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CAT Practice Test - 13


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76 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series | CAT Practice Test - 13

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CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 1

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
"Free of the taint of manufacture" – that phrase, in particular, is heavily loaded with the ideology of what the Victorian socialist William Morris called the "anti-scrape", or an anticapitalist conservationism (not conservatism) that solaced itself with the vision of a preindustrial golden age. In Britain, folk may often appear a cosy, fossilised form, but when you look more closely, the idea of folk – who has the right to sing it, dance it, invoke it, collect it, belong to it or appropriate it for political or cultural ends – has always been contested territory. . . .
In our own time, though, the word "folk" . . . has achieved the rare distinction of occupying fashionable and unfashionable status simultaneously. Just as the effusive floral prints of the radical William Morris now cover genteel sofas, so the revolutionary intentions of many folk historians and revivalists have led to music that is commonly regarded as parochial and conservative. And yet – as newspaper columns periodically rejoice – folk is hip again, influencing artists, clothing and furniture designers, celebrated at music festivals, awards ceremonies and on TV, reissued on countless record labels. Folk is a sonic "shabby chic", containing elements of the uncanny and eerie, as well as an antique veneer, a whiff of Britain's heathen dark ages. The very obscurity and anonymity of folk music's origins open up space for rampant imaginative fancies. . . .
[Cecil Sharp, who wrote about this subject, believed that] folk songs existed in constant transformation, a living example of an art form in a perpetual state of renewal. "One man sings a song, and then others sing it after him, changing what they do not like" is the most concise summary of his conclusions on its origins. He compared each rendition of a ballad to an acorn falling from an oak tree; every subsequent iteration sows the song anew. But there is tension in newness. In the late 1960s, purists were suspicious of folk songs recast in rock idioms. Electrification, however, comes in many forms. For the early-20th-century composers such as Vaughan Williams and Holst, there were thunderbolts of inspiration from oriental mysticism, angular modernism and the body blow of the first world war, as well as input from the rediscovered folk tradition itself.
For the second wave of folk revivalists, such as Ewan MacColl and AL Lloyd, starting in the 40s, the vital spark was communism's dream of a post-revolutionary New Jerusalem. For their younger successors in the 60s, who thronged the folk clubs set up by the old guard, the lyrical freedom of Dylan and the unchained melodies of psychedelia created the conditions for folkrock's own golden age, a brief Indian summer that lasted from about 1969 to 1971. . . . Four decades on, even that progressive period has become just one more era ripe for fashionable emulation and pastiche. The idea of a folk tradition being exclusively confined to oral transmission has become a much looser, less severely guarded concept. Recorded music and television, for today's metropolitan generation, are where the equivalent of folk memories are seeded. . . .

Q. Which of the following statements about folk revivalism of the 1940s and 1960s cannot be inferred from the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 1

“In the late 1960s, purists were suspicious of folk songs recast in rock idioms. Electrification, however, comes in many forms.”
The author says that electrification, however, comes in many forms; in other words, electrification need not always come through rock along. It might come from any other form of music as well. Thus option 2 surely cannot be inferred.
Option 4 can be inferred because Cecil Sharp talks about folk music’s ability to adapt. The music of 40s and 60s demonstrates that adaptation.
The passage says that in the late 1960s, Purists were suspicious of folk songs recast in rock idioms, this suggests that it had critics. The purists were those critics. This supports choice 1
“…the lyrical freedom of Bob Dylan…” this phrase comes in support of choice 3

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 2

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
"Free of the taint of manufacture" – that phrase, in particular, is heavily loaded with the ideology of what the Victorian socialist William Morris called the "anti-scrape", or an anticapitalist conservationism (not conservatism) that solaced itself with the vision of a preindustrial golden age. In Britain, folk may often appear a cosy, fossilised form, but when you look more closely, the idea of folk – who has the right to sing it, dance it, invoke it, collect it, belong to it or appropriate it for political or cultural ends – has always been contested territory. . . .
In our own time, though, the word "folk" . . . has achieved the rare distinction of occupying fashionable and unfashionable status simultaneously. Just as the effusive floral prints of the radical William Morris now cover genteel sofas, so the revolutionary intentions of many folk historians and revivalists have led to music that is commonly regarded as parochial and conservative. And yet – as newspaper columns periodically rejoice – folk is hip again, influencing artists, clothing and furniture designers, celebrated at music festivals, awards ceremonies and on TV, reissued on countless record labels. Folk is a sonic "shabby chic", containing elements of the uncanny and eerie, as well as an antique veneer, a whiff of Britain's heathen dark ages. The very obscurity and anonymity of folk music's origins open up space for rampant imaginative fancies. . . .
[Cecil Sharp, who wrote about this subject, believed that] folk songs existed in constant transformation, a living example of an art form in a perpetual state of renewal. "One man sings a song, and then others sing it after him, changing what they do not like" is the most concise summary of his conclusions on its origins. He compared each rendition of a ballad to an acorn falling from an oak tree; every subsequent iteration sows the song anew. But there is tension in newness. In the late 1960s, purists were suspicious of folk songs recast in rock idioms. Electrification, however, comes in many forms. For the early-20th-century composers such as Vaughan Williams and Holst, there were thunderbolts of inspiration from oriental mysticism, angular modernism and the body blow of the first world war, as well as input from the rediscovered folk tradition itself.
For the second wave of folk revivalists, such as Ewan MacColl and AL Lloyd, starting in the 40s, the vital spark was communism's dream of a post-revolutionary New Jerusalem. For their younger successors in the 60s, who thronged the folk clubs set up by the old guard, the lyrical freedom of Dylan and the unchained melodies of psychedelia created the conditions for folkrock's own golden age, a brief Indian summer that lasted from about 1969 to 1971. . . . Four decades on, even that progressive period has become just one more era ripe for fashionable emulation and pastiche. The idea of a folk tradition being exclusively confined to oral transmission has become a much looser, less severely guarded concept. Recorded music and television, for today's metropolitan generation, are where the equivalent of folk memories are seeded. . . .

Q. All of the following are causes for plurality and diversity within the British folk tradition EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 2

Diversity will surely come if there is long history of past influence. Both option 1 and option 2 support that. The fluidity of folk forms means adaptability of folk forms, or flexibility of folk forms. Thus even 4 justifies the idea of diversity.
Option 1 goes out because being popular or unpopular has nothing to do with diversity.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 3

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
"Free of the taint of manufacture" – that phrase, in particular, is heavily loaded with the ideology of what the Victorian socialist William Morris called the "anti-scrape", or an anticapitalist conservationism (not conservatism) that solaced itself with the vision of a preindustrial golden age. In Britain, folk may often appear a cosy, fossilised form, but when you look more closely, the idea of folk – who has the right to sing it, dance it, invoke it, collect it, belong to it or appropriate it for political or cultural ends – has always been contested territory. . . .
In our own time, though, the word "folk" . . . has achieved the rare distinction of occupying fashionable and unfashionable status simultaneously. Just as the effusive floral prints of the radical William Morris now cover genteel sofas, so the revolutionary intentions of many folk historians and revivalists have led to music that is commonly regarded as parochial and conservative. And yet – as newspaper columns periodically rejoice – folk is hip again, influencing artists, clothing and furniture designers, celebrated at music festivals, awards ceremonies and on TV, reissued on countless record labels. Folk is a sonic "shabby chic", containing elements of the uncanny and eerie, as well as an antique veneer, a whiff of Britain's heathen dark ages. The very obscurity and anonymity of folk music's origins open up space for rampant imaginative fancies. . . .
[Cecil Sharp, who wrote about this subject, believed that] folk songs existed in constant transformation, a living example of an art form in a perpetual state of renewal. "One man sings a song, and then others sing it after him, changing what they do not like" is the most concise summary of his conclusions on its origins. He compared each rendition of a ballad to an acorn falling from an oak tree; every subsequent iteration sows the song anew. But there is tension in newness. In the late 1960s, purists were suspicious of folk songs recast in rock idioms. Electrification, however, comes in many forms. For the early-20th-century composers such as Vaughan Williams and Holst, there were thunderbolts of inspiration from oriental mysticism, angular modernism and the body blow of the first world war, as well as input from the rediscovered folk tradition itself.
For the second wave of folk revivalists, such as Ewan MacColl and AL Lloyd, starting in the 40s, the vital spark was communism's dream of a post-revolutionary New Jerusalem. For their younger successors in the 60s, who thronged the folk clubs set up by the old guard, the lyrical freedom of Dylan and the unchained melodies of psychedelia created the conditions for folkrock's own golden age, a brief Indian summer that lasted from about 1969 to 1971. . . . Four decades on, even that progressive period has become just one more era ripe for fashionable emulation and pastiche. The idea of a folk tradition being exclusively confined to oral transmission has become a much looser, less severely guarded concept. Recorded music and television, for today's metropolitan generation, are where the equivalent of folk memories are seeded. . . .

Q. At a conference on folk forms, the author of the passage is least likely to agree with which one of the following views?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 3

Right across the passage the author appreciates how folk forms have been used my modern musicians, and appreciates the fusion of folk with other forms of music.
Option 1 supports the author’s opinion by asserting that folk forms have the ability to influence and be influenced by. The author will agree with this statement.
Option 2 also supports the author’s contention that folk forms were relevant and are relevant even today
Option 4 also supports the author’s point and therefore the author is likely to agree with this point
Option 3 is the right choice because it says that folk music exhibit unusual homogeneity. If there is homogeneity, then the idea of the adapting and infusing with other kinds of music is not valid. Thus the author will not agree with this. The author would rather say that folk music, by influencing and by getting influenced, becomes heterogeneous and not homogenous. Heterogeneous means mixed with varieties, while homogenous means comprising things of the same type.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 4

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
"Free of the taint of manufacture" – that phrase, in particular, is heavily loaded with the ideology of what the Victorian socialist William Morris called the "anti-scrape", or an anticapitalist conservationism (not conservatism) that solaced itself with the vision of a preindustrial golden age. In Britain, folk may often appear a cosy, fossilised form, but when you look more closely, the idea of folk – who has the right to sing it, dance it, invoke it, collect it, belong to it or appropriate it for political or cultural ends – has always been contested territory. . . .
In our own time, though, the word "folk" . . . has achieved the rare distinction of occupying fashionable and unfashionable status simultaneously. Just as the effusive floral prints of the radical William Morris now cover genteel sofas, so the revolutionary intentions of many folk historians and revivalists have led to music that is commonly regarded as parochial and conservative. And yet – as newspaper columns periodically rejoice – folk is hip again, influencing artists, clothing and furniture designers, celebrated at music festivals, awards ceremonies and on TV, reissued on countless record labels. Folk is a sonic "shabby chic", containing elements of the uncanny and eerie, as well as an antique veneer, a whiff of Britain's heathen dark ages. The very obscurity and anonymity of folk music's origins open up space for rampant imaginative fancies. . . .
[Cecil Sharp, who wrote about this subject, believed that] folk songs existed in constant transformation, a living example of an art form in a perpetual state of renewal. "One man sings a song, and then others sing it after him, changing what they do not like" is the most concise summary of his conclusions on its origins. He compared each rendition of a ballad to an acorn falling from an oak tree; every subsequent iteration sows the song anew. But there is tension in newness. In the late 1960s, purists were suspicious of folk songs recast in rock idioms. Electrification, however, comes in many forms. For the early-20th-century composers such as Vaughan Williams and Holst, there were thunderbolts of inspiration from oriental mysticism, angular modernism and the body blow of the first world war, as well as input from the rediscovered folk tradition itself.
For the second wave of folk revivalists, such as Ewan MacColl and AL Lloyd, starting in the 40s, the vital spark was communism's dream of a post-revolutionary New Jerusalem. For their younger successors in the 60s, who thronged the folk clubs set up by the old guard, the lyrical freedom of Dylan and the unchained melodies of psychedelia created the conditions for folkrock's own golden age, a brief Indian summer that lasted from about 1969 to 1971. . . . Four decades on, even that progressive period has become just one more era ripe for fashionable emulation and pastiche. The idea of a folk tradition being exclusively confined to oral transmission has become a much looser, less severely guarded concept. Recorded music and television, for today's metropolitan generation, are where the equivalent of folk memories are seeded. . . .

