CAT Mock Test - 2


100 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2020 | CAT Mock Test - 2


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This mock test of CAT Mock Test - 2 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 100 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT CAT Mock Test - 2 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CAT Mock Test - 2 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this CAT Mock Test - 2 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CAT Mock Test - 2 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Choose the odd one out from the sentences given below.

Solution:

The given set of statements laments the decline of poetry and the rise of prose as its replacement. Statement 4 must precede statement 1 since they both pertain to the lack of poetry in the present day and age.
Statement 1 mentions how poetry eludes us in our everyday lives, which are replete with prose and statement 5 mentions a consequence of this - becoming "... deaf to what language can do.”. Thus, statements 4, 1, and 5 are a logically consistent set. Statement 2 also relates to these sentences since it talks about the lack of respect for poetry.
Thus, the coherent sequence can be 2-4-1-5 or 4-1-5-2. Statement 3 cannot be linked to these statements since it describes the “inoperative nature” of prose, which the other statements do not hint towards. The “misfortune of poetry” cannot be attributed to the ineffectiveness of prose with any certainty from the given set of statements.
Hence, the correct answer is 3.

QUESTION: 2

Choose the odd one out from the sentences given below.

Solution:

The given set of statements discuss the body language of the neck and one's gaze. Only statement 3 is capable of starting the sequence. It explains the position of the neck and lends perspective to the rest of the statements. Statement 5 then summarizes what has been said in statement 3.
Statements 1 and 4 form an obvious link. Statement 4 explains what it means when “...you bow your head you also conceal your gaze from the other.” that has been mentioned in 1.
Though both statements 1 and 2 mention what being “stiffnecked” conveys, only statement 1 can be tied to the rest of the sequence. Statement 2 highlights the defensive connotation of being “stiff-necked”, which none of the other statements address. This vindicates statement 2 as the correct answer.
Hence, the correct answer is 2.

QUESTION: 3

Five sentences are given below labeled (1), (2), (3), (4) and (5). Of these four sentences need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. Pick out the sentence that does not fit the sequence.

Solution:

Statements 1-3 form a pair as 1 is the episode being referred to in statement 3. Both the statements talk about the financial system crisis being faced by the big companies. Statement 4 delves further into the issue of financial breakdown and says that not every institute slipping into financial crisis is necessarily a bank. Statement 5 gives the example of A.I.G not being a bank and still being vulnerable in terms of financial breakdown. Statement 2 is a generic statement about financial crises and does not directly connect with the other statements. However, it could be a conclusion to the complete story.
Hence, the correct answer is 2.

QUESTION: 4

Four sentences are given below labeled (1), (2), (3) and (4). Of these, three sentences need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. Pick out the sentence that does not fit the sequence.

Solution:

Apart from statement 2, which talks about the role of education in deciding whether some one will become a repeat offender or not, all other statements talk about the various steps the Obama administration has taken to give a fair second chance to people with criminal records in order to be socially acceptable and live with dignity. The correct order of the statements is 1-3-4.
Hence, the correct answer is 2.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 5

Arrange statements 1-5 given below in a logical sequence in order to form a coherent paragraph. Your answer will be the order of statement numbers that forms this logical sequence e.g. 23514.

1. At first, it was regarded only as a facet of architectural historicism.

2. But few were consistent, and fewer still had sufficient firsthand knowledge of the style to interpret it with any conviction.

3. The Gothic Revival in the United States was inevitably a stylistic import.

4. It was not the outcome of deeply felt original sentiments of either a Romantic or moral nature.

5. Architects later adopted the aspirations and ideals of Pugin, the Camdenians, and Viollet-le-Duc and attempted to use the Gothic style in conformity with the principles that they had laid down.


Solution:

Looking at the given sentences, sentence 3 looks like the best starter for the sequence.
Sentence 4 would immediately follow by what Gothic revival in US was not (after stating what it was.) Sentence 1 will follow sentence 4 as both talk about how the Gothic revival in US was regarded. “At first” in sentence 1 and “later” in sentence 5 make them (1-5) a mandatory pair. 2 will be the closing sentence of the sequence.
Hence, the correct sequence is 34152.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 6

Arrange statements 1-5 given below in a logical sequence in order  to form a coherent paragraph. Your answer will be the order of statement numbers that forms this logical sequence e.g. 23514.

1. As a result, Mexico became a net exporter of wheat by 1963.

2. These collective increases in yield have been labeled the Green Revolution, and Borlaug is often credited with saving over a billion people from starvation.

3. Between 1965 and 1970, wheat yields nearly doubled in Pakistan and India, greatly improving the food security in those nations.

4. During the mid-20th century, Borlaug led the introduction of these high-yielding varieties combined with modem agricultural production techniques to Mexico, Pakistan, and India.

5. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 in recognition of his contributions to world peace through increasing food supply.


Solution:

The 4-1-3 link is clear since statement 4 introduces Borlaug, and statements 1 and 3 describe the results of “the introduction of these high-yielding varieties combined with modern agricultural production techniques” mentioned in statement 4, in countries like Mexico, Pakistan and India.
Statement 1 should precede statement 3 as per chronology. Statement 2 should follow 3 since it further talks about the collective measures in yields mentioned in statement 3. 2-5 is a clear link since statement 5 adds to the information provided in statement 2. Statement 5 mentions the particular award given to Borlaug for having saved “over a billion people from starvation” which has been mentioned in 2.
Hence, the correct sequence is 41325.

QUESTION: 7

Enter the number of the option which correctly fits the blank.

His_____________disregard for the college rules resulted in his suspension.

Solution:

The sentence stresses on the careless nature of the individual which resulted in a negative consequence for him . Here, “blithe” which means ‘nonchalant’ or ‘uncaring’ is the best suited option. Hence, the correct option is 1.

QUESTION: 8

Enter the number of the option which correctly fits the blank.

The pair are accused of __________ the player's image rights to the companies in order to avoid declaring money made from __________ deals with sponsors in Spain.

Solution:

The first part of the sentence talks about the individuals giving the image rights to the company so as to gain profits. Therefore, “ceding” meaning ‘hand over’ or ‘transfer’ fits the first blank. The second part of the sentence indicates that the type of deals offered to the pair were profitable, hinting at the word “lucrative” for the second blank.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 9

The question below contains a paragraph followed by alternative  summaries. Choose the option that best captures the essence of the paragraph.

Though nihilism and existentialism are distinct philosophies, they are often confused with one another. A primary cause of confusion is that Friedrich Nietzsche is a central philosopher in both fields. Adding to the confusion is a form of existentialism, nihilistic existentialism, which contains elements of both. What sets existential nihilists apart from pure nihilists is that while nihilists do not believe in any meaning whatsoever, existential nihilists only believe this in relation to any sort of meaning to life. This position is implied in “regular” nihilism, and existential nihilists may also subscribe to the full nihilistic view, but existential nihilism is still a separate view.

Solution:

The main points are : Nihilism and Existentialism have Nietzsche as the central figure- hence they are often confused. The existence of existential nihilism which contains elements of both nihilism and existentialism but is a third distinct philosophy adds to the confusion.
Statement 4 captures this essence.
Statements 1 and 2 talk erroneously about “Nihilism and existential nihilism” leaving out existentialism. “They are often confused because of the Central philosopher Nietzsche” in statement 3 changes the meaning, making it a highly awkward and ambiguous

QUESTION: 10

The statement(s) below are the summary of a paragraph. Choose  option that best represents the paragraph that was summarised.

Although the use of a priori to distinguish knowledge such as that which we have in mathematics is comparatively recent, the interest of philosophers in that kind of knowledge is almost as old as philosophy itself. No one finds it puzzling that one can acquire information by looking, feeling, or listening, but philosophers who have taken seriously the possibility of learning by mere thinking have often considered that this requires some special explanation.

Solution:

The gist of the passage is: Although the term a priori is recent, referring to knowledge independent of experience and observation (e.g., mathematics), it has always interested philosophers. It is easy to understand the knowledge through experience, but knowledge acquired merely through thinking needs some explanation. Statement 3 best captures this essence.
Statement 1 does not distinguish between a priori knowledge and the knowledge gained through experience and observation. Statement 2 mentions ‘through learning’ which makes it factually incorrect. It should be ‘through experience’ or ‘through observation’.
Statement 4 does not make the distinction between a priori knowledge and the knowledge gained through experience.
Hence, the correct answer is 3.

QUESTION: 11

The passage given below is followed by a question. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Cycling has saved me so much time, and money. I failed my driving test aged 17, and then never got round to taking it again: I've never owned a car and experienced all the hassles (and, admittedly joys) that come with one. But with the help of trains, I can go anywhere I like, and in London, to multiple events in a single evening. There is the odd, fairly small repair cost, but it would meanwhile cost me hundreds, if not thousands every year to use the tube.
Cycling also allows time to see so much more than other forms of transport. On a recent holiday in Devon, I stopped to look at some beautiful horses along a country road. I could smell the warm, horsey aroma, while the early evening June glow caught their shiny manes. Later that evening I mentioned this to a friend who lives locally and who had driven along that route hundreds of times but had never noticed there were stables at the end of the road. There is something just right about the speed of a bike. It allows you to cover so much more ground than walking, but you can see so much more than from a car. On that same ride I spotted an owl, rabbits and a grass snake wriggling into a bush. You'd frighten them off with a roaring engine, or even turn them into roadkill.
Last year I took part in a charity bike ride from John O'Groats to Land's End - 1,000 miles in just nine days. It was fantastic, but undeniably tough at times. But one of the things that amazed me was how fit and healthy some of the older cyclists were. The man mostly at the front was at least 50, tearing up road at tremendous speeds and leaving others gasping. At least one of the other riders was over 70. Cycling seems to be an activity you can keep improving at, even when past the conventional sporting peak of your late 20s. So in that respect it seems to be like being music or writing, or wine, improving with age. I sometimes do other forms of exercise - a bit of running and swimming - but many of my friends who have played a lot of football - at least more than me - have completely worn their knees out. But cycling's low impact seems to only strengthen knees, and I feel that mine will last longer thanks to a lifetime in the saddle.
When on a challenging trip or even in the city, cycling's culture of friendliness and mutual support, especially when you have a puncture or other breakdown, continues to surprise me. What other activities seem to inspire such camaraderie among strangers?
Cycling must have its downsides, surely? Yes, but even they can have solutions. Admittedly cycling in snow is next to impossible, and or heavy rain unpleasant, but improvements in breathable waterproof clothing make that much more bearable, and doesn't stop my daily commute. And hills? They get so much easier with practice, like anything else. I've grown to love going uphill, perhaps as much as downhill. I can climb a long hill near Torquay in Devon with the birds singing and the wind whistling through the trees. It is tranquil, and very satisfying.

 


Q.Which of these is not mentioned as a benefit of using the cycle? 

Solution:

Option 1 is validated by “Cycling also allows time to see so much more than other forms of transport.” Option 2 is validated by “Cycling has saved me so much time, and money.” Option 4 is validated by “But one of the things that amazed me was how fit and healthy some of the older cyclists were.” Option 3 is not stated in the passage. In fact the passage talks about cycling encouraging camaraderie or friendliness among strangers.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 12

Cycling has saved me so much time, and money. I failed my driving test aged 17, and then never got round to taking it again: I've never owned a car and experienced all the hassles (and, admittedly joys) that come with one. But with the help of trains, I can go anywhere I like, and in London, to multiple events in a single evening. There is the odd, fairly small repair cost, but it would meanwhile cost me hundreds, if not thousands every year to use the tube.
Cycling also allows time to see so much more than other forms of transport. On a recent holiday in Devon, I stopped to look at some beautiful horses along a country road. I could smell the warm, horsey aroma, while the early evening June glow caught their shiny manes. Later that evening I mentioned this to a friend who lives locally and who had driven along that route hundreds of times but had never noticed there were stables at the end of the road. There is something just right about the speed of a bike. It allows you to cover so much more ground than walking, but you can see so much more than from a car. On that same ride I spotted an owl, rabbits and a grass snake wriggling into a bush. You'd frighten them off with a roaring engine, or even turn them into roadkill.
Last year I took part in a charity bike ride from John O'Groats to Land's End - 1,000 miles in just nine days. It was fantastic, but undeniably tough at times. But one of the things that amazed me was how fit and healthy some of the older cyclists were. The man mostly at the front was at least 50, tearing up road at tremendous speeds and leaving others gasping. At least one of the other riders was over 70. Cycling seems to be an activity you can keep improving at, even when past the conventional sporting peak of your late 20s. So in that respect it seems to be like being music or writing, or wine, improving with age. I sometimes do other forms of exercise - a bit of running and swimming - but many of my friends who have played a lot of football - at least more than me - have completely worn their knees out. But cycling's low impact seems to only strengthen knees, and I feel that mine will last longer thanks to a lifetime in the saddle.
When on a challenging trip or even in the city, cycling's culture of friendliness and mutual support, especially when you have a puncture or other breakdown, continues to surprise me. What other activities seem to inspire such camaraderie among strangers?
Cycling must have its downsides, surely? Yes, but even they can have solutions. Admittedly cycling in snow is next to impossible, and or heavy rain unpleasant, but improvements in breathable waterproof clothing make that much more bearable, and doesn't stop my daily commute. And hills? They get so much easier with practice, like anything else. I've grown to love going uphill, perhaps as much as downhill. I can climb a long hill near Torquay in Devon with the birds singing and the wind whistling through the trees. It is tranquil, and very satisfying.

 

Q.From the passage, what can you say about the author?

Solution:

The passage is the author’s account of his passion with cycling through his years. The way he describes his cycling adventures, makes him an enthusiast of cycling or someone with expertise of cycling. “Aficionado” means ‘enthusiast’ or ‘devotee’. This validates option 3.
Option 1 with “journalist” is inappropriate as the author is talking about his passions first hand. Also “sports” is too generic.
Option 2 with “novice” meaning beginner is incorrect and does not support what is mentioned in the passage.
Option 4 with “adventure” maybe correct but the author is more than an “admirer”.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 13

The passage given below is followed by a question. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Cycling has saved me so much time, and money. I failed my driving test aged 17, and then never got round to taking it again: I've never owned a car and experienced all the hassles (and, admittedly joys) that come with one. But with the help of trains, I can go anywhere I like, and in London, to multiple events in a single evening. There is the odd, fairly small repair cost, but it would meanwhile cost me hundreds, if not thousands every year to use the tube.
Cycling also allows time to see so much more than other forms of transport. On a recent holiday in Devon, I stopped to look at some beautiful horses along a country road. I could smell the warm, horsey aroma, while the early evening June glow caught their shiny manes. Later that evening I mentioned this to a friend who lives locally and who had driven along that route hundreds of times but had never noticed there were stables at the end of the road. There is something just right about the speed of a bike. It allows you to cover so much more ground than walking, but you can see so much more than from a car. On that same ride I spotted an owl, rabbits and a grass snake wriggling into a bush. You'd frighten them off with a roaring engine, or even turn them into roadkill.
Last year I took part in a charity bike ride from John O'Groats to Land's End - 1,000 miles in just nine days. It was fantastic, but undeniably tough at times. But one of the things that amazed me was how fit and healthy some of the older cyclists were. The man mostly at the front was at least 50, tearing up road at tremendous speeds and leaving others gasping. At least one of the other riders was over 70. Cycling seems to be an activity you can keep improving at, even when past the conventional sporting peak of your late 20s. So in that respect it seems to be like being music or writing, or wine, improving with age. I sometimes do other forms of exercise - a bit of running and swimming - but many of my friends who have played a lot of football - at least more than me - have completely worn their knees out. But cycling's low impact seems to only strengthen knees, and I feel that mine will last longer thanks to a lifetime in the saddle.
When on a challenging trip or even in the city, cycling's culture of friendliness and mutual support, especially when you have a puncture or other breakdown, continues to surprise me. What other activities seem to inspire such camaraderie among strangers?
Cycling must have its downsides, surely? Yes, but even they can have solutions. Admittedly cycling in snow is next to impossible, and or heavy rain unpleasant, but improvements in breathable waterproof clothing make that much more bearable, and doesn't stop my daily commute. And hills? They get so much easier with practice, like anything else. I've grown to love going uphill, perhaps as much as downhill. I can climb a long hill near Torquay in Devon with the birds singing and the wind whistling through the trees. It is tranquil, and very satisfying.

