CAT Verbal And RC MCQ


34 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2020 | CAT Verbal And RC MCQ


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This mock test of CAT Verbal And RC MCQ for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 34 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT CAT Verbal And RC MCQ (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CAT Verbal And RC MCQ quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this CAT Verbal And RC MCQ exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CAT Verbal And RC MCQ extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

One of the most curious sub-plots on Referendum day was what quickly, and predictably, became known on social media as “pen-gate”. Groups of Brexit campaigners started to hand out pens in polling stations to replace the government-issued pencils with which voters are usually asked to make their cross. Their worry was that, somewhere along the electoral line, a pencil cross in the “Leave” box could easily be erased by those working on behalf of “the establishment”, and replaced with a vote for “Remain”. ___________________________ .

Solution:

Option 1 perfectly concludes the paragraph which highlights the intensity of the situation and the phrase “alternative voting instruments” being referred to the pens being handed out by the Brexiters.

Options 2 and 4 with “anxieties” refer to a number of anxieties while the paragraph describes only one anxiety. So, eliminate options 2 and 4.

Option 4 makes a serious allegation against the leaders and does not make for an apt concluding sentence.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 2

As noted already in the Guardian’s science pages, there is no lack of initiatives to tackle science’s crisis in all its aspects, from reproducibility to the abuse of metrics, to the problems of peer review. This gives good grounds for hope that the crisis will eventually be resolved, and that it will not become a general crisis of trust in science. Should that occur, and ‘science’ ceases to be a key cultural symbol of both truth and probity, along with material beneficence, then the consequences could be far- reaching.___________________________________.

Solution:

Statement 1 goes a step ahead of the discussion and talks about the situation after the crisis explosion.
Science in the past has not been differentiated from science in the present as the passage talks about a crisis faced by science in general. So, eliminate option 3.

Statement 4 needs more evidence to support its claim and is too strong compared to the tone of the passage.

Statement 2 aptly concludes by raising an alarm over the malpractices that are likely to ruin the idealistic image of science.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 3

What often goes unnoticed, is that anxieties about exhaustion are not peculiar to our age. Those who imagine that life in the past was simpler, slower and better are wrong. The experience of exhaustion, and anxieties about exhaustion epidemics in the wider population, are not bound to a particular time and place.

Solution:

The passage attempts to clear the notion that the experience of exhaustion is specific to the modern age.

The author says that the feeling of exhaustion is not a peculiarity of modern era but has been prevalent for a long time. From all of the options, only option 2 puts forth the contradictory argument in line with the tone of the passage.

Statement 1 is more of an opening sentence and needs the support of successive statements to substantiate its claim. Statement 3 is neutral in nature and would not serve to end the paragraph in the same way as option 2.

There are no theories to justify the use of “theorising” in the concluding statement. So, eliminate option 4.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 4

The following question consists of a certain number of sentences. Some sentences are grammatically incorrect or inappropriate. Identify the number of sentences that are grammatically incorrect.

Solution:

“Sprung Off” in sentence A is incorrect usage. It should be, ‘sprung up’ meaning ‘developed’.
All the other sentences are grammatically correct.

Hence, the correct answer is 1.

QUESTION: 5

Answer the following questions based on the information given below.

The citizens of today’s free societies are (almost always) democrats out of conviction, custom, and habit. Only a small minority exhibits populist tendencies that, if they gained power, could lead a society from democracy to dictatorship. Nevertheless, today’s democratic citizens mostly show disdain for democracy by not participating vigorously in political processes. Among the youngest voters, indeed, this impulse is very strong, with their participation in elections falling sharply.

Q.

Which of the following explains "democratic citizens mostly showdisdain for democracy by not participating vigorously in political processes"?

Solution:

The statement used in option 3 is categorically explained in the passage. It is just reworded in simple terms.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 6

Carefully read the statements in the questions below and arrange them in a logical order.

1. Like the Navy SEALs and other special-ops teams now roaming the planet in secrecy, Bond is an extrajudicial killer, whether for personal revenge, as in Quantum of Solace; geopolitical reasons, as in Die Another Day; or simply because someone is in his way.

