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CAT Practice Test - 14


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CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 1

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
British colonial policy . . . went through two policy phases, or at least there were two strategies between which its policies actually oscillated, sometimes to its great advantage. At first, the new colonial apparatus exercised caution, and occupied India by a mix of military power and subtle diplomacy, the high ground in the middle of the circle of circles. This, however, pushed them into contradictions. For, whatever their sense of the strangeness of the country and the thinness of colonial presence, the British colonial state represented the great conquering discourse of Enlightenment rationalism, entering India precisely at the moment of its greatest unchecked arrogance. As inheritors and representatives of this discourse, which carried everything before it, this colonial state could hardly adopt for long such a self-denying attitude. It had restructured everything in Europe—the productive system, the political regimes, the moral and cognitive orders—and would do the same in India, particularly as some empirically inclined theorists of that generation considered the colonies a massive laboratory of utilitarian or other theoretical experiments. Consequently, the colonial state could not settle simply for eminence at the cost of its marginality; it began to take initiatives to introduce the logic of modernity into Indian society. But this modernity did not enter a passive society. Sometimes, its initiatives were resisted by pre-existing structural forms. At times, there was a more direct form of collective resistance. Therefore the map of continuity and discontinuity that this state left behind at the time of independence was rather complex and has to be traced with care.
Most significantly, of course, initiatives for . . . modernity came to assume an external character. The acceptance of modernity came to be connected, ineradicably, with subjection. This again points to two different problems, one theoretical, the other political. Theoretically, because modernity was externally introduced, it is explanatorily unhelpful to apply the logical format of the ‘transition process’ to this pattern of change. Such a logical format would be wrong on two counts. First, however subtly, it would imply that what was proposed to be built was something like European capitalism. (And, in any case, historians have forcefully argued that what it was to replace was not like feudalism, with or without modificatory adjectives.) But, more fundamentally, the logical structure of endogenous change does not apply here. Here transformation agendas attack as an external force. This externality is not something that can be casually mentioned and forgotten. It is inscribed on every move, every object, every proposal, every legislative act, each line of causality. It comes to be marked on the epoch itself. This repetitive emphasis on externality should not be seen as a nationalist initiative that is so well rehearsed in Indian social science. . . .
Quite apart from the externality of the entire historical proposal of modernity, some of its contents were remarkable. . . . Economic reforms, or rather alterations . . . did not foreshadow the construction of a classical capitalist economy, with its necessary emphasis on extractive and transport sectors. What happened was the creation of a degenerate version of capitalism —what early dependency theorists called the ‘development of underdevelopment’.

All of the following statements about British colonialism can be inferred from the first paragraph, EXCEPT that it:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 1

From the first paragraph, we can infer all of the following except 2. The experimental sites idea is visible in the first para. Similarly, we can see Enlightenment rationalism as the motivation behind the change in colonial policy.
The statement “It had restructured everything in Europe—the productive system, the political regimes, the moral and cognitive orders—and would do the same in India” in the first para supports option 3 as well.
Thus we have evidence for 1,3 and 4. Many of you might wonder as to why 2 cannot be inferred because we have evidence for 2 as well.
But option 2 is distorted, it did face resistance from existing structural forms, but these structural forms were not of modernity. In fact there was no modernity in India, it was introduced externally by the British, as the passage argues. The existing structural forms were of society and not of modernity. Thus we can’t infer 2.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 2

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
British colonial policy . . . went through two policy phases, or at least there were two strategies between which its policies actually oscillated, sometimes to its great advantage. At first, the new colonial apparatus exercised caution, and occupied India by a mix of military power and subtle diplomacy, the high ground in the middle of the circle of circles. This, however, pushed them into contradictions. For, whatever their sense of the strangeness of the country and the thinness of colonial presence, the British colonial state represented the great conquering discourse of Enlightenment rationalism, entering India precisely at the moment of its greatest unchecked arrogance. As inheritors and representatives of this discourse, which carried everything before it, this colonial state could hardly adopt for long such a self-denying attitude. It had restructured everything in Europe—the productive system, the political regimes, the moral and cognitive orders—and would do the same in India, particularly as some empirically inclined theorists of that generation considered the colonies a massive laboratory of utilitarian or other theoretical experiments. Consequently, the colonial state could not settle simply for eminence at the cost of its marginality; it began to take initiatives to introduce the logic of modernity into Indian society. But this modernity did not enter a passive society. Sometimes, its initiatives were resisted by pre-existing structural forms. At times, there was a more direct form of collective resistance. Therefore the map of continuity and discontinuity that this state left behind at the time of independence was rather complex and has to be traced with care.
Most significantly, of course, initiatives for . . . modernity came to assume an external character. The acceptance of modernity came to be connected, ineradicably, with subjection. This again points to two different problems, one theoretical, the other political. Theoretically, because modernity was externally introduced, it is explanatorily unhelpful to apply the logical format of the ‘transition process’ to this pattern of change. Such a logical format would be wrong on two counts. First, however subtly, it would imply that what was proposed to be built was something like European capitalism. (And, in any case, historians have forcefully argued that what it was to replace was not like feudalism, with or without modificatory adjectives.) But, more fundamentally, the logical structure of endogenous change does not apply here. Here transformation agendas attack as an external force. This externality is not something that can be casually mentioned and forgotten. It is inscribed on every move, every object, every proposal, every legislative act, each line of causality. It comes to be marked on the epoch itself. This repetitive emphasis on externality should not be seen as a nationalist initiative that is so well rehearsed in Indian social science. . . .
Quite apart from the externality of the entire historical proposal of modernity, some of its contents were remarkable. . . . Economic reforms, or rather alterations . . . did not foreshadow the construction of a classical capitalist economy, with its necessary emphasis on extractive and transport sectors. What happened was the creation of a degenerate version of capitalism —what early dependency theorists called the ‘development of underdevelopment’.

“Consequently, the colonial state could not settle simply for eminence at the cost of its marginality; it began to take initiatives to introduce the logic of modernity into Indian society.” Which of the following best captures the sense of this statement?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 2

To marginalise means to treat something or someone as insignificant.  The colonial state was marginalized because it was at the periphery of Indian society. Here colonial state is the small ruling elite. Since it was a small group, it was marginalized, and to come out of that marginalization, it tried to introduce modernity in Indian society, because if everyone is modernized, then the colonized state would be a part of mainstream Indian society. To get the right answer we have to understand the meaning of the word marginalized. No other option correctly captures the contextual meaning of the word ‘marginalized’, except 4. Thus 4 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 3

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
British colonial policy . . . went through two policy phases, or at least there were two strategies between which its policies actually oscillated, sometimes to its great advantage. At first, the new colonial apparatus exercised caution, and occupied India by a mix of military power and subtle diplomacy, the high ground in the middle of the circle of circles. This, however, pushed them into contradictions. For, whatever their sense of the strangeness of the country and the thinness of colonial presence, the British colonial state represented the great conquering discourse of Enlightenment rationalism, entering India precisely at the moment of its greatest unchecked arrogance. As inheritors and representatives of this discourse, which carried everything before it, this colonial state could hardly adopt for long such a self-denying attitude. It had restructured everything in Europe—the productive system, the political regimes, the moral and cognitive orders—and would do the same in India, particularly as some empirically inclined theorists of that generation considered the colonies a massive laboratory of utilitarian or other theoretical experiments. Consequently, the colonial state could not settle simply for eminence at the cost of its marginality; it began to take initiatives to introduce the logic of modernity into Indian society. But this modernity did not enter a passive society. Sometimes, its initiatives were resisted by pre-existing structural forms. At times, there was a more direct form of collective resistance. Therefore the map of continuity and discontinuity that this state left behind at the time of independence was rather complex and has to be traced with care.
Most significantly, of course, initiatives for . . . modernity came to assume an external character. The acceptance of modernity came to be connected, ineradicably, with subjection. This again points to two different problems, one theoretical, the other political. Theoretically, because modernity was externally introduced, it is explanatorily unhelpful to apply the logical format of the ‘transition process’ to this pattern of change. Such a logical format would be wrong on two counts. First, however subtly, it would imply that what was proposed to be built was something like European capitalism. (And, in any case, historians have forcefully argued that what it was to replace was not like feudalism, with or without modificatory adjectives.) But, more fundamentally, the logical structure of endogenous change does not apply here. Here transformation agendas attack as an external force. This externality is not something that can be casually mentioned and forgotten. It is inscribed on every move, every object, every proposal, every legislative act, each line of causality. It comes to be marked on the epoch itself. This repetitive emphasis on externality should not be seen as a nationalist initiative that is so well rehearsed in Indian social science. . . .
Quite apart from the externality of the entire historical proposal of modernity, some of its contents were remarkable. . . . Economic reforms, or rather alterations . . . did not foreshadow the construction of a classical capitalist economy, with its necessary emphasis on extractive and transport sectors. What happened was the creation of a degenerate version of capitalism —what early dependency theorists called the ‘development of underdevelopment’.