 

Q.“Admittedly cycling in snow is next to impossible.”

Solution:

The word “admittedly” holds the key. It means “by one’s own admission”. If the author is admitting that cycling in snow is difficult, it is a valid assumption that the author has cycled in snow. This validates option 1.
Option 2 with “some” cannot be assumed as the quoted text is only talking about one challenge.
Option 3 is true if we read the entire passage. However, just from the given line, this is not a valid assumption.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 14

The passage given below is followed by a question. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Cycling has saved me so much time, and money. I failed my driving test aged 17, and then never got round to taking it again: I've never owned a car and experienced all the hassles (and, admittedly joys) that come with one. But with the help of trains, I can go anywhere I like, and in London, to multiple events in a single evening. There is the odd, fairly small repair cost, but it would meanwhile cost me hundreds, if not thousands every year to use the tube.
Cycling also allows time to see so much more than other forms of transport. On a recent holiday in Devon, I stopped to look at some beautiful horses along a country road. I could smell the warm, horsey aroma, while the early evening June glow caught their shiny manes. Later that evening I mentioned this to a friend who lives locally and who had driven along that route hundreds of times but had never noticed there were stables at the end of the road. There is something just right about the speed of a bike. It allows you to cover so much more ground than walking, but you can see so much more than from a car. On that same ride I spotted an owl, rabbits and a grass snake wriggling into a bush. You'd frighten them off with a roaring engine, or even turn them into roadkill.
Last year I took part in a charity bike ride from John O'Groats to Land's End - 1,000 miles in just nine days. It was fantastic, but undeniably tough at times. But one of the things that amazed me was how fit and healthy some of the older cyclists were. The man mostly at the front was at least 50, tearing up road at tremendous speeds and leaving others gasping. At least one of the other riders was over 70. Cycling seems to be an activity you can keep improving at, even when past the conventional sporting peak of your late 20s. So in that respect it seems to be like being music or writing, or wine, improving with age. I sometimes do other forms of exercise - a bit of running and swimming - but many of my friends who have played a lot of football - at least more than me - have completely worn their knees out. But cycling's low impact seems to only strengthen knees, and I feel that mine will last longer thanks to a lifetime in the saddle.
When on a challenging trip or even in the city, cycling's culture of friendliness and mutual support, especially when you have a puncture or other breakdown, continues to surprise me. What other activities seem to inspire such camaraderie among strangers?
Cycling must have its downsides, surely? Yes, but even they can have solutions. Admittedly cycling in snow is next to impossible, and or heavy rain unpleasant, but improvements in breathable waterproof clothing make that much more bearable, and doesn't stop my daily commute. And hills? They get so much easier with practice, like anything else. I've grown to love going uphill, perhaps as much as downhill. I can climb a long hill near Torquay in Devon with the birds singing and the wind whistling through the trees. It is tranquil, and very satisfying.

 

Q.Which of the following weakens the position of the author? 
A. Cycling is a value-for-money investment.
B. In commuting, cycling comes second only to walking.
C. Cycles cause as many accidents as cars.

Solution:

Statement A is a fact as confirmed from the first paragraph. It strengthens the author’s point of view.
The passage mentions “It allows you to cover so much more ground than walking.” Statement B contradicts the author’s point of view by stating that walking is superior to cycling.
The passage mentions “You'd frighten them off with a roaring engine, or even turn them into roadkill.” Statement C contradicts the author’s point of view by stating that cycles and cars cause the same number of accidents.
Statements B and C weaken the author’s points of view. Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 15

The passage given below is followed by a question. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Cycling has saved me so much time, and money. I failed my driving test aged 17, and then never got round to taking it again: I've never owned a car and experienced all the hassles (and, admittedly joys) that come with one. But with the help of trains, I can go anywhere I like, and in London, to multiple events in a single evening. There is the odd, fairly small repair cost, but it would meanwhile cost me hundreds, if not thousands every year to use the tube.
Cycling also allows time to see so much more than other forms of transport. On a recent holiday in Devon, I stopped to look at some beautiful horses along a country road. I could smell the warm, horsey aroma, while the early evening June glow caught their shiny manes. Later that evening I mentioned this to a friend who lives locally and who had driven along that route hundreds of times but had never noticed there were stables at the end of the road. There is something just right about the speed of a bike. It allows you to cover so much more ground than walking, but you can see so much more than from a car. On that same ride I spotted an owl, rabbits and a grass snake wriggling into a bush. You'd frighten them off with a roaring engine, or even turn them into roadkill.
Last year I took part in a charity bike ride from John O'Groats to Land's End - 1,000 miles in just nine days. It was fantastic, but undeniably tough at times. But one of the things that amazed me was how fit and healthy some of the older cyclists were. The man mostly at the front was at least 50, tearing up road at tremendous speeds and leaving others gasping. At least one of the other riders was over 70. Cycling seems to be an activity you can keep improving at, even when past the conventional sporting peak of your late 20s. So in that respect it seems to be like being music or writing, or wine, improving with age. I sometimes do other forms of exercise - a bit of running and swimming - but many of my friends who have played a lot of football - at least more than me - have completely worn their knees out. But cycling's low impact seems to only strengthen knees, and I feel that mine will last longer thanks to a lifetime in the saddle.
When on a challenging trip or even in the city, cycling's culture of friendliness and mutual support, especially when you have a puncture or other breakdown, continues to surprise me. What other activities seem to inspire such camaraderie among strangers?
Cycling must have its downsides, surely? Yes, but even they can have solutions. Admittedly cycling in snow is next to impossible, and or heavy rain unpleasant, but improvements in breathable waterproof clothing make that much more bearable, and doesn't stop my daily commute. And hills? They get so much easier with practice, like anything else. I've grown to love going uphill, perhaps as much as downhill. I can climb a long hill near Torquay in Devon with the birds singing and the wind whistling through the trees. It is tranquil, and very satisfying.

 

Q.According to the passage, cyclists: 

Solution:

Option 1 is validated from the following - “Cycling seems to be an activity you can keep improving at.” Option 2 is a generalized statement which is said about one person and not all cyclists. The passage states “The man mostly at the front was at least 50, tearing up road at tremendous speeds and leaving others gasping.” Option 3 is again a generalization. The author only talks about his experience of going uphill and experiencing tranquillity.
Option 4 is incorrect. The passage states in the first paragraph that the repair costs are minimal.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 16

The passage given below is followed by a question. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Cycling has saved me so much time, and money. I failed my driving test aged 17, and then never got round to taking it again: I've never owned a car and experienced all the hassles (and, admittedly joys) that come with one. But with the help of trains, I can go anywhere I like, and in London, to multiple events in a single evening. There is the odd, fairly small repair cost, but it would meanwhile cost me hundreds, if not thousands every year to use the tube.
Cycling also allows time to see so much more than other forms of transport. On a recent holiday in Devon, I stopped to look at some beautiful horses along a country road. I could smell the warm, horsey aroma, while the early evening June glow caught their shiny manes. Later that evening I mentioned this to a friend who lives locally and who had driven along that route hundreds of times but had never noticed there were stables at the end of the road. There is something just right about the speed of a bike. It allows you to cover so much more ground than walking, but you can see so much more than from a car. On that same ride I spotted an owl, rabbits and a grass snake wriggling into a bush. You'd frighten them off with a roaring engine, or even turn them into roadkill.
Last year I took part in a charity bike ride from John O'Groats to Land's End - 1,000 miles in just nine days. It was fantastic, but undeniably tough at times. But one of the things that amazed me was how fit and healthy some of the older cyclists were. The man mostly at the front was at least 50, tearing up road at tremendous speeds and leaving others gasping. At least one of the other riders was over 70. Cycling seems to be an activity you can keep improving at, even when past the conventional sporting peak of your late 20s. So in that respect it seems to be like being music or writing, or wine, improving with age. I sometimes do other forms of exercise - a bit of running and swimming - but many of my friends who have played a lot of football - at least more than me - have completely worn their knees out. But cycling's low impact seems to only strengthen knees, and I feel that mine will last longer thanks to a lifetime in the saddle.
When on a challenging trip or even in the city, cycling's culture of friendliness and mutual support, especially when you have a puncture or other breakdown, continues to surprise me. What other activities seem to inspire such camaraderie among strangers?
Cycling must have its downsides, surely? Yes, but even they can have solutions. Admittedly cycling in snow is next to impossible, and or heavy rain unpleasant, but improvements in breathable waterproof clothing make that much more bearable, and doesn't stop my daily commute. And hills? They get so much easier with practice, like anything else. I've grown to love going uphill, perhaps as much as downhill. I can climb a long hill near Torquay in Devon with the birds singing and the wind whistling through the trees. It is tranquil, and very satisfying.

 

Q.Why did the author’s friend never notice the horses in  Devon? 

Solution:

According to the passage, the author’s friend did not notice the horses because of the speed of the car and the attention he would have to pay on the road as opposed to riding a bike, taking lesser risk and being able to notice other things on the road. This validates option 1.
The remaining options cannot be corroborated from the passage.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 17

Chander Singh apologises as he is a tad late when he comes to pick up this writer in his new Swift Dzire. Singh has been a driver for many years; most recently with The Imperial, a heritage hotel in Delhi. He earned a lot from tips foreign tourists doled out, but was getting tired of polishing his shoes every morning - a demand from his managers he found hassling. Instead, he wanted to work on his own terms. So a few months ago he, along with a friend, bought a car on loan and started working for San Francisco-based cab hailing company Uber. He hopes he will make Rs. 25,000 a month on average. Uber, says Singh, also tops up with Rs. 300 per trip during peak hours. At the end of the trip, from Noida to South Delhi, Singh quips: “I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day.”

All marketplaces have a choke point. In the case of e-tailers, it is the consumers whose appetite for discounts leads them to flame venture capital money. In the case of on-demand taxi aggregators such as Uber, Ola Cabs and Meru Cabs, it is the drivers. Taxi aggregators typically don’t own any cabs or employ drivers; they connect customers with drivers through a tech platform, the front-end for the customer being an app. According to one estimate, 1.6 million vehicles in India are licensed to run as cabs but there are not as many quality drivers. It is quite a task for aggregators to convince drivers - used to a mom-and-pop model or radio taxis - to work with them. And those who are available, like Singh, may not remain loyal to one company.
Securing the supply side has become a slugfest among India's top three on-demand taxi companies - ANI Technologies, which runs Ola , Uber and Meru - as they pour money to capture the market. Ola and Uber, particularly, backed by global venture capitalists, are threatening to make every other taxi company in India irrelevant. Home-bred Ola has thus far raised more than $700 million. Uber has mopped up $6 billion and has committed $1 billion for India in the next nine months. Both are using their war chest to offer incentives to drivers and discounted fares to riders. Traditional radio cabs and small-time operators are struggling to match up. The existential threat has made them cry out “market monopolisation”. Companies such as Meru, Carzonrent and Mega Cabs have thrown their collective might to regulate the "unregulated" on-demand companies. Legal tussles have greeted the aggregators.

Big money is making this battle worth fighting for. According to the Association of Radio Taxi India, the taxi business in the country is growing at 20 to 25 per cent a year. The organised taxi sector accounts for just four to five per cent of the industry and totals $800 million. It is expected to grow to $7 billion by 2020.

 

Q.Which of the following is true according to the passage?

Solution:

Option 1 is incorrect. The passage states that Chander Singh “wishes” to make Rs. 25,000 a month.
Option 2 is true for Uber and not Ola.
Option 4 is incorrect. The passage states - “According to the Association of Radio Taxi India, the taxi business in the country is growing at 20 to 25 per cent a year.” Option 3 is correct - “ANI Technologies, which runs Ola, Uber and Meru...” indicates that Ola is run by ANI Technologies, and Uber and Meru are standalone companies.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 18

Chander Singh apologises as he is a tad late when he comes to pick up this writer in his new Swift Dzire. Singh has been a driver for many years; most recently with The Imperial, a heritage hotel in Delhi. He earned a lot from tips foreign tourists doled out, but was getting tired of polishing his shoes every morning - a demand from his managers he found hassling. Instead, he wanted to work on his own terms. So a few months ago he, along with a friend, bought a car on loan and started working for San Francisco-based cab hailing company Uber. He hopes he will make Rs. 25,000 a month on average. Uber, says Singh, also tops up with Rs. 300 per trip during peak hours. At the end of the trip, from Noida to South Delhi, Singh quips: “I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day.”

All marketplaces have a choke point. In the case of e-tailers, it is the consumers whose appetite for discounts leads them to flame venture capital money. In the case of on-demand taxi aggregators such as Uber, Ola Cabs and Meru Cabs, it is the drivers. Taxi aggregators typically don’t own any cabs or employ drivers; they connect customers with drivers through a tech platform, the front-end for the customer being an app. According to one estimate, 1.6 million vehicles in India are licensed to run as cabs but there are not as many quality drivers. It is quite a task for aggregators to convince drivers - used to a mom-and-pop model or radio taxis - to work with them. And those who are available, like Singh, may not remain loyal to one company.
Securing the supply side has become a slugfest among India's top three on-demand taxi companies - ANI Technologies, which runs Ola , Uber and Meru - as they pour money to capture the market. Ola and Uber, particularly, backed by global venture capitalists, are threatening to make every other taxi company in India irrelevant. Home-bred Ola has thus far raised more than $700 million. Uber has mopped up $6 billion and has committed $1 billion for India in the next nine months. Both are using their war chest to offer incentives to drivers and discounted fares to riders. Traditional radio cabs and small-time operators are struggling to match up. The existential threat has made them cry out “market monopolisation”. Companies such as Meru, Carzonrent and Mega Cabs have thrown their collective might to regulate the "unregulated" on-demand companies. Legal tussles have greeted the aggregators.

Big money is making this battle worth fighting for. According to the Association of Radio Taxi India, the taxi business in the country is growing at 20 to 25 per cent a year. The organised taxi sector accounts for just four to five per cent of the industry and totals $800 million. It is expected to grow to $7 billion by 2020.

 

Q.Which of the following is an example of “market monopolisation”? 