Q. the pervasive influence of folk on contemporary art, culture, and fashion.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 4

Our team could not come up with the correct explanation for this question, though by elimination and by understanding the context, we can arrive at option 3 as the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 5

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
"Free of the taint of manufacture" – that phrase, in particular, is heavily loaded with the ideology of what the Victorian socialist William Morris called the "anti-scrape", or an anticapitalist conservationism (not conservatism) that solaced itself with the vision of a preindustrial golden age. In Britain, folk may often appear a cosy, fossilised form, but when you look more closely, the idea of folk – who has the right to sing it, dance it, invoke it, collect it, belong to it or appropriate it for political or cultural ends – has always been contested territory. . . .
In our own time, though, the word "folk" . . . has achieved the rare distinction of occupying fashionable and unfashionable status simultaneously. Just as the effusive floral prints of the radical William Morris now cover genteel sofas, so the revolutionary intentions of many folk historians and revivalists have led to music that is commonly regarded as parochial and conservative. And yet – as newspaper columns periodically rejoice – folk is hip again, influencing artists, clothing and furniture designers, celebrated at music festivals, awards ceremonies and on TV, reissued on countless record labels. Folk is a sonic "shabby chic", containing elements of the uncanny and eerie, as well as an antique veneer, a whiff of Britain's heathen dark ages. The very obscurity and anonymity of folk music's origins open up space for rampant imaginative fancies. . . .
[Cecil Sharp, who wrote about this subject, believed that] folk songs existed in constant transformation, a living example of an art form in a perpetual state of renewal. "One man sings a song, and then others sing it after him, changing what they do not like" is the most concise summary of his conclusions on its origins. He compared each rendition of a ballad to an acorn falling from an oak tree; every subsequent iteration sows the song anew. But there is tension in newness. In the late 1960s, purists were suspicious of folk songs recast in rock idioms. Electrification, however, comes in many forms. For the early-20th-century composers such as Vaughan Williams and Holst, there were thunderbolts of inspiration from oriental mysticism, angular modernism and the body blow of the first world war, as well as input from the rediscovered folk tradition itself.
For the second wave of folk revivalists, such as Ewan MacColl and AL Lloyd, starting in the 40s, the vital spark was communism's dream of a post-revolutionary New Jerusalem. For their younger successors in the 60s, who thronged the folk clubs set up by the old guard, the lyrical freedom of Dylan and the unchained melodies of psychedelia created the conditions for folkrock's own golden age, a brief Indian summer that lasted from about 1969 to 1971. . . . Four decades on, even that progressive period has become just one more era ripe for fashionable emulation and pastiche. The idea of a folk tradition being exclusively confined to oral transmission has become a much looser, less severely guarded concept. Recorded music and television, for today's metropolitan generation, are where the equivalent of folk memories are seeded. . . .

Q. The author says that folk “may often appear a cosy, fossilised form” because:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 5

something that is fossilized belongs to or reminds of the past. The only correct choice that can be convincingly picked is choice 4. Rest all don’t justify the word ‘fossilised’

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 6

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
In the past, credit for telling the tale of Aladdin has often gone to Antoine Galland . . . the first European translator of . . . Arabian Nights [which] started as a series of translations of an incomplete manuscript of a medieval Arabic story collection. . . But, though those tales were of medieval origin, Aladdin may be a more recent invention. Scholars have not found a manuscript of the story that predates the version published in 1712 by Galland, who wrote in his diary that he first heard the tale from a Syrian storyteller from Aleppo named Hanna Diyab . . .
Despite the fantastical elements of the story, scholars now think the main character may actually be based on a real person’s real experiences. . . . Though Galland never credited Diyab in his published translations of the Arabian Nights stories, Diyab wrote something of his own: a travelogue penned in the mid-18th century. In it, he recalls telling Galland the story of Aladdin [and] describes his own hard-knocks upbringing and the way he marveled at the extravagance of Versailles. The descriptions he uses were very similar to the descriptions of the lavish palace that ended up in Galland’s version of the Aladdin story. [Therefore, author Paulo Lemos] Horta believes that “Aladdin might be the young Arab Maronite from Aleppo, marveling at the jewels and riches of Versailles.” . . .
For 300 years, scholars thought that the rags-to-riches story of Aladdin might have been inspired by the plots of French fairy tales that came out around the same time, or that the story was invented in that 18th century period as a byproduct of French Orientalism, a fascination with stereotypical exotic Middle Eastern luxuries that was prevalent then. The idea that Diyab might have based it on his own life — the experiences of a Middle Eastern man encountering the French, not vice-versa — flips the script. [According to Horta,] “Diyab was ideally placed to embody the overlapping world of East and West, blending the storytelling traditions of his homeland with his youthful observations of the wonder of 18th-century France.” . . .
To the scholars who study the tale, its narrative drama isn’t the only reason storytellers keep finding reason to return to Aladdin. It reflects not only “a history of the French and the Middle East, but also [a story about] Middle Easterners coming to Paris and that speaks to our world today,” as Horta puts it. “The day Diyab told the story of Aladdin to Galland, there were riots due to food shortages during the winter and spring of 1708 to 1709, and Diyab was sensitive to those people in a way that Galland is not. When you read this diary, you see this solidarity among the Arabs who were in Paris at the time. . . . There is little in the writings of Galland that would suggest that he was capable of developing a character like Aladdin with sympathy, but Diyab’s memoir reveals a narrator adept at capturing the distinctive psychology of a young protagonist, as well as recognizing the kinds of injustices and opportunities that can transform the path of any youthful adventurer.”

Q. Which of the following is the primary reason for why storytellers are still fascinated by the story of Aladdin?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 6

The first few sentences of the last paragraph have the clue to the right answer.
“To the scholars who study the tale, its narrative drama isn’t the only reason storytellers keep finding reason to return to Aladdin. It reflects not only “a history of the French and the Middle
East, but also [a story about] Middle Easterners coming to Paris and that speaks to our world today,” as Horta puts it.”
The archetype rags to riches story… has not featured in the above passage.
By reading the above paragraph, we can indisputably mark option 2 as your choice.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 7

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
In the past, credit for telling the tale of Aladdin has often gone to Antoine Galland . . . the first European translator of . . . Arabian Nights [which] started as a series of translations of an incomplete manuscript of a medieval Arabic story collection. . . But, though those tales were of medieval origin, Aladdin may be a more recent invention. Scholars have not found a manuscript of the story that predates the version published in 1712 by Galland, who wrote in his diary that he first heard the tale from a Syrian storyteller from Aleppo named Hanna Diyab . . .
Despite the fantastical elements of the story, scholars now think the main character may actually be based on a real person’s real experiences. . . . Though Galland never credited Diyab in his published translations of the Arabian Nights stories, Diyab wrote something of his own: a travelogue penned in the mid-18th century. In it, he recalls telling Galland the story of Aladdin [and] describes his own hard-knocks upbringing and the way he marveled at the extravagance of Versailles. The descriptions he uses were very similar to the descriptions of the lavish palace that ended up in Galland’s version of the Aladdin story. [Therefore, author Paulo Lemos] Horta believes that “Aladdin might be the young Arab Maronite from Aleppo, marveling at the jewels and riches of Versailles.” . . .
For 300 years, scholars thought that the rags-to-riches story of Aladdin might have been inspired by the plots of French fairy tales that came out around the same time, or that the story was invented in that 18th century period as a byproduct of French Orientalism, a fascination with stereotypical exotic Middle Eastern luxuries that was prevalent then. The idea that Diyab might have based it on his own life — the experiences of a Middle Eastern man encountering the French, not vice-versa — flips the script. [According to Horta,] “Diyab was ideally placed to embody the overlapping world of East and West, blending the storytelling traditions of his homeland with his youthful observations of the wonder of 18th-century France.” . . .
To the scholars who study the tale, its narrative drama isn’t the only reason storytellers keep finding reason to return to Aladdin. It reflects not only “a history of the French and the Middle East, but also [a story about] Middle Easterners coming to Paris and that speaks to our world today,” as Horta puts it. “The day Diyab told the story of Aladdin to Galland, there were riots due to food shortages during the winter and spring of 1708 to 1709, and Diyab was sensitive to those people in a way that Galland is not. When you read this diary, you see this solidarity among the Arabs who were in Paris at the time. . . . There is little in the writings of Galland that would suggest that he was capable of developing a character like Aladdin with sympathy, but Diyab’s memoir reveals a narrator adept at capturing the distinctive psychology of a young protagonist, as well as recognizing the kinds of injustices and opportunities that can transform the path of any youthful adventurer.”

Q. Which of the following, if true, would invalidate the inversion that the phrase “flips the script” refers to?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 7

To invalidate the inversion, we have to first understand the inversion. What exactly is ‘flips the script” referring to? Scholars initially thought that Aladdin must have been inspired by 18th century French Fairy tales, but “The idea that Diyab might have based it on his own life — the experiences of a Middle Eastern man encountering the French, not vice-versa — flips the script.“
Here flips the script means changes the opinion that Aladdin was inspired by French Fairy tales. In other words, Aladdin was not inspired by French Fairy tales but that Diyab was the actual author. By invalidating the inversion, the question wants us to not give the credit to Diyab
Option 3 goes out because by pointing out the dissimilarity between Aladdin and French Fairy Tales, it gives the credit to Diyab.
Option 2 does not invalidate because still Diyab has seen the luxury and opulence of France, not necessarily of Versailles.
Option 1 also gives the credit to Diyab, so it is not invalidating the inversion.
Option 4 is the right choice because, if they bore no resemblance, then it disputes the evidence that Diyab ever narrated the story to Galland, as Galland claims in his diary. This would contradict, at least to some extent, the author’s claim that Diyab was the author of the character of Aladdin.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 8

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
In the past, credit for telling the tale of Aladdin has often gone to Antoine Galland . . . the first European translator of . . . Arabian Nights [which] started as a series of translations of an incomplete manuscript of a medieval Arabic story collection. . . But, though those tales were of medieval origin, Aladdin may be a more recent invention. Scholars have not found a manuscript of the story that predates the version published in 1712 by Galland, who wrote in his diary that he first heard the tale from a Syrian storyteller from Aleppo named Hanna Diyab . . .
Despite the fantastical elements of the story, scholars now think the main character may actually be based on a real person’s real experiences. . . . Though Galland never credited Diyab in his published translations of the Arabian Nights stories, Diyab wrote something of his own: a travelogue penned in the mid-18th century. In it, he recalls telling Galland the story of Aladdin [and] describes his own hard-knocks upbringing and the way he marveled at the extravagance of Versailles. The descriptions he uses were very similar to the descriptions of the lavish palace that ended up in Galland’s version of the Aladdin story. [Therefore, author Paulo Lemos] Horta believes that “Aladdin might be the young Arab Maronite from Aleppo, marveling at the jewels and riches of Versailles.” . . .
For 300 years, scholars thought that the rags-to-riches story of Aladdin might have been inspired by the plots of French fairy tales that came out around the same time, or that the story was invented in that 18th century period as a byproduct of French Orientalism, a fascination with stereotypical exotic Middle Eastern luxuries that was prevalent then. The idea that Diyab might have based it on his own life — the experiences of a Middle Eastern man encountering the French, not vice-versa — flips the script. [According to Horta,] “Diyab was ideally placed to embody the overlapping world of East and West, blending the storytelling traditions of his homeland with his youthful observations of the wonder of 18th-century France.” . . .
To the scholars who study the tale, its narrative drama isn’t the only reason storytellers keep finding reason to return to Aladdin. It reflects not only “a history of the French and the Middle East, but also [a story about] Middle Easterners coming to Paris and that speaks to our world today,” as Horta puts it. “The day Diyab told the story of Aladdin to Galland, there were riots due to food shortages during the winter and spring of 1708 to 1709, and Diyab was sensitive to those people in a way that Galland is not. When you read this diary, you see this solidarity among the Arabs who were in Paris at the time. . . . There is little in the writings of Galland that would suggest that he was capable of developing a character like Aladdin with sympathy, but Diyab’s memoir reveals a narrator adept at capturing the distinctive psychology of a young protagonist, as well as recognizing the kinds of injustices and opportunities that can transform the path of any youthful adventurer.”