All of the following statements, if true, could be seen as supporting the arguments in the passage, EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 3

The points that are mentioned directly by the author in the passage will definitely support his argument. The point that is not mentioned or is opposite to what the author has to say will not support his argument. You must understand that not supporting doesn’t mean weakening. Any Option 4 supports the author’s argument because he himself mentions historians who have argued that capitalism in India was not introduced with any modifications (2nd para paragraph)
Option 3, too, has been mentioned in the passage in the very first para where the author says that colonies were experimental labs.
Option 2 has come towards the end of the passage, in the last para wherein the author says that since modernity was externally imposed, it led to development of underdevelopment.
Option 1 is difficult because people have difficulty understanding the meaning of the term ‘induced by’. Induced by means triggered by or caused by. The change in British colonial policy was not induced by resistance to modernity. In fact, first came the change in policy, then came the resistance to modernity in Indian society. So the correct way of framing this idea would be: the resistance to modernity in Indian society was induced by the change in the British colonial policy.
Option 1 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 4

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
British colonial policy . . . went through two policy phases, or at least there were two strategies between which its policies actually oscillated, sometimes to its great advantage. At first, the new colonial apparatus exercised caution, and occupied India by a mix of military power and subtle diplomacy, the high ground in the middle of the circle of circles. This, however, pushed them into contradictions. For, whatever their sense of the strangeness of the country and the thinness of colonial presence, the British colonial state represented the great conquering discourse of Enlightenment rationalism, entering India precisely at the moment of its greatest unchecked arrogance. As inheritors and representatives of this discourse, which carried everything before it, this colonial state could hardly adopt for long such a self-denying attitude. It had restructured everything in Europe—the productive system, the political regimes, the moral and cognitive orders—and would do the same in India, particularly as some empirically inclined theorists of that generation considered the colonies a massive laboratory of utilitarian or other theoretical experiments. Consequently, the colonial state could not settle simply for eminence at the cost of its marginality; it began to take initiatives to introduce the logic of modernity into Indian society. But this modernity did not enter a passive society. Sometimes, its initiatives were resisted by pre-existing structural forms. At times, there was a more direct form of collective resistance. Therefore the map of continuity and discontinuity that this state left behind at the time of independence was rather complex and has to be traced with care.
Most significantly, of course, initiatives for . . . modernity came to assume an external character. The acceptance of modernity came to be connected, ineradicably, with subjection. This again points to two different problems, one theoretical, the other political. Theoretically, because modernity was externally introduced, it is explanatorily unhelpful to apply the logical format of the ‘transition process’ to this pattern of change. Such a logical format would be wrong on two counts. First, however subtly, it would imply that what was proposed to be built was something like European capitalism. (And, in any case, historians have forcefully argued that what it was to replace was not like feudalism, with or without modificatory adjectives.) But, more fundamentally, the logical structure of endogenous change does not apply here. Here transformation agendas attack as an external force. This externality is not something that can be casually mentioned and forgotten. It is inscribed on every move, every object, every proposal, every legislative act, each line of causality. It comes to be marked on the epoch itself. This repetitive emphasis on externality should not be seen as a nationalist initiative that is so well rehearsed in Indian social science. . . .
Quite apart from the externality of the entire historical proposal of modernity, some of its contents were remarkable. . . . Economic reforms, or rather alterations . . . did not foreshadow the construction of a classical capitalist economy, with its necessary emphasis on extractive and transport sectors. What happened was the creation of a degenerate version of capitalism —what early dependency theorists called the ‘development of underdevelopment’.

Which of the following observations is a valid conclusion to draw from the author’s statement that “the logical structure of endogenous change does not apply here. Here transformation agendas attack as an external force”?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 4

Here we must correctly understand the meaning of the word endogenous. Endogenous is not the same as endogamous, though there are some parallels. Endogenous means having internal cause or origin, while endogamous means marriage within a specific tribe. Option 3 has to go out.
The meaning of the word endogenous makes it clear that the right answer has to be 2.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 5

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
British colonial policy . . . went through two policy phases, or at least there were two strategies between which its policies actually oscillated, sometimes to its great advantage. At first, the new colonial apparatus exercised caution, and occupied India by a mix of military power and subtle diplomacy, the high ground in the middle of the circle of circles. This, however, pushed them into contradictions. For, whatever their sense of the strangeness of the country and the thinness of colonial presence, the British colonial state represented the great conquering discourse of Enlightenment rationalism, entering India precisely at the moment of its greatest unchecked arrogance. As inheritors and representatives of this discourse, which carried everything before it, this colonial state could hardly adopt for long such a self-denying attitude. It had restructured everything in Europe—the productive system, the political regimes, the moral and cognitive orders—and would do the same in India, particularly as some empirically inclined theorists of that generation considered the colonies a massive laboratory of utilitarian or other theoretical experiments. Consequently, the colonial state could not settle simply for eminence at the cost of its marginality; it began to take initiatives to introduce the logic of modernity into Indian society. But this modernity did not enter a passive society. Sometimes, its initiatives were resisted by pre-existing structural forms. At times, there was a more direct form of collective resistance. Therefore the map of continuity and discontinuity that this state left behind at the time of independence was rather complex and has to be traced with care.
Most significantly, of course, initiatives for . . . modernity came to assume an external character. The acceptance of modernity came to be connected, ineradicably, with subjection. This again points to two different problems, one theoretical, the other political. Theoretically, because modernity was externally introduced, it is explanatorily unhelpful to apply the logical format of the ‘transition process’ to this pattern of change. Such a logical format would be wrong on two counts. First, however subtly, it would imply that what was proposed to be built was something like European capitalism. (And, in any case, historians have forcefully argued that what it was to replace was not like feudalism, with or without modificatory adjectives.) But, more fundamentally, the logical structure of endogenous change does not apply here. Here transformation agendas attack as an external force. This externality is not something that can be casually mentioned and forgotten. It is inscribed on every move, every object, every proposal, every legislative act, each line of causality. It comes to be marked on the epoch itself. This repetitive emphasis on externality should not be seen as a nationalist initiative that is so well rehearsed in Indian social science. . . .
Quite apart from the externality of the entire historical proposal of modernity, some of its contents were remarkable. . . . Economic reforms, or rather alterations . . . did not foreshadow the construction of a classical capitalist economy, with its necessary emphasis on extractive and transport sectors. What happened was the creation of a degenerate version of capitalism —what early dependency theorists called the ‘development of underdevelopment’.

Which one of the following 5-word sequences best captures the flow of the arguments in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 5

This is the easiest question of the passage. Towards the end the author talks about the development of underdevelopment, and he opens the passage by introducing British colonial policy. Option 4 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 6

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .
When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .
As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.
And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?
For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

Which of the following can be inferred from the author’s claim, “Which way is Oriental?”

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 6

To answer this question we must understand the context in which Orientalism has been used. The word Orientalism has been used here in the sense of identity. The author says when we speak the same language and understand each other, there is nothing like Orientalism in that case. In effect, he wants to say that language breaks all the barriers of culture and identity.
Option 2 is correct because it mentions learning another language and thus captures the essence. Option 1 goes out because goodwill is not the intention, nor is globalization. Option 4 takes the word Orientalism literally, the author has used the word in a context, that context is identity defined by language.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 7

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .
When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .
As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.
And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?
For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

A French ethnographer decides to study the culture of a Nigerian tribe. Which of the following is most likely to be the view of the author of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 7

This is an application based question. The answer to such questions cannot be found directly in the passage, but has to be gathered from the key ideas supported by the author. The author of this passage is in favour of learning a new language because he thinks it breaks cultural barriers. So, if a French ethnographer decides to study the culture of a Nigerian tribe, the author would unarguably want him to learn their language, as this will help the ethnographer better study the tribe.
This is a very easy question and option 3 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 8

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .
When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .
As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.
And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?
For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

According to the passage, which of the following is not responsible for language’s ability to change us?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 8

This is an easy question. By reading third last para of the passage, you should be able to answer all the questions.
Passage says “My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate”… this justifies option 2. Option 2 can be ruled out.
If you are welcomed because you speak a particular language, then it has intrinsic connection with your identity. You speak a language, as a result people identify you as someone similar to them, so they welcome you.
The third last para of the passage clearly mentions option 4.
Option 3 is the right choice because it has nothing to do with language’s ability to change us.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 9

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
For two years, I tracked down dozens of . . . Chinese in Upper Egypt [who were] selling lingerie. In a deeply conservative region, where Egyptian families rarely allow women to work or own businesses, the Chinese flourished because of their status as outsiders. They didn’t gossip, and they kept their opinions to themselves. In a New Yorker article entitled “Learning to Speak Lingerie,” I described the Chinese use of Arabic as another non-threatening characteristic. I wrote, “Unlike Mandarin, Arabic is inflected for gender, and Chinese dealers, who learn the language strictly by ear, often pick up speech patterns from female customers. I’ve come to think of it as the lingerie dialect, and there’s something disarming about these Chinese men speaking in the feminine voice.” . . .
When I wrote about the Chinese in the New Yorker, most readers seemed to appreciate the unusual perspective. But as I often find with topics that involve the Middle East, some people had trouble getting past the black-and-white quality of a byline. “This piece is so orientalist I don’t know what to do,” Aisha Gani, a reporter who worked at The Guardian, tweeted. Another colleague at the British paper, Iman Amrani, agreed: “I wouldn’t have minded an article on the subject written by an Egyptian woman—probably would have had better insight.” . . .
As an MOL (man of language), I also take issue with this kind of essentialism. Empathy and understanding are not inherited traits, and they are not strictly tied to gender and race. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative. In Upper Egypt, the Chinese experience of struggling to learn Arabic and local culture had made them much more thoughtful. In the same way, I was interested in their lives not because of some kind of voyeurism, but because I had also experienced Egypt and Arabic as an outsider. And both the Chinese and the Egyptians welcomed me because I spoke their languages. My identity as a white male was far less important than my ability to communicate.
And that easily lobbed word—“Orientalist”—hardly captures the complexity of our interactions. What exactly is the dynamic when a man from Missouri observes a Zhejiang native selling lingerie to an Upper Egyptian woman? . . . If all of us now stand beside the same river, speaking in ways we all understand, who’s looking east and who’s looking west? Which way is Oriental?
For all of our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are.