Solution:

According to the passage a market monopoly can be understood from the following “...radio cabs and small-time operators are struggling to match up. The existential threat has made them cry out "market monopolisation".” Option 1 does not talk about Hollywood movie business shutting down or suffering because of Indian films. Thus, it can be ruled out.
Option 2 talks about competition and not monopoly.
Option 4 does not compare the rickshaws with another medium of transport or does not state the reason for their demand. Thus, it can be eliminated.
Option 3 is very clear. The Indian handloom industry is suffering due to the factory produced clothes.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3

QUESTION: 19

Chander Singh apologises as he is a tad late when he comes to pick up this writer in his new Swift Dzire. Singh has been a driver for many years; most recently with The Imperial, a heritage hotel in Delhi. He earned a lot from tips foreign tourists doled out, but was getting tired of polishing his shoes every morning - a demand from his managers he found hassling. Instead, he wanted to work on his own terms. So a few months ago he, along with a friend, bought a car on loan and started working for San Francisco-based cab hailing company Uber. He hopes he will make Rs. 25,000 a month on average. Uber, says Singh, also tops up with Rs. 300 per trip during peak hours. At the end of the trip, from Noida to South Delhi, Singh quips: “I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day.”

All marketplaces have a choke point. In the case of e-tailers, it is the consumers whose appetite for discounts leads them to flame venture capital money. In the case of on-demand taxi aggregators such as Uber, Ola Cabs and Meru Cabs, it is the drivers. Taxi aggregators typically don’t own any cabs or employ drivers; they connect customers with drivers through a tech platform, the front-end for the customer being an app. According to one estimate, 1.6 million vehicles in India are licensed to run as cabs but there are not as many quality drivers. It is quite a task for aggregators to convince drivers - used to a mom-and-pop model or radio taxis - to work with them. And those who are available, like Singh, may not remain loyal to one company.
Securing the supply side has become a slugfest among India's top three on-demand taxi companies - ANI Technologies, which runs Ola , Uber and Meru - as they pour money to capture the market. Ola and Uber, particularly, backed by global venture capitalists, are threatening to make every other taxi company in India irrelevant. Home-bred Ola has thus far raised more than $700 million. Uber has mopped up $6 billion and has committed $1 billion for India in the next nine months. Both are using their war chest to offer incentives to drivers and discounted fares to riders. Traditional radio cabs and small-time operators are struggling to match up. The existential threat has made them cry out “market monopolisation”. Companies such as Meru, Carzonrent and Mega Cabs have thrown their collective might to regulate the "unregulated" on-demand companies. Legal tussles have greeted the aggregators.

Big money is making this battle worth fighting for. According to the Association of Radio Taxi India, the taxi business in the country is growing at 20 to 25 per cent a year. The organised taxi sector accounts for just four to five per cent of the industry and totals $800 million. It is expected to grow to $7 billion by 2020.

 

Q.According to the passage which of the following is/are difficulties faced by taxi aggregators?

1. Drivers with a fixed mindset

2. Drivers who have criminal records

3. Drivers who are dependable

Solution:

The passage states - “I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day”. This indicates a lack of drivers with a fixed mindset. “And those who are available, like Singh, may not remain loyal to one company.” This indicates that divers may not be dependable/loyal to one company. This validates statements A and C.
Nothing has been said about drivers having criminal records. Thus, statement B can be eliminated.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 20

Chander Singh apologises as he is a tad late when he comes to pick up this writer in his new Swift Dzire. Singh has been a driver for many years; most recently with The Imperial, a heritage hotel in Delhi. He earned a lot from tips foreign tourists doled out, but was getting tired of polishing his shoes every morning - a demand from his managers he found hassling. Instead, he wanted to work on his own terms. So a few months ago he, along with a friend, bought a car on loan and started working for San Francisco-based cab hailing company Uber. He hopes he will make Rs. 25,000 a month on average. Uber, says Singh, also tops up with Rs. 300 per trip during peak hours. At the end of the trip, from Noida to South Delhi, Singh quips: “I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day.”

All marketplaces have a choke point. In the case of e-tailers, it is the consumers whose appetite for discounts leads them to flame venture capital money. In the case of on-demand taxi aggregators such as Uber, Ola Cabs and Meru Cabs, it is the drivers. Taxi aggregators typically don’t own any cabs or employ drivers; they connect customers with drivers through a tech platform, the front-end for the customer being an app. According to one estimate, 1.6 million vehicles in India are licensed to run as cabs but there are not as many quality drivers. It is quite a task for aggregators to convince drivers - used to a mom-and-pop model or radio taxis - to work with them. And those who are available, like Singh, may not remain loyal to one company.
Securing the supply side has become a slugfest among India's top three on-demand taxi companies - ANI Technologies, which runs Ola , Uber and Meru - as they pour money to capture the market. Ola and Uber, particularly, backed by global venture capitalists, are threatening to make every other taxi company in India irrelevant. Home-bred Ola has thus far raised more than $700 million. Uber has mopped up $6 billion and has committed $1 billion for India in the next nine months. Both are using their war chest to offer incentives to drivers and discounted fares to riders. Traditional radio cabs and small-time operators are struggling to match up. The existential threat has made them cry out “market monopolisation”. Companies such as Meru, Carzonrent and Mega Cabs have thrown their collective might to regulate the "unregulated" on-demand companies. Legal tussles have greeted the aggregators.

Big money is making this battle worth fighting for. According to the Association of Radio Taxi India, the taxi business in the country is growing at 20 to 25 per cent a year. The organised taxi sector accounts for just four to five per cent of the industry and totals $800 million. It is expected to grow to $7 billion by 2020.

 

Q."I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day."
What can you conclude about the driver?

A. The driver has his options open.
B. The driver is hardworking.
C. The thriving taxi business benefits the driver.
D. Job opportunities are plenty for the driver.

Solution:

Statement A is valid as the driver can chose from Uber, Ola and Meru.
Statement C is valid as the quoted text mentions three taxi aggregators, which tells us that there is competition among these aggregators whcih is a sign of success of taxi business. The variety of options open for the driver suggests that it is beneficial for the driver.
Statement D is valid as the driver is said to have received calls from Meru while already booked with another taxi company.
Statement B cannot be concluded from the quoted text. Thus, statements A, C and D are valid conclusions.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 21

Chander Singh apologises as he is a tad late when he comes to pick up this writer in his new Swift Dzire. Singh has been a driver for many years; most recently with The Imperial, a heritage hotel in Delhi. He earned a lot from tips foreign tourists doled out, but was getting tired of polishing his shoes every morning - a demand from his managers he found hassling. Instead, he wanted to work on his own terms. So a few months ago he, along with a friend, bought a car on loan and started working for San Francisco-based cab hailing company Uber. He hopes he will make Rs. 25,000 a month on average. Uber, says Singh, also tops up with Rs. 300 per trip during peak hours. At the end of the trip, from Noida to South Delhi, Singh quips: “I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day.”

All marketplaces have a choke point. In the case of e-tailers, it is the consumers whose appetite for discounts leads them to flame venture capital money. In the case of on-demand taxi aggregators such as Uber, Ola Cabs and Meru Cabs, it is the drivers. Taxi aggregators typically don’t own any cabs or employ drivers; they connect customers with drivers through a tech platform, the front-end for the customer being an app. According to one estimate, 1.6 million vehicles in India are licensed to run as cabs but there are not as many quality drivers. It is quite a task for aggregators to convince drivers - used to a mom-and-pop model or radio taxis - to work with them. And those who are available, like Singh, may not remain loyal to one company.
Securing the supply side has become a slugfest among India's top three on-demand taxi companies - ANI Technologies, which runs Ola , Uber and Meru - as they pour money to capture the market. Ola and Uber, particularly, backed by global venture capitalists, are threatening to make every other taxi company in India irrelevant. Home-bred Ola has thus far raised more than $700 million. Uber has mopped up $6 billion and has committed $1 billion for India in the next nine months. Both are using their war chest to offer incentives to drivers and discounted fares to riders. Traditional radio cabs and small-time operators are struggling to match up. The existential threat has made them cry out “market monopolisation”. Companies such as Meru, Carzonrent and Mega Cabs have thrown their collective might to regulate the "unregulated" on-demand companies. Legal tussles have greeted the aggregators.

Big money is making this battle worth fighting for. According to the Association of Radio Taxi India, the taxi business in the country is growing at 20 to 25 per cent a year. The organised taxi sector accounts for just four to five per cent of the industry and totals $800 million. It is expected to grow to $7 billion by 2020.

 

Q.A suitable title for this passage would be: 

Solution:

Option 1 does not capture the aspect of the taxi business. Option 3 is not comprehensive for the passage content. Option 4 is again too broad and does not capture the essence which is the taxi business.
The passage talks about the big players like Uber, Ola and Meru thriving in the taxi market. Certain lines of the passage indicate the actual scenario of the taxi business.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 22

Chander Singh apologises as he is a tad late when he comes to pick up this writer in his new Swift Dzire. Singh has been a driver for many years; most recently with The Imperial, a heritage hotel in Delhi. He earned a lot from tips foreign tourists doled out, but was getting tired of polishing his shoes every morning - a demand from his managers he found hassling. Instead, he wanted to work on his own terms. So a few months ago he, along with a friend, bought a car on loan and started working for San Francisco-based cab hailing company Uber. He hopes he will make Rs. 25,000 a month on average. Uber, says Singh, also tops up with Rs. 300 per trip during peak hours. At the end of the trip, from Noida to South Delhi, Singh quips: “I am trying out Uber. If this doesn't work, I will go to Ola. I am also getting calls from Meru every day.”

All marketplaces have a choke point. In the case of e-tailers, it is the consumers whose appetite for discounts leads them to flame venture capital money. In the case of on-demand taxi aggregators such as Uber, Ola Cabs and Meru Cabs, it is the drivers. Taxi aggregators typically don’t own any cabs or employ drivers; they connect customers with drivers through a tech platform, the front-end for the customer being an app. According to one estimate, 1.6 million vehicles in India are licensed to run as cabs but there are not as many quality drivers. It is quite a task for aggregators to convince drivers - used to a mom-and-pop model or radio taxis - to work with them. And those who are available, like Singh, may not remain loyal to one company.
Securing the supply side has become a slugfest among India's top three on-demand taxi companies - ANI Technologies, which runs Ola , Uber and Meru - as they pour money to capture the market. Ola and Uber, particularly, backed by global venture capitalists, are threatening to make every other taxi company in India irrelevant. Home-bred Ola has thus far raised more than $700 million. Uber has mopped up $6 billion and has committed $1 billion for India in the next nine months. Both are using their war chest to offer incentives to drivers and discounted fares to riders. Traditional radio cabs and small-time operators are struggling to match up. The existential threat has made them cry out “market monopolisation”. Companies such as Meru, Carzonrent and Mega Cabs have thrown their collective might to regulate the "unregulated" on-demand companies. Legal tussles have greeted the aggregators.

Big money is making this battle worth fighting for. According to the Association of Radio Taxi India, the taxi business in the country is growing at 20 to 25 per cent a year. The organised taxi sector accounts for just four to five per cent of the industry and totals $800 million. It is expected to grow to $7 billion by 2020.

 

Q.“Ola and Uber, particularly, backed by global venture  capitalists, are threatening to make every other taxi company in India irrelevant.”

What can we assume from the above statement?

Solution:

Option 1 is a valid assumption and can be gauged from “every other taxi company..” This means that there could be several taxi companies in India.
Option 2 is not a valid assumption. The passage does not say anything about the quality of Indian taxi companies.
Option 3 is not a valid assumption. Infact, if India has had other taxi companies running, it would be safe to assume that cabs were a popular mode of transport even before Uber or Ola.
Option 4 is false. If taxi companies in India are irrelevant, then Uber and Ola would not be getting global capital to back them up.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 23

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.
Pulp magazines were inexpensive fiction magazines. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, a half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges.

In fact, the name "pulp" comes from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on better paper were called "glossies" or "slicks." Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are best remembered for their lurid and exploitative stories and sensational cover art.
Pulp covers, printed in color on higher-quality (slick) paper, were famous for their half-dressed damsels in distress, usually awaiting a rescuing hero. Cover art played a major part in the marketing of pulp magazines, and a number of the most successful cover artists became as popular as the authors featured on the interior pages. Among the most famous pulp artists were Frank R. Paul and Virgil Finlay.

Later pulps began to feature interior illustrations, depicting elements of the stories. The drawings were printed in black ink on the same cream-colored paper used for the text, and had to use specific techniques to avoid blotting on the coarse texture of the cheap pulp. Thus, fine lines and heavy detail were usually not an option. Shading was by crosshatching or pointillism, and even that had to be limited and coarse. Usually the art was black lines on the paper's background, but Finlay and a few others did some work that was primarily white lines against large dark areas.

 

Q. what can we derive about glossies from the passage?

Solution:

The passage plainly states that “Magazines printed on better paper were called "glossies" or "slicks."” Option 1 presents data the other way round.
Passage does not support data in option 3.
Option 4 is incorrect as glossies were also known as “slicks.” Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 24

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.
Pulp magazines were inexpensive fiction magazines. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, a half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges.

In fact, the name "pulp" comes from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on better paper were called "glossies" or "slicks." Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are best remembered for their lurid and exploitative stories and sensational cover art.
Pulp covers, printed in color on higher-quality (slick) paper, were famous for their half-dressed damsels in distress, usually awaiting a rescuing hero. Cover art played a major part in the marketing of pulp magazines, and a number of the most successful cover artists became as popular as the authors featured on the interior pages. Among the most famous pulp artists were Frank R. Paul and Virgil Finlay.

Later pulps began to feature interior illustrations, depicting elements of the stories. The drawings were printed in black ink on the same cream-colored paper used for the text, and had to use specific techniques to avoid blotting on the coarse texture of the cheap pulp. Thus, fine lines and heavy detail were usually not an option. Shading was by crosshatching or pointillism, and even that had to be limited and coarse. Usually the art was black lines on the paper's background, but Finlay and a few others did some work that was primarily white lines against large dark areas.

 

Q.Which of the following words comes closest in meaning to the word “lurid”?

Solution:

‘Lurid’ means ‘glaringly vivid, sensational, shocking’. ‘Smutty’ means ‘indecent' or 'obscene.’ ‘Livid’ means ‘extremely angry’. ‘Bohemian’ is ‘a person, artist or writer who lives and acts free of conventional rules and practices.’ Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 25

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

Pulp magazines were inexpensive fiction magazines. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, a half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges.

In fact, the name "pulp" comes from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on better paper were called "glossies" or "slicks." Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are best remembered for their lurid and exploitative stories and sensational cover art.
Pulp covers, printed in color on higher-quality (slick) paper, were famous for their half-dressed damsels in distress, usually awaiting a rescuing hero. Cover art played a major part in the marketing of pulp magazines, and a number of the most successful cover artists became as popular as the authors featured on the interior pages. Among the most famous pulp artists were Frank R. Paul and Virgil Finlay.

Later pulps began to feature interior illustrations, depicting elements of the stories. The drawings were printed in black ink on the same cream-colored paper used for the text, and had to use specific techniques to avoid blotting on the coarse texture of the cheap pulp. Thus, fine lines and heavy detail were usually not an option. Shading was by crosshatching or pointillism, and even that had to be limited and coarse. Usually the art was black lines on the paper's background, but Finlay and a few others did some work that was primarily white lines against large dark areas.