2. Fabulous military technology is part of the spectacle and becomes its own justification - a character in the hero’s story line.

3. His bosses, too, identify targets from afar and order their annihilation, without revealing any awareness of ambiguity concerning who is a “bad guy” or acknowledging the possibility of poor intelligence or mistaken identity.

4. For 50 years, James Bond and his “license to kill” have stood for imperial justice beyond the limits of law.

5. His innocent victims, meanwhile, are invisible.

Solution:

The paragraph discusses the audacious James Bond and how he takes law and order into his own hands. It draws parallels between his operations and those used by real life ‘Navy SEALs’ and ‘military technology’.

Sentence 4 introduces the theme of the paragraph - James Bond - with the phrases “license to kill” and "beyond the limits of law" which is reinforced by sentence 1 with "extrajudicial killer". 4-1 are a pair.

Sentences 3 and 5 are a pair as they begin with the pronoun, "His" which refers to Bond. 5 will follow 3 because of "meanwhile" which pertains to the matter mentioned in 3. 4-1-3-5 follow a logical order which leaves us with sentence 2 with a new adjunct idea - military technology - to end the paragraph.
Hence, the correct sequence is 41352.

QUESTION: 7

Choose the odd one out from the sentences given below.

Solution:

The statements address how the goddess Kali is perceived by putting forth an example of the legend associated with her. Statement 4 introduces the goddess and details upon how she embodies fear.

Statement 3 then goes onto discuss what happens during Kali Puja, which statement I substantiates by putting forth the legend associated with the goddess.

Statements 4, 3 and 1 do-not discuss anything about the location of the Kali temple or what the location is known for. Thus, statement 2 evidently stands out as the odd one out.

Hence, the correct answer is 2.

QUESTION: 8

Five sentences are given below labeled (1), (2), (3), (4) and (5). Of these, four sentences need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. Pick out the sentence that does not fit the sequence.

1. But pertiaps the best motivation for mathematicians to study them has been the aesthetics of seeing patterns among them.

2. A major subject of interest among mathematicians who work in number theory is the study of prime numbers.

3. Prime numbers are divisible only by 1 and themselves, and large primes are used, among other things, in encrypting data.

4. Though prime numbers occupy definite positions on the number line and thereby are not random at all, studying distributions of numbers comes in useful to predict properties which haven’t been proved yet.

5. A new and interesting pattern has emerged among prime numbers thanks to the work of Kannan Soundararajan and Robert Lemke Oliver of Stanford University. They have found a pattern in the last digits of successive prime numbers, by analysing numerically the first 100 million numbers.

Solution:

Statement 2 introduces the topic of the paragraph -mathematicians interested in the study of prime numbers. This is followed by 3 which defines prime numbers and states their use in order to justify the fascination of mathematicians with prime numbers. Statement 1, which tells the actual motivation of mathematicians behind studying prime numbers, is next in the sequence. Statement 5 with “new and interesting pattern” connects with “aesthetics of seeing patterns” in statement 1. We thus have a logical sequence - 2-3-1-5.

Statement 4 which talks about why prime numbers are not random, is not directly linked nor does it follow any of the other statements logically.

Hence, the correct answer is 4.

QUESTION: 9

Five sentences are given below labeled (1), (2), (3), (4) and (5). 3Marks Qf these, four sentences need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. Pick out the sentence that does not fit the sequence.

1. The stand, which she named the Khi Tao market, expanded to include a growing number of small business owners who paid rent on a daily or monthly basis.

2. The Thammawattana family fortune, estimated at around Bt10 billion ($US280 million), began in the early 1950s when Suwapee opened a simple food stand in Bangkok catering for officers and soldiers from a nearby artillery base.

3. Using these military connections in 1955 she exited the restaurant and started a fresh food operation in the city’s Saphan Mai area.

4. Throughout the 1990s Noppadon, a U.S. business school graduate, improved revenues by increasing the market’s income generating areas.