Q. All of the following serve as evidence for the character of Aladdin being based on Hanna Diyab EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 8

We have to mark the choice that is not serving as evidence, as it is an except question.
Option 1 serves as evidence (Diyab was ideally placed to embody the overlapping world of East and West, blending the storytelling traditions of his homeland with his youthful observations of the wonder of 18th-century France.”). The youthful observations of the wealth of Versailles refers to his cross-cultural experience. We can also eliminate choice 4 by reading above extract from the passage.
Option 2 can be ruled out because of this extract from the second paragraph: a travelogue penned in the mid-18th century. In it, he recalls telling Galland the story of Aladdin [and] describes his own hard-knocks upbringing…(the hard-knocks upbringing supports that Diyab could well be the author)
Option 3 does not serve as evidence for the character of Aladdin being based on Hanna Diyab, because Diyab could have read or heard the story from somewhere or narrated it to Galland. The fact that he is just narrating the story to Galland does not serve as evidence that Diyab is likely to be real Aladdin.
The other choices do support that.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 9

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
In the past, credit for telling the tale of Aladdin has often gone to Antoine Galland . . . the first European translator of . . . Arabian Nights [which] started as a series of translations of an incomplete manuscript of a medieval Arabic story collection. . . But, though those tales were of medieval origin, Aladdin may be a more recent invention. Scholars have not found a manuscript of the story that predates the version published in 1712 by Galland, who wrote in his diary that he first heard the tale from a Syrian storyteller from Aleppo named Hanna Diyab . . .
Despite the fantastical elements of the story, scholars now think the main character may actually be based on a real person’s real experiences. . . . Though Galland never credited Diyab in his published translations of the Arabian Nights stories, Diyab wrote something of his own: a travelogue penned in the mid-18th century. In it, he recalls telling Galland the story of Aladdin [and] describes his own hard-knocks upbringing and the way he marveled at the extravagance of Versailles. The descriptions he uses were very similar to the descriptions of the lavish palace that ended up in Galland’s version of the Aladdin story. [Therefore, author Paulo Lemos] Horta believes that “Aladdin might be the young Arab Maronite from Aleppo, marveling at the jewels and riches of Versailles.” . . .
For 300 years, scholars thought that the rags-to-riches story of Aladdin might have been inspired by the plots of French fairy tales that came out around the same time, or that the story was invented in that 18th century period as a byproduct of French Orientalism, a fascination with stereotypical exotic Middle Eastern luxuries that was prevalent then. The idea that Diyab might have based it on his own life — the experiences of a Middle Eastern man encountering the French, not vice-versa — flips the script. [According to Horta,] “Diyab was ideally placed to embody the overlapping world of East and West, blending the storytelling traditions of his homeland with his youthful observations of the wonder of 18th-century France.” . . .
To the scholars who study the tale, its narrative drama isn’t the only reason storytellers keep finding reason to return to Aladdin. It reflects not only “a history of the French and the Middle East, but also [a story about] Middle Easterners coming to Paris and that speaks to our world today,” as Horta puts it. “The day Diyab told the story of Aladdin to Galland, there were riots due to food shortages during the winter and spring of 1708 to 1709, and Diyab was sensitive to those people in a way that Galland is not. When you read this diary, you see this solidarity among the Arabs who were in Paris at the time. . . . There is little in the writings of Galland that would suggest that he was capable of developing a character like Aladdin with sympathy, but Diyab’s memoir reveals a narrator adept at capturing the distinctive psychology of a young protagonist, as well as recognizing the kinds of injustices and opportunities that can transform the path of any youthful adventurer.”

Q. Which of the following does not contribute to the passage’s claim about the authorship of Aladdin?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 9

We have to mark the choice that does not contribute to the passage’s claim about the authorship of Aladdin.
Option 1 does contribute because it confirms that Diyab is the author of the Aladdin
Option 2 too is mentioned in the passage towards the end “…Diyab’s memoir reveals a narrator adept at capturing the distinctive psychology of a young Protagonist…”
Option 4, too, supports the claim that Diyab could well be the author.
Option 3 does not support the claim because ‘the French fairy tales’ evidence has been disputed by the author, and he says that “The idea that Diyab might have based it on his own life — the experiences of a Middle Eastern man encountering the French, not vice-versa — flips the script.“
Which script is getting flipped? The story that Aladdin was inspired by French Fairy tales of the 18th century (read the passage)

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 10

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
In the past, credit for telling the tale of Aladdin has often gone to Antoine Galland . . . the first European translator of . . . Arabian Nights [which] started as a series of translations of an incomplete manuscript of a medieval Arabic story collection. . . But, though those tales were of medieval origin, Aladdin may be a more recent invention. Scholars have not found a manuscript of the story that predates the version published in 1712 by Galland, who wrote in his diary that he first heard the tale from a Syrian storyteller from Aleppo named Hanna Diyab . . .
Despite the fantastical elements of the story, scholars now think the main character may actually be based on a real person’s real experiences. . . . Though Galland never credited Diyab in his published translations of the Arabian Nights stories, Diyab wrote something of his own: a travelogue penned in the mid-18th century. In it, he recalls telling Galland the story of Aladdin [and] describes his own hard-knocks upbringing and the way he marveled at the extravagance of Versailles. The descriptions he uses were very similar to the descriptions of the lavish palace that ended up in Galland’s version of the Aladdin story. [Therefore, author Paulo Lemos] Horta believes that “Aladdin might be the young Arab Maronite from Aleppo, marveling at the jewels and riches of Versailles.” . . .
For 300 years, scholars thought that the rags-to-riches story of Aladdin might have been inspired by the plots of French fairy tales that came out around the same time, or that the story was invented in that 18th century period as a byproduct of French Orientalism, a fascination with stereotypical exotic Middle Eastern luxuries that was prevalent then. The idea that Diyab might have based it on his own life — the experiences of a Middle Eastern man encountering the French, not vice-versa — flips the script. [According to Horta,] “Diyab was ideally placed to embody the overlapping world of East and West, blending the storytelling traditions of his homeland with his youthful observations of the wonder of 18th-century France.” . . .
To the scholars who study the tale, its narrative drama isn’t the only reason storytellers keep finding reason to return to Aladdin. It reflects not only “a history of the French and the Middle East, but also [a story about] Middle Easterners coming to Paris and that speaks to our world today,” as Horta puts it. “The day Diyab told the story of Aladdin to Galland, there were riots due to food shortages during the winter and spring of 1708 to 1709, and Diyab was sensitive to those people in a way that Galland is not. When you read this diary, you see this solidarity among the Arabs who were in Paris at the time. . . . There is little in the writings of Galland that would suggest that he was capable of developing a character like Aladdin with sympathy, but Diyab’s memoir reveals a narrator adept at capturing the distinctive psychology of a young protagonist, as well as recognizing the kinds of injustices and opportunities that can transform the path of any youthful adventurer.”

Q. The author of the passage is most likely to agree with which of the following explanations for the origins of the story of Aladdin?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 10

This is a very simple question. The main argument of the passage is that Diyab could well be the author of the passage. We have to pick a choice that goes in this direction.
Option 1 attributes the authorship to Diyab, it is the right choice
Option 2 attributes the authorship to some incomplete medieval manuscript. It goes out
Option 3 goes out for the same reason as option 2
Option 4 says that Galland derived the story, ultimately giving the credit of authorship to Galland.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 11

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the question based on it.
As defined by the geographer Yi-Fu Tuan, topophilia is the affective bond between people and place. His 1974 book set forth a wide-ranging exploration of how the emotive ties with the material environment vary greatly from person to person and in intensity, subtlety, and mode of expression. Factors influencing one’s depth of response to the environment include cultural background, gender, race, and historical circumstance, and Tuan also argued that there is a biological and sensory element. Topophilia might not be the strongest of human emotions— indeed, many people feel utterly indifferent toward the environments that shape their lives— but when activated it has the power to elevate a place to become the carrier of emotionally charged events or to be perceived as a symbol.
Aesthetic appreciation is one way in which people respond to the environment. A brilliantly colored rainbow after gloomy afternoon showers, a busy city street alive with human interaction—one might experience the beauty of such landscapes that had seemed quite ordinary only moments before or that are being newly discovered. This is quite the opposite of a second topophilic bond, namely that of the acquired taste for certain landscapes and places that one knows well. When a place is home, or when a space has become the locus of memories or the means of gaining a livelihood, it frequently evokes a deeper set of attachments than those predicated purely on the visual. A third response to the environment also depends on the human senses but may be tactile and olfactory, namely a delight in the feel and smell of air, water, and the earth.
Topophilia—and its very close conceptual twin, sense of place—is an experience that, however elusive, has inspired recent architects and planners. Most notably, new urbanism seeks to counter the perceived placelessness of modern suburbs and the decline of central cities through neo-traditional design motifs. Although motivated by good intentions, such attempts to create places rich in meaning are perhaps bound to disappoint. As Tuan noted, purely aesthetic responses often are suddenly revealed, but their intensity rarely is longlasting. Topophilia is difficult to design for and impossible to quantify, and its most articulate interpreters have been self-reflective philosophers such as Henry David Thoreau, evoking a marvelously intricate sense of place at Walden Pond, and Tuan, describing his deep affinity for the desert.
Topophilia connotes a positive relationship, but it often is useful to explore the darker affiliations between people and place. Patriotism, literally meaning the love of one’s terra patria or homeland, has long been cultivated by governing elites for a range of nationalist projects, including war preparation and ethnic cleansing. Residents of upscale residential developments have disclosed how important it is to maintain their community’s distinct identity, often by casting themselves in a superior social position and by reinforcing class and racial differences. And just as a beloved landscape is suddenly revealed, so too may landscapes of fear cast a dark shadow over a place that makes one feel a sense of dread or anxiety—or topophobia.

Q. Which one of the following comes closest in meaning to the author’s understanding of topophilia?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 11

Topophilia means love for a particular place. The choice must reflect love. Option 2 goes out because in the option we have "least affinity for the place". Option 3 says that the French are not patriotic, so it too goes out because topophilia will bring patriotism. Topography has nothing to do with love, topography means understanding of the topology of a particular place. Thus only 1 fits the meaning of topophilia.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 12

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the question based on it.
As defined by the geographer Yi-Fu Tuan, topophilia is the affective bond between people and place. His 1974 book set forth a wide-ranging exploration of how the emotive ties with the material environment vary greatly from person to person and in intensity, subtlety, and mode of expression. Factors influencing one’s depth of response to the environment include cultural background, gender, race, and historical circumstance, and Tuan also argued that there is a biological and sensory element. Topophilia might not be the strongest of human emotions— indeed, many people feel utterly indifferent toward the environments that shape their lives— but when activated it has the power to elevate a place to become the carrier of emotionally charged events or to be perceived as a symbol.
Aesthetic appreciation is one way in which people respond to the environment. A brilliantly colored rainbow after gloomy afternoon showers, a busy city street alive with human interaction—one might experience the beauty of such landscapes that had seemed quite ordinary only moments before or that are being newly discovered. This is quite the opposite of a second topophilic bond, namely that of the acquired taste for certain landscapes and places that one knows well. When a place is home, or when a space has become the locus of memories or the means of gaining a livelihood, it frequently evokes a deeper set of attachments than those predicated purely on the visual. A third response to the environment also depends on the human senses but may be tactile and olfactory, namely a delight in the feel and smell of air, water, and the earth.
Topophilia—and its very close conceptual twin, sense of place—is an experience that, however elusive, has inspired recent architects and planners. Most notably, new urbanism seeks to counter the perceived placelessness of modern suburbs and the decline of central cities through neo-traditional design motifs. Although motivated by good intentions, such attempts to create places rich in meaning are perhaps bound to disappoint. As Tuan noted, purely aesthetic responses often are suddenly revealed, but their intensity rarely is longlasting. Topophilia is difficult to design for and impossible to quantify, and its most articulate interpreters have been self-reflective philosophers such as Henry David Thoreau, evoking a marvelously intricate sense of place at Walden Pond, and Tuan, describing his deep affinity for the desert.
Topophilia connotes a positive relationship, but it often is useful to explore the darker affiliations between people and place. Patriotism, literally meaning the love of one’s terra patria or homeland, has long been cultivated by governing elites for a range of nationalist projects, including war preparation and ethnic cleansing. Residents of upscale residential developments have disclosed how important it is to maintain their community’s distinct identity, often by casting themselves in a superior social position and by reinforcing class and racial differences. And just as a beloved landscape is suddenly revealed, so too may landscapes of fear cast a dark shadow over a place that makes one feel a sense of dread or anxiety—or topophobia.