 

Q.What do we learn about art on the inside pages of pulps? 

Solution:

The passage states that, “Fine lines and heavy detail were usually not an option.” Option 1 is incorrect as “Finlay and a few others did some work that was primarily white lines against large dark areas.” Option 2 is incorrect as the cover illustrators were famous, not the ones who worked on the inside pages - “Cover art played a major part in the marketing of pulp magazines, and a number of the most successful cover artists became as popular as the authors featured on the interior pages.” Option 4 is incorrect as the ink blotted because of the “texture” of the paper, not width - “The drawings were printed in black ink on the same cream-colored paper used for the text, and had to use specific techniques to avoid blotting on the coarse texture of the cheap pulp.” Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 26

Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.

She’d wait to go to Le Pain Quotidien and pay? 200 for a sandwich. After 6pm, the day’s stock is discounted.
The office canteen offered meals all day that she could afford, but eating was a lower priority than keeping up the appearance that she could, when she chose to, do it at Le Pain Quotidien.

These are the urban poor. Objectively and relative to a vast majority of Indians, they aren’t “poor” at all. But they’re certainly hungry and broke a lot. These are the metro-dwelling twentysomethings who’ve internalised the pressures surrounding them, and spend a majority of their salaries on keeping up the lifestyles and appearances that they believe are essential to earning those salaries.

The expenses that rack up are notionally non-negotiable: the clothes and the grooming, the bar nights and office dinners, the Olas and Ubers you have to take because you’re networking until 1am, the Starbucks coffee you have to buy because that’s where your job interview is. The heels and the dresses.

As the bank balance crashes past zero by the 22nd of the month, they concede that the math may not work today, but they hold on to hope that it will work out in the end; when that increment comes, when the promotion arrives, when Dad sends a little extra one month. Their influences are not difficult to spot. Their startup economy’s success stories are of entrepreneurs who spent VC money to create their own wealth, who spent every paisa immediately to multiply each into a rupee. The stories they hear are of Mukesh Ambani, who inherited an empire and built a very expensive home, instead of Dhirubhai, who lived in a very small home and built a very big empire. They read about Katrina Kaif’s hair costing? 50 lakh to dye correctly. They internalise the lesson that to earn any money, you’ve got to spend a lot of it.

What we’re left with is a flood of twentysomethings running hard to leave behind roti-sabzi for a perception of burger-coke. From there, they sprint with equal abandon toward the cheese-champagne.

 

Q.According to the passage, the urban poor are:

1. not actually poor

2. young and clumsy

3. leading superficial lives

4. hopeful for success Which of the above are correct? 

Solution:

Statement A is supported by the passage - “These are the urban poor. Objectively and relative to a vast majority of Indians, they aren’t “poor” at all.” Statement B with “clumsy” is not corroborated from the passage.
Statement C is true as the passage talks about how the urban young have internalized societal standards of what they want and not what they require, they feel these standards are not negotiable and even at the cost of being broke they maintain these standards.
Statement D is supported by - “but they hold on to hope that it will work out in the end; when that increment comes, when the promotion arrives....” Thus, statements A, C and D are validated.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 27

She’d wait to go to Le Pain Quotidien and pay? 200 for a sandwich. After 6pm, the day’s stock is discounted.
The office canteen offered meals all day that she could afford, but eating was a lower priority than keeping up the appearance that she could, when she chose to, do it at Le Pain Quotidien.

These are the urban poor. Objectively and relative to a vast majority of Indians, they aren’t “poor” at all. But they’re certainly hungry and broke a lot. These are the metro-dwelling twentysomethings who’ve internalised the pressures surrounding them, and spend a majority of their salaries on keeping up the lifestyles and appearances that they believe are essential to earning those salaries.

The expenses that rack up are notionally non-negotiable: the clothes and the grooming, the bar nights and office dinners, the Olas and Ubers you have to take because you’re networking until 1am, the Starbucks coffee you have to buy because that’s where your job interview is. The heels and the dresses.

As the bank balance crashes past zero by the 22nd of the month, they concede that the math may not work today, but they hold on to hope that it will work out in the end; when that increment comes, when the promotion arrives, when Dad sends a little extra one month. Their influences are not difficult to spot. Their startup economy’s success stories are of entrepreneurs who spent VC money to create their own wealth, who spent every paisa immediately to multiply each into a rupee. The stories they hear are of Mukesh Ambani, who inherited an empire and built a very expensive home, instead of Dhirubhai, who lived in a very small home and built a very big empire. They read about Katrina Kaif’s hair costing? 50 lakh to dye correctly. They internalise the lesson that to earn any money, you’ve got to spend a lot of it.

What we’re left with is a flood of twentysomethings running hard to leave behind roti-sabzi for a perception of burger-coke. From there, they sprint with equal abandon toward the cheese-champagne.

 

Q.“As the bank balance crashes past zero by the 22nd of the month..”

The above statement implies that:

Solution:

Option 1 talks about prevention and is not a direct implication.
Option 2 is far-fetched.
Option 3 is an assumption because we cannot ascertain their situation post 22nd of the month.
If the bank balance crashed past zero by the 22nd of a month it is a valid implication that this person is incapable of managing his/her finances. This validates option 4.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 28

She’d wait to go to Le Pain Quotidien and pay? 200 for a sandwich. After 6pm, the day’s stock is discounted.
The office canteen offered meals all day that she could afford, but eating was a lower priority than keeping up the appearance that she could, when she chose to, do it at Le Pain Quotidien.

These are the urban poor. Objectively and relative to a vast majority of Indians, they aren’t “poor” at all. But they’re certainly hungry and broke a lot. These are the metro-dwelling twentysomethings who’ve internalised the pressures surrounding them, and spend a majority of their salaries on keeping up the lifestyles and appearances that they believe are essential to earning those salaries.

The expenses that rack up are notionally non-negotiable: the clothes and the grooming, the bar nights and office dinners, the Olas and Ubers you have to take because you’re networking until 1am, the Starbucks coffee you have to buy because that’s where your job interview is. The heels and the dresses.

As the bank balance crashes past zero by the 22nd of the month, they concede that the math may not work today, but they hold on to hope that it will work out in the end; when that increment comes, when the promotion arrives, when Dad sends a little extra one month. Their influences are not difficult to spot. Their startup economy’s success stories are of entrepreneurs who spent VC money to create their own wealth, who spent every paisa immediately to multiply each into a rupee. The stories they hear are of Mukesh Ambani, who inherited an empire and built a very expensive home, instead of Dhirubhai, who lived in a very small home and built a very big empire. They read about Katrina Kaif’s hair costing? 50 lakh to dye correctly. They internalise the lesson that to earn any money, you’ve got to spend a lot of it.

What we’re left with is a flood of twentysomethings running hard to leave behind roti-sabzi for a perception of burger-coke. From there, they sprint with equal abandon toward the cheese-champagne.

 

Q.The author gives the example of Ambani father-son, for his readers to understand that:

Solution:

Option 1 with “media” is unrelated.
Option 2 does not bare any reference to the given example. Option 3 undermines the hardships of Dhirubhai Ambani as the author wants us to read or emulate what Dhirubhai has done rather than be mesmerized by the outcome which Mukesh Ambani enjoys.
According to the passage, people are usually caught up in their big dreams but fail to understand the pursuit or struggle that goes to achieve it. Thus, option 4 can be logically deduced.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 29

She’d wait to go to Le Pain Quotidien and pay? 200 for a sandwich. After 6pm, the day’s stock is discounted.
The office canteen offered meals all day that she could afford, but eating was a lower priority than keeping up the appearance that she could, when she chose to, do it at Le Pain Quotidien.

These are the urban poor. Objectively and relative to a vast majority of Indians, they aren’t “poor” at all. But they’re certainly hungry and broke a lot. These are the metro-dwelling twentysomethings who’ve internalised the pressures surrounding them, and spend a majority of their salaries on keeping up the lifestyles and appearances that they believe are essential to earning those salaries.

The expenses that rack up are notionally non-negotiable: the clothes and the grooming, the bar nights and office dinners, the Olas and Ubers you have to take because you’re networking until 1am, the Starbucks coffee you have to buy because that’s where your job interview is. The heels and the dresses.

As the bank balance crashes past zero by the 22nd of the month, they concede that the math may not work today, but they hold on to hope that it will work out in the end; when that increment comes, when the promotion arrives, when Dad sends a little extra one month. Their influences are not difficult to spot. Their startup economy’s success stories are of entrepreneurs who spent VC money to create their own wealth, who spent every paisa immediately to multiply each into a rupee. The stories they hear are of Mukesh Ambani, who inherited an empire and built a very expensive home, instead of Dhirubhai, who lived in a very small home and built a very big empire. They read about Katrina Kaif’s hair costing? 50 lakh to dye correctly. They internalise the lesson that to earn any money, you’ve got to spend a lot of it.

What we’re left with is a flood of twentysomethings running hard to leave behind roti-sabzi for a perception of burger-coke. From there, they sprint with equal abandon toward the cheese-champagne.

 

Q.What can you definitely say about Le Pain Quotidien from the information in the passage?

Solution:

The passage states “She’d wait to go to Le Pain Quotidien and pay ?200 for a sandwich. After 6pm, the day’s stock is discounted.” Option 1 is not a definite truth as a hotel provides lodging and from the paragraph we can only tell that Le Pain Quotidien is an eatery.
Option 2 is not definitely true. As the passage says that she goes to Le Pain Quotidien to buy a sandwich, which would not be available at a fine dining.
Option 3 is definitely true. If after a discount a sandwich would cost ?200 (actual price being ?400), then it can be said without a doubt that Le Pain Quotidien is a place for the rich. Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 30

She’d wait to go to Le Pain Quotidien and pay? 200 for a sandwich. After 6pm, the day’s stock is discounted.
The office canteen offered meals all day that she could afford, but eating was a lower priority than keeping up the appearance that she could, when she chose to, do it at Le Pain Quotidien.

These are the urban poor. Objectively and relative to a vast majority of Indians, they aren’t “poor” at all. But they’re certainly hungry and broke a lot. These are the metro-dwelling twentysomethings who’ve internalised the pressures surrounding them, and spend a majority of their salaries on keeping up the lifestyles and appearances that they believe are essential to earning those salaries.

The expenses that rack up are notionally non-negotiable: the clothes and the grooming, the bar nights and office dinners, the Olas and Ubers you have to take because you’re networking until 1am, the Starbucks coffee you have to buy because that’s where your job interview is. The heels and the dresses.

As the bank balance crashes past zero by the 22nd of the month, they concede that the math may not work today, but they hold on to hope that it will work out in the end; when that increment comes, when the promotion arrives, when Dad sends a little extra one month. Their influences are not difficult to spot. Their startup economy’s success stories are of entrepreneurs who spent VC money to create their own wealth, who spent every paisa immediately to multiply each into a rupee. The stories they hear are of Mukesh Ambani, who inherited an empire and built a very expensive home, instead of Dhirubhai, who lived in a very small home and built a very big empire. They read about Katrina Kaif’s hair costing? 50 lakh to dye correctly. They internalise the lesson that to earn any money, you’ve got to spend a lot of it.

What we’re left with is a flood of twentysomethings running hard to leave behind roti-sabzi for a perception of burger-coke. From there, they sprint with equal abandon toward the cheese-champagne.

 

Q.Which of the following strengthens the point of view of the urban poor?

Solution:

The passage states that the urban poor have the belief that - “...to earn any money, you’ve got to spend a lot of it.” Option 1 aptly exemplifies this as it covers “earning” as well as “spending”. Option 2 talks about “saving” and can be ruled out.
Option 3 with “keep two jobs” means that the urban poor are working hard so that they can spend more money. Whereas, the belief is that “one has to spend more to fit the part and so he/she will earn more”.
Option 4 is partly correct with “I spend” however it is not as strong as option 1 with the outcome. The “earning” clause is not covered in option 4.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 31

She’d wait to go to Le Pain Quotidien and pay? 200 for a sandwich. After 6pm, the day’s stock is discounted.
The office canteen offered meals all day that she could afford, but eating was a lower priority than keeping up the appearance that she could, when she chose to, do it at Le Pain Quotidien.

These are the urban poor. Objectively and relative to a vast majority of Indians, they aren’t “poor” at all. But they’re certainly hungry and broke a lot. These are the metro-dwelling twentysomethings who’ve internalised the pressures surrounding them, and spend a majority of their salaries on keeping up the lifestyles and appearances that they believe are essential to earning those salaries.

The expenses that rack up are notionally non-negotiable: the clothes and the grooming, the bar nights and office dinners, the Olas and Ubers you have to take because you’re networking until 1am, the Starbucks coffee you have to buy because that’s where your job interview is. The heels and the dresses.

As the bank balance crashes past zero by the 22nd of the month, they concede that the math may not work today, but they hold on to hope that it will work out in the end; when that increment comes, when the promotion arrives, when Dad sends a little extra one month. Their influences are not difficult to spot. Their startup economy’s success stories are of entrepreneurs who spent VC money to create their own wealth, who spent every paisa immediately to multiply each into a rupee. The stories they hear are of Mukesh Ambani, who inherited an empire and built a very expensive home, instead of Dhirubhai, who lived in a very small home and built a very big empire. They read about Katrina Kaif’s hair costing? 50 lakh to dye correctly. They internalise the lesson that to earn any money, you’ve got to spend a lot of it.

What we’re left with is a flood of twentysomethings running hard to leave behind roti-sabzi for a perception of burger-coke. From there, they sprint with equal abandon toward the cheese-champagne.

 

Q.Why are twentysomethings running hard to leave behind, “roti-sabzi” ?
A. They are caught in the perception of a "modem” lifestyle.
B. They believe that anything “Indian” is simple and below their dignity.

Solution:

The passage states “What we’re left with is a flood of twentysomethings running hard to leave behind roti-sabzi for a perception of burger-coke.” This validates statement A. Statement B can be validated from the following - “The office canteen offered meals all day that she could afford, but eating was a lower priority than keeping up the appearance that she could, when she chose to, do it at Le Pain Quotidien.” Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 32

Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.
Since the 1960s, China’s average ecological footprint - a measure of human pressure on the Earth’s natural resources - has grown rapidly. A world consuming resources and producing waste at Chinese levels for 2007 would need the equivalent of 1.2 planets to support its activities (the global average in 2007 was 1.5 planets). As part of its economic expansion, China has become a major consumer of oil, gas, coal, metals, timber and fish, increasingly sourcing them outside its borders and often from developing countries in Africa, South-East Asia and Latin America.

The Chinese government has recognized the challenges of environmental problems linked to economic development and has placed environmental sustainability high on the political agenda. This is an opportunity that the world cannot afford to miss.

One of the key features of the latest China five-year plans is the so- called “Going Global Strategy”, which encourages Chinese companies to invest overseas. As part of this economic expansion, China’s outward investment has surged and the trend is likely to continue.

With the 12th five-year plan approved in 2011, China has adopted a number of significant environmental targets. It is important that the same principles of sustainability are applied to overseas investments, so that China’s development can benefit partner countries, while contributing to the conservation of the planet’s natural environment.

