CAT Mock Test - 19


100 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2020 | CAT Mock Test - 19


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This mock test of CAT Mock Test - 19 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 100 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT CAT Mock Test - 19 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CAT Mock Test - 19 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this CAT Mock Test - 19 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CAT Mock Test - 19 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

The sum of the present ages of Varun and Kapil is 42 yrs. The ratio of their ages after 5 yrs will be 15:11. What is the present age of Kapil?

Solution:

Let Varun's age = V
Kapil's age = K
V + K = 42
⇒ V = 42 - K


⇒ 11(V + 5) = 15(K + 5)
⇒ 11(42 - K + 5) = 15K + 75
⇒ 462 - 11K + 55 = 15K + 75
⇒ - 11K - 15K = 75 - 517
⇒ - 26K = - 442
⇒ K = 17

QUESTION: 2

If the product of n positive real numbers is unity, then their sum is necessarily

Solution:

The numbers must be reciprocals of each other.

Hence the sum is greater than the product of numbers.

QUESTION: 3

Let x,y and z be distinct integers x and y are odd positive, and z is even and positive. Which one of the following statements cannot be true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

In the following questions two equations numbered I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and
I. x2 - x - 12 = 0
II. y2 + 5y + 6 = 0

Solution:

I. x2 - x - 12 = 0
⇒ x2 - 4x + 3x - 12 = 0
⇒ x(x - 4) + 3(x - 4) = 0
⇒ (x - 4) (x + 3) = 0
∴ x = 4 or -3
II. y2 + 5y + 6 = 0
⇒ y2 + 3y + 2y + 6 = 0
⇒ y(y + 3) + 2(y + 3) = 0
⇒ (y + 3) (y + 2) = 0
∴ y = -3 or -2
x ≥ y

QUESTION: 5

I. x2 - 8x + 15 = 0
II. y2 - 3y + 2 = 0

Solution:

I. x2 - 8x + 15 = 0
⇒ x2 - 5x - 3x + 15 = 0
⇒ x(x - 5) - 3(x - 5) = 0
⇒ (x - 3) (x - 5) = 0
∴ x = 3 or 5
II. y2 - 3y + 2 = 0
⇒ y2 - 2y - y + 2 = 0
⇒ y(y - 2) - 1(y - 2) = 0
⇒ (y - 1) (y - 2) = 0
∴ y = 1 or 2
x > y

QUESTION: 6

Which of the following statements is/are true ?
1. A quadrilateral is inscribed in a circle of area 154 cm². If the diagonals of the quadrilateral are 14 cm and 10 cm, then its area is 70 cm² .
2. A parallelogram is inscribed in a circle of area 38.5 cm² . If a diagonal of the parallelogram is 7 cm and the sum of its adjacent sides is 7√2 cm . then the area of the parallelogram is 24.5 cm². 
3. An isosceles trapezium is inscribed in a circle of area 346.5 cm². If the median of the trapezium is 21 cm and the parallel sides are 10 cm apart , the area of the trapezium is 210 cm².

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

A rectangular floor is fully covered with square tiles of identical size. The tiles on the edges are white and the tiles in the interior are red. The number of white tiles is the same as the number of red tiles. A possible value of the number of tiles along one edge of the floor is

Solution:

A rectangular floor is fully covered with square tiles of identical size. The tiles on the edges are white and the tiles in the interior are red. The number of white tiles is the same as the number of red tiles. A possible value of the number of tiles along one edge of the floor is

QUESTION: 8

The average speed of Howarh express inclusive of various halts at stations is 60kmph. However, if we do not take the time of halts into consideration the speed of Howrah express works out to be 72kmph. What is the average time per hour of journey?

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

The function f (x) = | x - 2 | + | 2.5 - x| + |3.6 -x|, where x is a real number, attains a minimum at:

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Let ABCDEF be a regular hexagon. What is the ratio of the area of the triangle ACE to that of the hexagon ABCDEF?

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Based on the figure below, what is the value of x, if y = 10?

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Given that −1 ≤ v ≤ 1,−2 ≤ u ≤ −0.5 and −2 ≤ z ≤ −0.5 and  , then which of the following is necessarily true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Ravi invested a certain amount in a 15 years fixed deposit scheme. An interest of Rs. 1,250 was accrued for the 5th year whereas Rs. 2,450 was accrued for the 11th year. If the interest is compounded annually , what is the maturity value of Rs. 1, 00,000 invested today, at the end of the 15 years of the fixed deposit scheme?

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

The curved surface of the cone inscribed in a given sphere is maximum if h=

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

A solution of sugar syrup has 15% sugar. Another solution has 5% sugar.How many litres of the second solution must be added to 20 litres of the first solution to make a solution of 10% sugar?

Solution:

Hence both the types should be added in the ratio of 1 : 1 to obtain the required strength.
Hence 20 litres of first type should be added to the 20 litres of the second type to get the desired solution

QUESTION: 16

Let n! = 1 × 2 × 3 ×...× n for integer n ≥ 1. If p = 1! + (2 × 2!) + (3 × 3!) + ....+ (10 × 10!), then p + 2 when divided by 11! leaves a remainder of

Solution:

if p = 1! then p + 2 = 3 when divided by 2! gives a remainder 1
if p = 1! + (2 × 2!) = 5 then p + 2 = 7 when divided by 3! gives a remainder 1
The result is the same for p = 1! + (2 × 2!) + (3 × 3!) + .....
So the answer for the given sum should be1

QUESTION: 17

A, B and C are defined as follows:
A = (2.000004) ÷ [(2.000004)² + (4.000008)] 
B = (3.000003) ÷ [(3.000003)² + (9.000009)] 
C = (4.000002) ÷ [(4.000002)² + (8.000004)] 
Which of the following is true about the values of the above three expressions?

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

For the product n(n+1)(2n+1),n∈N which one of the following is not necessarily true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Which of the following is the greatest?

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

The period of the function tan(3x+5)is

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

The letters of the word 'RANDOM' are written in all possible orders and these words are written out as in a dictionary .Find the rank of the word 'RANDOM'.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

5 coins are tossed. If two of them show heads , then the probability that all 5 coins show head is

Solution:

Total outcome:25 = 32
Outcome of at least two of them show heads:
Total-(1 head)-(0 head)= 32 - 5 - 1 = 26
Outcome of 5 heads = 1

Probability = 1/26

QUESTION: 23

Mohan bought a cycle for Rs. 475 and then sold it at a loss of 8% of the cost price. For how much did he sell the cycle?

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

What will be the quadratic equation in x when the roots have their airthmetic mean as A and geometric mean G ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

'A' can run a km in 4 minutes 54 secs and 'B'can run this distance in 5 minutes. How many mts ahead of 'A' should 'B' stand at the start of the km Race so that both of them reach the finish point together?

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

The number of employees in Obelix Menhir Co. is a prime number and is less than 300. The ratio of the number of employees who are graduates and above, to that of employees who are not, can possibly be

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

Find the sum of all the integers which are multiples of 7 and lie between 200 and 400.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

A condition for a function y = f (x) to have an inverse is that it should be

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

Ram and Shyam attempted to solve a quadratic equation. Ram made a mistake in writing down the constant term. He ended up with the roots (4, 3). Shyam made a mistake in writing down the coefficient of x. He got the root as (3, 2). What will be the exact roots of the original quadratic equation?

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

If 1 cm on a map corresponds to an actual distance of 40 kms. And the distance on the map between Bombay and Calcutta is 37.5 cms., the actual distance between them is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

A job is composed of three parts -A,B,C. The time required for these three parts are in the ratio of 2:3:5 and the number of workers involved are in the ratio of 2:3:4 . Part B requires 5 hours to be completed and 8 workers are engaged in part C. If three parts are being attended simultaneously, then what is the time required to complete the job and how many workers are involved?