Q. Which of the following statements, if true, could be seen as not contradicting the arguments in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 12

This is a slightly difficult question. We have to read the options carefully and look for the one that is not against what the author has to say, the ones that are against what the author has to say, will contradict the author’s argument. But we have to mark the choice that is not contradicting what the author has to say.’
Option 1 contradicts because the author says that olfactory response is the third most important factor, while the option says that it is the most important factor.
Option 2 also can be ruled out because the author says in the first paragraph: the emotive ties with the material environment vary greatly from person to person and in intensity, subtlety, and mode of expression. The author says ‘vary greatly’, while the option says ‘vary little’
Option 3 can be seen in the last paragraph, and is parallel to what the author has to say. This is not contradicting the author’s argument, and hence it is the right choice.
Option 4 can be ruled out because it too goes against what the author has to say.
“Most notably, new urbanism seeks to counter the perceived placelessness of modern suburbs and the decline of central cities through neo-traditional design motifs. Although motivated by good intentions, such attempts to create places rich in meaning are perhaps bound to disappoint”
The author says the New Urbanism is bound to disappoint, but the options says that it is successful as the client’s demand for it.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 13

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the question based on it.
As defined by the geographer Yi-Fu Tuan, topophilia is the affective bond between people and place. His 1974 book set forth a wide-ranging exploration of how the emotive ties with the material environment vary greatly from person to person and in intensity, subtlety, and mode of expression. Factors influencing one’s depth of response to the environment include cultural background, gender, race, and historical circumstance, and Tuan also argued that there is a biological and sensory element. Topophilia might not be the strongest of human emotions— indeed, many people feel utterly indifferent toward the environments that shape their lives— but when activated it has the power to elevate a place to become the carrier of emotionally charged events or to be perceived as a symbol.
Aesthetic appreciation is one way in which people respond to the environment. A brilliantly colored rainbow after gloomy afternoon showers, a busy city street alive with human interaction—one might experience the beauty of such landscapes that had seemed quite ordinary only moments before or that are being newly discovered. This is quite the opposite of a second topophilic bond, namely that of the acquired taste for certain landscapes and places that one knows well. When a place is home, or when a space has become the locus of memories or the means of gaining a livelihood, it frequently evokes a deeper set of attachments than those predicated purely on the visual. A third response to the environment also depends on the human senses but may be tactile and olfactory, namely a delight in the feel and smell of air, water, and the earth.
Topophilia—and its very close conceptual twin, sense of place—is an experience that, however elusive, has inspired recent architects and planners. Most notably, new urbanism seeks to counter the perceived placelessness of modern suburbs and the decline of central cities through neo-traditional design motifs. Although motivated by good intentions, such attempts to create places rich in meaning are perhaps bound to disappoint. As Tuan noted, purely aesthetic responses often are suddenly revealed, but their intensity rarely is longlasting. Topophilia is difficult to design for and impossible to quantify, and its most articulate interpreters have been self-reflective philosophers such as Henry David Thoreau, evoking a marvelously intricate sense of place at Walden Pond, and Tuan, describing his deep affinity for the desert.
Topophilia connotes a positive relationship, but it often is useful to explore the darker affiliations between people and place. Patriotism, literally meaning the love of one’s terra patria or homeland, has long been cultivated by governing elites for a range of nationalist projects, including war preparation and ethnic cleansing. Residents of upscale residential developments have disclosed how important it is to maintain their community’s distinct identity, often by casting themselves in a superior social position and by reinforcing class and racial differences. And just as a beloved landscape is suddenly revealed, so too may landscapes of fear cast a dark shadow over a place that makes one feel a sense of dread or anxiety—or topophobia.

Q. In the last paragraph, the author uses the example of “Residents of upscale residential developments” to illustrate the:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 13

This question can be answered only by understanding the context in which the phrase has come. It reads as follows:
“Residents of upscale residential developments have disclosed how important it is to maintain their community’s distinct identity, often by casting themselves in a superior social position and by reinforcing class and racial differences. “
Option 2 becomes the right answer, without any doubt. This was a very simple question.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 14

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the question based on it.
As defined by the geographer Yi-Fu Tuan, topophilia is the affective bond between people and place. His 1974 book set forth a wide-ranging exploration of how the emotive ties with the material environment vary greatly from person to person and in intensity, subtlety, and mode of expression. Factors influencing one’s depth of response to the environment include cultural background, gender, race, and historical circumstance, and Tuan also argued that there is a biological and sensory element. Topophilia might not be the strongest of human emotions— indeed, many people feel utterly indifferent toward the environments that shape their lives— but when activated it has the power to elevate a place to become the carrier of emotionally charged events or to be perceived as a symbol.
Aesthetic appreciation is one way in which people respond to the environment. A brilliantly colored rainbow after gloomy afternoon showers, a busy city street alive with human interaction—one might experience the beauty of such landscapes that had seemed quite ordinary only moments before or that are being newly discovered. This is quite the opposite of a second topophilic bond, namely that of the acquired taste for certain landscapes and places that one knows well. When a place is home, or when a space has become the locus of memories or the means of gaining a livelihood, it frequently evokes a deeper set of attachments than those predicated purely on the visual. A third response to the environment also depends on the human senses but may be tactile and olfactory, namely a delight in the feel and smell of air, water, and the earth.
Topophilia—and its very close conceptual twin, sense of place—is an experience that, however elusive, has inspired recent architects and planners. Most notably, new urbanism seeks to counter the perceived placelessness of modern suburbs and the decline of central cities through neo-traditional design motifs. Although motivated by good intentions, such attempts to create places rich in meaning are perhaps bound to disappoint. As Tuan noted, purely aesthetic responses often are suddenly revealed, but their intensity rarely is longlasting. Topophilia is difficult to design for and impossible to quantify, and its most articulate interpreters have been self-reflective philosophers such as Henry David Thoreau, evoking a marvelously intricate sense of place at Walden Pond, and Tuan, describing his deep affinity for the desert.
Topophilia connotes a positive relationship, but it often is useful to explore the darker affiliations between people and place. Patriotism, literally meaning the love of one’s terra patria or homeland, has long been cultivated by governing elites for a range of nationalist projects, including war preparation and ethnic cleansing. Residents of upscale residential developments have disclosed how important it is to maintain their community’s distinct identity, often by casting themselves in a superior social position and by reinforcing class and racial differences. And just as a beloved landscape is suddenly revealed, so too may landscapes of fear cast a dark shadow over a place that makes one feel a sense of dread or anxiety—or topophobia.

Q. Which one of the following best captures the meaning of the statement, “Topophilia is difficult to design for and impossible to quantify . . .”?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 14

We can answer the question by reading the sentence that follows this sentence. Let’s see what follows this sentence in the passage.
“Topophilia is difficult to design for and impossible to quantify, and its most articulate interpreters have been self-reflective philosophers such as Henry David Thoreau, evoking a marvelously intricate sense of place at Walden Pond, and Tuan, describing his deep affinity for the desert.”
Henry David liked the pond, while Tuan liked the desert. Thus there is subjectiveness. Option 1 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 15

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the question based on it.
As defined by the geographer Yi-Fu Tuan, topophilia is the affective bond between people and place. His 1974 book set forth a wide-ranging exploration of how the emotive ties with the material environment vary greatly from person to person and in intensity, subtlety, and mode of expression. Factors influencing one’s depth of response to the environment include cultural background, gender, race, and historical circumstance, and Tuan also argued that there is a biological and sensory element. Topophilia might not be the strongest of human emotions— indeed, many people feel utterly indifferent toward the environments that shape their lives— but when activated it has the power to elevate a place to become the carrier of emotionally charged events or to be perceived as a symbol.
Aesthetic appreciation is one way in which people respond to the environment. A brilliantly colored rainbow after gloomy afternoon showers, a busy city street alive with human interaction—one might experience the beauty of such landscapes that had seemed quite ordinary only moments before or that are being newly discovered. This is quite the opposite of a second topophilic bond, namely that of the acquired taste for certain landscapes and places that one knows well. When a place is home, or when a space has become the locus of memories or the means of gaining a livelihood, it frequently evokes a deeper set of attachments than those predicated purely on the visual. A third response to the environment also depends on the human senses but may be tactile and olfactory, namely a delight in the feel and smell of air, water, and the earth.
Topophilia—and its very close conceptual twin, sense of place—is an experience that, however elusive, has inspired recent architects and planners. Most notably, new urbanism seeks to counter the perceived placelessness of modern suburbs and the decline of central cities through neo-traditional design motifs. Although motivated by good intentions, such attempts to create places rich in meaning are perhaps bound to disappoint. As Tuan noted, purely aesthetic responses often are suddenly revealed, but their intensity rarely is longlasting. Topophilia is difficult to design for and impossible to quantify, and its most articulate interpreters have been self-reflective philosophers such as Henry David Thoreau, evoking a marvelously intricate sense of place at Walden Pond, and Tuan, describing his deep affinity for the desert.
Topophilia connotes a positive relationship, but it often is useful to explore the darker affiliations between people and place. Patriotism, literally meaning the love of one’s terra patria or homeland, has long been cultivated by governing elites for a range of nationalist projects, including war preparation and ethnic cleansing. Residents of upscale residential developments have disclosed how important it is to maintain their community’s distinct identity, often by casting themselves in a superior social position and by reinforcing class and racial differences. And just as a beloved landscape is suddenly revealed, so too may landscapes of fear cast a dark shadow over a place that makes one feel a sense of dread or anxiety—or topophobia.

Q. The word “topophobia” in the passage is used:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 15

This passage was the simplest of all the passages. The answer to the first question can be found in the passage itself in the last sentence, where the author introduces the idea of ‘topophobia’.
“And just as a beloved landscape is suddenly revealed, so too may landscapes of fear cast a dark shadow over a place that makes one feel a sense of dread or anxiety—or topophobia.”

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 16

Identify the odd word from : Cease, Launch, Initiate, Commence


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 16

Launch, initiate ad commence all mean to begin or start something while cease means to bring to halt. Hence, it is the odd one out.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 17

Identify the odd word from : Couple, Sever, Rend, Lacerate


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 17

Sever, rend and lacerate mean to separate by force while couple means a pair. Hence, it is the odd one out.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 18

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Contemporary internet shopping conjures a perfect storm of choice anxiety. Research has consistently held that people who are presented with a few options make better, easier decisions than those presented with many. . . . Helping consumers figure out what to buy amid an endless sea of choice online has become a cottage industry unto itself. Many brands and retailers now wield marketing buzzwords such as curation, differentiation, and discovery as they attempt to sell an assortment of stuff targeted to their ideal customer. Companies find such shoppers through the data gold mine of digital advertising, which can catalog people by gender, income level, personal interests, and more. Since Americans have lost the ability to sort through the sheer volume of the consumer choices available to them, a ghost now has to be in the retail machine, whether it’s an algorithm, an influencer, or some snazzy ad tech to help a product follow you around the internet. Indeed, choice fatigue is one reason so many people gravitate toward lifestyle influencers on Instagram—the relentlessly chic young moms and perpetually vacationing 20-somethings—who present an aspirational worldview, and then recommend the products and services that help achieve it. . . .
For a relatively new class of consumer-products start-ups, there’s another method entirely. Instead of making sense of a sea of existing stuff, these companies claim to disrupt stuff as Americans know it. Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice: The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices. They’re selling nice things, but maybe more importantly, they’re selling a confidence in those things, and an ability to opt out of the stuff rat race. . . .
One-thousand-dollar mattresses and $300 suitcases might solve choice anxiety for a certain tier of consumer, but the companies that sell them, along with those that attempt to massage the larger stuff economy into something navigable, are still just working within a consumer market that’s broken in systemic ways. The presence of so much stuff in America might be more valuable if it were more evenly distributed, but stuff’s creators tend to focus their energy on those who already have plenty. As options have expanded for people with disposable income, the opportunity to buy even basic things such as fresh food or quality diapers has contracted for much of America’s lower classes.
For start-ups that promise accessible simplicity, their very structure still might eventually push them toward overwhelming variety. Most of these companies are based on hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, the investors of which tend to expect a steep growth rate that can’t be achieved by selling one great mattress or one great sneaker. Casper has expanded into bedroom furniture and bed linens. Glossier, after years of marketing itself as no-makeup makeup that requires little skill to apply, recently launched a full line of glittering color cosmetics. There may be no way to opt out of stuff by buying into the right thing.