 

Q.Which of the following is least true according to the passage? 

Solution:

Option 1 is supported by the last paragraph.
Option 3 is supported by the penultimate paragraph.
Option 4 is supported by the first paragraph.
Option 2 is not entirely true. The passage states, “It is important that the same principles of sustainability are applied to overseas investments, so that China’s development can benefit partner countries, while contributing to the conservation of the planet’s natural environment.” This is not the same as saying China positively influences countries to conserve natural resources.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 33

Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.
Since the 1960s, China’s average ecological footprint - a measure of human pressure on the Earth’s natural resources - has grown rapidly. A world consuming resources and producing waste at Chinese levels for 2007 would need the equivalent of 1.2 planets to support its activities (the global average in 2007 was 1.5 planets). As part of its economic expansion, China has become a major consumer of oil, gas, coal, metals, timber and fish, increasingly sourcing them outside its borders and often from developing countries in Africa, South-East Asia and Latin America.

The Chinese government has recognized the challenges of environmental problems linked to economic development and has placed environmental sustainability high on the political agenda. This is an opportunity that the world cannot afford to miss.

One of the key features of the latest China five-year plans is the so- called “Going Global Strategy”, which encourages Chinese companies to invest overseas. As part of this economic expansion, China’s outward investment has surged and the trend is likely to continue.

With the 12th five-year plan approved in 2011, China has adopted a number of significant environmental targets. It is important that the same principles of sustainability are applied to overseas investments, so that China’s development can benefit partner countries, while contributing to the conservation of the planet’s natural environment.

 

Q.“Since the 1960s, China’s average ecological footprint - a measure of human pressure on the Earth’s natural resources - has grown rapidly.”

This implies:

Solution:

Option 1 is a universal truth but cannot be implied from the statement. An implication is a logical consequence.
Option 2 is apt as Chinese ecological footptint growing rapidly would result in depletion of resources.
Option 3 cannot be corroborated as we do not have data before 1960.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 34

Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.
Since the 1960s, China’s average ecological footprint - a measure of human pressure on the Earth’s natural resources - has grown rapidly. A world consuming resources and producing waste at Chinese levels for 2007 would need the equivalent of 1.2 planets to support its activities (the global average in 2007 was 1.5 planets). As part of its economic expansion, China has become a major consumer of oil, gas, coal, metals, timber and fish, increasingly sourcing them outside its borders and often from developing countries in Africa, South-East Asia and Latin America.

The Chinese government has recognized the challenges of environmental problems linked to economic development and has placed environmental sustainability high on the political agenda. This is an opportunity that the world cannot afford to miss.

One of the key features of the latest China five-year plans is the so- called “Going Global Strategy”, which encourages Chinese companies to invest overseas. As part of this economic expansion, China’s outward investment has surged and the trend is likely to continue.

With the 12th five-year plan approved in 2011, China has adopted a number of significant environmental targets. It is important that the same principles of sustainability are applied to overseas investments, so that China’s development can benefit partner countries, while contributing to the conservation of the planet’s natural environment.

 

Q.Which of the following is least suitable to describe the passage: 

Solution:

The passage talks about China having depleted a lot of resources due to its economic expansion and now taking up initiatives to become more environment friendly while progressing economically. This supports options 2, 3 and 4. The passage does not talk about political expansion but trade relations with other countries.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 35

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The market share of three commercial vehicle manufacturers, A, B and C, for the last four financial years is shown in the given bar graph. The product-wise breakup (in terms of percentage) of the vehicles sold by A, B and C every year, is shown in the given pie charts. 

 

 

Q.If the total number of vehicles sold in the year 2010-11 was  90000, then approximately how many more MCVs did B sell as compared to A, that year?


Solution:

Total MCVs sold by B in 2010-11 = (90000 x 65%) x 40% = 23400
Total MCVs sold by A in 2010-11 = (90000 x 35%) x 30% = 9450
The difference = 23400 - 9450 = 13950 

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 36

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The market share of three commercial vehicle manufacturers, A, B and C, for the last four financial years is shown in the given bar graph. The product-wise breakup (in terms of percentage) of the vehicles sold by A, B and C every year, is shown in the given pie charts. 

 

Q.What is the market share of company C in the ICV segment in the year 2013-14, if 1,50,000 vehicles in all were sold that year? Round off your answer to two decimal places if necessary.


Solution:

Total percentage of ICVs sold = (13% x 25%) + (20% x 55%) + (20% x 20%) = 18.25% Total number of ICVs sold = 150000 x 18.25% = 27,375 Number of ICVs sold by C = (150000 x 20%) x 20% = 6000 Market share of C in the ICV segment = (6000 x 100)/27375 = 21.917% = 21.92%

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 37

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The market share of three commercial vehicle manufacturers, A, B and C, for the last four financial years is shown in the given bar graph. The product-wise breakup (in terms of percentage) of the vehicles sold by A, B and C every year, is shown in the given pie charts. 

 

Q.If A stops production of LCVs in the year 2013-14 and C supplies A’s share in addition to its own, then what is the new market share (in %) of C in the LCV segment in the year 2013-14? Take necessary data from previous questions and round off your answer to two decimal places if necessary.


Solution:

From the second question, total vehicles sold in 2013-14 = 150000
LCVs sold by A = (150000 x 25%) x 12% = 4500 LCVs sold by B = (150000 x 55%) x 30% = 24750 LCVs sold by C = (150000 x 20%) x 70% = 21000 If A stops production, then total LCV’s supplied by C = 21000 + 4500 = 25500
Market share of C in LCV segment = (25500 x 100)/(25500 + 24750) = 50.746% = 50.75%

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 38

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The market share of three commercial vehicle manufacturers, A, B and C, for the last four financial years is shown in the given bar graph. The product-wise breakup (in terms of percentage) of the vehicles sold by A, B and C every year, is shown in the given pie charts. 

 

Q.If in the year 2013-14, C gains another 5% share in the total sales purely due to increased sales of MCVs, and these increased sales are at the cost of A & B, with both losing an equal number of MCVs, then what is the new market share of B in the MCV segment? Take necessary data from previous questions and round off your answer to two decimal places if necessary.


Solution:

From the second question, total vehicles sold in 2013 - 14 = 150000
MCVs sold by A = (150000 x 25%) x 30% = 11250 MCVs sold by B = (150000 x 55%) x 40% = 33000 MCVs sold by C = (150000 x 20%) x 10% = 3000 Total MCVs sold in the year 2013-14 = 11250 + 33000 + 3000 = 47250
To gain 5% market share, additional MCVs required by C = 150000 x 5% = 7500 Loss suffered by each of A & B = 7500/2 = 3750 New market share of B in MCV segment = [(33000 - 3750) x 100J/47250 = 61.905% = 61.91%

QUESTION: 39

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A company makes seven types of products - 't', 'u', 'v', 'w' , 'x', 'y' and 'z'. In order to make each of these products, different set of processes are required. The details of the costs and the time taken for each process are given in the table below.
Making one unit of 't' involves going through the processes A, C, I, F, B, H and G, in that order. Similarly, product 'u' involves H, I, F, C, A and B processes, product 'v' involves C, H, A, G, F and B processes, product 'w' involves B, F, I, G, C and H processes, product 'x' involves H, B, I, G, C and A processes, product 'y' involves F, D, E, G, A and C processes, and product 'z' involves I, F, B, E, H and G processes.

 

Q.Which type of product is the cheapest to make?

Solution:

The costs involved in making one unit of each product are as follows.
For product 't': A + C + I + F + B + H + G = 150 + 200 + 300 + 150 + 50 + 25 
+ 50 = Rs. 925
For product 'u': H + I + F + C + A + B = 25 + 300 + 150 + 200 + 150 + 50 = 
Rs. 875 For product 'v': C + H + A + G + F + B = 200 + 25 + 150 + 50 + 150 + 50 = 
Rs. 625
For product 'w': B + F + I + G + C + H = 50 + 150 + 300 + 50 + 200 + 25 =
Rs. 775 For product 'x': H + B + I + G + C + A = 25 + 50 + 300 + 50 + 200 + 150 =
Rs. 775

For product `y`:

F + D + E + G + A + C = 150 + 50 + 25 + 50 + 150 + 200 =
Rs. 625
For product'z': l + F + B + E + H + G = 300 + 150 + 50 + 25 + 25 + 50 = Rs. 600
The cheapest product is z.

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 40

A company makes seven types of products - 't', 'u', 'v', 'w' , 'x', 'y' and 'z'. In order to make each of these products, different set of processes are required. The details of the costs and the time taken for each process are given in the table below.
Making one unit of 't' involves going through the processes A, C, I, F, B, H and G, in that order. Similarly, product 'u' involves H, I, F, C, A and B processes, product 'v' involves C, H, A, G, F and B processes, product 'w' involves B, F, I, G, C and H processes, product 'x' involves H, B, I, G, C and A processes, product 'y' involves F, D, E, G, A and C processes, and product 'z' involves I, F, B, E, H and G processes.

 

Q."CT ratio" of a product is calculated by dividing the total cost incurred on all the process involved by the total time taken in the process. Which product has the highest CT ratio?

Solution:

The time taken for different processes involved to make one unit of different products can be calculated as follows.
For product't:

Time = A + C + I + F + B + H + G = 14 + 21 + 14 + 4 + 7 + 4 + 7 = 71 minutes

Cost = Rs. 925 [We know it from the previous question]

CT ratio = 925/71 * 13

Similarly,

For product 'u'

Time = 64 minutes and Cost = Rs. 875 CT ratio = 875/64 = 13.7

For product 'v':

Time = 57 minutes and Cost = Rs. 625 CT ratio = 625/57 * 11

For product 'w' :

Time = 57 minutes and Cost = Rs. 775 CT ratio = 775/57 « 13.6

For product 'x':

Time = 67 minutes and Cost = Rs. 775 CT ratio = 775/67 *11.6

For product 'y' :

Time = 57 minutes and Cost = Rs. 625 CT ratio = 625/57 = 11

For product 'z':

Time = 40 minutes and Cost = Rs. 600 CT ratio = 600/40 = 15

z has the highest CT ratio.
Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 41

A company makes seven types of products - 't', 'u', 'v', 'w' , 'x', 'y' and 'z'. In order to make each of these products, different set of processes are required. The details of the costs and the time taken for each process are given in the table below.
Making one unit of 't' involves going through the processes A, C, I, F, B, H and G, in that order. Similarly, product 'u' involves H, I, F, C, A and B processes, product 'v' involves C, H, A, G, F and B processes, product 'w' involves B, F, I, G, C and H processes, product 'x' involves H, B, I, G, C and A processes, product 'y' involves F, D, E, G, A and C processes, and product 'z' involves I, F, B, E, H and G processes.

 

Q.If the company wants to operate at break-even point (i.e. no profit and no loss), what should be the sum of the selling prices of the seven products (per unit)? 

Solution:

The costs for each product have been calculated in the first question of the set. These costs will be equal to the selling prices at the break-even point.
The sum of the selling prices = 925 + 875 + 625 + 775 +775 + 625 + 600 = Rs. 5,200 Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 42

A company makes seven types of products - 't', 'u', 'v', 'w' , 'x', 'y' and 'z'. In order to make each of these products, different set of processes are required. The details of the costs and the time taken for each process are given in the table below.
Making one unit of 't' involves going through the processes A, C, I, F, B, H and G, in that order. Similarly, product 'u' involves H, I, F, C, A and B processes, product 'v' involves C, H, A, G, F and B processes, product 'w' involves B, F, I, G, C and H processes, product 'x' involves H, B, I, G, C and A processes, product 'y' involves F, D, E, G, A and C processes, and product 'z' involves I, F, B, E, H and G processes.

 

Q.A new product 'tuvwxyz' was to be produced whose "CT ratio" would be equal to the average "CT ratio" of the existing seven products. Find the "CT ratio" of the new product. 

Solution:

The "CT ratios" of the seven products have been calculated in second question of the set.

Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 43

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A country XYZ is facing election in the current year. There are 5 political parties in the country contesting for the election namely P, Q, R, S and T. Each of the party has certain mathematicians within them who have determined with great accuracy the probability of winning certain number of votes. The following table illustrates the probability as calculated by them for each of the party

Answer the following question based on the table given above. Assume that the prediction from mathematician is true at the end of election.

 

Q. Which party would win the election? 

Solution:

We compute the expected number of votes which can be obtained by each of the party.
Party P
50 x 0.1 + 100 x 0.2 + 150 x 0.3 + 200 x 0.2 + 250 x 0.2 = 160
Party Q
50 x 0.0 + 100 x 0.1 + 150 x 0.4 + 200 x 0.4 + 250 x 0.1 = 175
Party R
25 x 0.1 + 50 x 0.2 + 75 x 0.3 + 100 x 0.3 + 150 x 0.1 = 80 
Party S

25 x 0.1 + 50 x 0.2 + 75 x 0.3 + 100 x 0.4 + 150 x 0.0 = 75 
Party T
25 x 0.0 + 50 x 0.3 + 75 x 0.6 + 100 x 0.1 + 150 x 0.0 = 70

Thus we see that Party Q will secure the maximum number of votes assuming that the calculations of the mathematicians stay correct.
Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 44

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A country XYZ is facing election in the current year. There are 5 political parties in the country contesting for the election namely P, Q, R, S and T. Each of the party has certain mathematicians within them who have determined with great accuracy the probability of winning certain number of votes. The following table illustrates the probability as calculated by them for each of the party

Answer the following question based on the table given above. Assume that the prediction from mathematician is true at the end of election.

 

Q.If XYZ requires a minimum of 255 votes for the formation of Government and parties can combine with each other, then which two party coalitions from the choices given below can form a Government meeting the criteria required?

Solution:

P and R on combination give a total of 240 votes Q and S on combination give a total of 250 votes P and S on combination give a total of 235 votes Q and R on combination give a total of 255 votes Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 45

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A country XYZ is facing election in the current year. There are 5 political parties in the country contesting for the election namely P, Q, R, S and T. Each of the party has certain mathematicians within them who have determined with great accuracy the probability of winning certain number of votes. The following table illustrates the probability as calculated by them for each of the party

Answer the following question based on the table given above. Assume that the prediction from mathematician is true at the end of election.

 

Q.If XYZ requires a minimum of 255 votes to form a government and any number of coalitions are allowed then in how many ways can Q form a government if Q and P together can never form a coalition Government?

Solution:

jIf Q cannot combine with P to form a Government then Q can form a Government in following ways:

• Q with R

• Q with R and S

■ Q with R and T

• Q with S and T

• Q with R, S and T

Thus, Q can form a coalition Government in 5 ways.
Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 46

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A country XYZ is facing election in the current year. There are 5 political parties in the country contesting for the election namely P, Q, R, S and T. Each of the party has certain mathematicians within them who have determined with great accuracy the probability of winning certain number of votes. The following table illustrates the probability as calculated by them for each of the party

Answer the following question based on the table given above. Assume that the prediction from mathematician is true at the end of election.

 

Q.After the election, party P is disqualified since it was found cheating. The votes of P were distributed to other parties in a way such that T got 20 votes more than S who got 20 votes more than R who got 20 votes more than Q. The criteria of forming a Government now changes to a minimum of 300 votes and a maximum of 3 party coalitions. In how many ways can a Government be formed now? 