The author’s critics would argue that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 9

This question too can be answered by keeping in mind the author’s key argument. The author says that language can help us overcome cultural barriers and barriers of identity you are born with. To weaken this point, the author’s critics would say something contrary to that point. Option 3 is the best choice.
Option 1 would support the author. Option 2 has nothing to do with language. Option 4 is simply out of scope.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 10

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.
Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .
In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest
community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .
Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .
[T]he nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . .
Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

In the context of the passage, the author refers to Manaus in order to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 10

This is an easy question and can be answered by understanding the context in which the author discusses Manaus. We have to go to the first sentence of the last para.
[T]he nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs.
Reading the above lines, we can shortlist two choices, one is 2 and the other is 3. But the purpose of giving jobs is to stop deforestation, which is the bigger issue. Option 3 is thus the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 11

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.
Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .
In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest
community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .
Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .
[T]he nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . .
Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

We can infer that Calthorpe’s statement “still jars” with most people because most people:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 11

This is a difficult question. The options are so close that it is difficult to pick any with confidence. However, we can try the elimination method here.
The passage says:
In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.”
The right answer has to be opposite of what Calthorpe has to say, because what people believe in and what Calthorpe has to say are contradictory in nature (the verb jars means to disturb). Calthorpe says that cities are the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. So people’s belief would be the opposite of this. Thus option 4 is the right choice.
Option 1 is not specific. It is too broad and does not capture the people’s belief as precisely as option 4 does. Option 2 is indeed very close, the pollution idea is stated by Calthorpe, but the idea of crowdedness is not present in his statement.
Similarly option 3 talks about crimes and diseases, something which has not been mentioned in Calthorpe’s quote.
Both choice 2 and 4 are very close, but 2 goes out only because of idea of ‘crowdedness’.
A very close call indeed.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 12

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.
Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .
In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest
community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .
Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .
[T]he nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . .
Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

Which one of the following statements would undermine the author’s stand regarding the greenness of cities?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 12

This is an easy question, provided that you have understood the question well. The question wants us to undermine the author’s argument regarding the ‘greenness of cities’. We must restrict our answer to greenness only.
Option 1 talks about ‘violent crimes’, which has nothing to do with greenness of cities. It can be ruled out
Option 2 is the right choice. If population density is likely to increase CO2 and global warming, then the idea of greenness is futile as the carbon dioxide will neutralize it.
Option 3, like option 1, is out of scope. The high cost of utilities has nothing to do with greenness
Option 4 too is out of scope. It is not countering the idea of greenness.
We must understand that in spite of the ideas presented in choices 1, 3 and 4, author’s idea of greenness of cities can still be a valid point.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 13

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
The magic of squatter cities is that they are improved steadily and gradually by their residents. To a planner’s eye, these cities look chaotic. I trained as a biologist and to my eye, they look organic. Squatter cities are also unexpectedly green. They have maximum density—1 million people per square mile in some areas of Mumbai—and have minimum energy and material use. People get around by foot, bicycle, rickshaw, or the universal shared taxi.
Not everything is efficient in the slums, though. In the Brazilian favelas where electricity is stolen and therefore free, people leave their lights on all day. But in most slums recycling is literally a way of life. The Dharavi slum in Mumbai has 400 recycling units and 30,000 ragpickers. Six thousand tons of rubbish are sorted every day. In 2007, the Economist reported that in Vietnam and Mozambique, “Waves of gleaners sift the sweepings of Hanoi’s streets, just as Mozambiquan children pick over the rubbish of Maputo’s main tip. Every city in Asia and Latin America has an industry based on gathering up old cardboard boxes.” . . .
In his 1985 article, Calthorpe made a statement that still jars with most people: “The city is the most environmentally benign form of human settlement. Each city dweller consumes less land, less energy, less water, and produces less pollution than his counterpart in settlements of lower densities.” “Green Manhattan” was the inflammatory title of a 2004 New Yorker article by David Owen. “By the most significant measures,” he wrote, “New York is the greenest
community in the United States, and one of the greenest cities in the world . . . The key to New York’s relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness. . . . Placing one and a half million people on a twenty-three-square-mile island sharply reduces their opportunities to be wasteful.” He went on to note that this very compactness forces people to live in the world’s most energy-efficient apartment buildings. . . .
Urban density allows half of humanity to live on 2.8 per cent of the land. . . . Consider just the infrastructure efficiencies. According to a 2004 UN report: “The concentration of population and enterprises in urban areas greatly reduces the unit cost of piped water, sewers, drains, roads, electricity, garbage collection, transport, health care, and schools.” . . .
[T]he nationally subsidised city of Manaus in northern Brazil “answers the question” of how to stop deforestation: give people decent jobs. Then they can afford houses, and gain security. One hundred thousand people who would otherwise be deforesting the jungle around Manaus are now prospering in town making such things as mobile phones and televisions. . .
Of course, fast-growing cities are far from an unmitigated good. They concentrate crime, pollution, disease and injustice as much as business, innovation, education and entertainment. . . . But if they are overall a net good for those who move there, it is because cities offer more than just jobs. They are transformative: in the slums, as well as the office towers and leafy suburbs, the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan . . .

From the passage it can be inferred that cities are good places to live in for all of the following reasons EXCEPT that they:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 13

This might prove to be a little challenging to most students as it asks to choose the one that cannot be inferred. In other words, we have to eliminate the ones that can be inferred and choose the as right answer the one that cannot be inferred.
The last paragraph helps us eliminate two choices. The first that cities indeed help create jobs, and the second that they help prevent destruction of environment. Both the choices can be inferred when the author gives example of Manaus. Option 1 and 3 can be ruled out.
So we are left with two choices, option 4 tells us that cities contribute to cultural transformation. This can be inferred from the last sentence of the para. The author has used the word transformative in the last sentence of the passage “the progress is from hick to metropolitan to cosmopolitan”, we can infer that this is cultural transformation, after all you are moving from metropolitan to cosmopolitan.
Many of you might say that option 2 can also be inferred from the last sentence of the passage. But this is not the reason why the author feels that cities are good places to live in.
The last para has clues to all the choices except 2.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 14

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions

Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .
Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.
Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.
The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.
The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.
The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

According to the passage, colonial powers located their capitals:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 14

You will not get a question easier than this.
In the first paragraph, we have the following lines: In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones…
Thus we get to know that colonial powers were focussed on trade. Option 2 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 15

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .
Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.
Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.
The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.
The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.
The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

The “long pedigree” of the aim to shift civil servants to improve their living standards implies that this move:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 15

This is primarily a vocabulary question. Pedigree means history. So a long pedigree means something that has a history. Thus option 4 becomes the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 16

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .
Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.
Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.
The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.
The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.
The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

The “dilemma” mentioned in the passage refers to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 16

This question has come from the second last paragraph of the passage.
“The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . .”
In short, the dilemma is pick small towns or opt for larger cities.
Option 2 says keep government agencies in large cities, but the issue is opt x or opt y, not opt x or keep y
Option 3 does not even mention the two choices, while option 4 talks about private enterprise, which is definitely out of scope.
Option 1 is the best answer, relocate to remote areas or to relatively larger cities, opt x or opt y.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 17

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .
Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.
Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.
The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.
The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.
The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

According to the author, relocating government agencies has not always been a success for all of the following reasons EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 17

This is a question that has double negative, you must carefully read the question, simplify it and then try to eliminate the options. According to the author, relocating government agencies has not always been a success. You have to mark the option that is not one of the reasons. The option that is the reason will go out, and the one that is not will be the right choice.
Once you understand the question, it becomes quite a simple one. The corruption point has been mentioned towards the end of the passage. So option 3 is the reason. Staff losses and difficulty of attracting talent are both mentioned in the passage.
Option 4 is nowhere mentioned and has to be the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 18

