = 3f(2) + 4f(3) + f(7)

= 3 x 2.4 + 4 x 3.7 + 7

= 29

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 63

What is the highest value of x in the expression (167!)/ (24!)x to an yield integral answer?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 63 Prime number just less than 24 is 23. Highest prime number should be considered because to yield an integral answer, the power of this highest prime number should be equal to the quotient( numerator divided by highest prime number). Otherwise, integral value cannot be obtained. Hence, dividing 167 by 23 gives us the quotient 7.
CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 64

Hyderabad ring road is in the form of a perfect circle of diameter 42 km. 2 points A and B lie on the ring road. There is another expressway that connects point A directly to point B. The length of the expressway that connects A and B is the same as the radius of the ring road. A person starts from point A and travels to point B through the ring road by taking the shortest route and immediately returns to A from B through the expressway. If the person completes the journey in half an hour, what is his speed (in kmph)?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 64 The road AB (expressway) is a chord. We have been given that the length of the expressway is equal to the radius of the circle. Therefore, on joining the points A and B with the centre of the circle, we will get an equilateral triangle.

⇒ Angle subtended by the expressway at the centre = 60

.Length of the arc AB = 60/360 x 2 x π x 21

= 22 km.

Length of the expressway AB = 21 km.

We know that the person covers 22 + 21 = 43 km in half an hour.

Therefore, the speed of the person is 86 kmph.

86 is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 65

If the selling price of the article is reduced by 40% and the cost price remains the same, the profit reduces by 50%. Find the original profit % of the article?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 65 Let the SP be x and the CP be y.

(x-y) = 2(0.6x-y)

0.2x = y

x = 5y

Original profit% =

= 400

CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 66

A person can complete a job in 120 days. He works alone on Day 1. On Day 2, he is joined by another person who also can complete the job in exactly 120 days. On Day 3, they are joined by another person of equal efficiency. Like this, everyday a new person with the same efficiency joins the work. How many days are required to complete the job?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 19 (13/11/2022) - Question 66 Let the rate of work of a person be x units/day. Hence, the total work = 120x.

It is given that one first day, one person works, on the second day two people work and so on.

Hence, the work done on day 1, day 2,... will be x, 2x, 3x, ... respectively.

The sum should be equal to 120x.

n2 + n − 240 = 0

n = 15 is the only positive solution.

Hence, it takes 15 days to complete the work.

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