Solution:

A - Time 2x, worked 2y
B - Time 3x, worked 3y
C - Time 5x, worked 4y
Now, 3x = 5 
⇒ x = 5/3
4y = 8 
⇒ y = 2
Total time required = 2 × (5/3) + 5 + 5 × (5/3)
(50/3) hrs
total workers are involved = 4 + 6 + 8 = 18 workers

QUESTION: 32

tan 75°-cot 75°=

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

The area of the triangle with the vertices (a, a), (a + 1, a) and (a, a + 2) is

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

There are three vessels in the shape of a cuboid, a circular cylinder and a conical frustum with the same height of 7 units. The other two sides of the cuboid are 11 units and 12 units. The radius of the cylinder is 6 units. The radii of two faces of the frustum are 3 units and 6 units. The cuboid is completely filled with water. The water is poured into the cylinder until it is completely filled. Then water from the cylinder is poured into the frustum until it is completely filled and then water from the frustum is emptied back into the cuboid. Find the ratio of the water in the cuboid to the total volume of the cuboid.

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Five educational films A, B, C, D, and E are to be shown to a group of students. The films are to be shown in a particular order, which conforms to the following conditions: 
A must be shown earlier than C. 
B must be shown earlier than D. 
E should not be the fifth film shown.

Q. Which among the following is an acceptable order for showing the educational films?

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Five educational films A, B, C, D, and E are to be shown to a group of students. The films are to be shown in a particular order, which conforms to the following conditions: 
A must be shown earlier than C. 
B must be shown earlier than D. 
E should not be the fifth film shown.

Q. In case C is shown earlier than E, which among the following will hold true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

Five educational films A, B, C, D, and E are to be shown to a group of students. The films are to be shown in a particular order, which conforms to the following conditions: 
A must be shown earlier than C. 
B must be shown earlier than D. 
E should not be the fifth film shown.

Q. In case D is to be shown earlier than A, then for which among the following is there exactly one position from first through fifth in which it can be scheduled to be shown?

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Five educational films A, B, C, D, and E are to be shown to a group of students. The films are to be shown in a particular order, which conforms to the following conditions: 
A must be shown earlier than C. 
B must be shown earlier than D. 
E should not be the fifth film shown.

Q. Which among the following is a pair of films that CANNOT both be shown earlier than E?

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Five educational films A, B, C, D, and E are to be shown to a group of students. The films are to be shown in a particular order, which conforms to the following conditions: 
A must be shown earlier than C. 
B must be shown earlier than D. 
E should not be the fifth film shown.

Q. In case D and E are shown as far apart from each other as possible, which among the following would be true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Study the following graph carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Q. What was the percentage drop in the number of C type tyres manufactured from 1993 to 1994?

Solution:

Percentage drop in the number of C type

QUESTION: 41

Study the following graph carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Q. What was the difference between the number of B type tyres manufactured in 1994 and 1995?

Solution:

Difference = 3500000 - 27500000 = 750000

QUESTION: 42

Study the following graph carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Q. The total number of all the three types of tyres manufactured was the least in which of the following years?

Solution:

In 1996, the total number of all the three types of tyres manufactured was the least
i.e. Type A + Type + Type C = 12.5 + 22.5 + 30 = 65 Lakh (is the least)

QUESTION: 43

Each of the questions given below consists of a question and two statements numbered I and II given below it. You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
In which month of the year was Mohan born?
Statements:
I. Mohan was born in winter. 
II. Mohan was born exactly fourteen months after his elder sister who was born in October.

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

Each of the questions given below consists of a question and two statements numbered I and II given below it. You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
In which direction is Ravi facing?
Statements:
I. Ashok is to the right of Ravi.
II. Samir is sitting opposite of Ashok facing north.

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if either the statement I alone or statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question.
Give answer (5) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. Who is in the middle of the row comprising A, B, C, D and E?
I. B is to right of C, who is second from the left.
II. A is standing to the left of C, who is D's neighbour.

Solution:

So, from I, If there will be two on the left of B then there will be also on the right of B
So, B will be at middle
So, statement I is sufficient to answer. Middle member cannot be identified by statement II

QUESTION: 46

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if either the statement I alone or statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question.
Give answer (5) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. What is Shilpa's rank in the class?
I. The class strength is 45
II. Shilpa is eight ranks below Mahesh who stood 17th

Solution:

∴ From II only, Shilpa's rank in the class
= 16 + 1 + 7 + 1 = 25 th

QUESTION: 47

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if either the statement I alone or statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question.
Give answer (5) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. Who runs the fastest among L, M, N and P?
I. P runs faster than L, who is the slowest.
II. M runs faster than N but slower than P.

Solution:

From I, P > L (slowest)
From II, P > M > N
∴ From I and II together the answer of question is obtained

QUESTION: 48

Q. During 1996-2002, the number of commodities that exhibited a net overall increase and a net overall decrease, respectively, were:

Solution:

The commodities that exhibited net overall increase were onion, rice, egg and chillies.
Therefore, the commodities that exhibited net overall decrease were dal and edible oil

QUESTION: 49

Q. The number of commodities that experienced a price decline for two or more consecutive years is:

Solution:

The commodities that experienced a price decline for and two or more consecutive years rice, egg, onion, dal and chillies

QUESTION: 50

Q. For which commodities did a price increase immediately follow a price decline only one in this period?

Solution:

The given condition is satisfied only for the commodity onion

QUESTION: 51

Q. For how many years was the difference in fixed and floating rate more than 0.5?

Solution:

1996, 1997, 2000, 2002

QUESTION: 52

Occultist: If there are ghosts, then they are supernatural beings. But science studies only natural phenomena. Therefore, there can be no scientific basis for criticizing the evidence that leads people to believe in ghosts.
The occultist’s argument is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that it takes for granted that

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

Jay: The development of a plain writing style in seventeenth-century England was mainly due to an increase in the literacy rate. To reach moderately educated readers, writers simplified their style.
Chandra: No, the pivotal factor was the increasing interest in science among the most highly educated people; a complex, artificial style, however beautiful, interfered with the presentation of scientific facts.
Jay’s and Chandra’s comments indicate that they disagree about

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however, that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains. 
Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the skeptics' objections?

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

Economist: Ordinarily, when energy efficiency improves, less energy is used to satisfy the same needs. So presumably, if a country improves its energy efficiency, then ordinarily its energy consumption should decrease. Yet empirical data show that as a country’s energy efficiency increases, energy consumption there either rises or stays the same.
Which one of the following, if true, most helps to explain the conflict between the economist’s presumption and the empirical data?

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

People should be held accountable for their own behavior, and if holding people accountable for their own behavior entails capital punishment, then so be it. However, no person should be held accountable for behavior over which he or she had no control. 
Which of the following is the most logical conclusion of the argument above?

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

The profitability of a company is defined as the ratio of its operating profit to its operating income, typically expressed in percentage. The following two charts show the operating income as well as the profitability of six companies in the Financial Years (F.Y.s) 2001-02 and 2002-03.


The operating profits of four of these companies are plotted against their respective operating income figures for the F.Y. 2002-03, in the third chart given below.

Q. What is the approximate average operating profit, in F.Y. 2001-2002, of the two companies excluded from the third chart?

Solution:

The two companies excluded from the third chart are companies B and D. These companies have had a negative profitability.

QUESTION: 58

The profitability of a company is defined as the ratio of its operating profit to its operating income, typically expressed in percentage. The following two charts show the operating income as well as the profitability of six companies in the Financial Years (F.Y.s) 2001-02 and 2002-03.


The operating profits of four of these companies are plotted against their respective operating income figures for the F.Y. 2002-03, in the third chart given below.

Q. Which company recorded the highest operating profit in F.Y. 2002-03?

Solution:

From Third chart highest operating profit company in F.Y 2002-03 is E

QUESTION: 59

The profitability of a company is defined as the ratio of its operating profit to its operating income, typically expressed in percentage. The following two charts show the operating income as well as the profitability of six companies in the Financial Years (F.Y.s) 2001-02 and 2002-03.