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
Around the world, capital cities are disgorging bureaucrats. In the post-colonial fervour of the 20th century, coastal capitals picked by trade-focused empires were spurned for “regionally neutral” new ones . . . . But decamping wholesale is costly and unpopular; governments these days prefer piecemeal dispersal. The trend reflects how the world has changed. In past eras, when information travelled at a snail’s pace, civil servants had to cluster together. But now desk-workers can ping emails and video-chat around the world. Travel for face-to-face meetings may be unavoidable, but transport links, too, have improved. . . .
Proponents of moving civil servants around promise countless benefits. It disperses the risk that a terrorist attack or natural disaster will cripple an entire government. Wonks in the sticks will be inspired by new ideas that walled-off capitals cannot conjure up. Autonomous regulators perform best far from the pressure and lobbying of the big city. Some even hail a cure for ascendant cynicism and populism. The unloved bureaucrats of faraway capitals will become as popular as firefighters once they mix with regular folk.
Beyond these sunny visions, dispersing central-government functions usually has three specific aims: to improve the lives of both civil servants and those living in clogged capitals; to save money; and to redress regional imbalances. The trouble is that these goals are not always realised.
The first aim—improving living conditions—has a long pedigree. After the second world war Britain moved thousands of civil servants to “agreeable English country towns” as London was rebuilt. But swapping the capital for somewhere smaller is not always agreeable. Attrition rates can exceed 80%. . . . The second reason to pack bureaucrats off is to save money. Office space costs far more in capitals. . . . Agencies that are moved elsewhere can often recruit better workers on lower salaries than in capitals, where well-paying multinationals mop up talent.
The third reason to shift is to rebalance regional inequality. . . . Norway treats federal jobs as a resource every region deserves to enjoy, like profits from oil. Where government jobs go, private ones follow. . . . Sometimes the aim is to fulfil the potential of a country’s second-tier cities. Unlike poor, remote places, bigger cities can make the most of relocated government agencies, linking them to local universities and businesses and supplying a better-educated workforce. The decision in 1946 to set up America’s Centres for Disease Control in Atlanta rather than Washington, D.C., has transformed the city into a hub for health-sector research and business.
The dilemma is obvious. Pick small, poor towns, and areas of high unemployment get new jobs, but it is hard to attract the most qualified workers; opt for larger cities with infrastructure and better-qualified residents, and the country’s most deprived areas see little benefit. . . . Others contend that decentralisation begets corruption by making government agencies less accountable. . . . A study in America found that state-government corruption is worse when the state capital is isolated—journalists, who tend to live in the bigger cities, become less watchful of those in power.

People who support decentralising central government functions are LEAST likely to cite which of the following reasons for their view?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 18

We have to choose an option that would not be used by people who support decentralizing of central government functions.
If the option supports decentralization, then it is out or else it is in.
Option 1 supports decentralization and has been discussed in the passage, the cost factor has been extensively discussed by the author.
New ideas and autonomy in regulation is given in the second paragraph. Thus options 2 and 3 are out,
Option 4 is not a reason given in support of decentralization.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 19

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.
But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."
When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.
But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.
The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.
Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .
[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.
Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

In Dr. Thompson’s view, CyArk owning the copyright of its digital scans of archaeological sites is akin to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 19

Owning the copyright technically means possessing something. The site belongs to some other country, but the copyrights are owned by some other entity. This would be akin to Egyptian artefacts owned by Western museum. This is the right analogy. You must understand that ‘seizing’ means snatching something forcefully from someone.
Option 1 goes out because the illegal downloading will not make you the owner of it.
Option 3 too goes out because giving free access to others is not akin to giving the right to own
Option 4 too does not have the right analogy.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 20

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.
But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."
When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.
But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.
The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.
Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .
[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.
Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

Of the following arguments, which one is LEAST likely to be used by the companies that digitally scan cultural sites?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 20

This question can be answered by using a bit of common sense and by reading the lines of the passage in which Google and CyArk have put forth their defence.  We should mark the choice that these companies would not use to support their actions.
Option 1, 2 and 4 provide valid reasons. Option 3 is not the valid reason because it implies authoritarian attitude on behalf of the companies. Someone who tries to be a protector of culture would be considered snobbish. You can be a promoter of culture but not a protector of culture. Option 3 is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 21

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions
War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.
But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."
When it comes to archaeological treasures, the losses have been mounting. ISIS blew up parts of the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria and an earthquake hit Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar, damaging dozens of temples, in 2016. In the past, all archaeologists and historians had for restoration and research were photos, drawings, remnants and intuition.
But that's changing. Before the earthquake at Bagan, many of the temples on the site were scanned. . . . [These] scans . . . are on Google's Arts & Culture site. The digital renditions allow viewers to virtually wander the halls of the temple, look up-close at paintings and turn the building over, to look up at its chambers. . . . [Google Arts & Culture] works with museums and other nonprofits . . . to put high-quality images online.
The images of the temples in Bagan are part of a collaboration with CyArk, a nonprofit that creates the 3D scanning of historic sites. . . . Google . . . says [it] doesn't make money off this website, but it fits in with Google's mission to make the world's information available and useful.
Critics say the collaboration could be an attempt by a large corporation to wrap itself in the sheen of culture. Ethan Watrall, an archaeologist, professor at Michigan State University and a member of the Society for American Archaeology, says he's not comfortable with the arrangement between CyArk and Google. . . . Watrall says this project is just a way for Google to promote Google. "They want to make this material accessible so people will browse it and be filled with wonder by it," he says. "But at its core, it's all about advertisements and driving traffic." Watrall says these images belong on the site of a museum or educational institution, where there is serious scholarship and a very different mission. . . .
[There's] another issue for some archaeologists and art historians. CyArk owns the copyrights of the scans — not the countries where these sites are located. That means the countries need CyArk's permission to use these images for commercial purposes.
Erin Thompson, a professor of art crime at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, says it's the latest example of a Western nation appropriating a foreign culture, a centuries-long battle. . . . CyArk says it copyrights the scans so no one can use them in an inappropriate way. The company says it works closely with authorities during the process, even training local people to help. But critics like Thompson are not persuaded. . . . She would prefer the scans to be owned by the countries and people where these sites are located.

By “digital colonialism”, critics of the CyArk–Google project are referring to the fact that:

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 21

We should always try to answer questions by looking for contextual references from the passage. The term ‘digital colonization’ has come in the very first paragraph. It says critics have raised question about “who should own the copyrights”. Some have referred to it as ‘digital colonization”. Thus digital colonization refers to the fact that countries where the scanned sites are located do not own the scan copyrights.
Option 4 is the other close choice, but this option can be true only if the host countries own the copyrights. Only if they own the copyrights can they give copyright permission.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 22

Directions : Rearrange the following sentences
A. Sceptics are warned to remain silent, lest they become unpleasantly conspicuous. 
B. When Lady Rose ' s Daughter appeared, the critic of a great metropolitan daily remarked that whoever did not immediately recognise the work as a masterpiece thereby proclaimed himself as a person incapable of judgement, taste, and appreciation. 
C. It is high time that somebody spoke out his mind about Mrs. Humphry Ward; her prodigious vogue is one of the most extraordinary literary phenomena of our day. 
D. Even professional reviewers lose all sense of proportion when they discuss her books, and their so-called criticisms sound like publishers ' advertisements. 
E. A roar of approval greets the publication of every new novel from her active pen, and it is almost pathetic to contemplate the reverent awe of her army of worshippers when they behold the solemn announcement that she is "collecting material" for another masterpiece.  


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 22

Statement C starts the paragraph. The word ' even ' in statement D must have some precedence. ED is a very strong link. E says: it is almost pathetic to contemplate the reverent awe of her army of worshippers. D says: Even professional reviewers lose all sense of proportion. These two ideas are interconnected. A and B are linked because they each focus on sceptics and how their reactions would be viewed. Option B is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 23

Directions : Rearrange the following sentences
A. The lack of charm that I always feel in reading Mrs. Ward ' s books (and I have read them all) is owing not merely to the lack of humour. It is partly due to what seems to be an almost total absence of freshness, spontaneity, and originality. 
B. Mrs. Ward works like a well-trained and high-class graduate student, who is engaged in the preparation of a doctor ' s thesis. 
C. Her discussions of socialism, her scenes in the House of Commons and on the Terrace, her excursions to Italy, her references to political history, her remarks on the army, her disquisitions on theology, her pictures of campaign riots, her studies of defective drainage, her representations of the labouring classes,—all these are "worked up" in a scholarly and scientific manner; there is the modern passion for accuracy, there is the German completeness of detail,—there is, in fact, everything except the breath of life. 
D. She works in the descriptive manner, from the outside in—not in the inspired manner which goes with imagination, sympathy, and genius. 
E. She is not only a student, she is a journalist; she is a special correspondent on politics and theology; but she is not a creative writer, or she has the critical, not the creative, temperament.  


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 23

This is the easiest of all questions. The paragraph can start with either A or B, for they both introduce Mrs Ward, but not with C or D or E because they both have the pronoun ' she ' and we do not know to what exactly it refers. Option C is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 24

Three out of four sentences, when arranged, form a coherent paragraph. Find the odd sentence out.
A) I am well aware of the difficulties that attend the subject, and from that consideration, had reserved it to a more advanced period of life.
B) I intended it to be the last offering I should make to my fellow-citizens of all nations, and that at a time when the purity of the motive that induced me to it could not admit of a question, even by those who might disapprove the work.
C) It has been my intention, for several years past, to publish my thoughts upon religion.
D) Soon after I had published the pamphlet COMMON SENSE, in America, I saw the exceeding probability that a revolution in the system of government would be followed by a revolution in the system of religion.