Q. All of the following, IF TRUE, would weaken the author’s claims EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 18

Option 2 definitely supports what the author has to say; right from the start he is in favour of offering limited choices to customers. This option shows that offering fewer product can bring positive results. Thus 2 is not weakening. It becomes the right choice.
Choice 4 goes out because people go to Instagram because they are overwhelmed with choices. If that fails (as the sales are 40 percent less) it will weaken the author’s argument.
Choice 1 too speaks in favour of giving greater product options to customers. Choice 3 too does the same thing.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 19

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Contemporary internet shopping conjures a perfect storm of choice anxiety. Research has consistently held that people who are presented with a few options make better, easier decisions than those presented with many. . . . Helping consumers figure out what to buy amid an endless sea of choice online has become a cottage industry unto itself. Many brands and retailers now wield marketing buzzwords such as curation, differentiation, and discovery as they attempt to sell an assortment of stuff targeted to their ideal customer. Companies find such shoppers through the data gold mine of digital advertising, which can catalog people by gender, income level, personal interests, and more. Since Americans have lost the ability to sort through the sheer volume of the consumer choices available to them, a ghost now has to be in the retail machine, whether it’s an algorithm, an influencer, or some snazzy ad tech to help a product follow you around the internet. Indeed, choice fatigue is one reason so many people gravitate toward lifestyle influencers on Instagram—the relentlessly chic young moms and perpetually vacationing 20-somethings—who present an aspirational worldview, and then recommend the products and services that help achieve it. . . .
For a relatively new class of consumer-products start-ups, there’s another method entirely. Instead of making sense of a sea of existing stuff, these companies claim to disrupt stuff as Americans know it. Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice: The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices. They’re selling nice things, but maybe more importantly, they’re selling a confidence in those things, and an ability to opt out of the stuff rat race. . . .
One-thousand-dollar mattresses and $300 suitcases might solve choice anxiety for a certain tier of consumer, but the companies that sell them, along with those that attempt to massage the larger stuff economy into something navigable, are still just working within a consumer market that’s broken in systemic ways. The presence of so much stuff in America might be more valuable if it were more evenly distributed, but stuff’s creators tend to focus their energy on those who already have plenty. As options have expanded for people with disposable income, the opportunity to buy even basic things such as fresh food or quality diapers has contracted for much of America’s lower classes.
For start-ups that promise accessible simplicity, their very structure still might eventually push them toward overwhelming variety. Most of these companies are based on hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, the investors of which tend to expect a steep growth rate that can’t be achieved by selling one great mattress or one great sneaker. Casper has expanded into bedroom furniture and bed linens. Glossier, after years of marketing itself as no-makeup makeup that requires little skill to apply, recently launched a full line of glittering color cosmetics. There may be no way to opt out of stuff by buying into the right thing.

Q. Which of the following hypothetical statements would add the least depth to the author’s prediction of the fate of start-ups offering few product options?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 19

The author says towards the end that start-ups have the pressure of revenue, and they too will start offering greater number of choices to customers, as Casper and Glossier have done.
Option 1 adds depth to that prediction. So it goes out.
Option 2 says start-ups are no exception, so there is nothing unique about them. They are bound to fail or will have to change.
Option 3 adds least depth because it brings out a point that will not lead start-ups to offer more product varieties, after all they are experiencing a surge in revenue without expanding their product catalogue.
Option 4 also predicts that start-ups are likely to fail, adding weight to author’s argument about their fate mentioned in the last para.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 20

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Contemporary internet shopping conjures a perfect storm of choice anxiety. Research has consistently held that people who are presented with a few options make better, easier decisions than those presented with many. . . . Helping consumers figure out what to buy amid an endless sea of choice online has become a cottage industry unto itself. Many brands and retailers now wield marketing buzzwords such as curation, differentiation, and discovery as they attempt to sell an assortment of stuff targeted to their ideal customer. Companies find such shoppers through the data gold mine of digital advertising, which can catalog people by gender, income level, personal interests, and more. Since Americans have lost the ability to sort through the sheer volume of the consumer choices available to them, a ghost now has to be in the retail machine, whether it’s an algorithm, an influencer, or some snazzy ad tech to help a product follow you around the internet. Indeed, choice fatigue is one reason so many people gravitate toward lifestyle influencers on Instagram—the relentlessly chic young moms and perpetually vacationing 20-somethings—who present an aspirational worldview, and then recommend the products and services that help achieve it. . . .
For a relatively new class of consumer-products start-ups, there’s another method entirely. Instead of making sense of a sea of existing stuff, these companies claim to disrupt stuff as Americans know it. Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice: The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices. They’re selling nice things, but maybe more importantly, they’re selling a confidence in those things, and an ability to opt out of the stuff rat race. . . .
One-thousand-dollar mattresses and $300 suitcases might solve choice anxiety for a certain tier of consumer, but the companies that sell them, along with those that attempt to massage the larger stuff economy into something navigable, are still just working within a consumer market that’s broken in systemic ways. The presence of so much stuff in America might be more valuable if it were more evenly distributed, but stuff’s creators tend to focus their energy on those who already have plenty. As options have expanded for people with disposable income, the opportunity to buy even basic things such as fresh food or quality diapers has contracted for much of America’s lower classes.
For start-ups that promise accessible simplicity, their very structure still might eventually push them toward overwhelming variety. Most of these companies are based on hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, the investors of which tend to expect a steep growth rate that can’t be achieved by selling one great mattress or one great sneaker. Casper has expanded into bedroom furniture and bed linens. Glossier, after years of marketing itself as no-makeup makeup that requires little skill to apply, recently launched a full line of glittering color cosmetics. There may be no way to opt out of stuff by buying into the right thing.

Q. A new food brand plans to launch a series of products in the American market. Which of the following product plans is most likely to be supported by the author of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 20

The author is in favour of two things: not too much variety, and mid-range pricing. Choice 2 and 3 provide less variety and out of the two only choice 2 provides mid-range pricing. Thus 2 is the right choice.
The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices”. The author has praised this in the passage.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 21

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Contemporary internet shopping conjures a perfect storm of choice anxiety. Research has consistently held that people who are presented with a few options make better, easier decisions than those presented with many. . . . Helping consumers figure out what to buy amid an endless sea of choice online has become a cottage industry unto itself. Many brands and retailers now wield marketing buzzwords such as curation, differentiation, and discovery as they attempt to sell an assortment of stuff targeted to their ideal customer. Companies find such shoppers through the data gold mine of digital advertising, which can catalog people by gender, income level, personal interests, and more. Since Americans have lost the ability to sort through the sheer volume of the consumer choices available to them, a ghost now has to be in the retail machine, whether it’s an algorithm, an influencer, or some snazzy ad tech to help a product follow you around the internet. Indeed, choice fatigue is one reason so many people gravitate toward lifestyle influencers on Instagram—the relentlessly chic young moms and perpetually vacationing 20-somethings—who present an aspirational worldview, and then recommend the products and services that help achieve it. . . .
For a relatively new class of consumer-products start-ups, there’s another method entirely. Instead of making sense of a sea of existing stuff, these companies claim to disrupt stuff as Americans know it. Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice: The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices. They’re selling nice things, but maybe more importantly, they’re selling a confidence in those things, and an ability to opt out of the stuff rat race. . . .
One-thousand-dollar mattresses and $300 suitcases might solve choice anxiety for a certain tier of consumer, but the companies that sell them, along with those that attempt to massage the larger stuff economy into something navigable, are still just working within a consumer market that’s broken in systemic ways. The presence of so much stuff in America might be more valuable if it were more evenly distributed, but stuff’s creators tend to focus their energy on those who already have plenty. As options have expanded for people with disposable income, the opportunity to buy even basic things such as fresh food or quality diapers has contracted for much of America’s lower classes.
For start-ups that promise accessible simplicity, their very structure still might eventually push them toward overwhelming variety. Most of these companies are based on hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, the investors of which tend to expect a steep growth rate that can’t be achieved by selling one great mattress or one great sneaker. Casper has expanded into bedroom furniture and bed linens. Glossier, after years of marketing itself as no-makeup makeup that requires little skill to apply, recently launched a full line of glittering color cosmetics. There may be no way to opt out of stuff by buying into the right thing.

Q. Which one of the following best sums up the overall purpose of the examples of Casper and Glossier in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 21

We can correctly mark the answer by reading three different parts of the paragraphs and combine them together.
“Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice”
“For start-ups that promise accessible simplicity, their very structure still might eventually push them toward overwhelming variety.”
“Casper has expanded into bedroom furniture and bed linens. Glossier, after years of marketing itself as no-makeup makeup that requires little skill to apply, recently launched a full line of glittering color cosmetics.”
The two companies started by offering simplicity in choices, but they might eventually push to overwhelming variety…Casper and Glossier both have done that. Thus 2 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 22

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Contemporary internet shopping conjures a perfect storm of choice anxiety. Research has consistently held that people who are presented with a few options make better, easier decisions than those presented with many. . . . Helping consumers figure out what to buy amid an endless sea of choice online has become a cottage industry unto itself. Many brands and retailers now wield marketing buzzwords such as curation, differentiation, and discovery as they attempt to sell an assortment of stuff targeted to their ideal customer. Companies find such shoppers through the data gold mine of digital advertising, which can catalog people by gender, income level, personal interests, and more. Since Americans have lost the ability to sort through the sheer volume of the consumer choices available to them, a ghost now has to be in the retail machine, whether it’s an algorithm, an influencer, or some snazzy ad tech to help a product follow you around the internet. Indeed, choice fatigue is one reason so many people gravitate toward lifestyle influencers on Instagram—the relentlessly chic young moms and perpetually vacationing 20-somethings—who present an aspirational worldview, and then recommend the products and services that help achieve it. . . .
For a relatively new class of consumer-products start-ups, there’s another method entirely. Instead of making sense of a sea of existing stuff, these companies claim to disrupt stuff as Americans know it. Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice: The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices. They’re selling nice things, but maybe more importantly, they’re selling a confidence in those things, and an ability to opt out of the stuff rat race. . . .
One-thousand-dollar mattresses and $300 suitcases might solve choice anxiety for a certain tier of consumer, but the companies that sell them, along with those that attempt to massage the larger stuff economy into something navigable, are still just working within a consumer market that’s broken in systemic ways. The presence of so much stuff in America might be more valuable if it were more evenly distributed, but stuff’s creators tend to focus their energy on those who already have plenty. As options have expanded for people with disposable income, the opportunity to buy even basic things such as fresh food or quality diapers has contracted for much of America’s lower classes.
For start-ups that promise accessible simplicity, their very structure still might eventually push them toward overwhelming variety. Most of these companies are based on hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, the investors of which tend to expect a steep growth rate that can’t be achieved by selling one great mattress or one great sneaker. Casper has expanded into bedroom furniture and bed linens. Glossier, after years of marketing itself as no-makeup makeup that requires little skill to apply, recently launched a full line of glittering color cosmetics. There may be no way to opt out of stuff by buying into the right thing.

Q. Based on the passage, all of the following can be inferred about consumer behavior EXCEPT that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 22

Since this is an inference question, we have to derive the answer from what is given.
The passage says:
“Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice: The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices.
They’re selling nice things, but maybe more importantly, they’re selling a confidence in those things, and an ability to opt out of the stuff rat race. . . .”
Thus we know that customers prefer fewer choices, and that in turn builds trust or confidence. Thus 1 and 3 can be inferred and will not be the right choice, as we have to pick the one that cannot be inferred.
“choice fatigue is one reason so many people gravitate toward lifestyle influencers on Instagram—the relentlessly chic young moms and perpetually vacationing 20-somethings—who present an aspirational worldview, and then recommend the products and services that help achieve it. . . .”
This extract from the passage suggests that customers are susceptible (influenced by) to marketing images on the social media (Instagram)
Choice 2 is the right answer because we have no evidence for it.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 23

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Contemporary internet shopping conjures a perfect storm of choice anxiety. Research has consistently held that people who are presented with a few options make better, easier decisions than those presented with many. . . . Helping consumers figure out what to buy amid an endless sea of choice online has become a cottage industry unto itself. Many brands and retailers now wield marketing buzzwords such as curation, differentiation, and discovery as they attempt to sell an assortment of stuff targeted to their ideal customer. Companies find such shoppers through the data gold mine of digital advertising, which can catalog people by gender, income level, personal interests, and more. Since Americans have lost the ability to sort through the sheer volume of the consumer choices available to them, a ghost now has to be in the retail machine, whether it’s an algorithm, an influencer, or some snazzy ad tech to help a product follow you around the internet. Indeed, choice fatigue is one reason so many people gravitate toward lifestyle influencers on Instagram—the relentlessly chic young moms and perpetually vacationing 20-somethings—who present an aspirational worldview, and then recommend the products and services that help achieve it. . . .
For a relatively new class of consumer-products start-ups, there’s another method entirely. Instead of making sense of a sea of existing stuff, these companies claim to disrupt stuff as Americans know it. Casper (mattresses), Glossier (makeup), Away (suitcases), and many others have sprouted up to offer consumers freedom from choice: The companies have a few aesthetically pleasing and supposedly highly functional options, usually at mid-range prices. They’re selling nice things, but maybe more importantly, they’re selling a confidence in those things, and an ability to opt out of the stuff rat race. . . .
One-thousand-dollar mattresses and $300 suitcases might solve choice anxiety for a certain tier of consumer, but the companies that sell them, along with those that attempt to massage the larger stuff economy into something navigable, are still just working within a consumer market that’s broken in systemic ways. The presence of so much stuff in America might be more valuable if it were more evenly distributed, but stuff’s creators tend to focus their energy on those who already have plenty. As options have expanded for people with disposable income, the opportunity to buy even basic things such as fresh food or quality diapers has contracted for much of America’s lower classes.
For start-ups that promise accessible simplicity, their very structure still might eventually push them toward overwhelming variety. Most of these companies are based on hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, the investors of which tend to expect a steep growth rate that can’t be achieved by selling one great mattress or one great sneaker. Casper has expanded into bedroom furniture and bed linens. Glossier, after years of marketing itself as no-makeup makeup that requires little skill to apply, recently launched a full line of glittering color cosmetics. There may be no way to opt out of stuff by buying into the right thing.