Solution:

After election P has 160 votes which are to be distributed with Q, R, S and T Let Q get q votes.
Thus, R gets q + 20 votes.
Thus, S gets q + 40 votes.
And T gets q + 60 votes.

All these votes combined should be the votes of P. q + (q + 20) + (q + 40) + (q + 60) = 160 ••• 4q = 40 Thus, (7=10 Thus, the number of votes will be Q = 185, R = 110, S = 125, T = 140
A Government with minimum of 300 votes can be formed in the following ways: • Q, S 
■ Q, T
• Q , R , S
• Q . R . T
• Q . S . T
• R . S . T
Thus, there are 6 ways to form a Government.
Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 47

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A survey was conducted among 100 investors to ask about their investment mode among Equity market, Mutual funds, and Property investment.
I. 25 investors don’t invest in any of three modes.
II. 3 investors invest in all three modes of investments.
III. 48 investors invest in property or equity market but don’t invest in mutual funds.

 

Q.How many investors invest in mutual funds but don’t invest in all the three modes?

Solution:

Number of investors who didn’t invest in any of three modes = h = 25
Number of investors who invest in all three modes of investments = g = 3 Number of investors who invest in property or equity market but not in mutual funds = a + c + e = 48 Number of investors investing in mutual funds but not in all three modes = b + d + f Total number of investors = 100 a + b + c + d+ e + f + g + h = 100 b + d + f = /Q - (a + c + e + g + h) = 100 - (a + c + e) - g - h

= 1 0 0 - 4 8 - 3 - 2 5
= 24
Number of investors who invest in mutual funds but don’t invest in all three modes = b + d + f = 24 Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 48

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A survey was conducted among 100 investors to ask about their investment mode among Equity market, Mutual funds, and Property investment.
I. 25 investors don’t invest in any of three modes.
II. 3 investors invest in all three modes of investments.
III. 48 investors invest in property or equity market but don’t invest in mutual funds.

 

Q.21 investors invested in atleast two modes. How many investors invested in only one mode of investment? 

Solution:

From the solution to the first question of the set, Number of investors who invested in atleast two modes = d + e + f + g = 21 Number of investors who invested in only one type of mode = a + b + c Total investors = 100 a + b + c + d + e + f + g + h = 100 a + b + c = 100 - (d + e + f + g + h) = 1 0 0 - 2 1 - 2 5 
= 54
Number of investors who invested in only one type of mode = a + b + c = 54 Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 49

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A survey was conducted among 100 investors to ask about their investment mode among Equity market, Mutual funds, and Property investment.
I. 25 investors don’t invest in any of three modes.
II. 3 investors invest in all three modes of investments.
III. 48 investors invest in property or equity market but don’t invest in mutual funds.

 

Q.How many investors invested in mutual funds? (Refer previous questions if needed) 

Solution:

From the solution to the first question of the set, Number of investors who invested in mutual funds = b + d + f + g = 24 + 3 = 27 Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 50

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A survey was conducted among 100 investors to ask about their investment mode among Equity market, Mutual funds, and Property investment.
I. 25 investors don’t invest in any of three modes.
II. 3 investors invest in all three modes of investments.
III. 48 investors invest in property or equity market but don’t invest in mutual funds.

 

Q.7 investors invested in equity and mutual funds but not  property. How many investors invested in mutual funds but not equity? (Refer previous questions if needed) 

Solution:

From the solution to the first question o f the set, d + b + f = 24
Investors invested in equity and mutual funds but not property = d = 7 Number of investors who invested in mutual funds but not equity = b + f = 24 - 7 = 17 Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 51

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
Three couples gather for a birthday party. These couples consist of three women - Asmita, Boby, Celine; and three men - Dinesh, Eshaan, Furqaan. They sit around a rectangular table as shown below, such that everyone is facing the centre.

The following information is also known;

1. Asmita sits opposite Boby or Dinesh.

2. Eshaan sits to the immediately left of Celine.

3. Furqaan sits to the immediate left of one woman and to the immediate right of another woman.

4. The person whose birthday is being celebrated is the only person who sits opposite a man and to the immediate left of a woman.

 

Q.Whose birthday is being celebrated?

Solution:

Let the person whose birthday is being celebrated be denoted by t.
Let Asmita, Boby, Celine, Dinesh, Eshaan and Furqaan be denoted by A, B, C, D, E and F respectively.
Let the woman who is to the immediate right of t be W1 and the man opposite t be Hence, we have the following possible arrangements;

The other three positions are simply mirror images of these three positions.
Here, x, y and z are the three other people.
Now, consider each combination separately.
Case I:
In this case, if x is a man, then / should also be a man; otherwise, z’s position will contradict the fourth condition.
Similarly, if x is a woman then y must also be a woman; otherwise, W-i’s position will contradict the fourth statements.
Hence, in this case, we get two possible arrangements.

Consider Case la;

By, third statement, M3 = F. So, by the second statement, M1 is E and W2 is C.
Hence, the M2 must be D.
Hence, we have following arrangement.

Here, t and W-| are A and B in no particular order.
But this doesn’t satisfy the first condition. Hence, it is not possible.

Consider Case lb;

In this case also, by the third statement, t is F, and by the second statement, M2 is E and W3 is C.
Hence, M-| must be D.
Hence, we have the following arrangement;

Here, again, W-| and W3 are A and B in no particular order.
But this doesn’t satisfy the first condition. Hence, it is not possible.
Case II:
In this case, if x is a man, then t must be a man; otherwise, / s position will contradict the fourth condition. Similarly, if x is a woman, then t must also be a woman; otherwise, M-j’s position will contradict the fourth condition.
Hence, we have the following arrangements;

Consider case lla; By the third statement, t is F, and by second statement M2 is E and W3 is C.
Hence, M1 is D.
Here W ^ and W 2 are A and B in no particular order.
Hence, we have the following arrangement;

But, this cannot satisfy the first condition.
Hence, this case is not possible.
Consider case lib; By, third condition, M-| is F.
By statement 2, M2 is E and t is C.
Hence, M3 must be D.
Hence, we have the following arrangements.
By condition 1, W 1 is A and W 2 is B. In this case, we get the following arrangement;

This is the possible arrangement.
Case III:
Note: x cannot be a man. As if y is a woman, z’s position will contradict the fourth statement. But if x and y are men, then z must be a woman. But, in this case, W<|’s position contradicts statement 4.
Similarly, if x is a woman then t must also be a woman; otherwise, M-i’s position will contradict statement 4. But if x and fare women, then y and z must be men. But this contradicts statement 3.
Hence, Case III is not possible.
So, the only possible arrangement possible is case Mb. Hence, final arrangement is;

Hence, Celine’s birthday is being celebrated. Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 52

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
Three couples gather for a birthday party. These couples consist of three women - Asmita, Boby, Celine; and three men - Dinesh, Eshaan, Furqaan. They sit around a rectangular table as shown below, such that everyone is facing the centre.

The following information is also known;

1. Asmita sits opposite Boby or Dinesh.

2. Eshaan sits to the immediately left of Celine.

3. Furqaan sits to the immediate left of one woman and to the immediate right of another woman.

4. The person whose birthday is being celebrated is the only person who sits opposite a man and to the immediate left of a woman.

 

Q.Who sits to the immediate right of Asmita?

Solution:

From the solution to the first question of the set; Furqaan sits to the immediate right of Asmita.
Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 53

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
There are three houses coloured red, yellow and blue on the same side of a road, not necessarily in that order. The red house has a blue bulb installed, the yellow house has a red bulb installed and the blue house has a yellow bulb installed. When the bulbs are switched on, an amazing phenomenon occurs. The red house appears yellow, the yellow house appears blue and the blue house appears red. The bulbs are turned on and off randomly. A person, Red, walks past the houses and has a look at them.

 

Q.As Red walks down the road, he observes that the houses have the colours red, blue and red, in that order. What is the actual colour of the second house? 

Solution:

If the bulb in a house is kept switched OFF, the house colour remains the same.
If the bulb is switched ON, the colour of each house changes as shown below:

R —► Y 
B —► R 
Y —> B

If a person sees two houses with the same colour, it implies that the bulb in one house is switched OFF and in the other is switched ON Red observes the house colours as red, blue and red.
Thus, one of the houses appearing “red” is actually red and the other is actually blue.
So, the house that appears “blue” is actually yellow.
Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 54

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
There are three houses coloured red, yellow and blue on the same side of a road, not necessarily in that order. The red house has a blue bulb installed, the yellow house has a red bulb installed and the blue house has a yellow bulb installed. When the bulbs are switched on, an amazing phenomenon occurs. The red house appears yellow, the yellow house appears blue and the blue house appears red. The bulbs are turned on and off randomly. A person, Red, walks past the houses and has a look at them.

 

Q.On the next day Red again passes by the road in the morning and observes the colour of the houses to be red, blue and red respectively. On returning via the same road in the evening he observes the colour of the first house which comes first on his way back to be yellow. What is the colour of the house that comes last on his way back? 

Solution:

Red observes the colour of the houses as red, blue and red respectively.
Number the houses 1,2, 3 in the order in which he sees them in the morning.
Based on the solution to the first question, house 2 is actually yellow.
Now, the colour of house 3 changes from red in the morning to yellow in the evening.
So, the actual colour of house 3 is red.

The house that he sees last on his way back is house 1; and the actual colour of house 1 is blue.
Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 55

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
There is a rectangular bench such that there are 5 seats each along the longer sides. The two shorter sides are called the head and tail. Also, people sitting in the chairs on the longer sides face the west and east respectively. Assume you are facing the north.

Ten friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J are sitting around this bench, 5 on each side.

1. B and H are at the maximum possible distance

2. C is somewhere between H and D

3. I is opposite to F; F and E are not on the same side

4. J and F are on the left hand side

5. G is not directly opposite D

6. E is somewhere between B and G

7. A, B and F are seated in a clockwise sequence such that the distance between A and F is equal to the distance between B and F

8. G is not fourth from the head

9. F is third from the tail and J is not F’s neighbour

 

Q.Who is seated directly opposite J? 

Solution:

Number the seats on the left side (from head to tail) sequentially as 1 to 5. Similarly, number the seats on the right side (from head to tail) as 6 to 10.
Thus, the arrangement looks like this:
HEAD

1 6
2 7
3 8
4 9
5 10 
TAIL
First identify the people sitting on the left hand side (facing east) and the one sitting on the right hand side (facing west).
It is given that J and F are on the left hand side. Thus, there are only three more people to be identified on the left.
Now, I is opposite to F and F and E are not on the same side.
Therefore, I and E are on the right hand side.
Since E is somewhere between B and G, B and G also have to be on the right hand side.
Thus, now there is only one place left on the right hand side.
C is somewhere between H and D.
Therefore, none of these three people can be on the right hand side. All three have to be on the left hand side.
Thus, only A can be on the right hand side now.
Thus the people on the left hand side are F, J, C, D, H and the people on the right hand side are I, E, B, G, A.
Now, F is third from the tail and J is not next to F. Also, I is opposite to F.
Thus, F is on seat 3, J can be on one of seats 1 and 5 and I is on seat 8.
Also, B and H are at the maximum possible distance. This is possible in two cases : B at 6 and H at 5 or B at 10 and H at 1.
Thus, the arrangement now looks like:

HEAD 
J/H B 
2 7
F I 
4 9
H/J B 
TAIL
Now, it is given that A, B and F are seated in a clockwise sequence such that the distance between A and F is the same as the distance between B and F.
This is possible only if A is on seat 6 and B is on seat 10.
Since B is on seat 10, H and J are on seats 1 and 5 respectively.
Thus, the arrangement now looks like: HEAD 
H A 
2 7
F I 
4 9
J B 
TAIL
Since G is not fourth from the head, G cannot be on seat 9.
Thus, G is on seat 7 and E is on seat 9.
Since D and G are not opposite to each other, D cannot be on seat 2.
Thus, C is on seat 2 and D is on seat 4.
Thus, the final arrangement is as shown below:
HEAD 
H A 
C G 
F I

D E 
J B 
TAIL
Thus, from the final arrangement obtained, B is opposite J. Hence, option 2.

 

QUESTION: 56

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
There is a rectangular bench such that there are 5 seats each along the longer sides. The two shorter sides are called the head and tail. Also, people sitting in the chairs on the longer sides face the west and east respectively. Assume you are facing the north.

Ten friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J are sitting around this bench, 5 on each side.

1. B and H are at the maximum possible distance

2. C is somewhere between H and D

3. I is opposite to F; F and E are not on the same side

4. J and F are on the left hand side

5. G is not directly opposite D

6. E is somewhere between B and G

7. A, B and F are seated in a clockwise sequence such that the distance between A and F is equal to the distance between B and F

8. G is not fourth from the head

9. F is third from the tail and J is not F’s neighbour
 

Q.How many people are between H and D?

Solution:

Consider the final arrangement obtained in the solution to the first question.
It is clear that there are two people (C and F) between H and D.
Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 57

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
Amit, Babloo, Chintu and Ishita are teachers in Xian institute of Psychology. On each day, there are exactly two lectures in the institute. Following information is also known: Each of Amit, Babloo and Chintu teaches on exactly four days a week.
No one takes more than one lecture in a day.
No one takes lectures on three consecutive days. (Saturday and Sunday are considered as consecutive days) The partial time table is as follows:

 

Q.If Babloo teaches on Wednesday, then who teaches with Ishita on Tuesday? 

Solution:

The remaining lectures must be taken by Amit, Babloo and Chintu.
As Babloo teaches on Wednesday and Babloo and Chintu cannot teach on Friday, Amit should take the second lecture on Friday.
So, Chintu must take the second lecture on Thursday.
Hence, Chintu cannot take the second lecture on Saturday.
Similarly, Amit also cannot take the second lecture on Saturday.
Hence, Babloo takes the second lecture on Saturday.
Four lectures of Babloo has been utilized. Hence, the second lecture on Monday and Tuesday will be taken by Amit and Chintu respectively.

Hence, Chintu teaches with Ishita on Tuesday. Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 58

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
Amit, Babloo, Chintu and Ishita are teachers in Xian institute of Psychology. On each day, there are exactly two lectures in the institute. Following information is also known: Each of Amit, Babloo and Chintu teaches on exactly four days a week.
No one takes more than one lecture in a day.
No one takes lectures on three consecutive days. (Saturday and Sunday are considered as consecutive days) The partial time table is as follows:

 

Q.Who among the following will never take a lecture with Ishita? 

Solution:

There are two possible cases: Case I: Babloo takes the second lecture on Wednesday.
From solution to the previous question, Amit does not take a lecture with Ishita.
Case II: Chintu takes the second lecture on Wednesday.
In this case, from third condition, we get that Amit must take second lecture on Thursday.
Hence, Babloo must take the second lecture on Friday.
By third condition, neither Amit nor Chintu can take lecture on Tuesday.

Hence, Babloo takes the second lecture on Tuesday.
So far we have done with four lectures of Babloo. Hence, remaining two lectures must be taken by Amit and Chintu.
Thus the arrangement is:

In this case also, Chintu and Babloo take lecture with Ishita. Hence, Amit never takes a lecture with Ishita.
Hence, option 1.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 59

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Akshay, Bhavna, Chitra, Dinesh, Ezaz, Farookh, Garima, Hamid and Isha are to be divided into 3 categories - Old Fashioned, Invogue and Western. No candidate can be placed in more than one category. The following conditions are to be followed.