5. As the market gained in popularity it became a gathering point for local politicians campaigning for elections.

Solution:

Statement 2 introduces the topic of the paragraph - how the Thammawattana family started making money. Statement 3 with “military connections” relates to “officers and soldiers from a nearby artillery base” in statement statement 2, making 2-3 an obvious pair. The next statement ought to be 1 as it describes the flourishing business of Thammawattana family as a result of Suwapee's connections mentioned in 3. Statement 5 continues with the description. Statement 4 is vague. We do not know about which/whose revenues were improved and for who Noppadon was working for.

Hence, the correct answer is 4.

QUESTION: 10

The followina auestion consists of a set of labelled sentences.

These sentences, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Choose the most logical order of sentences from the options.

1. Political parties have largely replaced their physical attempts to get the requisite ‘opportunity to see’ from voters with digital substitutes.

2. There are not so many leaflets clogging one’s mailbox or littering the streets, which themselves have been defaced far less than they usually are by political posters.

3. The good thing about the online campaigns and email bombardments which have taken the place of the traditional campaign posters is that they do not add to physical litter.

4. This time around, the elections haven’t been accompanied by quite the same amount of election-related litter that usually accumulates in our public and private spaces during campaign time.

5. They have been replaced by other things which, although not directly depleting rainforests, are nevertheless polluting in a much more insidious way.

Solution:

The paragraph describes how election campaigns have moved towards digital media leading to a reduction in the amount of physical litter. Statement 4 makes for an appropriate start since it introduces the subject being discussed by narrating an observation.

Statement 2 follows statement 4 by substantiating the observation mentioned in statement 4.
The pronoun “they” in statement 5 refers to the “leaflets” mentioned in statement 2. Statement 1 follows statement 5 by elaborating on what “a more insidious way” of pollution entails - digital campaigns.

Statement 3 concludes the paragraph by mentioning the silver lining of these campaigns - the reduction of physical litter.

Thus, the correct sequence is 42513.

QUESTION: 11

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Parents have been raising children since the beginning of the human race. But raising children is not the same as 'parenting'. The word itself entered the dictionary only in the 1950s, and did not become a part of the popular vocabulary till the 1970s.

Initially, the word was used to refer to what parents did, but over the years, especially today, the word has become completely normative. "'To parent' is a goal-directed verb; it describes a job, a kind of work. The goal is to somehow turn your child into a better or happier or more successful adult," writes Dr Alison Gopnik in The Wall Street Journal.
The idea that 'parenting' involves tips, tricks and techniques that enable people to become better fathers and mothers has become widespread, not just in the US, but around the world. The idea is so ubiquitous that the very idea of questioning it seems heretical. But the whole concept of 'parenting' is fundamentally misguided, says Gopnik.

For millennia, raising a child did not just involve the parents. There were grandfathers and grandmothers, uncles, aunts, cousins, siblings, friends and neighbours. "For most of human history, we lived in these extended family groups. This meant that we learned how to take care of children by practicing with our own little sisters and baby cousins and by watching many other people take care of children," writes Gopnik. But these groups no longer exist in large parts of the world. They've been scattered, dislocated, and communicate via the internet. "Today, most middle-class parents spend years taking classes and pursuing careers before they have children. It's not surprising, then, that going to school and working are modern parents' models for taking care of children: You go to school and work with a goal in mind, and you can be taught to do better at school and work," she writes.

Working to achieve a good outcome is a good idea for businessmen or writers, but making a child a 'product' or an 'outcome' does no justice to either the parent or the child, says Gopnik. In fact, there is no evidence to show that the small differences in 'parenting' techniques that many parents obsess over make any difference to the child's adulthood. "The most important rewards of being a parent aren't your children's grades and trophies--or even their graduations and weddings. They come from the moment-by- moment physical and psychological joy of being with this particular child, and in that child's moment-by-moment joy in being with you," writes Gopnik.

If that means valuing 'being a parent' over 'parenting', it sounds like a good advice.

Q.