The operating profits of four of these companies are plotted against their respective operating income figures for the F.Y. 2002-03, in the third chart given below.

Q. Which of the following statements in NOT true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

These questions are to be answered on the basis of the pie chart given below showing how a person's monthly salary is distributed over different expense heads.

Q. For a person, whose monthly salary is Rs.6,000 p.m. how many items are there on which he has to spend more than Rs.1,000 p.m?

Solution:

On two items savings and house rent he has to invest more than Rs 1000

QUESTION: 61

These questions are to be answered on the basis of the pie chart given below showing how a person's monthly salary is distributed over different expense heads.

Q. For the same person, an expenditure of Rs.1,800 p.m takes place on:

Solution:

He invests Rs 1800 on house rent

QUESTION: 62

These questions are to be answered on the basis of the pie chart given below showing how a person's monthly salary is distributed over different expense heads.

Q. The annual savings for such a person will be approximately:

Solution:

Saving per month = 6000 × 23% = Rs 1380
∴ Annual saving = 1380 × 12 = Rs 16560

QUESTION: 63

The following table gives the quantity of apples (in tones) arriving at New Delhi market from various states in a particular year. The month in which demand was more than supply, the additional demand was met by the stock from cold storage.

Q. What was the maximum percentage of apples supplied by any state in any of the months?

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

The following table gives the quantity of apples (in tones) arriving at New Delhi market from various states in a particular year. The month in which demand was more than supply, the additional demand was met by the stock from cold storage.

Q. Which state supplied the maximum apples?

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

The following table gives the quantity of apples (in tones) arriving at New Delhi market from various states in a particular year. The month in which demand was more than supply, the additional demand was met by the stock from cold storage.

Q. In which of the following periods was the supply greater than the demand?

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

The following table gives the quantity of apples (in tones) arriving at New Delhi market from various states in a particular year. The month in which demand was more than supply, the additional demand was met by the stock from cold storage.

Q. If the yield per tree was 40 kg, then from how many trees were the apples supplied to New Delhi (in million) during the year?

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

In each question, there are sentences with pair of italicized word(s)/phrase(s) . From the italicized word(s)/phrase(s), select the most appropriate word(s)/phrase(s) (P or Q) to form correct sentences. Then, choose the best one from the given options.

Q. The lawyer quoted many precedents(P)/presidents(Q) in support of his argument.
The Moon immersed(P)/emerged(Q) from behind a cloud.
Avoid using this lain(P)/lane(Q) as it is very narrow.
I have to replace the heal(P)/heel(Q) of my shoe.
Coffee is a mild stimulant(P)/stimulus(Q).

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

The doctor has prescribed(P)/proscribed(Q) this medicine for my father.
Many Indians emigrants(P)/immigrants(Q) are settled in Sri Lanka.
Akbar was a man of deep insight(P)/incite(Q).
Avadesh Singh hales(P)/hails(Q) from the Punjab.
Param Vir Chakra is an reward(P)/award(Q) given for the highest gallantry in war.

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

Tresspassers will be persecuted(P)/prosecuted(Q).
We went on an incursion(P)/excursion(Q) to Kashmir.
Kanpur is an industrious(P)/industrial(Q) city.
Constant worry affected(P)/effected(Q) his health.
We should not believe in cast(P)/caste(Q) system.

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

My brother has no practical(P)/practicable(Q) experience of factory life.
Real felicity(P)/facility(Q) is found only in hard work.
This is a very idle(P)/ideal(Q) book.
John refused to altar(P)/alter(Q) to his decision.
Whenever I passed the cemetery(P)/symmetry(Q) I thought of my dead parents.

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

One of the criteria by which we judge the vitality of a style of painting is its ability to renew itself -its responsiveness to the changing nature and quality of experience, the degree of conceptual and formal innovation that it exhibits. By this criterion, it would appear that the practice of abstractionism has failed to engage creatively with the radical change in human experience in recent decades. It has seemingly been unwilling to re-invent itself in relation to the systems of artistic expression and viewers expectations that have developed under the impact of the mass media. 
The judgement that abstractionism has slipped into 'inter gear' is gaining endorsement not only among discerning viewers and practitioners of other art forms but also among abstract painters themselves. Like their companions elsewhere in the world, abstractionists in India are asking themselves an overwhelming question today: Does abstractionism have a future? The major crisis that abstractionists face is that of revitalizing their picture surface; few have improvised any solutions beyond the ones that were exhausted by the 1970s. Like all revolutions, whether in policies or in art, abstractionism must now confront its moment of truth: having begun life as a new and radical pictorial approach to experience, it has become an entrenched orthodoxy itself. Indeed, when viewed against a historical situation in which a variety of subversive, interactive and richly hybrid forms are available to the art practitioner, abstractionism, assumes the remote and defiant air of an aristocracy that has outlived its age; trammeled by formulaic conventions yet buttressed by a rhetoric of sacred mystery, it seems condemned to being the last citadel of the self regarding 'fine art' tradition, the last hurrah of painting for painting's sake. 
The situation is further complicated in India by the circumstance in which an indigenous abstractionism came into prominence here during the 1960s. From the beginning it was propelled by the dielectric between two motive, one revolutionary and the other conservative - it was inaugurated as an act of emancipation from the dogmas of the nascent Indian nation state, when art was officially viewed as an indulgence at worst and at best as an instrument for the celebration of the republic's hopes and aspirations, Having rejected these dogmas, the pioneering abstractionists also went to reject the various figurative styles associated with the Shantiniketan circle and others. In such a situation, abstractionism was a revolutionary move. It led art towards the exploration of the subconscious mind, the spiritual quest and the possible expansion of consciousness. Indian painting entered into a phase of self-inquirya meditative inner space where cosmic symbols and non-representational images ruled. Often, the transition from figurative idioms to abstractionist ones took place within the same artists. 
At the same time Indian abstractionists have rarely committed themselves wholeheartedly to non-representational idiom. They have been preoccupied with the fundamentally metaphysical project of aspiring to the mystical holy without altogether renouncing the symbolic. This has been sustained by a hereditary reluctance to give up the murti, the inviolable iconic form, which explains why abstractionism is marked by the conservative tendency to operate with images from the sacred repertoire of the past. Abstractionism thus entered India as a double-edged device in a complex cultural transaction. Ideologically it served as an internationalist legitimization of the emerging revolutionary local trends. However, on entry, it was conscripted to serve local artistic preoccupations- a survey of indigenous abstractionism will show that it most obvious points of affinity with European and American abstract art were with the more mystically oriented of the major sources of abstractionist philosophy and practice, for instance, the Kandinsky Klee School. There have been no takers for Malevich's Suprematism which militantly rejected both artistic forms of the past and the world of appearances, privileging the new-minted geometric symbol as an autonomous sign of the desire for infinity. 
Against this backdrop we can identify three major abstractionist idioms in Indian art. The first develops from a love of the earth, and assumes the form of self's dissolution in the cosmic panorama; the landscape is not longer a realistic transcription of the scene, but is transformed into a visionary occasion for contemplating the cycles of decay and regeneration. The second idiom phrases its departures from symbolic and archetypal devices as invitations to heightened planes of awareness. Abstractionism begins with the establishment or dissolution of the motif which can be drawn from diverse sources including the hieroglyphic tablet, the Sufi mediation dance or the Tantric diagram. The third idiom is based on the lyric play of forms guided by gesture or allied with formal improvisations like the assemblage. Here, sometimes, the line dividing abstract image from patterned design or quasi-random expressive marking may blur. The flux of forms can also be regimented through the policies of pure colour arrangements, vector-diagrammatic spaces and gestural design. 
In this genealogy, some pure lines of descent follow their logic to the inevitable point of extinction, others engage in cross-fertilization and yet others undergo mutation to maintain their energy. However, this genealogical survey demonstrates the wave at its crests, those points where the metaphysical and the painterly have been fused in images of abiding potency, ideas sensuously ordained rather than fabricated programmatically to a concept. It is equally possible to enumerate the troughs where the two principles do not come together, thus arriving at a very different account. Uncharitable as it may sound, the history of Indian abstractionism records a series of attempts to avoid the risks of abstraction by resorting to an overt and near-generic symbolism which many Indian abstractionists embrace when they find themselves bereft of the imaginative energy to negotiate the union of metaphysics and painterliness. 
Such symbolism falls into a dual trap: it succumbs to the pompous vacuity of pure metaphysics when the burden of intention is passed off as justification; or then it is desiccated by the arid formalism of pure painterliness with delight in the measure of chance or pattern guiding the execution of a painting. This ensuing conflict of purpose stalls the progress of abstractionism in an impasse. The remarkable Indian abstractionists are precisely those who have overcome this and addressed themselves to the basic elements of their art with a decisive sense of independence form prior models. In their recent work, we see the logic of Indian abstractionism pushed almost to the furthest it can be taken. Beyond such artistic stands a lost generation of abstractionists whose works invoke a wistful, delicate beauty but stops there? 
Abstractionism is not a universal language; it is an art that points up the loss of a shared language of signs in society. And yet, it affirms the possibility of its recover through the effort of awareness. While its rhetoric has always emphasized a call for new forms of attention, abstractionist practice has tended to fall into a complacent pride in its own incomprehensibility; a complacency fatal in an ethos where vibrant new idioms compete for the viewers' attention. Indian abstractionists ought to really return to basics to reformulate and replenish their understanding of the nature of the relationship between the painted image and the world around it. But will they abandon their favourite conceptual habits and formal conventions, if this becomes necessary?