1. Invogue should consist of exactly one candidate more than Western.

2. Old Fashioned can have a minimum of zero candidates.

3. Akshay, Dinesh and Garima cannot be placed in Old Fashioned.

4. Bhavna, Ezaz and Hamid cannot be placed in Invogue.

5. Chitra, Farookh and Isha cannot be placed in Western.

 

Q.If Akshay and Chitra are placed in Invogue, at the most how many of the nine candidates can be placed in Western?


Solution:

Invogue = Western + 1 Therefore, the possibilities for the number of people in Invogue and Western respectively are 5 and 4, 4 and 3, 3 and 2, 2 and 1.
To maximise the number of people in Western, the best combination is when there is no person in Old Fashioned.
In such a case, we need to check if Invogue and Western can accept 5 and 4 people respectively.
Akshay and Chitra are already in Invogue.
Also, it is known that Bhavna, Ezaz and Hamid cannot be in Invogue. Hence, they should be in Western.
Similarly, Farookh and Isha cannot be in Western.
Hence, these two should be in Invogue.
This takes the Invogue count to 4.
Now, anyone from Dinesh and Garima should be in Invouge and the other person should be in Western.
Thus, Western can have a maximum of 4 people.
Answer: 4

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 60

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Akshay, Bhavna, Chitra, Dinesh, Ezaz, Farookh, Garima, Hamid and Isha are to be divided into 3 categories - Old Fashioned, Invogue and Western. No candidate can be placed in more than one category. The following conditions are to be followed.

1. Invogue should consist of exactly one candidate more than Western.

2. Old Fashioned can have a minimum of zero candidates.

3. Akshay, Dinesh and Garima cannot be placed in Old Fashioned.

4. Bhavna, Ezaz and Hamid cannot be placed in Invogue.

5. Chitra, Farookh and Isha cannot be placed in Western.

 

Q.The highest number of candidates that can be placed in Old Fashioned are?


Solution:

Akshay, Dinesh, and Garima cannot be placed in Old Fashioned.

Also, Invogue = Western + 1 Assign any two among Akshay, Dinesh, and Garima to Invogue and the third person to western.
Now we are left with 6 persons who can be assigned to Old Fashioned.
Answer: 6

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 61

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A multiplex has the following types of seats available for each show:

The multiplex follows these rules while selling tickets:

1. Maximum number of tickets a customer can buy is five.

2. Tickets are sold to each customer in such a way that the cost is a multiple of hundred.

 

Q.Shruti was the 22nd customer to buy a ticket for a particular show. By the time she reached the counter, 60 tickets for the show had been sold and only 14 tickets of type B were left. Also each of the 21 customers had purchased at least one ticket of type B. Find the maximum number tickets of Type A could be still available if not a single type C ticket was sold?


Solution:

We have the following two constraints:

1. The maximum number of tickets that a customer can buy is 5.

2. Tickets are sold to each customer in such a way that the total cost is a multiple of hundred.
Thus we can see that each of the 21 customers can buy tickets in the following ways only.

As no type C tickets were sold, we can eliminate cases 2, 3, 6, 9 and 10.
Also, as each of the customers had purchased at least one ticket of type B, we can eliminate case 7.
Hence possible combinations are,

Now, 21 people buy 26 tickets of type B. Hence no more than one person can buy the first combination of tickets.
Hence two cases are possible,

Case 1: No person buys the first combination.
Case 2: Exactly one person buys tickets as in the first combination.
Consider Case 1: As no person buys the first combination hence combinations

2, 3, 4 and 5 in the table are possible.
As 21 people buy 26 tickets hence the number of people buying 3rd and 5th combination is 5.
The remaining 16 people will buy the 2nd and 4th combination.
Let us assume that x tickets of type B and x tickets of type D were purchased in combinations 2 and 3.
Let y tickets of type B and 2y tickets of type A be purchased in combination 4.
Let z tickets of type B, z tickets of type A and z/2 tickets of type D be purchased in combination 5.
Hence, x + y+ z = 26, and 2x + 3y + 5z/2 = 60 Now,
2x + 3y + 5z/2 = 2(x + y + z) + y + z/2 = 52 + y + z/2 = 60
Hence, y + z/2 = 8 2y + z = 16 Now, number of A type tickets sold are,
2y + z
Hence number of A type tickets left = 30 - 16 = 14 Consider case 2: 1 person buys the first combination.

Hence remaining 20 persons buy tickets in the 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th combination.
Let us assume that x tickets of type B and x tickets of type D were purchased in combinations 2 and 3.
Let y tickets of type B and 2y tickets of type A be purchased in combination 4.
Let z tickets of type B, z tickets of type A and z/2 tickets of type D be purchased in combination 5.
Hence, x + y + z = 21, and 2x + 3y + 5z/2 = 55 Now,
2x + 3y + 5z/2 = 2(x + y + z) + y + z/2 = 42 + y + z/2 = 55 
Hence, y + z/2 = 13 2y + z = 26 Now, number of tickets of type A that are sold is 2y + z = 26 Hence number of A type tickets left = 30 - 26 = 4 Either 4 or 14 tickets of type A were still available.
Answer: 14

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 62

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A multiplex has the following types of seats available for each show:

The multiplex follows these rules while selling tickets:

1. Maximum number of tickets a customer can buy is five.

2. Tickets are sold to each customer in such a way that the cost is a multiple of hundred.

 

Q.Assuming data in the previous question, if less than 10 tickets of type A were left unsold, how many tickets of type D were sold before Shruti reached the counter?


Solution:

Referring to the previous answer we can see that as less than 10 tickets of type A were left unsold, 26 tickets of type A, 26 tickets of type B and 8 tickets of type D were sold.

Answer: 8

QUESTION: 63

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A Fibonacci series is defined as follows: The first two elements of the series are 1, 1 and each subsequent term is the sum of the previous two terms.

There are two rings each having the shape of a regular octagon.

The first eight elements of the Fibonacci series are placed at the corner of each ring such that they are in clockwise direction on ring 1 and in anti clockwise direction on ring 2.

Ring 2 is placed above ring 1 such that the first element of both rings coincides.

Based on the above information, answer the questions that follow.

 

Q.Which element, except 1, will coincide on both rings?

Solution:

The first eight element of Fibonacci series are, 1, 1,2, 3, 5, 8, 13,21

Since this same series is placed at the corners of two octagons such that one is placed clockwise and the other is placed anticlockwise, the first element of both will coincide, the second of one series and the eighth of the other will coincide, the third of one series and the seventh of the other will coincide, the fourth of one series and the sicth of the other will coincide and the fifth of both series will coincide.
Thus, the fifth element i.e. 5, will coincide will itself.
Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 64

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A Fibonacci series is defined as follows: The first two elements of the series are 1, 1 and each subsequent term is the sum of the previous two terms.

There are two rings each having the shape of a regular octagon.

The first eight elements of the Fibonacci series are placed at the corner of each ring such that they are in clockwise direction on ring 1 and in anti clockwise direction on ring 2.

Ring 2 is placed above ring 1 such that the first element of both rings coincides.

Based on the above information, answer the questions that follow.

 

Q.The maximum sum among coinciding pairs is :

Solution:

The first eight element of the Fibonacci series are 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13,21
The elements of ring 1 are placed in clockwise fashion while those ring 2 are placed in anticlockwise fashion.
The arrangement of the two circular rings can be expressed linearly as follows: Ring 1 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 Ring 2 1 21 13 8 5 3 2 1 Thus, the maximum sum amongI coinciding pairs is 21 + 1 = 22
Hence, option 3

QUESTION: 65

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A Fibonacci series is defined as follows: The first two elements of the series are 1, 1 and each subsequent term is the sum of the previous two terms.

There are two rings each having the shape of a regular octagon.

The first eight elements of the Fibonacci series are placed at the corner of each ring such that they are in clockwise direction on ring 1 and in anti clockwise direction on ring 2.

Ring 2 is placed above ring 1 such that the first element of both rings coincides.

Based on the above information, answer the questions that follow.

 

Q.If ring 1 is rotated clock wise by 90 degrees, then how many numbers will coincide on both rings?

Solution:

Consider the linear representation of the elements of both rings.
Ring 1 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 Ring 2 1 21 13 8 5 3 2 1 Rotating ring 1 clock wise by 90 degrees is same as shifting each element of ring 1 by 2 places.
Hence, the linear representation of the elements in their new position will be: Ring 1 13 21 1 1 2 3 5 8 Ring 2 1 21 13 8 5 3 2 1 Thus, the numbers 21 and 3 now coincide on both rings.
Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 66

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
A Fibonacci series is defined as follows: The first two elements of the series are 1, 1 and each subsequent term is the sum of the previous two terms.

There are two rings each having the shape of a regular octagon.

The first eight elements of the Fibonacci series are placed at the corner of each ring such that they are in clockwise direction on ring 1 and in anti clockwise direction on ring 2.

Ring 2 is placed above ring 1 such that the first element of both rings coincides.

Based on the above information, answer the questions that follow.

 

Q.The maximum product among the coinciding pairs can be :

Solution:

The first eight element of Fibonacci series are 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13,21

The arrangement of the elements of the two circular rings can be expressed linearly as follows: Ring 1 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 Ring 2 1 21 13 8 5 3 2 1 Thus, the maximum product among the coinciding pairs is 13 x 2 = 26 Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 67

N is an even number such that  . Also, A = N+ 2N. The largest natural number that always divides 2(A2 - 8A) is

Solution:

N > 4 and largest number that divides 2(A2 - 8A) is required.
N = 4
A = 24
2(A2 - 8A) = 768
The largest natural number dividing 768 is 768.
Hence, option 2.
Alternatively,

2(A2 - 8A) = 2A(A - 8) = 2(N2 + 2N)(N2 + 2N - 8) = 2N(N + 2)9N+ 4)(N - 2)
Note: N( N + 2)( N + 4)( N - 2 ) = ( N - 2)N(N+ 2)(N + 4) is a product of 4 consecutive even numbers.
The product of 4 consecutive even numbers is always divisible by 384.
2(A2 - 8A) is divisible by 2 * 384 = 768.
Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 68

If an = an - 1 - an - 2 for n > 2 and a6001 = a6005 = 6003 then what is the value of a6003?

Solution:

a6005 = a6004 - a6003 (i)

a6004 = a6003 - a6002  (ii)

a6003 = a6002 - a6001  (iii)

Substituting (iii) in (ii),

a6004 = a6002 - a6001 - a6002

a6005 =  _a6001 - a6003

a6003 =-2 x a6005 = - 12006

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 69

How many numbers among the given numbers do not belong to the domain of the function  f(x) = log (x5 -  x)?

Solution:

We know that the logarithm of zero and negative numbers does not exist.
I and II definitely do not belong to the domain of f(x).

f(x) = log (x5 - x)

So, only -19/83 belongs to the domain of f(x).
Answer: 3

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 70

A circle is drawn with point (a, 0) and ((3, 0) as the end point of diameter. If a and p are roots of the equation x2 + |x| - 2, then maximum possible area of a square (in sq. units) which can be inscribed in a circle is:


Solution:

Let, f(x) = x2 + |x| - 2

For x > 0, f(x) = x2 + x - 2

f(x) = (x + 2)(x - 1) Then root of f(x) for x > 0 will be, 1.
For x < 0, f(x) = x2 - x - 2

f{x) = (x - 2)(x + 1)

Then root of f(x) for x < 0 will be, -1.

ence a = 1 or -1, and (3 = -1 or 1.
Hence, diameter of the circle is = 1 - (- 1) = 2 units Maximum area of the square which can be inscribed in a circle = Product of the diagonals/2 = (22)/2 = 2 sq. units

Answer: 2

QUESTION: 71

A fraction is squared and added to one. The square root of the resultant is more than the original fraction by 25%. Find the fraction if it is positive.

Solution:

Let the fraction be(x/y)

From the given conditions;

xly = 4/3

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 72

The points where graphs x2 + y2 = 32 and y2 = 4 x intersect are

Solution:

Put y2 = 4x in x2 + y2 = 32

We get x2 + 4x - 32 = 0

On solving the the above equation we get x = -8 or x = 4

When x = -8 we get imaginary y co-ordinate and when x = 4 we get y = -4 and y = 4

The co-ordinates where these points intersect are (4,4) and (4,-4).
Hence, option 3.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 73

What is the sum of digits of p + 7, if p - 7, p + 3, p + 7 are all prime numbers?


Solution:

jA ny integer can be expressed in the form 3 k or 3 k + 1 o r 3 k - 1.
If p = 3k, then p - 7, p + 3 and p + 7 are 3 k - 7, 3 k + 3 and 3 k + 7 respectively. They leave remainders of 2, 0 and 1 respectively when divided by 3.
If p = 3k + 1, then p - 7, p + 3 and p + 7 are 3k - 6, 3k + 4 and 3k + 8 respectively. They leave remainders of 0, 1 and 2 respectively when divided by 3.
If p = 3k - 1, then p - 7, p + 3 and p + 7 are 3k - 8, 3k + 2 and 3k + 6 respectively. They leave remainders of 1, 2 and 0

But p - 7, p + 3 and p + 7 are all prime. The only prime number that gives a remainder of 0 when divided by 3 is 3.
Thus one of the three prime numbers has to be 3.
Clearly, it cannot be p + 3 or p + 7, or else the other two numbers will be non-positive. p - 7 = 3 p + 3 = 13 and p + 7 = 17 The sum of digits of p + 7 is 8.
Answer: 8

QUESTION: 74

50 shares of a 8% stock are sold at Rs. 4000 per share and with the proceeds, a 10% stock is bought at Rs. 2500 per share. What is the resulting change in the dividend earnings? (Assume face value of each stock is Rs. 100.)

Solution:

Stocks sold worth Rs. 50 * 4000 = Rs. 2,00,000 Number of shares purchased = 200000/2500 = 80 Earlier income from dividend = 8% x 100 * 50 = Rs. 400 New income from dividend = 10% x 100 x 80 = Rs. 800 Thus, the resulting change in the dividend earnings is a profit of Rs. 400

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 75

Nihir mixes 30 litres of kerosene with 90 litres of petrol. After selling one-third of this mixture, he adds kerosene to replenish the quantity that he has sold. What is the current proportion of kerosene in the mixuture?

Solution:

The quantity of petrol and kerosene is as shown in the table.
Current proportion of kerosene in the mixture = 60 : (60 + 60)= 1 :2
Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 76

A conference table is in the shape of a polygon with sides parallel to either the x-axis or the y-axis. A corner of such a polygon is said to be convex if the internal angle is 90° or concave if the internal angle is 270°. If the table has 20 convex corners, then the number of ways in which people can be seated at concave corners is:

Solution:

Consider the polygon as shown in the figure. Here 4 corners A, D, G and J are the concave corners and remaining 8 corners are convex corners.
In general, for a polygon with sides parallel to the axes, if n is the number of concave corners and m is the number of convex corners, then we have,

m - n = 4 v

m = 20

n = 16
People can be seated in the concave corners in 15! ways. ...[••• Number of ways of seating people will be calculated as in case of circular seating arrangement] Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 77

If Rahul drives at a speed of 16 km/hr he reaches his destination at 6:15 pm. If he drives at speed of 20 km/hr, he reaches the same place at 5:00 pm. What time does he start and at what speed should he drive to reach same place at 12:30 am the following day?