According to the passage, ideally, focus of parenthood 3Marks should be oriented towards which of the following?

Solution:

Option 4 talks about discipline, which is nowhere mentioned in the passage and hence is eliminated.

The passage mentions that parenting is not an activity like work or education where almost the entire focus in on the final result. In light of this, options 1 and 2 are eliminated.

As the passage mentions that the rewards of being a parent come from the joy of being with the child, option 3 directly follows.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 12

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Parents have been raising children since the beginning of the human race. But raising children is not the same as 'parenting'. The word itself entered the dictionary only in the 1950s, and did not become a part of the popular vocabulary till the 1970s.

Initially, the word was used to refer to what parents did, but over the years, especially today, the word has become completely normative. "'To parent' is a goal-directed verb; it describes a job, a kind of work. The goal is to somehow turn your child into a better or happier or more successful adult," writes Dr Alison Gopnik in The Wall Street Journal.
The idea that 'parenting' involves tips, tricks and techniques that enable people to become better fathers and mothers has become widespread, not just in the US, but around the world. The idea is so ubiquitous that the very idea of questioning it seems heretical. But the whole concept of 'parenting' is fundamentally misguided, says Gopnik.

For millennia, raising a child did not just involve the parents. There were grandfathers and grandmothers, uncles, aunts, cousins, siblings, friends and neighbours. "For most of human history, we lived in these extended family groups. This meant that we learned how to take care of children by practicing with our own little sisters and baby cousins and by watching many other people take care of children," writes Gopnik. But these groups no longer exist in large parts of the world. They've been scattered, dislocated, and communicate via the internet. "Today, most middle-class parents spend years taking classes and pursuing careers before they have children. It's not surprising, then, that going to school and working are modern parents' models for taking care of children: You go to school and work with a goal in mind, and you can be taught to do better at school and work," she writes.

Working to achieve a good outcome is a good idea for businessmen or writers, but making a child a 'product' or an 'outcome' does no justice to either the parent or the child, says Gopnik. In fact, there is no evidence to show that the small differences in 'parenting' techniques that many parents obsess over make any difference to the child's adulthood. "The most important rewards of being a parent aren't your children's grades and trophies--or even their graduations and weddings. They come from the moment-by- moment physical and psychological joy of being with this particular child, and in that child's moment-by-moment joy in being with you," writes Gopnik.

If that means valuing 'being a parent' over 'parenting', it sounds like a good advice.

Q.

According to the passage, which of the following could be a primary cause for parenthood becoming a goal-directed activity?

A. Parents not being able to devote significant amount of time to their newborns.

B. Many people spending significant amount of time in work and education before becoming parents.

Solution:

Statement A is incorrect as the passage does not say anything about the parents being unable to devote time but that the parents are pursuing the modern model of parenting which is goal-directed.

Statement B is one of the main causes discussed in the passage in relation to parenthood becoming a goal-directed activity.

Hence the correct answer is 2.

QUESTION: 13

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Parents have been raising children since the beginning of the human race. But raising children is not the same as 'parenting'. The word itself entered the dictionary only in the 1950s, and did not become a part of the popular vocabulary till the 1970s.

Initially, the word was used to refer to what parents did, but over the years, especially today, the word has become completely normative. "'To parent' is a goal-directed verb; it describes a job, a kind of work. The goal is to somehow turn your child into a better or happier or more successful adult," writes Dr Alison Gopnik in The Wall Street Journal.
The idea that 'parenting' involves tips, tricks and techniques that enable people to become better fathers and mothers has become widespread, not just in the US, but around the world. The idea is so ubiquitous that the very idea of questioning it seems heretical. But the whole concept of 'parenting' is fundamentally misguided, says Gopnik.