Q. Which one of the following is not stated by the author as a reason for abstractionism losing its vitality?

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

One of the criteria by which we judge the vitality of a style of painting is its ability to renew itself -its responsiveness to the changing nature and quality of experience, the degree of conceptual and formal innovation that it exhibits. By this criterion, it would appear that the practice of abstractionism has failed to engage creatively with the radical change in human experience in recent decades. It has seemingly been unwilling to re-invent itself in relation to the systems of artistic expression and viewers expectations that have developed under the impact of the mass media. 
The judgement that abstractionism has slipped into 'inter gear' is gaining endorsement not only among discerning viewers and practitioners of other art forms but also among abstract painters themselves. Like their companions elsewhere in the world, abstractionists in India are asking themselves an overwhelming question today: Does abstractionism have a future? The major crisis that abstractionists face is that of revitalizing their picture surface; few have improvised any solutions beyond the ones that were exhausted by the 1970s. Like all revolutions, whether in policies or in art, abstractionism must now confront its moment of truth: having begun life as a new and radical pictorial approach to experience, it has become an entrenched orthodoxy itself. Indeed, when viewed against a historical situation in which a variety of subversive, interactive and richly hybrid forms are available to the art practitioner, abstractionism, assumes the remote and defiant air of an aristocracy that has outlived its age; trammeled by formulaic conventions yet buttressed by a rhetoric of sacred mystery, it seems condemned to being the last citadel of the self regarding 'fine art' tradition, the last hurrah of painting for painting's sake. 
The situation is further complicated in India by the circumstance in which an indigenous abstractionism came into prominence here during the 1960s. From the beginning it was propelled by the dielectric between two motive, one revolutionary and the other conservative - it was inaugurated as an act of emancipation from the dogmas of the nascent Indian nation state, when art was officially viewed as an indulgence at worst and at best as an instrument for the celebration of the republic's hopes and aspirations, Having rejected these dogmas, the pioneering abstractionists also went to reject the various figurative styles associated with the Shantiniketan circle and others. In such a situation, abstractionism was a revolutionary move. It led art towards the exploration of the subconscious mind, the spiritual quest and the possible expansion of consciousness. Indian painting entered into a phase of self-inquirya meditative inner space where cosmic symbols and non-representational images ruled. Often, the transition from figurative idioms to abstractionist ones took place within the same artists. 
At the same time Indian abstractionists have rarely committed themselves wholeheartedly to non-representational idiom. They have been preoccupied with the fundamentally metaphysical project of aspiring to the mystical holy without altogether renouncing the symbolic. This has been sustained by a hereditary reluctance to give up the murti, the inviolable iconic form, which explains why abstractionism is marked by the conservative tendency to operate with images from the sacred repertoire of the past. Abstractionism thus entered India as a double-edged device in a complex cultural transaction. Ideologically it served as an internationalist legitimization of the emerging revolutionary local trends. However, on entry, it was conscripted to serve local artistic preoccupations- a survey of indigenous abstractionism will show that it most obvious points of affinity with European and American abstract art were with the more mystically oriented of the major sources of abstractionist philosophy and practice, for instance, the Kandinsky Klee School. There have been no takers for Malevich's Suprematism which militantly rejected both artistic forms of the past and the world of appearances, privileging the new-minted geometric symbol as an autonomous sign of the desire for infinity. 
Against this backdrop we can identify three major abstractionist idioms in Indian art. The first develops from a love of the earth, and assumes the form of self's dissolution in the cosmic panorama; the landscape is not longer a realistic transcription of the scene, but is transformed into a visionary occasion for contemplating the cycles of decay and regeneration. The second idiom phrases its departures from symbolic and archetypal devices as invitations to heightened planes of awareness. Abstractionism begins with the establishment or dissolution of the motif which can be drawn from diverse sources including the hieroglyphic tablet, the Sufi mediation dance or the Tantric diagram. The third idiom is based on the lyric play of forms guided by gesture or allied with formal improvisations like the assemblage. Here, sometimes, the line dividing abstract image from patterned design or quasi-random expressive marking may blur. The flux of forms can also be regimented through the policies of pure colour arrangements, vector-diagrammatic spaces and gestural design. 
In this genealogy, some pure lines of descent follow their logic to the inevitable point of extinction, others engage in cross-fertilization and yet others undergo mutation to maintain their energy. However, this genealogical survey demonstrates the wave at its crests, those points where the metaphysical and the painterly have been fused in images of abiding potency, ideas sensuously ordained rather than fabricated programmatically to a concept. It is equally possible to enumerate the troughs where the two principles do not come together, thus arriving at a very different account. Uncharitable as it may sound, the history of Indian abstractionism records a series of attempts to avoid the risks of abstraction by resorting to an overt and near-generic symbolism which many Indian abstractionists embrace when they find themselves bereft of the imaginative energy to negotiate the union of metaphysics and painterliness. 
Such symbolism falls into a dual trap: it succumbs to the pompous vacuity of pure metaphysics when the burden of intention is passed off as justification; or then it is desiccated by the arid formalism of pure painterliness with delight in the measure of chance or pattern guiding the execution of a painting. This ensuing conflict of purpose stalls the progress of abstractionism in an impasse. The remarkable Indian abstractionists are precisely those who have overcome this and addressed themselves to the basic elements of their art with a decisive sense of independence form prior models. In their recent work, we see the logic of Indian abstractionism pushed almost to the furthest it can be taken. Beyond such artistic stands a lost generation of abstractionists whose works invoke a wistful, delicate beauty but stops there? 
Abstractionism is not a universal language; it is an art that points up the loss of a shared language of signs in society. And yet, it affirms the possibility of its recover through the effort of awareness. While its rhetoric has always emphasized a call for new forms of attention, abstractionist practice has tended to fall into a complacent pride in its own incomprehensibility; a complacency fatal in an ethos where vibrant new idioms compete for the viewers' attention. Indian abstractionists ought to really return to basics to reformulate and replenish their understanding of the nature of the relationship between the painted image and the world around it. But will they abandon their favourite conceptual habits and formal conventions, if this becomes necessary?