Solution:

Suppose Rahul takes x hours to reach the place at 6:15 pm at speed of 16 km/hr.
Difference in Rahul's travel time when he travels at a speed of 16 km/hr and when at 20 km/hr = 1.25 hr

Since the distance travelled in the two cases is constant,

16x = 2 0 ( x - 1.25)

x = 6.25 hrs

Rahul started at 12:00 pm.
Distance between the starting point and Rahul's destination = 6.25x 16 = 100 km Now, to reach the same place at 12:30 am next day he will have to drive for 12.5 hrs.
Speed at which Rahul drives to reach his destination at 12:30 am = 100/12.50 = 8 km/hr

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 78

Consider the  shown in the following figure where QR = 18 cm, QS = 12 cm, RS = 16 cm and m∠QRS = m ∠QPR. What is the ratio of the perimeter of the  to that of the

 

Solution:

m∠QRS = m∠QPR and zQ is common to triangles PQR and RQS,
ΔPQR ~ ΔRQS 
PQ/RQ = QR/QS = PR/RS 
PQ/18 = 18/12 = PR/16 
PQ = 27 cm and PR = 24 cm

PS = PQ - QS = 27 - 12 = 15 cm

Perimeter of APSR = 15 + 16 + 24 = 55 cm And, perimeter of AQRS = 18 + 16 + 12 = 46 cm Required ratio = 55/46

Alternatively,Perimeter of AQRS = 18+16 + 12 = 46 cm So denominator of the ratio should be a factor of 46. 9 is not a factor of 46.
Therefore, among the given options, 55/46 is the only possible value of the ratio.
Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 79

If l and m are the roots of die equation ax2 + b x + c then the equation whose roots are 

Solution:

The sum of roots of the new equation 

Product of roots of the new equation 

We see that option 1 gives such an equation. Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 80

What is the value of S?

Solution:

Where, Sn is the nth term of the given series. Pn is the nth term of the Arithmetic progression with first term 2 and common difference 3 and Qn is the nth term of the Arithmetic Progression with first term 5 and common difference 3.

.•.Pn = 2 + 3 ( n - 1 )

For Pn = 95, n = 32

Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 81

A fighter plane traveling at u km/hr wants to refuel itself in mid-air. It sights a refueling station coming towards it with a speed of v km/hr. The angle of elevation from the refuelling station and the shortest distance between them are 30° and 220 km respectively. The plane sends a signal for refueling to the refueling station. It receives a confirmation in 10 minutes. During this time, the angle of elevation changes to 60°. If the vertical distance between them remains the same throughout and u : v = 10 : 1 , find the speed of the refueling station.

Solution:

The positions of the plane and the refueling station during the 10 minute span can be shown as follows,

The vertical distance (SQ or S'R) between the plane and the refueling station:

SQ = S'R = PS sin 30° = 220 sin 30° = 110 km

The initial horizontal distance (PQ) between the plane and the refueling station:

The final horizontal distance (P'R) between the plane and the refueling station:

Now, PQ = PP' + P'R + SS'

Also,

u = 10v

Substituting the value of u in (i),

Solving the given equation, we get,

Hence, option 2.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 82

A father distributes his wealth of Rs. 76,000 unequally among his 3 children Ramesh, Suresh and Yadnesh such that Ramesh gets one third of what Suresh gets and Suresh gets one-fifth of what Yadnesh gets. Find the amount with Yadnesh.


Solution:

Let Yadnesh gets Rs. 15x, so Suresh will get 3x and Ramesh will getx.
x + 3x + 15x = 19x = 76000

x = 4000 and hence, Yadnesh’s share = 15x = Rs. 60,000 Answer: 60000

QUESTION: 83

A number is formed by writing all the natural numbers upto n as follows: 123456...n. If this number is divisible by 3, then what is the remainder when n is divided by 3?

Solution:

If the number is divisible by 3, then the sum of its digits should be divisible by 3.
n should be such that (1 + 2 + 3 + ... + n) is divisible by 3.

Either n or n + 1 should be divisible by 3.

If n is divisible by 3, then n should give a remainder of 0 or if n + 1 is divisible by 3, then n should give a remainder of 2 when divided by 3.
Hence, option 4.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 84

Premchand made an aggregate profit of (226/15)% by selling bats by exporting to china, England and India at 8%, 12% and 18% profit respectively. The selling of bats to China and England got him a profit of (74/9)%. How many bats were exported to India if the total number of bats exported were 600 and all bats were bought at the same price?


Solution:

Let x and y be the number of bats exported to China and England, respectively.
Number of bats exported to India = 600 - (x + y)

Let the cost of each bat be Re. 1.
Total cost of bats exported to China, England and India is x, y and 600 - (x + y), respectively.
Profit made by selling bats to China and England is (74/9)%,

[0.08x + 0.12y]/[x + y] = 74/900

72x + 108y = 74x + 74y

x = 17y
Aggregate profit earned by selling the bats to three different places is (226/15)%.

[0.08x + 0.12y + 0.18(600 - x - y)]/600 = 226/1500

0.08x+ 0.12y+ 108 - 0.18x- 0.18y = 90.4 0.1x+ 0.06y = 17.6

Now, substituting x = 17y, we get,

0.1(17y) + 0.06y = 17.6

1.7y + 0.06y = 17.6

1.76y = 17.6

y - 10

x = X l y - 170
The number of bats exported to India = 600 - (x + y) = 600 - 180 = 420
Answer: 420

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 85

A man is four times as good as a woman and takes 90 days less than a woman to do a job. Find the number of days in which they together do twice the work.


Solution:

If a man can do a job in x days, a woman can do it in 4x days.
4x - x = 90

x = 30
Thus, a man and woman can independently do the work in 30 and 120 days respectively.
If the original work is 120 units, the man and woman do 4 units and 1 unit of work (per day) respectively.
Number of days taken by both of them to do twice the work = 240/(4 + 1) = 48 days.
Answer: 48

QUESTION: 86

There are k boxes and each has n regular packs of cards. Each pack has 52 cards in it. In each pack each card has a face value starting from ace as 1, 2 as 2, 3 as 3,..., Jack as 11, Queen as 12 and the King as 13. In how many ways the card is drawn such that its value is less than the value of Queen?

Solution:

Since we are looking at drawing a card whose value is less than the value of the queen it means that the card should have a value that is equal to the value of Jack or less than that.
So number of ways of drawing a card of value less than or equal to Jack
= Number of ways of selecting a box x Number of ways of selecting a pack x number of ways of selecting a card

= k x n x  4 x 11

= 44 kn

Hence, option 2.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 87

PQRS is a quadrilateral which is inscribed in a circle. Measures of three of its angles are in the ratio of 2 : 3 : 4. If any of the diagonals of the quadrilateral is not the diameter of the circumcircle, what is the measure of the largest possible angle?


Solution:

Let the angles of the quadrilateral be 2a, 3a, 4a and b.
Since PQRS is a cyclic quadrilateral, the sum of its opposite angles is 180°.
Three cases are possible.
Case I: 2a + 3a = 4a + b= 180°

5a = 180° which implies that a = 36° and b = 180 - 144 = 36° So, the angles are 72°, 108°, 144° and 36°.
Case II:

2a + 4a = 3a + b = 180°

6a = 180° which implies that 3a = 90°

Since 3a is one of the angles of the quadrilateral, this implies that in this case one of the diagonals of the quadrilateral is a diameter of the circumcircle. Hence, this case is discarded.
Case III:

2a + b = 3a + 4a = 180°

7a = 180° which implies that a « 25.71°

So, the angles are approximately of measure 51.42°, 77.13°, 102.84° and 128.58°.
Thus, the largest possible angle is 144°.
Answer: 144

QUESTION: 88

A playground is in shape of a parallelogram with one of its angles to be 60°. Length of its longer diagonal is 8 m. What is the area of the playground if the diagonals bisect its angles?

Solution:

The diagonals bisect the angles of the parallelogram => The parallelogram is a rhombus.
The diagonals of the rhombus are perpendicular bisectors of each other.

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 89

Solution:

The fractions are in the form of (b - a)/ab.

Thus `x` can be written as

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 90

A thirsty crow finds a cylindrical drum of height 12 units and radius 1 units, which has water upto a height of 8 units. Since the crow can only drink water from the brim of the drum, it is unable to drink the water right now. He therefore throws 120 spherical pebbles of diameter 0.5 units in the tumbler. How many more pebbles does he need to throw in the drum so that he can drink the water? Neglect the space between the pebbles.

Solution:

Let the increase in the height of water in the tumbler be h units because of the 120 pebbles of diameter 0.5 units that are dropped in the tumbler

h = 2.5 units
Height of the water in the drum after 120 pebbles are thrown = 8 + 2.5 = 10.5 units The crow still needs to raise the height of the water by 1.5 units.
Let n be the number of pebbles needed to raise the height of the water by 1.5 units.

n = 72

Hence, option 1.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 91

It is known that two circles of radii 3 cm and 6 cm have at most 1 common tangent. Let d and D be the minimum and maximum possible distances between their centres. What is the value, in cm, of (D - d)?


Solution:

If the two circles have at most 1 common tangent, they can either have no common tangents or one common tangent. They will have no common tangent if one circle is completely within the other with no point of contact, and one common tangent if one circle is inside the other, but there is one point of contact.
To find d (the minimum distance between centres) we observe that the least distance between centres will occur when the circles are concentric, so d = 0.

Clearly, the centres will be farthest apart when the circles are tangent to each other (because, in both our cases, we know that one circle is interior to the other).
Thus, D is equal to the difference in the radii o f the circles = 6 - 3 = 3 cm Further, (D - d) = 3 - 0 = 3 cm Answer: 3

QUESTION: 92

If 25p + 1 < 8r, and 2r + 9 = 7q2, then

Solution:

We have,

25p + 1 < 8r ...(i)

2 r + 9 = 7g2 ...(ii)

From (i) and (ii), we get,

25p + 1 < 4(2r)

25p + 1 < 4(7q2 - 9)

p < (28g2 - 37)/25

For q = 1, we get p < 0
P < Q
For q = 2, we get p < 3

p could be greater than or less than q.
None of the given options are necessarily true.

Hence, option 4.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 93

Radha went to Mega Bazar to buy fruits. Only 100 units each of apples, bananas, oranges, guavas and melons were available in the fruits section. The number of fruits that she bought of each type were in the ratio 6 : 7 : 8 : 9 : 10. In all she bought 56% of the total fruits available. The number of types of fruits of which she bought more than 60% of units available is:


Solution:

Total number of fruits available = 5 * 100 = 500

Let the number of fruits of each type bought be 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x and 10x.
6x + 7x + 8x + 9x + 10x = 56% of 500 
x = 7
Number of apples, bananas, oranges, guavas and melons bought are 42, 49, 56, 63 and 70.
She bought more than 60% of the units available for 2 types of fruits.
Answer: 2

QUESTION: 94

What are the last two digits of 7200?

Solution:

71 = 7
72 = 49
73 = 343
74 = 2401
75 = 74 x 7 = 2401 x 7 = 2400 x 7 + 7, which will have 07 at the end.

76 = 74 x 49 = 2401 X 49 = 2400 x 49 + 49, which will have 49 at the end.

77 = 74 x 343 = 2401 x 343 = 2400 x 343 + 343, which will have 43 at the end.

78 = 74 x 74 = 2401 x 2401, which will have 01 at the end.
The last two digits of powers of 7 repeat in the cycle : 07, 49, 43, 01 and so on. Hence, for 4nth power of 7, the last two digits are 01.
Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 95

A right-angled triangle has inradius as 2 cm and hypotenuse as 10 cm. Find the length, in cm, of the smaller of the two perpendicular sides.

Solution:

From the options we can see that all the values are integers.
Thus, the sides of the triangle have to be a triplet with hypotenuse = 10.

The only triplet possible is (6, 8, 10) Hence, option 2.
Alternatively,

From the given diagram we get

x + y = 10 ... (i)

Also,
(x + 2)2 + (y + 2)2 = 100 ...(ii)

From (1) and (2) we get,

xy = 24 ...(iii)

On solving (i) and (ii) we get,

x = 6 or 4 and y = 4 or 6

Note: x, y < 10

The smaller of the two sides is 4 + 2 = 6 cm.
Hence, option 2.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 96

In a class with a certain number of students, the average weight of students increases by 1 when a boy of weight 35 kg comes in, while the average weight goes down by 1 when a girl of weight 21 kg joins the class. Find the number of students in the class.


Solution:

Let S be the sum of the weights of all the students in the class and n be the number of students in the class.
The average of the weight of the class = S/n From the given information, we get the following equations,

S/n + 1 = (S + 35)/(n + 1)... (1)

S/n - 1 = (S + 21)/(n + 1)... (2)

Solving for n, we get, 2(n + 1) = 14 .•./? = 6
Answer: 6

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 97

 is right angled at B and AC = 10 cm. What is the maximum possible value (in cm2) of (AB + BC)2?


Solution:

By Pythagoras theorem, we have that,

AB2 + BC2 = AC2 = 100 cm2

Now, (AB + BC)2 = AB2 + BC2 + 2 x (AB x BC) = 100 + 2 x (AB x BC)

Now using the AM-GM inequality we get that,

Maximum value of 2 x (AB x BC) =100 cm2 Maximum value of (AB + BC)2 = 100 + 100 = 200 cm2 
Answer: 200

 

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 98

Raju wrote first N natural numbers on a blackboard. Later he erased one number and calculated the average of remaining numbers. It turned out to be . Which number did he erased.  


Solution:

Denominator contains the number 17, which implies number of terms = 17 k
Since the original average must be around 34 - 36, number of terms must be in the range 67-71

Therefore k = 4

Number of terms = 17 x 4 = 68 (after erasing one number) Therefore number of terms originally = 68 + 1 = 69

Original average = (69 + 1 )/2 = 35

Sum of 69 numbers = 35 x 69 = 2415

The number that was erased = 2415 - 2400 = 15 
Answer: 15

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 99

If the sum of the third and ninth term of an A.P. is 8, what will be the sum of the first 11 terms of the progression?


Solution:

The third term is ‘t3' and ninth term is ‘tg'o f an A. P.
Then, t3 + tg = 8
(a + 2d) + (a + 8d) = 8 .......... Since tn = a + (n - 1 )d
2a + 10c/ = 8

Now sum of 11 terms is expressed as

S n = ( 11/ 2 ) x [2a + 10d] = 11 x 4
S11 = 44 Answer: 44

QUESTION: 100

Three non zero integers x, y and z are such that  .What is the least value of xz/y?

Solution:

Least value of xz/y occurs when it is negative with maximum absolute value.
It can occur when |x x z| is maximum (i.e. 3 x 7 = 21) and |y| is minimum (i.e. 1), and one/all three of x, y, z are negative.
The least value of xz/y is -21.
Hence, option 2.

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