For millennia, raising a child did not just involve the parents. There were grandfathers and grandmothers, uncles, aunts, cousins, siblings, friends and neighbours. "For most of human history, we lived in these extended family groups. This meant that we learned how to take care of children by practicing with our own little sisters and baby cousins and by watching many other people take care of children," writes Gopnik. But these groups no longer exist in large parts of the world. They've been scattered, dislocated, and communicate via the internet. "Today, most middle-class parents spend years taking classes and pursuing careers before they have children. It's not surprising, then, that going to school and working are modern parents' models for taking care of children: You go to school and work with a goal in mind, and you can be taught to do better at school and work," she writes.

Working to achieve a good outcome is a good idea for businessmen or writers, but making a child a 'product' or an 'outcome' does no justice to either the parent or the child, says Gopnik. In fact, there is no evidence to show that the small differences in 'parenting' techniques that many parents obsess over make any difference to the child's adulthood. "The most important rewards of being a parent aren't your children's grades and trophies--or even their graduations and weddings. They come from the moment-by- moment physical and psychological joy of being with this particular child, and in that child's moment-by-moment joy in being with you," writes Gopnik.

If that means valuing 'being a parent' over 'parenting', it sounds like a good advice.

Q.

Which of the following could be a suitable title for the above passage?

Solution:

Options 1 and 2 are eliminated as the passage does not present itself as a complete guide to amateur parents.

The author of the passage does not aim to clarify any misconceived notions about parenting but enlightens his readers on the diametric difference between “being parents” and “parenting”. So, eliminate option 3.

Option 4 is most suitable as the passage is critical of the goal-associated nature of the word ‘parenting’ and wants to bring the joy-associated nature of ‘being parents’ into focus.

Hence, the answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 14

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Parents have been raising children since the beginning of the human race. But raising children is not the same as 'parenting'. The word itself entered the dictionary only in the 1950s, and did not become a part of the popular vocabulary till the 1970s.

Initially, the word was used to refer to what parents did, but over the years, especially today, the word has become completely normative. "'To parent' is a goal-directed verb; it describes a job, a kind of work. The goal is to somehow turn your child into a better or happier or more successful adult," writes Dr Alison Gopnik in The Wall Street Journal.
The idea that 'parenting' involves tips, tricks and techniques that enable people to become better fathers and mothers has become widespread, not just in the US, but around the world. The idea is so ubiquitous that the very idea of questioning it seems heretical. But the whole concept of 'parenting' is fundamentally misguided, says Gopnik.

For millennia, raising a child did not just involve the parents. There were grandfathers and grandmothers, uncles, aunts, cousins, siblings, friends and neighbours. "For most of human history, we lived in these extended family groups. This meant that we learned how to take care of children by practicing with our own little sisters and baby cousins and by watching many other people take care of children," writes Gopnik. But these groups no longer exist in large parts of the world. They've been scattered, dislocated, and communicate via the internet. "Today, most middle-class parents spend years taking classes and pursuing careers before they have children. It's not surprising, then, that going to school and working are modern parents' models for taking care of children: You go to school and work with a goal in mind, and you can be taught to do better at school and work," she writes.

Working to achieve a good outcome is a good idea for businessmen or writers, but making a child a 'product' or an 'outcome' does no justice to either the parent or the child, says Gopnik. In fact, there is no evidence to show that the small differences in 'parenting' techniques that many parents obsess over make any difference to the child's adulthood. "The most important rewards of being a parent aren't your children's grades and trophies--or even their graduations and weddings. They come from the moment-by- moment physical and psychological joy of being with this particular child, and in that child's moment-by-moment joy in being with you," writes Gopnik.

If that means valuing 'being a parent' over 'parenting', it sounds like a good advice.

Q.

Which of the following statements, if true, strengthens the argument made in the above passage?

A. According to a survey, adults who spent most of their childhood with both parents were happier than those who spent better part of their childhood with one of their parents being away.

B. Parents need a strong alpha presentation to inspire a child to trust them and depend upon them.

Solution:

The passage states being with your child is the activity that gives optimum results for children as well as parents in terms of joy. Statement A clearly supports this and hence is a strengthening statement.

Statement B weakens the main argument by targeting the capabilities of parents and that the children’s trust depend on them.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 15

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Parents have been raising children since the beginning of the human race. But raising children is not the same as 'parenting'. The word itself entered the dictionary only in the 1950s, and did not become a part of the popular vocabulary till the 1970s.