Q. Which of the following hypothetical statements would add the least depth to the author’s prediction of the fate of start-ups offering few product options?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 23

The author says towards the end that start-ups have the pressure of revenue, and they too will start offering greater number of choices to customers, as Casper and Glossier have done.
Option 1 adds depth to that prediction. So it goes out.
Option 2 says start-ups are no exception, so there is nothing unique about them. They are bound to fail or will have to change.
Option 3 adds least depth because it brings out a point that will not lead start-ups to offer more product varieties, after all they are experiencing a surge in revenue without expanding their product catalogue.
Option 4 also predicts that start-ups are likely to fail, adding weight to author’s argument about their fate mentioned in the last para.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 24

Identify the odd word from: Quell, Ruffle, Allay ,Control


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 24

Quell means to put an end to something, ruffle means to destroy, allay means to put to rest and control means to prevent something from flourishing. Hence, ruffle is the odd one out.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 25

Directions: Identify the most appropriate summary for the paragraph.
To me, a "classic" means precisely the opposite of what my predecessors understood: a work is classical by reason of its resistance to contemporaneity and supposed universality, by reason of its capacity to indicate human particularity and difference in that past epoch. The classic is not what tells me about shared humanity—or, more truthfully put, what lets me recognize myself as already present in the past, what nourishes in me the illusion that everything has been like me and has existed only to prepare the way for me. Instead, the classic is what gives access to radically different forms of human consciousness for any given generation of readers, and thereby expands for them the range of possibilities of what it means to be a human being.


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 25

The author of the paragraph defines a classic as giving access to very different forms of human consciousness for any reader at any time, enabling them to experience the different possibilities of being a human being. 
"A classic is a work exploring the new, going beyond the universal, the contemporary, and the notion of a unified human consciousness" faithfully sticks to the classical experience going beyond the notion of a unified human consciousness to give access to different forms of human consciousness.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 26

Which of the following will be the odd one out.
"M H Ansari, Abdul Kalam, Pranab Mukherjee, Dr. Rajendra Prasad".


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 26

Except for M.H.Ansari(who is a Vice President of India), rest are Ex-Presidents of India.
So, M H Ansariwill be the perfect odd one out. 

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 27

Directions : Read the following passage and answer the question.
Techno India University started five medical colleges in year 2007 at five different places, Rajarhat, Salt-Lake, Chinsura, Topsia and PoddarVihar. The following table provides information about the 1st batch of students who took admission in these colleges in the year 2007 and the range of pass percentage of these students in the first two years. Pass percentage as well as number of students passed was a natural number for each college in each of the years. If a student failed in a year he was ousted from the college. Further, it is known that no student failed in 3rd, 4th or 5th year. A student who passes in 5thyear said to have completed the course.
Range of pass percentage for all the colleges is given for the first two years. For example, pass percentage for college at Rajarhat in 1st year can take any value between 60% and 75%, both inclusive.

Q. In the first year, if the number of students who passed in the colleges from Salt Lake, Chinsurs and Poddar Vihar was the same, X, then find the value of 'X'?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 27

Let the pass percentage in the colleges of Salt Lake, Chinsurs and Poddar Vihar be a, b and c respectively.
∴ a % of 3600=b % of 2700
∴ a : b=3:4
Similarly a : c=4:3
∴ a:b:c=12:16:9
So 'a' is a multiple of 12, and it can take either of two values out of 60 or 72. If a is 72, then b will be 96, which is out of range. Hence, a is 60, b is 80 and c is 45.
Hence, X= 60% of 3600=2160.
Hence, the correct option is (A).

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 28

Directions : Read the following passage and answer the question.
Techno India University started five medical colleges in year 2007 at five different places, Rajarhat, Salt-Lake, Chinsura, Topsia and PoddarVihar. The following table provides information about the 1st batch of students who took admission in these colleges in the year 2007 and the range of pass percentage of these students in the first two years. Pass percentage as well as number of students passed was a natural number for each college in each of the years. If a student failed in a year he was ousted from the college. Further, it is known that no student failed in 3rd, 4th or 5th year. A student who passes in 5thyear said to have completed the course.
Range of pass percentage for all the colleges is given for the first two years. For example, pass percentage for college at Rajarhat in 1st year can take any value between 60% and 75%, both inclusive.

Q. What was the minimum possible number of students who were part of the first batch and completed medical from any of the five colleges?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 28

The minimum possible number of students completing medical from colleges in
PoddarVihar = 45% x 60% x 4800 =1296
Rajarhat = 60% x 70% x 3750 =1575
Topsia = 65 % x 60% x 3000 =1170
Chinsurs = 70% x 65% x 2700 =1228
Salt Lake = 60% x 50% x 3600 =1080.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 29

Directions : Read the following passage and answer the question.
Techno India University started five medical colleges in year 2007 at five different places, Rajarhat, Salt-Lake, Chinsura, Topsia and PoddarVihar. The following table provides information about the 1st batch of students who took admission in these colleges in the year 2007 and the range of pass percentage of these students in the first two years. Pass percentage as well as number of students passed was a natural number for each college in each of the years. If a student failed in a year he was ousted from the college. Further, it is known that no student failed in 3rd, 4th or 5th year. A student who passes in 5thyear said to have completed the course.
Range of pass percentage for all the colleges is given for the first two years. For example, pass percentage for college at Rajarhat in 1st year can take any value between 60% and 75%, both inclusive.

Q. In the first year, if pass percentage was highest in the college of Rajarhat, what was the maximum possible number of students who passed in first year from the college of Chinsura?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 29

The minimum pass percentage in the college from Chinsurs is 70%.
The highest pass percentage in the college from Rajarhat was 75%. So the highest pass percentage in the college from Chinsurs must be 74%.
Hence, the required number= 74%of 2700=1998.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 30

Directions : Read the following passage and answer the question.
Techno India University started five medical colleges in year 2007 at five different places, Rajarhat, Salt-Lake, Chinsura, Topsia and PoddarVihar. The following table provides information about the 1st batch of students who took admission in these colleges in the year 2007 and the range of pass percentage of these students in the first two years. Pass percentage as well as number of students passed was a natural number for each college in each of the years. If a student failed in a year he was ousted from the college. Further, it is known that no student failed in 3rd, 4th or 5th year. A student who passes in 5thyear said to have completed the course.
Range of pass percentage for all the colleges is given for the first two years. For example, pass percentage for college at Rajarhat in 1st year can take any value between 60% and 75%, both inclusive.

Q. The number of students who passed the second year from the colleges in city Rajarhat and Salt-Lake put together as a percentage of total students who took admission in these two colleges in first year could not be more than approximately? (Enter the percentage to 1 decimal place in the space provided without the percentage symbol. 


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 30

The total percentage would be maximum when the number of students passed from both the colleges individually was maximum.
For college in Rajarhat (75% of 3750)x80%=2250
For college in Salt-Lake  (76% of 3600)x60%=1641.6
Required percentage= 100 x (2250+1641.6) / (3750 + 3600) =52.94%

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 31

Directions: The table below shows the time schedule of Sarai ghat Express, Train number 12345. The timing of the Sarai ghat Express train along with its arrival and departure time at each station is given below. The distance column shows the distance traveled by the train from its starting point i.e. Howrah Junction:-
In between which two stations the train achieves maximum average speed?

Q. In between which two stations the train achieves maximum average speed?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 31


Here, Time=Arrival time in new station - Dept. time from previous station
Distance between two stations=Distance of 2nd station from Howrah - Distance of 1st station from Howrah
Avg. Speed=Distance/Time
Comparing all the avg. speeds we find that between Malda Town and Kishan ganj the speed is maximum=1.32 Km/min
Therefore, option D is correct.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 32

Directions: The table below shows the time schedule of Sarai ghat Express, Train number 12345. The timing of the Sarai ghat Express train along with its arrival and departure time at each station is given below. The distance column shows the distance traveled by the train from its starting point i.e. Howrah Junction:-
In between which two stations the train achieves maximum average speed?

Q. Suppose the Saraighat Express starts its journey from Howrah with a uniform constant speed of 60 Km/hr, and stops for 5 mins at each station and arrives at Guwahati. How much more or less time it takes to reach GHY compared to the scheduled time?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 32


Here, Time=Arrival time in new station - Dept. time from previous station
Distance between two stations=Distance of 2nd station from Howrah - Distance of 1st station from Howrah
Avg. Speed=Distance/Time
If normal schedule is maintained total time to reach Guwahati to Howrah= 17 hrs 45 mins
Now there are 11 stations in between Howrah and Guwahati. So total stoppage time=5*11=55 mins.
Now distance between the source and destination is =1019 km
The train moves with uniform constant speed of 60 Km/hr =1km/min
So the total time taken to reach GHY=1019 min + 55 min =1074 min=17 hr 54 min, which is 9 mins more.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 33

Directions: The table below shows the time schedule of Sarai ghat Express, Train number 12345. The timing of the Sarai ghat Express train along with its arrival and departure time at each station is given below. The distance column shows the distance traveled by the train from its starting point i.e. Howrah Junction:-
In between which two stations the train achieves maximum average speed?

Q. Suppose the Saraighat Express starts its journey from Howrah on Monday, reaches New Jalpaiguri 1 hour 20 mins late of his actual schedule time. Then again starts its journey towards Guwahati but arrives there on time. What is the difference of avg. speed (km/hr) of the train between the 2nd half (from NJP) and the first half (up to NJP) of the journey?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 33


Here, Time=Arrival time in new station - Dept. time from previous station
Distance between two stations=Distance of 2nd station from Howrah - Distance of 1st station from Howrah
Avg. Speed=Distance/Time
Total time taken to reach NJP= (74+47+59+104+45+110+123+ 80) =642 mins (we are excluding the stoppage time in each station).
Total Distance between Howrah & NJP=560 Km
So the avg. speed for the 1st half of the journey=560/642 km/min=52.33 Km/hr
The time taken to reach GHY from NJP= (135+18+108+165+21-80) (as train reaches GHY at the scheduled time thus it took 80 mins less to reach GHY from NJP) = 367 mins
Total distance between NJP and GHY=459 Km
So the avg. speed for the 2nd half of the journey=459/367 Km/min =75 Km/hr
So the difference in speed = 75 - 52.33 =22.67

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 34

Directions: The table below shows the time schedule of Sarai ghat Express, Train number 12345. The timing of the Sarai ghat Express train along with its arrival and departure time at each station is given below. The distance column shows the distance traveled by the train from its starting point i.e. Howrah Junction:-
In between which two stations the train achieves maximum average speed?