Q. Which of the following, according to the author, is the role that abstractionism plays in a society?

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

One of the criteria by which we judge the vitality of a style of painting is its ability to renew itself -its responsiveness to the changing nature and quality of experience, the degree of conceptual and formal innovation that it exhibits. By this criterion, it would appear that the practice of abstractionism has failed to engage creatively with the radical change in human experience in recent decades. It has seemingly been unwilling to re-invent itself in relation to the systems of artistic expression and viewers expectations that have developed under the impact of the mass media. 
The judgement that abstractionism has slipped into 'inter gear' is gaining endorsement not only among discerning viewers and practitioners of other art forms but also among abstract painters themselves. Like their companions elsewhere in the world, abstractionists in India are asking themselves an overwhelming question today: Does abstractionism have a future? The major crisis that abstractionists face is that of revitalizing their picture surface; few have improvised any solutions beyond the ones that were exhausted by the 1970s. Like all revolutions, whether in policies or in art, abstractionism must now confront its moment of truth: having begun life as a new and radical pictorial approach to experience, it has become an entrenched orthodoxy itself. Indeed, when viewed against a historical situation in which a variety of subversive, interactive and richly hybrid forms are available to the art practitioner, abstractionism, assumes the remote and defiant air of an aristocracy that has outlived its age; trammeled by formulaic conventions yet buttressed by a rhetoric of sacred mystery, it seems condemned to being the last citadel of the self regarding 'fine art' tradition, the last hurrah of painting for painting's sake. 
The situation is further complicated in India by the circumstance in which an indigenous abstractionism came into prominence here during the 1960s. From the beginning it was propelled by the dielectric between two motive, one revolutionary and the other conservative - it was inaugurated as an act of emancipation from the dogmas of the nascent Indian nation state, when art was officially viewed as an indulgence at worst and at best as an instrument for the celebration of the republic's hopes and aspirations, Having rejected these dogmas, the pioneering abstractionists also went to reject the various figurative styles associated with the Shantiniketan circle and others. In such a situation, abstractionism was a revolutionary move. It led art towards the exploration of the subconscious mind, the spiritual quest and the possible expansion of consciousness. Indian painting entered into a phase of self-inquirya meditative inner space where cosmic symbols and non-representational images ruled. Often, the transition from figurative idioms to abstractionist ones took place within the same artists. 
At the same time Indian abstractionists have rarely committed themselves wholeheartedly to non-representational idiom. They have been preoccupied with the fundamentally metaphysical project of aspiring to the mystical holy without altogether renouncing the symbolic. This has been sustained by a hereditary reluctance to give up the murti, the inviolable iconic form, which explains why abstractionism is marked by the conservative tendency to operate with images from the sacred repertoire of the past. Abstractionism thus entered India as a double-edged device in a complex cultural transaction. Ideologically it served as an internationalist legitimization of the emerging revolutionary local trends. However, on entry, it was conscripted to serve local artistic preoccupations- a survey of indigenous abstractionism will show that it most obvious points of affinity with European and American abstract art were with the more mystically oriented of the major sources of abstractionist philosophy and practice, for instance, the Kandinsky Klee School. There have been no takers for Malevich's Suprematism which militantly rejected both artistic forms of the past and the world of appearances, privileging the new-minted geometric symbol as an autonomous sign of the desire for infinity. 
Against this backdrop we can identify three major abstractionist idioms in Indian art. The first develops from a love of the earth, and assumes the form of self's dissolution in the cosmic panorama; the landscape is not longer a realistic transcription of the scene, but is transformed into a visionary occasion for contemplating the cycles of decay and regeneration. The second idiom phrases its departures from symbolic and archetypal devices as invitations to heightened planes of awareness. Abstractionism begins with the establishment or dissolution of the motif which can be drawn from diverse sources including the hieroglyphic tablet, the Sufi mediation dance or the Tantric diagram. The third idiom is based on the lyric play of forms guided by gesture or allied with formal improvisations like the assemblage. Here, sometimes, the line dividing abstract image from patterned design or quasi-random expressive marking may blur. The flux of forms can also be regimented through the policies of pure colour arrangements, vector-diagrammatic spaces and gestural design. 
In this genealogy, some pure lines of descent follow their logic to the inevitable point of extinction, others engage in cross-fertilization and yet others undergo mutation to maintain their energy. However, this genealogical survey demonstrates the wave at its crests, those points where the metaphysical and the painterly have been fused in images of abiding potency, ideas sensuously ordained rather than fabricated programmatically to a concept. It is equally possible to enumerate the troughs where the two principles do not come together, thus arriving at a very different account. Uncharitable as it may sound, the history of Indian abstractionism records a series of attempts to avoid the risks of abstraction by resorting to an overt and near-generic symbolism which many Indian abstractionists embrace when they find themselves bereft of the imaginative energy to negotiate the union of metaphysics and painterliness. 
Such symbolism falls into a dual trap: it succumbs to the pompous vacuity of pure metaphysics when the burden of intention is passed off as justification; or then it is desiccated by the arid formalism of pure painterliness with delight in the measure of chance or pattern guiding the execution of a painting. This ensuing conflict of purpose stalls the progress of abstractionism in an impasse. The remarkable Indian abstractionists are precisely those who have overcome this and addressed themselves to the basic elements of their art with a decisive sense of independence form prior models. In their recent work, we see the logic of Indian abstractionism pushed almost to the furthest it can be taken. Beyond such artistic stands a lost generation of abstractionists whose works invoke a wistful, delicate beauty but stops there? 
Abstractionism is not a universal language; it is an art that points up the loss of a shared language of signs in society. And yet, it affirms the possibility of its recover through the effort of awareness. While its rhetoric has always emphasized a call for new forms of attention, abstractionist practice has tended to fall into a complacent pride in its own incomprehensibility; a complacency fatal in an ethos where vibrant new idioms compete for the viewers' attention. Indian abstractionists ought to really return to basics to reformulate and replenish their understanding of the nature of the relationship between the painted image and the world around it. But will they abandon their favourite conceptual habits and formal conventions, if this becomes necessary?