Initially, the word was used to refer to what parents did, but over the years, especially today, the word has become completely normative. "'To parent' is a goal-directed verb; it describes a job, a kind of work. The goal is to somehow turn your child into a better or happier or more successful adult," writes Dr Alison Gopnik in The Wall Street Journal.
The idea that 'parenting' involves tips, tricks and techniques that enable people to become better fathers and mothers has become widespread, not just in the US, but around the world. The idea is so ubiquitous that the very idea of questioning it seems heretical. But the whole concept of 'parenting' is fundamentally misguided, says Gopnik.

For millennia, raising a child did not just involve the parents. There were grandfathers and grandmothers, uncles, aunts, cousins, siblings, friends and neighbours. "For most of human history, we lived in these extended family groups. This meant that we learned how to take care of children by practicing with our own little sisters and baby cousins and by watching many other people take care of children," writes Gopnik. But these groups no longer exist in large parts of the world. They've been scattered, dislocated, and communicate via the internet. "Today, most middle-class parents spend years taking classes and pursuing careers before they have children. It's not surprising, then, that going to school and working are modern parents' models for taking care of children: You go to school and work with a goal in mind, and you can be taught to do better at school and work," she writes.

Working to achieve a good outcome is a good idea for businessmen or writers, but making a child a 'product' or an 'outcome' does no justice to either the parent or the child, says Gopnik. In fact, there is no evidence to show that the small differences in 'parenting' techniques that many parents obsess over make any difference to the child's adulthood. "The most important rewards of being a parent aren't your children's grades and trophies--or even their graduations and weddings. They come from the moment-by- moment physical and psychological joy of being with this particular child, and in that child's moment-by-moment joy in being with you," writes Gopnik.

If that means valuing 'being a parent' over 'parenting', it sounds like a good advice.

Q.

According to the passage, which of the following is true about most of the parents today?

Solution:

Options 1, 3, and 4 are nowhere mentioned or hinted at in the passage but it can be inferred from the passage that parents’ focus and efforts are going in the wrong direction. Thus, they being misguided is justified.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 16

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Parents have been raising children since the beginning of the human race. But raising children is not the same as 'parenting'. The word itself entered the dictionary only in the 1950s, and did not become a part of the popular vocabulary till the 1970s.

Initially, the word was used to refer to what parents did, but over the years, especially today, the word has become completely normative. "'To parent' is a goal-directed verb; it describes a job, a kind of work. The goal is to somehow turn your child into a better or happier or more successful adult," writes Dr Alison Gopnik in The Wall Street Journal.
The idea that 'parenting' involves tips, tricks and techniques that enable people to become better fathers and mothers has become widespread, not just in the US, but around the world. The idea is so ubiquitous that the very idea of questioning it seems heretical. But the whole concept of 'parenting' is fundamentally misguided, says Gopnik.

For millennia, raising a child did not just involve the parents. There were grandfathers and grandmothers, uncles, aunts, cousins, siblings, friends and neighbours. "For most of human history, we lived in these extended family groups. This meant that we learned how to take care of children by practicing with our own little sisters and baby cousins and by watching many other people take care of children," writes Gopnik. But these groups no longer exist in large parts of the world. They've been scattered, dislocated, and communicate via the internet. "Today, most middle-class parents spend years taking classes and pursuing careers before they have children. It's not surprising, then, that going to school and working are modern parents' models for taking care of children: You go to school and work with a goal in mind, and you can be taught to do better at school and work," she writes.

Working to achieve a good outcome is a good idea for businessmen or writers, but making a child a 'product' or an 'outcome' does no justice to either the parent or the child, says Gopnik. In fact, there is no evidence to show that the small differences in 'parenting' techniques that many parents obsess over make any difference to the child's adulthood. "The most important rewards of being a parent aren't your children's grades and trophies--or even their graduations and weddings. They come from the moment-by- moment physical and psychological joy of being with this particular child, and in that child's moment-by-moment joy in being with you," writes Gopnik.