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 24

The paragraph talks about the intention of the author to write on the topic of religion. As option C introduces the subject, it would be the opening line of the paragraph. A logically proceeds from C by stating that the author appreciates the difficulties involved in the undertaking and B concludes the paragraph by saying that the author wanted it to be his last work Hence, the correct order is C-A-B. Thus, option D is out-of-context.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 25

Directions : Rearrange the following sentences
A. His popularity with the general mass of readers has been sufficient to satisfy the wildest dreams of an author ' s ambition; and his fame is, in a way, officially sanctioned by the receipt of honorary degrees from McGill University, from Durham, from Oxford, and from Cambridge; and in 1907 he was given the Nobel Prize, with the ratifying applause of the whole world. 
B. There is no indication that either the shouts of the mob or the hoods of Doctorates have turned his head; he remains to-day what he always has been—a hard, conscientious workman, trying to do his best every time. 
C. He has not yet attained the age of forty-five; but his numerous stories, novels, and poems have reached the unquestioned dignity of "works," and in uniform binding they make on my library shelves a formidable and gallant display. 
D. Mr. Rudyard Kipling is in the anomalous and fortunate position of having enjoyed a prodigious reputation for twenty years, and being still a young man. 
E. Foreigners read them in their own tongues; critical essays in various languages are steadily accumulating; and he has received the honour of being himself the hero of a strange French novel.  


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 25

We must trace the pronoun reference for ' them ' in statement E. There is no plural noun in statement D to which it could point; nor there is any logical reference in statement B; so, D and B cannot come before E. This eliminates option C and D. B must come after A. Option B is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 26

Directions : Rearrange the following sentences
A. But all these latter-day pamphlets, good as they are, fail to reach the excellence of Bob, Son of Battle. It is the best dog story ever written, and it inspires regret that dogs cannot read. 
B. During the last half-century, since the publication of Dr. John Brown ' s Rab and his Friends (1858), the dog has approached an apotheosis. 
C. One of the most profoundly affecting incidents in the Odyssey is the recognition of the ragged Ulysses by the noble old dog, who dies of joy. 
D. Among innumerable sketches and stories with canine heroes may be mentioned Bret Harte ' s brilliant portrait of Boonder; Maeterlinck ' s essay on dogs; Richard Harding Davis ' s The Bar Sinister; Stevenson ' s whimsical comments on The Character of Dogs; Kipling ' s Garm; and Jack London ' s initial success, The Call of the Wild.  


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 26

Statement C obviously starts the paragraph. In statement A, we have the phrase ' all these latter day pamphlets ' . The pronoun ' these ' must have a reference. The reference is found in statement D. DA is a strong pair. Statement B must come before D. It says that ' the dog has reached an apotheosis ' , which means that the dog has reached a divine rank. D says how it has reached a divine rank. So, CBDA is the link. Hence D is the right choice.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 27

The area of square ABCD is 128 cm2. The midpoints of its sides are joined to form the square EFGH. The midpoints of its sides are J, K, L, and M. The area of the shaded region is

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 27

AB=BC=CD=DA= 8√2
AF=AE= 4√2
From Δ EAF, EF =8
FJ =FK=LH=MH=4
Area of shaded area =Area of Square EFGH -Area of ΔJFK -Area of ΔLHM
Area of Square EFGH=64
Area of ΔJFK = Area of ΔLHM=½ (4*4) = 8
Area of shaded area =64-8-8 =48.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 28

Directions:  These questions are based on the given charts.

In which year during the period 2007-10 was the ratio of expenses to profit the lowest?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 28

The ratio of expenses to profit

The ratio is lowest in 2007 .

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 29

Directions:  These questions are based on the given charts.

In how many of the years from 2007 to 2010 (both inclusive) was a rise in profit per employee accompanied by a fall in the total profits or vice-versa (with respect to the previous year)?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 29

Change in profit per employee can be calculated from first bar-chart and change in total
profit can be calculated from second bar-chart.
Change in profit per employee
In 2007 = − 1(–ve)
In 2008 = − 10 (–ve)
In 2009 = 1 (+ve)
In 2010 = 2 (+ve)
Change in total profit
In 2007 = 300 − 217 = 83 crores (+ve)
In 2008 = 112 − 300 = − 188 crores (–ve)
In 2009 = 247 − 112 = 135 crores (+ve)
In 2010 = 263 − 247 = 16 crores (+ve)
There is a opposite trend only in year 2007.
 In the year 2009, number of govt. employees
= 3846 × 1.04 × 1.05 × 1.06 = 4452
Number of private employees
= 0.87 × 3846 × 0.98 × 1 × 0.99
= 3246
Required difference = 4452 − 3246 = 1206

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 30

Directions:  These questions are based on the given charts.

In which of the following years, was the number of employees of company XYZ, the highest?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 30

Hence, in 2009 the number of employees of company XYZ was highest.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 31

Directions:  These questions are based on the given charts.

The total assets of company XYZ continuously decreased (with respect to the previous year) in the four years from 2007 to 2010 by 20%, 10%, 5%, 10% respectively. Of these four years, in which year, was the ratio of revenue to assets the highest?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 31

From year 2007 to 2010, revenue is highest in year 2009 As assets of the company is continuously decreasing.
∴ Assets in 2009 is lesser than that in 2007 and 2008
∴ Ratio of revenue to assets in 2009 is higher than that in 2007 and 2008 Now in 2010 assets decreased by 10% when compared to 2009 and revenue in 2010 is 442 crores.
Let assets in 2009 be x
Then ratio of revenue to assets

∴ Ratio is highest in 2009

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 32

Directions: The following graph shows the percentage change in number of employees of two sectors. Refer the graph to answer the questions that follow.

If number of government employees and the number of private employees are the same in the year 2003 and number of government employees is 500 more than number of private employees in 2006, then what will be the difference between these two classes in the year 2009?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 32

1206

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 33

Directions:  The following graph shows the percentage change in number of employees of two sectors. Refer the graph to answer the questions that follow.

If government employees’ salary is Rs 60 per head and private sector employees’ salary is Rs 75 per head and the total salary of government employees and private sector employees in the year 2010 are Rs 50000 and Rs 70000 respectively, then what is the difference in total salary of government and private employees in the year 2011?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 33

In the year 2010, number of govt. employees
= 50000/60
= 833.33~− 833
Number of private employees
= 70000/75
= 933.33~− 933
In the year 2011, number of govt. employees
= 833 × 1.08
= 899.64~− 900
Number of private employees = 933 × 0.99
= 923.67~− 924
Now total salary of govt. employees
= 900 × 60 = Rs 54000
And total salary of private employees
= 924 × 75 = Rs 69300
Required difference = 69300 − 54000
= Rs 15300

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 34

Directions: The following graph shows the percentage change in number of employees of two sectors. Refer the graph to answer the questions that follow.

In the year 1999, if numbers of government employees and private employees are the same and equal to 5000, then what will be the difference between these two in the year 2005?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 34

915

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 35

Directions: The following graph shows the percentage change in number of employees of two sectors. Refer the graph to answer the questions that follow.

If in the year 1999, government employees are twice of private sector employees then what will be the ratio of government employees to private sector employees in the year 2003?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 35

In the year 2003, number of govt. employees
= 2P × 1.01 × 1 × 1 × 1 = 2.02P
Number of private employees
= P × 0.98 × 0.96 × 0.98 × 0.97
= 0.89 P
Required Ratio = 2.02 P/0.89 P = 2.27

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 36

Directions: The following graph shows the percentage change in number of employees of two sectors. Refer the graph to answer the questions that follow.

If the ratio of total salaries of the government employees to the private employees is 3 : 2 in the year 2004, then what will be the ratio of total salaries of the government employees to the private employees in the year 2009?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 36

In the year 2004
In the year 2009

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 37

Directions:  The following table shows data of lipsticks, please refer to the table to answer the questions that follow

The total sales of Brand ‘A’ lipstick from April 2008 to August 2008 account for

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 37

Total sales from April, 2008 to August, 2008
= Annual total sales – cummulative sales from Sep, 2008 to March, 2009
12639 – 7636 = 5000 appx.
Rs 5000000 ≈ Rs 5 million appx.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 38

Directions:  The following table shows data of lipsticks, please refer to the table to answer the questions that follow

What is the total market sales of brand ‘C’ (in Rs ’000) in March 2009?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 38

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 39

Directions: The following table shows data of lipsticks, please refer to the table to answer the questions that follow

Average price per unit of Brand ‘A’ lipstick in March 2009 is

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 39

The average price is 1552000/239266 = Rs 6.5

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 40

Directions:  The following table shows data of lipsticks, please refer to the table to answer the questions that follow

Brand C’s sales in March 2009 account for what percentage of Brand C’s cumulative sales from April 2008 to August 2008?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 40

Brand ‘C’s April, 2008 to August, 2008 sales
= Rs 14850000
March sales are Rs 3137000.
Required percentage = 21%

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 41

Directions:  Answer the questions on the basis of the information given below.A person in India was searching through five internet shopping portals V, W, X, Y and Z which are based in USA, Australia, England, India and Abu Dhabi respectively, for purchasing some items among A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H. The basic costs of these items at each portal are listed in the table given below.
The cost at each portal is given in terms of the currency of the country where the portal is based and payments are accepted only in that currency. The shipping costs incurred in transferring goods bought from V, W, X and Z to India were 3%, 4%, 5% and 2% respectively of the basic cost. No transportation charges are to be paid for any item bought from portal Y.The total cost to be paid for an item is the sum of its basic cost and shipping cost, if any.
The conversion rate for different currencies with respect to Indian rupees is as follows.
1 Dollar (USA) = Rs 45
1 Dollar (Australian) = Rs 27
1 Pound (England) = Rs 75
1 Dinar (Abu Dhabi) = Rs 15From which portal can the person buy item C at the cheapest total cost?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 41

Total cost (in rupees) of each item when it is bought from V, W, X, Y and Z (including transportation charges).