Q. According to the author, which one of the following characterises the crisis faced by abstractionism?

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

One of the criteria by which we judge the vitality of a style of painting is its ability to renew itself -its responsiveness to the changing nature and quality of experience, the degree of conceptual and formal innovation that it exhibits. By this criterion, it would appear that the practice of abstractionism has failed to engage creatively with the radical change in human experience in recent decades. It has seemingly been unwilling to re-invent itself in relation to the systems of artistic expression and viewers expectations that have developed under the impact of the mass media. 
The judgement that abstractionism has slipped into 'inter gear' is gaining endorsement not only among discerning viewers and practitioners of other art forms but also among abstract painters themselves. Like their companions elsewhere in the world, abstractionists in India are asking themselves an overwhelming question today: Does abstractionism have a future? The major crisis that abstractionists face is that of revitalizing their picture surface; few have improvised any solutions beyond the ones that were exhausted by the 1970s. Like all revolutions, whether in policies or in art, abstractionism must now confront its moment of truth: having begun life as a new and radical pictorial approach to experience, it has become an entrenched orthodoxy itself. Indeed, when viewed against a historical situation in which a variety of subversive, interactive and richly hybrid forms are available to the art practitioner, abstractionism, assumes the remote and defiant air of an aristocracy that has outlived its age; trammeled by formulaic conventions yet buttressed by a rhetoric of sacred mystery, it seems condemned to being the last citadel of the self regarding 'fine art' tradition, the last hurrah of painting for painting's sake. 
The situation is further complicated in India by the circumstance in which an indigenous abstractionism came into prominence here during the 1960s. From the beginning it was propelled by the dielectric between two motive, one revolutionary and the other conservative - it was inaugurated as an act of emancipation from the dogmas of the nascent Indian nation state, when art was officially viewed as an indulgence at worst and at best as an instrument for the celebration of the republic's hopes and aspirations, Having rejected these dogmas, the pioneering abstractionists also went to reject the various figurative styles associated with the Shantiniketan circle and others. In such a situation, abstractionism was a revolutionary move. It led art towards the exploration of the subconscious mind, the spiritual quest and the possible expansion of consciousness. Indian painting entered into a phase of self-inquirya meditative inner space where cosmic symbols and non-representational images ruled. Often, the transition from figurative idioms to abstractionist ones took place within the same artists. 
At the same time Indian abstractionists have rarely committed themselves wholeheartedly to non-representational idiom. They have been preoccupied with the fundamentally metaphysical project of aspiring to the mystical holy without altogether renouncing the symbolic. This has been sustained by a hereditary reluctance to give up the murti, the inviolable iconic form, which explains why abstractionism is marked by the conservative tendency to operate with images from the sacred repertoire of the past. Abstractionism thus entered India as a double-edged device in a complex cultural transaction. Ideologically it served as an internationalist legitimization of the emerging revolutionary local trends. However, on entry, it was conscripted to serve local artistic preoccupations- a survey of indigenous abstractionism will show that it most obvious points of affinity with European and American abstract art were with the more mystically oriented of the major sources of abstractionist philosophy and practice, for instance, the Kandinsky Klee School. There have been no takers for Malevich's Suprematism which militantly rejected both artistic forms of the past and the world of appearances, privileging the new-minted geometric symbol as an autonomous sign of the desire for infinity. 
Against this backdrop we can identify three major abstractionist idioms in Indian art. The first develops from a love of the earth, and assumes the form of self's dissolution in the cosmic panorama; the landscape is not longer a realistic transcription of the scene, but is transformed into a visionary occasion for contemplating the cycles of decay and regeneration. The second idiom phrases its departures from symbolic and archetypal devices as invitations to heightened planes of awareness. Abstractionism begins with the establishment or dissolution of the motif which can be drawn from diverse sources including the hieroglyphic tablet, the Sufi mediation dance or the Tantric diagram. The third idiom is based on the lyric play of forms guided by gesture or allied with formal improvisations like the assemblage. Here, sometimes, the line dividing abstract image from patterned design or quasi-random expressive marking may blur. The flux of forms can also be regimented through the policies of pure colour arrangements, vector-diagrammatic spaces and gestural design. 
In this genealogy, some pure lines of descent follow their logic to the inevitable point of extinction, others engage in cross-fertilization and yet others undergo mutation to maintain their energy. However, this genealogical survey demonstrates the wave at its crests, those points where the metaphysical and the painterly have been fused in images of abiding potency, ideas sensuously ordained rather than fabricated programmatically to a concept. It is equally possible to enumerate the troughs where the two principles do not come together, thus arriving at a very different account. Uncharitable as it may sound, the history of Indian abstractionism records a series of attempts to avoid the risks of abstraction by resorting to an overt and near-generic symbolism which many Indian abstractionists embrace when they find themselves bereft of the imaginative energy to negotiate the union of metaphysics and painterliness. 
Such symbolism falls into a dual trap: it succumbs to the pompous vacuity of pure metaphysics when the burden of intention is passed off as justification; or then it is desiccated by the arid formalism of pure painterliness with delight in the measure of chance or pattern guiding the execution of a painting. This ensuing conflict of purpose stalls the progress of abstractionism in an impasse. The remarkable Indian abstractionists are precisely those who have overcome this and addressed themselves to the basic elements of their art with a decisive sense of independence form prior models. In their recent work, we see the logic of Indian abstractionism pushed almost to the furthest it can be taken. Beyond such artistic stands a lost generation of abstractionists whose works invoke a wistful, delicate beauty but stops there? 
Abstractionism is not a universal language; it is an art that points up the loss of a shared language of signs in society. And yet, it affirms the possibility of its recover through the effort of awareness. While its rhetoric has always emphasized a call for new forms of attention, abstractionist practice has tended to fall into a complacent pride in its own incomprehensibility; a complacency fatal in an ethos where vibrant new idioms compete for the viewers' attention. Indian abstractionists ought to really return to basics to reformulate and replenish their understanding of the nature of the relationship between the painted image and the world around it. But will they abandon their favourite conceptual habits and formal conventions, if this becomes necessary?

Q. According to the author, the introduction of abstractionism was revolutionary because it:

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

One of the criteria by which we judge the vitality of a style of painting is its ability to renew itself -its responsiveness to the changing nature and quality of experience, the degree of conceptual and formal innovation that it exhibits. By this criterion, it would appear that the practice of abstractionism has failed to engage creatively with the radical change in human experience in recent decades. It has seemingly been unwilling to re-invent itself in relation to the systems of artistic expression and viewers expectations that have developed under the impact of the mass media. 
The judgement that abstractionism has slipped into 'inter gear' is gaining endorsement not only among discerning viewers and practitioners of other art forms but also among abstract painters themselves. Like their companions elsewhere in the world, abstractionists in India are asking themselves an overwhelming question today: Does abstractionism have a future? The major crisis that abstractionists face is that of revitalizing their picture surface; few have improvised any solutions beyond the ones that were exhausted by the 1970s. Like all revolutions, whether in policies or in art, abstractionism must now confront its moment of truth: having begun life as a new and radical pictorial approach to experience, it has become an entrenched orthodoxy itself. Indeed, when viewed against a historical situation in which a variety of subversive, interactive and richly hybrid forms are available to the art practitioner, abstractionism, assumes the remote and defiant air of an aristocracy that has outlived its age; trammeled by formulaic conventions yet buttressed by a rhetoric of sacred mystery, it seems condemned to being the last citadel of the self regarding 'fine art' tradition, the last hurrah of painting for painting's sake. 
The situation is further complicated in India by the circumstance in which an indigenous abstractionism came into prominence here during the 1960s. From the beginning it was propelled by the dielectric between two motive, one revolutionary and the other conservative - it was inaugurated as an act of emancipation from the dogmas of the nascent Indian nation state, when art was officially viewed as an indulgence at worst and at best as an instrument for the celebration of the republic's hopes and aspirations, Having rejected these dogmas, the pioneering abstractionists also went to reject the various figurative styles associated with the Shantiniketan circle and others. In such a situation, abstractionism was a revolutionary move. It led art towards the exploration of the subconscious mind, the spiritual quest and the possible expansion of consciousness. Indian painting entered into a phase of self-inquirya meditative inner space where cosmic symbols and non-representational images ruled. Often, the transition from figurative idioms to abstractionist ones took place within the same artists. 
At the same time Indian abstractionists have rarely committed themselves wholeheartedly to non-representational idiom. They have been preoccupied with the fundamentally metaphysical project of aspiring to the mystical holy without altogether renouncing the symbolic. This has been sustained by a hereditary reluctance to give up the murti, the inviolable iconic form, which explains why abstractionism is marked by the conservative tendency to operate with images from the sacred repertoire of the past. Abstractionism thus entered India as a double-edged device in a complex cultural transaction. Ideologically it served as an internationalist legitimization of the emerging revolutionary local trends. However, on entry, it was conscripted to serve local artistic preoccupations- a survey of indigenous abstractionism will show that it most obvious points of affinity with European and American abstract art were with the more mystically oriented of the major sources of abstractionist philosophy and practice, for instance, the Kandinsky Klee School. There have been no takers for Malevich's Suprematism which militantly rejected both artistic forms of the past and the world of appearances, privileging the new-minted geometric symbol as an autonomous sign of the desire for infinity. 
Against this backdrop we can identify three major abstractionist idioms in Indian art. The first develops from a love of the earth, and assumes the form of self's dissolution in the cosmic panorama; the landscape is not longer a realistic transcription of the scene, but is transformed into a visionary occasion for contemplating the cycles of decay and regeneration. The second idiom phrases its departures from symbolic and archetypal devices as invitations to heightened planes of awareness. Abstractionism begins with the establishment or dissolution of the motif which can be drawn from diverse sources including the hieroglyphic tablet, the Sufi mediation dance or the Tantric diagram. The third idiom is based on the lyric play of forms guided by gesture or allied with formal improvisations like the assemblage. Here, sometimes, the line dividing abstract image from patterned design or quasi-random expressive marking may blur. The flux of forms can also be regimented through the policies of pure colour arrangements, vector-diagrammatic spaces and gestural design. 
In this genealogy, some pure lines of descent follow their logic to the inevitable point of extinction, others engage in cross-fertilization and yet others undergo mutation to maintain their energy. However, this genealogical survey demonstrates the wave at its crests, those points where the metaphysical and the painterly have been fused in images of abiding potency, ideas sensuously ordained rather than fabricated programmatically to a concept. It is equally possible to enumerate the troughs where the two principles do not come together, thus arriving at a very different account. Uncharitable as it may sound, the history of Indian abstractionism records a series of attempts to avoid the risks of abstraction by resorting to an overt and near-generic symbolism which many Indian abstractionists embrace when they find themselves bereft of the imaginative energy to negotiate the union of metaphysics and painterliness. 
Such symbolism falls into a dual trap: it succumbs to the pompous vacuity of pure metaphysics when the burden of intention is passed off as justification; or then it is desiccated by the arid formalism of pure painterliness with delight in the measure of chance or pattern guiding the execution of a painting. This ensuing conflict of purpose stalls the progress of abstractionism in an impasse. The remarkable Indian abstractionists are precisely those who have overcome this and addressed themselves to the basic elements of their art with a decisive sense of independence form prior models. In their recent work, we see the logic of Indian abstractionism pushed almost to the furthest it can be taken. Beyond such artistic stands a lost generation of abstractionists whose works invoke a wistful, delicate beauty but stops there? 
Abstractionism is not a universal language; it is an art that points up the loss of a shared language of signs in society. And yet, it affirms the possibility of its recover through the effort of awareness. While its rhetoric has always emphasized a call for new forms of attention, abstractionist practice has tended to fall into a complacent pride in its own incomprehensibility; a complacency fatal in an ethos where vibrant new idioms compete for the viewers' attention. Indian abstractionists ought to really return to basics to reformulate and replenish their understanding of the nature of the relationship between the painted image and the world around it. But will they abandon their favourite conceptual habits and formal conventions, if this becomes necessary?