Q. The longest run between two successive station is

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 34


Here, Time=Arrival time in new station - Dept. time from previous station
Distance between two stations=Distance of 2nd station from Howrah - Distance of 1st station from Howrah
Avg. Speed=Distance/Time
The max distance between 2 successive stations is between New Bongaigaon & Kamakhya=202 Km

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 35

Directions : Inflow and Outflow of Funds of Indian Railways in a year


Profit = Inflow - Outflow
If in the year, the inflow of funds was Rs. 18,000 crore and outflow was Rs. 20, 000 crore, then what is the difference between the amount received from goods receipts and the amount spent on fuel?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 35

Amount received from goods receipts = 18000 x 45/100 = Rs. 8100 crore.
Amount spent on fuel = 20000 x 20/100 = Rs. 4000 crore.
Difference = 8100 - 4000 = Rs. 4100 crore.
Option 2.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 36

Directions : Inflow and Outflow of Funds of Indian Railways in a year


Profit = Inflow - Outflow
If the Sundry earnings is equal to lease charges, then what is the ratio of passenger receipts to wages?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 36

Let the total inflow the x & outflow the y
15% of x = 20% y.
x/y = 4/3
⇒ x = 4k y = 8k
Passenger receipts is 30% of 4k & wages is 30% of 3k.
30% of 4K : 30% of 3k
=4:3
Option 2

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 37

Directions : Inflow and Outflow of Funds of Indian Railways in a year


Profit = Inflow - Outflow
If in the year, the Railways incurred a loss of Rs. 2000 crore and if the total inflow of funds was 20% less than the total outflow of funds, then what was the amount received from passenger receipts?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 37

Let outflow be 100x then Inflow is 80x.
The loss will be 100x - 80x = 20x.
∴ 20x = Rs. 2000 crore X = Rs. 100 crore.
∴ Outflow = Rs. 10000 crore and inflow = Rs. 8000 crore.
∴ The amount received through passenger receipts = 8,000 x 30/100 = Rs. 2400 crore.
Option 1.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 38

Directions : Inflow and Outflow of Funds of Indian Railways in a year


Profit = Inflow - Outflow
If in the year, the sum of sundry earnings and fine receipts is Rs. 5,000 crore, then what would the profit/loss be, given that the sum of pensions and dividend is Rs.1,800 crore?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 38

Sundry Earnings and fine receipts together are 20% of Inflow and the amount to Rs. 5000 crore.
∴ Total inflow = 5000 x 100/20 = Rs. 25000 crore.
Pensions and dividends together account for 12% of the outflow of funds which is Rs. 1800 crore.
∴ Total outflow = 1800 x 100/12 = Rs. 15000 crore
∴ Profit = Inflow - Outflow = 25000 - 15000 = Rs. 10000 crore.
Option 2

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 39

Directions : The following table and two bar graphs gives the information of a survey made in five regions of West Bengal. Study the following and answer the following questions


Q. The male count above poverty line of Rishra is 1.9 X 106, then the total population of Rishra in millions is?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 39

Let the total count of Rishra be x million.
Count of Rishra above poverty line
= [(100 - 24)% of x] million
And so, male population of Rishra above poverty line
= 0.4 x [(100 - 24)] % of x million
But, it is given that male population of Rishra above poverty line = 1.9 million.
Hence 2/5 x (76/100 x X) = 1.9 ⇒ x = (5 x 100 x 1.9)/(76 x 2) = 6.25
Hence total population of Rishra = 6.25 million.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 40

Directions : The following table and two bar graphs gives the information of a survey made in five regions of West Bengal. Study the following and answer the following questions


Q. If the population of males below poverty line for Qachrapara is 2.4 million and that for TetulGanj is 6 million, then the total populations of Qachrapara and TetulGanj are in the ratio?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 40

For Qachrapara:
Male population below poverty line = 2.4 million.
The female population below poverty line be assumed as x million.
Therefore, 3 : 5 = 2.4 : x ⇒ x = (5 x 2.4)/3 = 4.
Total population below poverty line = (2.4 + 4) = 6.4 million.
If Nq be the total population of Qachrapara, then, 25% of Nq = 6.4 million ⇒ Nq = ((6.4 x 100)/25) million = 25.6 million.
For TetulGanj
Male population below poverty line = 6 million.
The female population below poverty line be assumed as y million.
Then, 5 : 3 = 6 : y ⇒ y = (3 x 6)/5 = 3.6.
Total population below poverty line = (6 + 3.6) = 9.6 million.
If Nt be the total population of TetulGanj, then, 15% of Nt = 9.6 million ((9.6 x 100)/15) million = 64 million
⇒ Nt =64 million
Thus, required ration = Nq/Nt = 25.6/64 = 0.4 = 2/5
Thus the required ratio is 2/5.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 41

Directions : The following table and two bar graphs gives the information of a survey made in five regions of West Bengal. Study the following and answer the following questions


Q. Find the male population above poverty line of 24 Parganas if the female population below poverty line of the region is 2.1 million?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 41

Female population = 2.1 million
The male population below poverty line of 24 Parganas be assumed as x million.
Therefore, 5:6 = x:2.1 ⇒ x = (2.1 x 5)/6 = 1.75.
Population below poverty line = (2.1 + 1.75) million = 3.85 million.
The population above poverty line in 24 Parganas be assumed as y million.
Since, 35% of the total population of 24 Parganas is below poverty line, therefore, 65% of the total population of 24 Parganas is above poverty line i.e., the ratio of population below poverty line to that above poverty line for 24 Parganas is 35 : 65.
35:65 = 3.85:y ⇒ y = (65 x 3.85)/35 = 7.15
Population above poverty line = 7.15 million and so, male population above poverty line is
= (6/13 x 7.15) million
= 3.3 million
Hence the male population above poverty line = 3.3 million.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 42

Directions : The following table and two bar graphs gives the information of a survey made in five regions of West Bengal. Study the following and answer the following questions


Q. What will be the number of females above the poverty line in the Santoshpur, if it is known that the population of Santoshpur is 7 million?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 42

Population of Santoshpur = 7 million.
Population of Santoshpur above poverty line = 0.81 X 7 million = 5.67 million
Number of females above poverty line in Santoshpur = 3/7 x 5.67 million = 2.43 million

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 43

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up
Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Spartans
Statement 2: Ninjas scored the highest number of points in the final round

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 43

The table looks like this, after computing the total score across the three rounds.

Since Ninjas had the maximum number of points in the 'Litius' round, one of A or B must be Ninjas.
Now since the points of Spartans and Rangers differ by 12, A & D may constitute one of Spartans while the other will be Rangers. Then B must be Ninjas and C must be Fighters.
Otherwise B & C may constitute one of Spartans, while the other is Rangers. Then A will be Ninjas and D will be Fighters.
Thus possible combinations can be represented as follows:-
case I

or case II

Statement 2 is True implies Case - I, in which case we cannot say if statement 1 is True/False. However if Statement 2 is False, Case - II is implied, in which case Statement 1 too will be false, as Spartans cannot win the Quiz in Case - II. 
Hence, option D is correct.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 44

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up
If Ninjas earned five points more than the Spartans in one particular round of the Quiz, then which team definitely did not make it to the Top 2 Finish?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 44

The table looks like this, after computing the total score across the three rounds.

Since Ninjas had the maximum number of points in the 'Litius' round, one of A or B must be Ninjas.
Now since the points of Spartans and Rangers differ by 12, A & D may constitute one of Spartans while the other will be Rangers. Then B must be Ninjas and C must be Fighters.
Otherwise B & C may constitute one of Spartans, while the other is Rangers. Then A will be Ninjas and D will be Fighters.
Thus possible combinations can be represented as follows:-
case I

or case II

In Case - I, Ninjas may have got 77 points in Litius, while Spartans got 72 points. Again in Case - II, Ninjas may have got 52 points in Lortius, while Spartans got 47. Thus both cases are possible. In Case - I, Ninjas finish 2nd, while in Case - II, Fighters finish 1st. Hence both Ninjas and Fighters can have a Top 2 finish. Hence None of These is the correct answer for this question.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 45

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up
If Rangers were able to avoid a last position finish, then which team won the Quiz?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 45

The table looks like this, after computing the total score across the three rounds.

Since Ninjas had the maximum number of points in the 'Litius' round, one of A or B must be Ninjas.
Now since the points of Spartans and Rangers differ by 12, A & D may constitute one of Spartans while the other will be Rangers. Then B must be Ninjas and C must be Fighters.
Otherwise B & C may constitute one of Spartans, while the other is Rangers. Then A will be Ninjas and D will be Fighters.
Thus possible combinations can be represented as follows:-
case I

or case II

Rangers could have avoided a last place finish in either Case - I or Case - II. In both case we can have different Winners, and hence the answer will be Cannot Be Determined.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 46

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up

Directions: The below table represents the points earned by the four participating teams (Ninjas, Spartans, Fighters & Rangers) in the Grand Finale of the National Sports Quiz Contest, which comprised of three rounds, Litius, Latius, and Lortius. The scores obtained by the four teams have been represented as A, B, C, and D in no particular order. The overall winner of the Quiz Contest is the team with the highest cumulative points across the three rounds, while the team finishing second-highest on points, would be declared Runners-Up.
The following additional information is provided too:-

  • In the 'Litius' round, Ninjas had the maximum number of points
  • The cumulative scores across the three rounds of the Spartans and Rangers differ by a margin of 12 points

Given the following two statements, what can be said regarding them?
Statement 1: The Winners of the Quiz was Team Rangers
Statement 2: Team Ninjas emerged Runners-Up
Which one of the following statements is true about matches played in the first two rounds?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 46

Germany and Argentina have 2 games each and Spain and Pakistan have won 1 game each. We also know that Germany beat Spain.
So, Germany won its second game against one among SA/NZ.
Similarly, Argentina must have won one game against Pakistan and another against SA/NZ.
Argentina scored 2 goals and conceded 0 goals. So it must have won both the games 1 - 0.
NZ conceded 6 goals. The only possibility is it lost 5-1 to Spain and lost 1 - 0 to Argentina.
As Spain conceded 2 goals it must have lost its opening game to Germany by 1 - 0.
Now, the results of all the games can be known.
The following are the possible match result after 2 rounds:

Hence, option C is correct.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 47

Directions : Each of the six friends namely Shikhar, Mahinder, Ravindra, Suresh, Rohit and Virat took one ball from a box containing 36 balls of six different colours Red, Blue Green, Yellow, Black and White. Also, the number of balls of each colour is the same.
Following is the detail of three statements made by each of the persons:-

Exactly one of the statements made by each person is true and only one of the statements made about Mahinder is correct. Also, balls of two particular colours were not taken by any of the persons.
What is the colour of the ball taken by Virat?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 47

By observing Virat's 1st and 3rd statement we can see that either of the statements must be true. Hence Statement - II of Virat must be False. Hence Suresh took a Blue ball.
Now moving on to Shikhar's 1st and 3rd statements we see that both statements are identical since Suresh took a blue ball. In both cases Mahinder is deemed to have taken a blue ball. But both the statements can't be right, and hence both must be False. Shikhar's Statement - II must be the True. Ravindra took a Red ball.
Now both Mahinder and Ravindra state that Virat took a black ball, either both will be true or both false. If both are true then Rohit took a yellow ball as per Mahinder and a read ball as per Ravindra, which is not possible. Also their statements on Suresh are also false.
This implies that Statement - I of Mahinder and Statement - III of Ravindra must be True. Thus Rohit took neither a yellow nor a red ball.
So far all the statements about Mahinder have been false. Hence Suresh Statement - III must be True, as it is mentioned that exactly one statement about Mahinder was true. Thus Mahinder took a green ball. This also means Statement - II is false. Thus Virat took a red ball. Again Statement - I is also false, and Shikhar did not take a blue ball.
Thus the final mapping of person to the ball taken by them is as follows:-
 
Virat took a Red ball.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 48

Which of the following will be the odd one out.
"Spoon, Sword, Knife, Fork".


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 48

All except the sword are used in the kitchen.
So, Swordwill be the perfect odd one out. 

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 49

Directions: Identify the most appropriate summary for the paragraph.
A translator of literary works needs a secure hold upon the two languages involved, supported by a good measure of familiarity with the two cultures. For Indian translating works in an Indian language into English, finding satisfactory equivalents in a generalized western culture of practices and symbols in the original would be less difficult than gaining fluent control of contemporary English. When a westerner works on texts in Indian languages the interpretation of cultural elements will be the major challenge, rather than control over the grammar and essential vocabulary of the language concerned. It is much easier to remedy lapses in language in a text translated into English, than flaws of content. Since it is easier for an Indian to learn the English language than it is for a Briton or American to comprehend Indian culture, translations of Indian texts is better left to Indians.


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 49

The paragraph essentially reveals that Indian translating works in an Indian language to English would find cultural equivalents in the western world easily, whereas a Westerner would find it very difficult to interpret cultural elements into English. Hence, it is better if an Indian translates Indian texts into English, as lapses in language are easily addressed, whereas flaws of content are a strict no-no!
"Indian translators should translate Indian texts into English as their work is less likely to pose cultural problems which are harder to address than the quality of language" will become the exact summary that we want.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 50

Directions: Identify the most appropriate summary for the paragraph.
To me, a "classic" means precisely the opposite of what my predecessors understood: a work is classical by reason of its resistance to contemporaneity and supposed universality, by reason of its capacity to indicate human particularity and difference in that past epoch. The classic is not what tells me about shared humanity—or, more truthfully put, what lets me recognize myself as already present in the past, what nourishes in me the illusion that everything has been like me and has existed only to prepare the way for me. Instead, the classic is what gives access to radically different forms of human consciousness for any given generation of readers, and thereby expands for them the range of possibilities of what it means to be a human being.