It is clear from the table that cheapest cost of item C is at portal X.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 42

Directions:  Answer the questions on the basis of the information given below.The FIFA World Cup tournament has 16 teams ranked from 1 to 16, taking part in the first stage called the pool stage. They are divided into four pools such that ranks 1, 2, 3 and 4 are in pools 1, 2, 3, 4 respectively; ranks 5, 6, 7, 8 in pools 4, 3, 2, 1 respectively; ranks 9, 10, 11, 12 in pools 1, 2, 3, 4 respectively and ranks 13, 14, 15, 16 in pools 4, 3, 2 and 1 respectively. Each team in a pool plays all the other teams in the pool exactly once. For the next stage called the Super Eight stage, the top two teams from each pool, based on their number of points, would qualify from each of the four pools. If at any stage, two or more teams end up with the same number of points, complex rules are applied to determine their placing. In the Super Eight stage, each team plays every other team except the team that qualified from its own pool. A team qualifying for the Super Eight stage carries forward only those points that it gained in its pool stage match against the other team that qualified from its pool. The top four teams in terms of points at the end of the Super Eight stage, would qualify for the semi-finals with the losers of the semi-finals playing for the third place and the winners of the semi-finals playing the final.For any team, the manner in which the points are awarded for a match, in the pool stage or the Super Eight stage, is : two points for a win and zero points for a loss. An upset is caused when, in any match, a lower ranked team beats a higher ranked team. In any match, in case the scores are equal at the end of the normal duration of play, the teams play extra time till the winner is decided.What is the minimum number of points required for a team to reach the semi-finals?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 42

Suppose that 4 teams that qualified for Super Eight stage have carry forward points.
There are 24 matches at Super-Eight stage.
So total point at Super-Eight stage
= 4 × 2 + 24 × 2 = 56
Suppose top 3 teams have maximum number of points, ie, 14, 12 and 10. Now there are remaining 20 poitns that can be equally distributed among 5 teams. So a team having 4 points can reach the semi-finals by applying complex rules of the tournament.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 43

Directions:  Answer the questions on the basis of the information given below.The FIFA World Cup tournament has 16 teams ranked from 1 to 16, taking part in the first stage called the pool stage. They are divided into four pools such that ranks 1, 2, 3 and 4 are in pools 1, 2, 3, 4 respectively; ranks 5, 6, 7, 8 in pools 4, 3, 2, 1 respectively; ranks 9, 10, 11, 12 in pools 1, 2, 3, 4 respectively and ranks 13, 14, 15, 16 in pools 4, 3, 2 and 1 respectively. Each team in a pool plays all the other teams in the pool exactly once. For the next stage called the Super Eight stage, the top two teams from each pool, based on their number of points, would qualify from each of the four pools. If at any stage, two or more teams end up with the same number of points, complex rules are applied to determine their placing. In the Super Eight stage, each team plays every other team except the team that qualified from its own pool. A team qualifying for the Super Eight stage carries forward only those points that it gained in its pool stage match against the other team that qualified from its pool. The top four teams in terms of points at the end of the Super Eight stage, would qualify for the semi-finals with the losers of the semi-finals playing for the third place and the winners of the semi-finals playing the final.For any team, the manner in which the points are awarded for a match, in the pool stage or the Super Eight stage, is : two points for a win and zero points for a loss. An upset is caused when, in any match, a lower ranked team beats a higher ranked team. In any match, in case the scores are equal at the end of the normal duration of play, the teams play extra time till the winner is decided.If the pool stage had only a single upset, the lowest ranked team which can win the tournament is the team ranked

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 43

In any pool, the lowest ranked team of that pool can reach at Super-Eight stage by causing only one upset.
If lowest ranked team beats 2nd best ranked team and 2nd best ranked team beats 3rd best ranked team and 3rd best ranked team beasts the lowest ranked team and all these three teams are beaten by the top ranked team then these three teams have 2 points each. By applying the complex rules of tournament the lowest ranked team can enter at Super-Eight stage and can win the tournament. At pool 1 the lowest ranked team is 16.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 44

Directions:  Refer to the following information to answer the questions that follow.The passengers travelled by an airline during the year 2008, consisted of 45% men, 35% women and the remaining children. Of the children, 40% were female and 60% male. Of the men, 10% were over the age of 60 yr and 25% below the age of 40 yr. Of the women, 20% were over the age of 60 yr and an equal number were under 40 yr of age. The number of men increased by 4% in 2009 and that of women increased by 6%. The number of passengers travelled in 2008 was 2,00,000.What is the men in the year 2009?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 44

The given data can be summarized as follows:
Total passengers in 2008 = 200000
Men = 45% of 2 lakh = 90000
Above 60 yr = 10% of 90000
= 9000 = 4.5%
Less than 40 yr = 25% of 90,000
= 22500 = 11.25%
Women = 35% of 2 lakh = 70000
Less than 40% = 20% of 70000 = 14000 = 7%
Children = 20% of 2 lakh = 40000
Boys = 60% of 40000 = 24000 = 12%
Girls = 40% of 40000 = 16000 = 8%
In the year 2009, percentage increase in male passengers was 4% and female = 6%.
Number of men in 2009
1.04 × 90000 = 93600

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 45

Directions:  Refer to the following information to answer the questions that follow.The passengers travelled by an airline during the year 2008, consisted of 45% men, 35% women and the remaining children. Of the children, 40% were female and 60% male. Of the men, 10% were over the age of 60 yr and 25% below the age of 40 yr. Of the women, 20% were over the age of 60 yr and an equal number were under 40 yr of age. The number of men increased by 4% in 2009 and that of women increased by 6%. The number of passengers travelled in 2008 was 2,00,000.What percentage of passengers in 2009 consisted of children?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 45

It cannot be determined as we don’t have any data regarding the change in the total passengers or in the number of children.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 46

Five students went to a doctor for regular checkup. Doctor asked his assistant to measure the weight of these students. But the problem is that the weighing machine that assistant has measures only those weights which are more than 80kg. So assistant thought to measure weight of 3 students at a time and he weighed all the possible combinations of weight of students. He obtained the measurements as 95kg, 150kg, 125kg, 120kg, 145kg, 175kg, 170kg, 200kg, 195kg & 225kg.

Find the average weight of all the students.


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 46

Let p, q, r, s, t be the weight of 5 students. Let us assume that p < q < r < s < t.
From the information mentioned above.
The three lightest students will have the least weight.
Hence, p + q + r = 95 (i)
The two lightest students and the fourth lightest student will have the second least weight.
p + q + s = 120 (ii)
The three heaviest students will have the highest weight.
r + s + t = 225 (iii)
The two heaviest students and the fourth heaviest student will have the second highest weight.
q + s + t = 200 (iv)
Since the students are weighed in triplets, 10 weightings mean each student is weighed 6 times.
Hence, 6(p + q + r + s + t) = 95 + 150 + 145 + 120 + 145 + 175 + 170 + 200 + 195 + 225 = 1620
=> p + q + r + s + t = 270 (v)
(i) + (iii) - (v) => r = 50
(i) + (iv) - (v) => q = 25
(ii) + (iii) - (v) => s = 75
Putting the values of q and r in (i), we get p=20
Putting the values of r and s in (iii), we get t=100
Average weight of all the students = (p + q + r + s + t)/5 = (20 + 25 + 50 + 75 +100)/5 = 270/5 = 54kg.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 47

Five students went to a doctor for regular checkup. Doctor asked his assistant to measure the weight of these students. But the problem is that the weighing machine that assistant has measures only those weights which are more than 80kg. So assistant thought to measure weight of 3 students at a time and he weighed all the possible combinations of weight of students. He obtained the measurements as 95kg, 150kg, 125kg, 120kg, 145kg, 175kg, 170kg, 200kg, 195kg & 225kg.