Q. Which one of the following is not part of the author's characterisation of the conservative trend in Indian abstractionism?

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

The communities of ants are sometimes very large ,numbering even up to 500, individuals and it is a lesson to us that no one has ever yet seen quarrel between any two ants belonging to the same community .On the other hand ,it must be admitted that they are in hostility not only with most other insects ,including ants of different species ,but even with those of the same species if belongs to different communities .I have over and over again introduced ants from one of my nests into another nest of the same species ; and they were in variable attacked , seized by a leg or an antenna and dragged out .It is evident therefore ,that the ants of each community all recognize one another ,which is very remarkable .But more than this ,I several times divided a nest into two halves and found that even after separation of a year and nine months they recognize one another and were perfectly friendly ,while they at once attacked ants from a different nest ,although of the same species. 

It has been suggested that the ant of each nest have some sign or password by which they recognize one another .To test this I made some of them insensible, first I tried chloroform; but this was fatal to them and I do not consider the test satisfactory .I decided therefore to intoxicate them. This was less easy then I had expected .None of my ants would voluntarily degrade themselves by getting drunk .However ,I got over the difficulty by putting them into whisky for a few moments .I took fifty specimens –25 percent from one nest and 25 percent from another made them dead drunk ,marked each with a spot of paint ,and put them on a table close to where other ants from one of the nests were feeding .The table was surrounded as usual with a most of water to prevent them from straying .The ants ,which were feeding soon noticed those ,which I had made drunk .They seemed quite astonished to find their comrades in such a disgraceful condition ,and as much at loss to know what to do with their drunkards as we were .After a while ,however ,they carried them all away the strangers they took to the edge of the moat and dropped into the water ,while they bore their friends home in the nest where by degrees they slept off the effects of the spirits .Thus it is evident that they know their friends even when incapable of giving any sign or password.

Q. An appropriate title for this passage might be:

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

The communities of ants are sometimes very large ,numbering even up to 500, individuals and it is a lesson to us that no one has ever yet seen quarrel between any two ants belonging to the same community .On the other hand ,it must be admitted that they are in hostility not only with most other insects ,including ants of different species ,but even with those of the same species if belongs to different communities .I have over and over again introduced ants from one of my nests into another nest of the same species ; and they were in variable attacked , seized by a leg or an antenna and dragged out .It is evident therefore ,that the ants of each community all recognize one another ,which is very remarkable .But more than this ,I several times divided a nest into two halves and found that even after separation of a year and nine months they recognize one another and were perfectly friendly ,while they at once attacked ants from a different nest ,although of the same species. 

It has been suggested that the ant of each nest have some sign or password by which they recognize one another .To test this I made some of them insensible, first I tried chloroform; but this was fatal to them and I do not consider the test satisfactory .I decided therefore to intoxicate them. This was less easy then I had expected .None of my ants would voluntarily degrade themselves by getting drunk .However ,I got over the difficulty by putting them into whisky for a few moments .I took fifty specimens –25 percent from one nest and 25 percent from another made them dead drunk ,marked each with a spot of paint ,and put them on a table close to where other ants from one of the nests were feeding .The table was surrounded as usual with a most of water to prevent them from straying .The ants ,which were feeding soon noticed those ,which I had made drunk .They seemed quite astonished to find their comrades in such a disgraceful condition ,and as much at loss to know what to do with their drunkards as we were .After a while ,however ,they carried them all away the strangers they took to the edge of the moat and dropped into the water ,while they bore their friends home in the nest where by degrees they slept off the effects of the spirits .Thus it is evident that they know their friends even when incapable of giving any sign or password.

Q. Attitude of ants towards strangers of the same species may be categorized as

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

The communities of ants are sometimes very large ,numbering even up to 500, individuals and it is a lesson to us that no one has ever yet seen quarrel between any two ants belonging to the same community .On the other hand ,it must be admitted that they are in hostility not only with most other insects ,including ants of different species ,but even with those of the same species if belongs to different communities .I have over and over again introduced ants from one of my nests into another nest of the same species ; and they were in variable attacked , seized by a leg or an antenna and dragged out .It is evident therefore ,that the ants of each community all recognize one another ,which is very remarkable .But more than this ,I several times divided a nest into two halves and found that even after separation of a year and nine months they recognize one another and were perfectly friendly ,while they at once attacked ants from a different nest ,although of the same species. 

It has been suggested that the ant of each nest have some sign or password by which they recognize one another .To test this I made some of them insensible, first I tried chloroform; but this was fatal to them and I do not consider the test satisfactory .I decided therefore to intoxicate them. This was less easy then I had expected .None of my ants would voluntarily degrade themselves by getting drunk .However ,I got over the difficulty by putting them into whisky for a few moments .I took fifty specimens –25 percent from one nest and 25 percent from another made them dead drunk ,marked each with a spot of paint ,and put them on a table close to where other ants from one of the nests were feeding .The table was surrounded as usual with a most of water to prevent them from straying .The ants ,which were feeding soon noticed those ,which I had made drunk .They seemed quite astonished to find their comrades in such a disgraceful condition ,and as much at loss to know what to do with their drunkards as we were .After a while ,however ,they carried them all away the strangers they took to the edge of the moat and dropped into the water ,while they bore their friends home in the nest where by degrees they slept off the effects of the spirits .Thus it is evident that they know their friends even when incapable of giving any sign or password.