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 50

The author of the paragraph defines a classic as giving access to very different forms of human consciousness for any reader at any time, enabling them to experience the different possibilities of being a human being. 
"A classic is a work exploring the new, going beyond the universal, the contemporary, and the notion of a unified human consciousness" faithfully sticks to the classical experience going beyond the notion of a unified human consciousness to give access to different forms of human consciousness.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 51

Ashish is given Rs. 158 in one- rupee denominations. He has been asked to allocate them into a number of bags such that any amount required between Rs. 1 and Rs. 158 can be given by handing out a certain number of bags without opening them. What is the minimum number of bags required?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 51

The possible arrangements are 1, multiples of 2, remaining. So we have 1+2+4+8+16+32+64+31=158. Hence minimum no. of bags required is 8.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 52

The shortest median of a right-angled triangle is 25 units. If the area of the triangle is 336 sq.units, what is the length (in units) of the longest median of the triangle?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 52

The shortest median is the median drawn on to the largest side.
Let AC be the hypotenuse and AB be the shortest side.
AC = 2 × 25 = 50cm


AB2 + BC2 = 2500
AB × BC = 672
Solving (1) and (2)
We get, AB = 14cm and BC = 48cm
Length of the longest median =

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 53

Find abc if a+b+c=0 and a3+b3+c3=216

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 53

a3 + b3 + c3 − 3abc = (a + b + c) (a2 + b2 + c2 − ab − bc − ca)
216 − 3abc = 0
abc = 72.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 54

The sum of the integers in the solution set of |x2−5x|<6 is:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 54

|x2−5x|<6
x2−5x−6<0
(x−6)(x+1)<0
−1x={0,1,2,3,4,5}
And
|x2−5x|<6
−(x2−5x)−6<0
x2−5x+6>0
(x−2)(x−3)>0
x<2 or x>3
Values of x common to both {0,1,4,5}
Sum of values of x=0+1+4+5=10.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 55

In triangle ABC, D is a point on BC. P and Q are points on AB and AC respectively such that DP is perpendicular to AB and DQ is perpendicular to AC. If the altitudes from B to AC and C to AB are 30 cm and 40cm respectively and DO=6, find DP.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 55


Let the altitudes from B and C be BN and CM

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 56

Side AB of a triangle ABC is 80 cm long, whose perimeter is 170cm. If angle ABC=60 degrees, the shortest side of triangle ABC measures (cm).

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 56

a+b=90cm. cosine rule gives  cos⁡60= ⋅ Solving a=17 and and b = 73

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 57

If f (y) = x2 + (2p + l)x + p2 — 1 and a; is a real number, for what values o f ' p ' the function becomes 0?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 57

The function f(y) is a quadratic equation. It is given that x is real.
So the discriminant of f(y) > 0
i.e. D = b2 — 4ac > 0 or
(2 p + l ) 2 - 4 ( p 2 - 1) > 0
4p2 + 4p + 1 — 4 ( p 2 — l ) > 0
4p + 5 > 0 

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 58

A railway half ticket costs half the full fare and the reservation charge is the same on half ticket as on full ticket. One reserved first class ticket from Chennai to Trivandrum costs Rs. 216 and one full and one half reserved first class tickets cost Rs. 327. What is the basic first class full fare and what is the reservation charge?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 58

Let half of the full basic fare be Rs. X. Therefore, full basic fare is Rs. 2X.
Let the reservation charge be Rs. Y per ticket. Now, one full reservation ticket would cost 2X (basic fare) +Y (reservation charge) 2X+Y=216 ...(1)
The total basic fare for one half and one full ticket =x+2x=3X and the total reservation charge is 2Y. Hence, 3X+2Y=327 ...(2)
Solving (1) and (2) we get, x=105 and Y=6
Hence, the full basic fare is 2X= Rs. 210 and the reservation charge is Y= Rs. 

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 59

Find the area of the shaded region in fig., where ABCD is a square of side 14 cm and four circles are of same radii each.

                                                                             

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 59

Area of square = (14 cm)2 = 196 cm2

Radius of each circle =  cm

Area of 4 circles = 

Area of shaded region = Area of square - Area of 4 circles

= 196 - 154 = 42 cm2

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 60

Two men undertake to do a piece of work for Rs. 200. One alone could do it in 6 days, the other In 8 days. With the assistance of a boy they finish it in 3 clays. What Is the share of the boy?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 60

1st man's a days work =3/6, 2nd man's 3 days work =3/8.
The boy's 3 days' work =1−(3/6+3/8)=1/8
Clearly Rs.200 should be divided amongst them in the proportion of 3/6:3/8:1/8 or 4:3:1
1st man's share =4/8 of Rs. 200= Rs. 100 .
2nd man's share =3/8 of Rs. 200= Rs. 75 .
The boy's share =1/8 of Rs.200= Rs. 25

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 61

A contract Is to be completed In 56 days and 104 men were set to work, each working 8 hours a day. After 30 days, 2/5 of the work Is finished. How many additional men may be employed so that work may be completed on time?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 61

Total number of men - 
Therefore, Additional men required = 180 - 104 = 76

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 62

After the division of a number successively by 3,4 and 7, the remainders obtained are 2,1 and 4 respectively. What will be the remainder if 84 divides the same number?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 62

Since after division of a number successively by 3,4 and 7, the
remainders obtained are 2,1 and 4 respectively, the number is
of form ((((4×4)+1)×3)+2)k=53K
Let k=1; the number becomes 53
If it is divided by 84, the remainder is 53.
Option d) is the correct answer.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 63

Metal A costs Rs. 8.40 per gm and Metal B Rs. 0.21 per gm. In what proportion must these metals be mixed so that gram of the mixture may be worth Rs. 5.67 ?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 63

Using the formula of alligation,

required ratio 2 : 1

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 64

Meena scores 40% in an examination and after review, even though her score is increased by 50%, she fails by 35 marks. If her post-review score is increased by 20%, she will have 7 marks more than the passing score. The percentage score needed for passing the examination is

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 64

Let the total score of the exam be 100x.
Meena's before review =40% of 100x=40x
Her score after review =40x+50% of 40x=60x
Passing marks =60x+35 ...(1)
Her score after increasing it by 20% of post review score =60x+20% of 60x=72x
Passing marks =72x−7 ...(2)
Equating (1) and (2)
72x−7=60x+35
⇒x=3.5
Hence, Total Marks =100x=350 and passing marks =60x+35=245
Therefore, passing percentage 

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 65

Find the maximum and minimum value of 8 cos A + 15 sin A + 15

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 65

Always look out for Pythagorean triplets, we know that (8,15,17) is one T h e expression becomes: 17

Let there be a angle B for which sin B =

⇒ 17 (s in B cos A + cos B sin A ) + 15 17 (s in (A + B + 15 We know that sin (A + B) max = 1 s i n ( A + B) m i n = — 1
: Max value = 17 x 1 + 15 = 32 Min value = 17 x — 1 + 15 = — 2

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 66

A factory has 80 workers and 3 machines. Each worker knows to operate atleast 1 machine. If there are 65 persons who knows to operate machine 1,60 who knows to operate machine 2 and 55 who knows to operate machine 3, what can be the minimum number of persons who knows to operate all the three machines?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 66

Let's start with taking a random value for all three category. So let's first take 40 for the all three category. Now 65+60+55=180, this means there is
an extra count of 180−80=100.
Now as we know that the extra count occurs in the in the exactly two area and the all three area. So let's try put the extra count in these area.
Trial 1− since 40 is already assumed to be in the all three area, it takes care of extra count of 40×2=80.
Thus we are left with 20 as extra count which we have to place at the exactly two area.
Thus in the above case our venn diagram will look as:

A close look in the figure tells us that we can further decrease the value of all the three area. A bit of logical thinking will bring us to the value 20. No value less than 20 can satisfy the conditions of the question. As there is no scope left for reallocating numbers left from one area to another in this case.
Hence the final venn diagram will look as:

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 67

In some code, letters a,b,c,d and e represent numbers 2,4,5,6 and 10. We just do not know which letter represents which number. Consider the following relationships:
I. a+c=e
II. b−d=d and
III. e +a=b

Which of the following statements is true?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 67

We have a +c=e
so possible summation 6+4=10 or 4+2=6
Also b=2d so possible values 4=2×2 or 10=5×2
So considering both we have b=10,d=5,a=4,c=2,e=6
Hence the correct option is (B)

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 68

Solve for 

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 68

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 69

Three friends went for a picnic. First brought five apples and the second brought three. The third friend however brought only Rs. 8. What is the share of the first friend?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 69

The number of apples =8, so the amount eaten by each of the three is 8/3 apples therefore first friend should be paid for 5−(8/3) and second friend should be paid for 3−(8/3) apples. They should distribute the sum of Rs. 8 in ratio 7/3:1/3, i.e., 7 : 1

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 70

Solve for 

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 70

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 71

Sonu started a new business with accounts in two different banks (i.e. Axis and SBI).He deposited the earnings of each day in either of the two banks. However he does not deposit his earnings in both the banks simultaneously on any given day. However somehow he could not carry the business for long and had to shut it down. Find the total no of days Sonu carried on the business if…
1) He did not deposited in axis bank on 20 days and in SBI on 24 days.
2) He deposited on either axis bank or SBI on 28 days.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 71

Let the total No. of days Sonu deposited the earnings in Axis bank be 'n(a)' and that in SBI be 'n(b)'
Now,
Total no of days he carried on the business =n(a)+n(b)−n(a∩b)+ Neither (Days he didn't earned)
Since on any given day he does not deposit in both the bank accounts
n(a∩b)=0
Hence, Total no of days he carried on the business =n(a)+n(b)+ Neither (Days he didn't earned)
Now,
A/Q
Total −n(a)=20 ...(1)
Total −n(b)=24 ...(2)
n(a)+n(b)=28 ...(3)
Solving the 3 equations we get,
n(a)=16
n(b)=12
Total =36
Hence the total number of days he carried on the business  = 36

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 72

In Grand Oberoi hotel, 1160 guests are present currently. The hotel provides the following extra facilities: Gym, Swimming, Fun park, Food. During a regular survey the management team of Oberoi noticed something quite extraordinary about the extra facilities provided by them. They noticed that for every person who uses ‘F’ no. of facilities, there are exactly 3 persons who uses at least (F−7) no. of facilities, F=2,3,4. They also found that the no. of persons who used no extra facilities is twice the no of person that used all the 4 facilities. Help the management team to find out how many persons used exactly 3 facilities.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 72

since, for every person who uses 'F' no of facilities, there are exactly 3 person who uses atleast (F−1) no. of facilities. If we take the no. of persons who uses all
the four facilities to be 'x' then the no. of person who uses atleast 3 facilities will be 3x and so on.
The No. of persons who use exactly 3 facilities =3x−x=2x
Thus, the no. of persons who opt for various facilities can be summarized as follows:

We also know that no of person who uses no facilities
= twice of those who uses all the 4 facilities =2x.
So according the above deductions we can clearly
see that the number of person the hotel would be x+2x+6x+18x+2x=29x=1160
x=40
Hence the number of person who uses exactly three science = 2x = 80

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 73

A bike costs Rs.48000. Its value depreciates by 30% in the first year and in each subsequent year the depreciation is 20% of the value at the beginning of that year. The value of the bike after 3 years will be


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 73

The required value of the bike after 3 years 

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 74

A train 150m long running at 72 kmph crosses a platform in 25 sec. What is the length of the platform?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 74

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 75

I sell a table for Rs. 24 and thus make a percentage of profit equal to the cost price. What did the table cost me?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 75

Let the cost price and profit be X.

CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 76

Rajesh is 10 years younger to Baskar. 10 years back, Rajesh's age was two-thirds that of Baskar's. How old is Baskar now?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 13 - Question 76

Let the present age of Baskar be 'b' and that of Rajesh be "r". So, r=b−10 ...(1)
10 years back Rajesh was ( r−10) years old. 10 years back Baskar was (b−10) years old.
The question states that 10 years back Rajesh was two thirds as old as Baskar was. i.e., (r−10)=(2/3)×(b−10) ...(2)
Cross multiplying, we get 3(r−10)=2(b−10) or 3r−30=2b−20 ..(2)
From eqn (1) we can substitute r as (b−10) in eqn ( 2) So, 3(b−10)−30=2b−20
or 3b−30−30=2b−20
or b=40
The present age of Baskar is 40 years.

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