What is the weight of the heaviest student?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 47

Let p, q, r, s, t be the weight of 5 students. Let us assume that p < q < r < s < t.
From the information mentioned above.
The three lightest students will have the least weight.
Hence, p + q + r = 95 (i)
The two lightest students and the fourth lightest student will have the second least weight.
p + q + s = 120 (ii)
The three heaviest students will have the highest weight.
r + s + t = 225 (iii)
The two heaviest students and the fourth heaviest student will have the second highest weight.
q + s + t = 200 (iv)
Since the students are weighed in triplets, 10 weightings mean each student is weighed 6 times.
Hence, 6(p + q + r + s + t) = 95 + 150 + 145 + 120 + 145 + 175 + 170 + 200 + 195 + 225 = 1620
=> p + q + r + s + t = 270 (v)
(i) + (iii) - (v) => r = 50
(i) + (iv) - (v) => q = 25
(ii) + (iii) - (v) => s = 75
Putting the values of q and r in (i), we get p=20
Putting the values of r and s in (iii), we get t=100
Weight of the heaviest student t = 100kg

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 48

If Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal account for 40% and 30% of the total cost, in how many years has their combined contribution been greater than the total cost of the previous year on the basis of the given graph? (Use above data for other questions if required.)


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 48

Since they account for a combined 70%, we have to check out for the years where 70% of that year's contribution is greater than the previous years contribution. Only two years, '86 and '93 satisfy the required condition. 

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 49

What is the average amount spent on flood damage during the mentioned years in the nineties? (in Rs crore)


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 49

The total for the 90's is ≈ Rs. 12750 crore. So the average is ≈ Rs. 2125 crore.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 50

Direction: The table given below shows the aircraft handling capabilities in terms of maximum size of aircraft. It is assumed for all airports that a lesser sized aircraft can also be handled, if it can handle a larger sized aircraft. The figure in brackets in third column shows the number of months required for airports to be implemented.

How many airports will have capabilities to handle all types of aircrafts after four months?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 50

All airports which can handle a B - 474 can also handle all other lesser capacity aircrafts. Hence total number of airports which can handle all types of aircrafts in next 4 months is 10. 

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 51

Direction: The table given below shows the aircraft handling capabilities in terms of maximum size of aircraft. It is assumed for all airports that a lesser sized aircraft can also be handled, if it can handle a larger sized aircraft. The figure in brackets in third column shows the number of months required for airports to be implemented.

How many airports will have capability to handle either B - 474 or AB - 300. but not both, after seven months?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 51

All the airports those can handle a B - 474, can also handle a AB - 300. So, all airports which can handle B- 474 are out of the category about which question is asking. But all airports which has maximum capacity of AB - 300, can't handle B 474 ( a higher capacity aircraft). Number of such airports are 9 + 5 = 14. But out of these Ahmedabad, Amritsar and Guwahati would be able to handle8-474 in three months. Hence the number of airports required satisfying the condition asked in the question are 14-3 = 11.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 52

Find the area of the circle passing through centers of three circles with radius 2 m, 3 m and 10 m placed in such a way that each circle touches the other two circles externally.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 52


 

As per the given condition above diagram will be formed. So lines joining the centers of three circles will form right angle triangle as 5, 12, and 13 which is a Pythagorean triplet. So the circle passing through the centers of these circles will be passing through the vertex of this right angle triangle. So the diameter of such circle is hypotenuse of triangle which is 13 cm.Thus radius 6.5 cm and hence area will be π (13/2)2 = 169 π /4

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 53

The area of square ABCD is 128 cm2. The midpoints of its sides are joined to form the square EFGH. The midpoints of its sides are J, K, L, and M. The area of the shaded region is

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 53

AB=BC=CD=DA= 8√2
AF=AE= 4√2
From Δ EAF, EF =8
FJ =FK=LH=MH=4
Area of shaded area =Area of Square EFGH -Area of ΔJFK -Area of ΔLHM
Area of Square EFGH=64
Area of ΔJFK = Area of ΔLHM=½ (4*4) = 8
Area of shaded area =64-8-8 =48.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 54

Hans borrows Rs. 7000 at a simple interest from the village money lender. At the end of 3years, he again borrows Rs. 3000 and closes his account after paying Rs. 4615 as interest after 8 years from the time he made the first borrowing. Find the rate of interest.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 54

The interest would be paid on
7000 for 3 years + 10000 for 5 years
Let the rate of interest be x.
SI = 210x + 500x which is equal to 4615 => x = 6.5.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 55

There are 4 typists P, Q, R and S. Q takes double the time taken by P to type a page, R takes double that of Q to type a page, and S takes double that of R to type a page. Now the four typist need to be grouped into groups of two such that one pair takes half the time taken by the other group to finish a typing task. Which two typists can be clubbed as a part of the faster typing group?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 55

Suppose P takes x hours to finish the work. So Q, R and S shall take 2x, 4x & 8x hours respectively.
Work done by pair P, Q in an hour = 1/x + 1/2x = 3/2x
Work done by pair R, S in an hour = 1/4x + 1/8x = 3/8x
Work done by pair P, R in an hour = 1/x + 1/4x = 5/4x
Work done by pair Q, S in an hour = 1/2x + 1/8x = 5/8x
Work done by pair P, S in an hour = 1/x + 1/8x = 9/8x
Work done by pair Q, R in an hour = 1/2x + 1/4x = 3/4x
We see that the pair P, R does double the work done by Q, S in an hour. So the time taken by P, R will be half. Hence P, R constitute the faster pair.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 56

Hari marks up an article by 30% and he sells it to his friend at a discount of 20%. His friend marks up the price to 20% more than Hari's cost price. What is the maximum discount Hari's friend can afford without going into loss?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 56

Let the cost price for Hari be 100
As he marks up the price to 130
He sells it at 104
His friend marks up the price 20% more than 100, so final marked up price = 120
The least sale price = 104
If he sells the article at 104 maximum discount he can afford = 16
So the required % = 16/220*100 =40/3%

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 57

How much water should a shopkeeper add to 100 liters of pure milk if he wants to make a profit of 12.5% after giving a discount of 10%? It is known that the marked price of the mixture is equal to cost price of milk.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 57

Let the cost price of 1 liter of milk = Rs x
Hence marked price of 100-liter milk= Rs 100x
Then the selling price after giving discount of 10% = Rs 90x
The shopkeeper is making a profit of 12.5%, hence the cost price of the mixture = Rs (90 X 8/9) = Rs 80x
Hence in 100 liter of mixture 80 liters is milk and 20 liters is water.
Hence volume of water the shopkeeper should add to 100 liter of milk = (20/80) x 100 = 25 liter.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 58

The range of the function tan (logx) must be

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 58

The value of logx for any value of x will be from (-∞,∞).
Tangent of any value of the above domain gives a range of (-∞,∞).

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 59

What is the reflection of the point (-13, 11) in the x-y plane, about the line (x + y = 0)?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 59

The reflection of any point (p, q) in the x-y plane, about the line (x + y = 0) shall be (-p, -q).
Hence, the reflection of the point (-13, 11) in the x-y plane, about the line (x + y = 0) shall be (13, -11).

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 60

How many triangles can be drawn by using vertices of regular decagon, but not using the sides.

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 60

The first vertex can be selected in 10 ways. The remaining two are to be selected from 7 vertices so that they are not consecutive. This can be done in 7P2 - 6 ways.
The total number of ways = 10 X (7P2 - 6)=150
But in this method, each selection is repeated thrice.
Number of triangles = 150/3 = 50

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 61

In a right angled triangle ABC, AB=6, BC =8 & Angle B = 90°. A semi-circle is inscribed as shown below. AC is a tangent to the semi-circle. What is the radius of semi-circle?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 61

Let D be the point of contact of the semi-circle with AC and O be the center of the circle

Join OD
CD=CB =8 (lengths of tangents drawn to a circle from a common point are equal)
Also ΔOAD and ΔABC are similar as ∠ODA = ∠ABC.
Thus, OD/BC=DA/BA
AB=6 and BC=8, therefore AC=10
Hence, AD=AC-CD=10-8=2
r/8=2/6
r=8/3

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 62

What is the volume of a hollow box made from 21 x 28 cm rectangular cardboard by cutting 7 x 7 cm squares from the four corners and folding the piece along the cuts?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 62


 

Volume of the box (Cuboid) = lbh {l = 7, b =14 and h = 7}
=7 x14x 7=686 cm3
Hence the correct option is (4)

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 63

A natural number is selected from the set of all natural numbers between 61 and 1020 (both numbers inclusive). What is the probability that the number is a multiple of 3 or 4 or 5?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 63

The LCM of 3, 4 and 5 is 60.
Thus checking the remainder of 61 w.r.t. 3/4/5 is the same as checking the remainder of 1 w.r.t. 3/4/5.
Similarly 62 is akin to 2, 63 to 3 and so on.
So let us simply look at the 1st 60 numbers.
Divisible by 3 = |60/3| = 20
Divisible by 4 = |60/4| = 15
Divisible by 5 = |60/5| = 12
Divisible by 3 & 4 = |60/12| = 5
Divisible by 3 & 5 = |60/15| = 4
Divisible by 4 & 5 = |60/20| = 3
Divisible by 3 & 4 & 5 = |60/60| = 1
Thus total number of number divisible by 3 or 4 or 5 = (20 + 15 + 12) - (5 + 4 + 3) + 1
= 47 - 12 + 1
= 36
Thus for every 60 numbers, 36 of them will satisfy, hence probability = 36/60 = 12/20.
Now 61-1020 involves 960 numbers which is 16 sets of 60 numbers, hence Probability = 12/20.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 64