Q. The author's anecdotes of the inebriated ants would support all the following inductions except the statement that

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

The communities of ants are sometimes very large ,numbering even up to 500, individuals and it is a lesson to us that no one has ever yet seen quarrel between any two ants belonging to the same community .On the other hand ,it must be admitted that they are in hostility not only with most other insects ,including ants of different species ,but even with those of the same species if belongs to different communities .I have over and over again introduced ants from one of my nests into another nest of the same species ; and they were in variable attacked , seized by a leg or an antenna and dragged out .It is evident therefore ,that the ants of each community all recognize one another ,which is very remarkable .But more than this ,I several times divided a nest into two halves and found that even after separation of a year and nine months they recognize one another and were perfectly friendly ,while they at once attacked ants from a different nest ,although of the same species. 

It has been suggested that the ant of each nest have some sign or password by which they recognize one another .To test this I made some of them insensible, first I tried chloroform; but this was fatal to them and I do not consider the test satisfactory .I decided therefore to intoxicate them. This was less easy then I had expected .None of my ants would voluntarily degrade themselves by getting drunk .However ,I got over the difficulty by putting them into whisky for a few moments .I took fifty specimens –25 percent from one nest and 25 percent from another made them dead drunk ,marked each with a spot of paint ,and put them on a table close to where other ants from one of the nests were feeding .The table was surrounded as usual with a most of water to prevent them from straying .The ants ,which were feeding soon noticed those ,which I had made drunk .They seemed quite astonished to find their comrades in such a disgraceful condition ,and as much at loss to know what to do with their drunkards as we were .After a while ,however ,they carried them all away the strangers they took to the edge of the moat and dropped into the water ,while they bore their friends home in the nest where by degrees they slept off the effects of the spirits .Thus it is evident that they know their friends even when incapable of giving any sign or password.

Q. According to the passage ,chloroform was less successful than alcohol for inhibiting communication because of

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

The communities of ants are sometimes very large ,numbering even up to 500, individuals and it is a lesson to us that no one has ever yet seen quarrel between any two ants belonging to the same community .On the other hand ,it must be admitted that they are in hostility not only with most other insects ,including ants of different species ,but even with those of the same species if belongs to different communities .I have over and over again introduced ants from one of my nests into another nest of the same species ; and they were in variable attacked , seized by a leg or an antenna and dragged out .It is evident therefore ,that the ants of each community all recognize one another ,which is very remarkable .But more than this ,I several times divided a nest into two halves and found that even after separation of a year and nine months they recognize one another and were perfectly friendly ,while they at once attacked ants from a different nest ,although of the same species. 

It has been suggested that the ant of each nest have some sign or password by which they recognize one another .To test this I made some of them insensible, first I tried chloroform; but this was fatal to them and I do not consider the test satisfactory .I decided therefore to intoxicate them. This was less easy then I had expected .None of my ants would voluntarily degrade themselves by getting drunk .However ,I got over the difficulty by putting them into whisky for a few moments .I took fifty specimens –25 percent from one nest and 25 percent from another made them dead drunk ,marked each with a spot of paint ,and put them on a table close to where other ants from one of the nests were feeding .The table was surrounded as usual with a most of water to prevent them from straying .The ants ,which were feeding soon noticed those ,which I had made drunk .They seemed quite astonished to find their comrades in such a disgraceful condition ,and as much at loss to know what to do with their drunkards as we were .After a while ,however ,they carried them all away the strangers they took to the edge of the moat and dropped into the water ,while they bore their friends home in the nest where by degrees they slept off the effects of the spirits .Thus it is evident that they know their friends even when incapable of giving any sign or password.

Q. Although the author is a scientist,his style of writing also exhibits a quality of:

Solution:
QUESTION: 81

Fill in the blanks with appropriate pair of words.

Q. There are different and ...... versions about what happened in the city, but one thing is certain: it is a dastardly act that must be condemned .......

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

By ...... celebrities from the sports, entertainment, or business arenas, the show narrates the stories of the ...... newsmakers from all walk of life.

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

Behind their strange appearance and ...... for carrion, which has long singled them out for fear and loathing hyenas present a ...... society in which females dominate.

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

Choose the italised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. The national cadet corpse are used to dealing with calamities.

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

Choose the italised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. He promised to give me permission if I compiled with his wishes.

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

Choose the italised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. The Director decided in favour of raising the salaries of all employers

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

Choose the italised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. It is my firm believe that the will emerge victorious.

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.
(P) To propose the idea of becoming perfected is not the same as saying that we human beings can be perfect.
(Q) It only means that we are capable of learning, changing and growing throughout the span of our earthly life. 
(R) Learning is a process that begins at birth and lasts till death. 
(S) This development through understanding new things, transforming and developing thought may be considered as the perfection of soul. 
(T) Given that we are here to continually learn of the journey of life, it seems that the ultimate goal of learning is the perfection of our souls. 
(U) Nor that we should be perfect in everything.

Q. Which of the following should be the SECOND statement after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 89

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.
(P) To propose the idea of becoming perfected is not the same as saying that we human beings can be perfect.
(Q) It only means that we are capable of learning, changing and growing throughout the span of our earthly life. 
(R) Learning is a process that begins at birth and lasts till death. 
(S) This development through understanding new things, transforming and developing thought may be considered as the perfection of soul. 
(T) Given that we are here to continually learn of the journey of life, it seems that the ultimate goal of learning is the perfection of our souls. 
(U) Nor that we should be perfect in everything.

Q. Which of the following should be the FIRST statement after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 90

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.
(P) To propose the idea of becoming perfected is not the same as saying that we human beings can be perfect.
(Q) It only means that we are capable of learning, changing and growing throughout the span of our earthly life. 
(R) Learning is a process that begins at birth and lasts till death. 
(S) This development through understanding new things, transforming and developing thought may be considered as the perfection of soul. 
(T) Given that we are here to continually learn of the journey of life, it seems that the ultimate goal of learning is the perfection of our souls. 
(U) Nor that we should be perfect in everything.

Q. Which of the following should be the FIFTH statement after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.
(P) To propose the idea of becoming perfected is not the same as saying that we human beings can be perfect.
(Q) It only means that we are capable of learning, changing and growing throughout the span of our earthly life. 
(R) Learning is a process that begins at birth and lasts till death. 
(S) This development through understanding new things, transforming and developing thought may be considered as the perfection of soul. 
(T) Given that we are here to continually learn of the journey of life, it seems that the ultimate goal of learning is the perfection of our souls. 
(U) Nor that we should be perfect in everything.

Q. Which of the following should be the SIXTH (last) statement after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.
(P) To propose the idea of becoming perfected is not the same as saying that we human beings can be perfect.
(Q) It only means that we are capable of learning, changing and growing throughout the span of our earthly life. 
(R) Learning is a process that begins at birth and lasts till death. 
(S) This development through understanding new things, transforming and developing thought may be considered as the perfection of soul. 
(T) Given that we are here to continually learn of the journey of life, it seems that the ultimate goal of learning is the perfection of our souls. 
(U) Nor that we should be perfect in everything.

Q. Which of the following should be the THIRD statement after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

Choose the grammatically correct option from the following.

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

Choose the grammatically correct option from the following.

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

Which of phrases given below each sentence should replace the phrase in italisized type to make grammatically correct?
Being abandoned by our friends is the cause of great sorrow for us.

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. I'll CLEAR OUT this drawer and you can put your things in it.​

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. Even as a young boy he HAS LACKED the inclination to go outdoors and play.

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. You don't know the mechanism of computer, ISN'T IT.

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

Choose the italicised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. There are few differents between these two marketing proposals.

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

Choose the italicised word which is wrongly spelt/inappropriate in the context of the sentence.

Q. Most banks have been hiring staff for their corporate banking divisons.

Solution:

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