The profit percentage earned by selling an item for Rs. 1078 is equal to the percentage loss incurred by selling the same item for Rs. 882. What should be the Marked Price of the item if it is to be sold at approximately 15% profit, after giving 10% discount to the customer?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 64

Let CP be x.
As per the given condition,
(1078 - x)/x = (x - 882)/x
⇒ 1078 - x = x - 882
⇒ x = 980
Selling price in order to make 15% profit = 980 x 1.15 = Rs 1127.
Hence Marked Price of the item should be (10/9)*1127 = Rs. 1252.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 65

Akhil and Bineet are two typists can together type a certain novel named "Two States" in 8 days while Cia can type same novel "Two States" alone in 12 days .Bineet and Cia can type another novel "One Night At Call Centre" in 10 days while Akhil can type "One Night At Call Centre"in 18 days .In how many days Bineet alone can type "Two States" ?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 65

Let Akhil, Bineet, Cia can do a, b, c amount of work per day respectively .
Let w1  denotes the work of typing novel "Two States" and w2 denotes the work of typing novel "One Night At Call Centre".
Then 8(a + b) = 12c = w1 and 10(b + c) = 18a = w2
Since 5b + 5c = 9a and 8a = 12c -8b
40b+40c = 108c-72b
112b=68c
28b=17c
Now 12c = w1
Putting value of c = w1/12 in 28b=17c, we have w1 = 28 x 12b/17
w1/b = 19.76

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 66

Gagan and Laxman started a business investing Rs. 64000 and Rs. 40000 respectively. After three months Sujit joined them investing Rs. 82000. 3 months after starting business Gagan and Laxman withdraw Rs. 15000 and Rs. 18000 respectively. At the end of the year find the sum of shares of Sujit and Laxman in total profit of Rs. 6450

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 66

Investment by Gagan is 64000 for first three months and (64000-15000) for next nine months.
Similarly, for others too.
Investment by Gagan = 64000x3 + 49000x9 = 633000
Investment by Laxman = 40000x3 + 22000x9 = 318000
Investment by Sujit = 82000x9 = 738000
Share of Sujit & Laxman = (318+738)/(633+318+738) x 6450 = Rs. 4032.68

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 67

A mixture contains two liquids A and B in the ratio 7: 5. When 60 liter of the mixture is drawn off and the mixture is again replenished with the same volume of liquid B then the above ratio becomes 7: 9. What was the original volume of liquid A in the mixture?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 67

Let the original mixture be 120n liters.
Volume of liquid A in the mixture = 70n liter
Volume of liquid B in the mixture = 50n liter
Volume of liquid A in 60 liter of mixture = 60 X 7/12 = 35 liter
Volume of liquid B in 60 liter of mixture = 60 - 35 = 25 liter
After drawing 60 liter of mixture, volume of liquid A in the remaining mixture = (70n - 35) liter
Similarly, volume of liquid B left in the mixture = (50n - 25) liter
Now again 60 liter of liquid B is added then the new volume of liquid B = 50n - 25 + 60 = (50n + 35) liter
Now according to the question, (70n - 35)/(50n + 35) = 7/9
⇒ (10n - 5)/50n + 35 = 1/9
⇒ 90n - 45 = 50n + 35
⇒ 40n = 80
⇒ n = 2
Hence original volume of liquid A in the mixture = 70n liter = 140 liter

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 68

ABCD is a square such that A lies on the +ve y-axis, B on +ve x-axis. If D is (12,17), the coordinates of C will be?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 68

Consider a square drawn according to the given conditions i.e A lies on the +ve y-axis, B on +ve x-axis
Co-ordinates of D is (12,17)
Let OA = a and OB = b
OAB is a right angled triangle, with AB as hypotenuse
Since AB is a side of the sqaure ABCD, remaning lengths will be as shown in the diagram
Therefore, D’s co-ordinates will be of the form (a,a +b) = (12,17)
a = 12 and b = 5; hence C is (17, 5)

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 69

For how many ordered pairs (a, b) of natural numbers will the LCM of 'a' and 'b' be 23 79 1316?

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 69

One of the numbers will have 23 in it, as the LCM has 23.
Now the other number can have the powers of 2 as 0, 1, 2 and 3. So the number of pairs will be 4: (23,20),(23,21),(23,22),(23,23). So the number of ordered pairs would be 2*4 - 1 = 7

Similarly for the power of 7, we have 2*10 - 1 = 19

And number of ordered pairs for the power of 13 = 2*17 - 1 = 33

Total number of ordered pairs = 7*19*33 = 4389 ordered pairs.

CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 70

Find number of terms of the expansion of (x1+x2+⋯+x9)20

Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 70

(x1+ x2+ x3+⋯............+x9 )20
[x(1+x1+ x2+ x3+⋯............+x8)]20
In the bracket above there should be one term of x0, one term of x1, one term of x2................one term of x160. In this way there are a total of 161 terms

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 71

If f(x/y) = f(x) - f(y), and it is given that f(2) = 2.4, f(3) = 3.7, f(7) = 7, then find the value of f(4536)?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 71

If f(x/y) = f(x) - f(y),
We can see that f(x) is similar to the Log function.
i.e. Log(x/y) = Log(x) - Log(y)
So we need to break 4536 into its prime factors as follows,
4536 = 23.34.7
Log(4536) = 3Log 2 + 4 Log 3 + Log 7
Similarly f(4536) = 3f(2) + 4f(3) + f(7)
= 3*2.4 + 4*3.7 + 7
= 29

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 72

What is the highest value of x in the expression (167!)/ (24!)x  to an yield integral answer?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 72

Prime number just less than 24 is 23. Highest prime number should be considered because to yield an integral answer, the power of this highest prime number should be equal to the quotient( numerator divided by highest prime number). Otherwise, integral value cannot be obtained. Hence, dividing 167 by 23 gives us the quotient 7.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 73

If n! has 4 zeros at the end and (n+1)! has six zeros at the end, then n can be:


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 73

If n! has 4 zeros at the end, then it will have 54 as a factor
Therefore, n can be 20 to 24 because 20 to 24 will have four 5s i.e 5, 5X2, 5X3, 5X4
(n+1)! should have 6 zeros
Therefore, n+1 = 25 or n=24 [ 25 = 5 X 5, hence total 6 zeros]

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 74

In a examination, students had to find out the average of nine 3-digit natural numbers. Shweta by mistake copied down one of the numbers in her answer sheet, in the reverse order of the digits, and proceeded to calculate the average. She got an answer which was 22 more than that of the actual average. How many distinct values are possible for the 3-digit number that Shweta erroneously copied down?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 74

The average of the nine numbers increases by 22, hence the sum of the numbers increases by 22x9 = 198.
Let us assume that the number erroneously copied down by Shweta was actually 'abc', and she used 'cba' in her calculations,
Hence, 'cba' - 'abc' = 198
or 100c + 10b + a - 100a - 10b - c = 198
or 99(c - a) = 198
or c - a = 2.
Hence the 3rd digit must be 2 more than the 1st digit, while the 2nd digit can assume any value between 0-9.
Hence possible combinations of 1st and 3rd digits are (1,3), (2,4), (3,5), (4,6), (5,7), (6,8), (7,9).
Thus there are 7 combinations, each of which contains 10 values, since 'b' can assume any value between 0-9.
Hence total possible values = 7*10 = 70 values.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 75

An escalator moves at a constant rate from one floor up to the next floor. Jack walks up 29 steps while traveling on the escalator between the floors. Jill takes twice as long to travel between the floors and walks up only 11 steps. When it is stopped, how many steps does the escalator has between the two floors?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 75

Suppose that the escalator was two floors long, instead of just one, and that Jack and Jill start walking at the same time. Then Jack will reach the second floor at the same time Jill reaches the first floor (since it takes Jill twice as long to climb one floor). In that time,
Jack will have climbed 2(29)steps and Jill will have climbed 11 steps, so there will be
47=2(29)−11 steps between them on the escalator.
These 47 steps represent the distance between two floors, or the length of the escalator.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 76

All numbers from 1 to 300 (in decimal system) are written in base 8 and base 11 systems. How many of the numbers will have a non-zero unit digit in both base 8 and base 11 notations?


Detailed Solution for CAT Practice Test - 14 - Question 76

A number in decimal system will have a zero unit digit in base 8 system only if it is divisible by 8.
A number in decimal system will have a zero unit digit in base 11 system only if it is divisible by 11.
Thus all we need to identify are those numbers which are neither divisible by 8 nor divisible by 11.
For this we first compute all those numbers which are divisible by either 8 or 11.
No. of numbers divisible by 8 = |300/8| = 37.
No. of numbers divisible by 11 = |300/11| = 27.
No. of numbers divisible by 88 = |300/88| = 3.
Thus no. of numbers divisible by either 8 or 11 = 37 + 27 - 3 = 61.
Thus no. of numbers neither divisible by 8, nor by 11 is = 300 - 61 = 239.

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