If that means valuing 'being a parent' over 'parenting', it sounds like a good advice.

Q.

Which of the following statements, if true, weakens the author’s view in the above passage?

A. A child’s academic performance depicts his parents’ ability to nurture their child.

B. Children are great observers and parents should lead by example.

Solution:

The passage discourages judging one’s parenting capabilities by the rewards and achievements of his/her children. Thus, statement A, if true, directly contradicts this and weakens the views of the author.

Statement B is a generic statement which does not support or contradict the argument made in the passage.
Therefore, only statement A is weakening.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 17

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
India ranks 4th in carbon emission among nations worldwide. For a developing nation like India, it seems impossible to bring a significant reduction in carbon emissions in near future. The Environment Protection Act, 1986, was one of the first legislations brought about by the legislature to protect the environment from degradation caused by the ever-increasing pollution. The next decade was a witness to economic liberalisation which in turn resulted in industrialisation and a revolutionary increase in automobiles on the road.

The Delhi government recently applied the odd and even plan for automobiles. The odd and even scheme of the Delhi government is laudable for the sheer fact that it takes courage to take such an antipopulist measure. The scheme may not have had a drastic impact on the pollution, but it has indeed resulted in a reduction in both the traffic and the resultant pollution. There are certain sections of society who are still miffed with the government, but then constructive criticism is a sign of a healthy democracy.

Taking a lesson from the successful implementation of odd and even rule, governments across the country should board the reform bandwagon. These days we see many advertisements making people aware of the ill-impact of various particulate matters from vehicles as well as from industry. The government should continue with them and should spread awareness among the masses.

Every developing township is getting clogged with the ever increasing traffic on their roads. Cities which have already acquired a shape can be restructured through implementing metro rail-based mass rapid transit systems (MRTS). It has been observed that road- based MRTS is less effective in the urban centres in India. Most of the Indian cities have developed in a haphazard manner and there is no or little scope for implementation of road-based MRTS.
The use of CNG vehicles should be increased and people should be encouraged to use more and more of it. It could be fuelled further by asking auto manufacturers to assign CNG fitting stations from where people can install CNG kits in their cars without losing their warranty. Conversion percentage of vehicles into CNG will get a shot in the arm with this initiative.
However, it seems impossible for governments to act on their own because unlike the Delhi government, very few governments in the states enjoy such absolute majority. The reason for judicial intervention is the avaricious attitude of the people. The court should reassume its role and put its act together to save them from the self-destructive ways and should pave a way in which pollution could be curbed in India.

Q.

Delhi’s approach in curbing pollution could be termed as

Solution:

The passage clearly says that the odd and even plan for automobiles did not execute to have a drastic effect on pollution which indicates that the plan was a reactive measure against the ever increasing pollution of Delhi as prevention is far-fetched in this case.

The passage does not elaborate on the active involvement of the government in the implementation of the odd-even plan. Thus option 3 is eliminated.

Though possibly insufficient, the government is seen to be making efforts to curb pollution, and hence can’t be termed indifferent in its approach. Thus option 4 is eliminated.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 18

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
India ranks 4th in carbon emission among nations worldwide. For a developing nation like India, it seems impossible to bring a significant reduction in carbon emissions in near future. The Environment Protection Act, 1986, was one of the first legislations brought about by the legislature to protect the environment from degradation caused by the ever-increasing pollution. The next decade was a witness to economic liberalisation which in turn resulted in industrialisation and a revolutionary increase in automobiles on the road.

The Delhi government recently applied the odd and even plan for automobiles. The odd and even scheme of the Delhi government is laudable for the sheer fact that it takes courage to take such an antipopulist measure. The scheme may not have had a drastic impact on the pollution, but it has indeed resulted in a reduction in both the traffic and the resultant pollution. There are certain sections of society who are still miffed with the government, but then constructive criticism is a sign of a healthy democracy.

Taking a lesson from the successful implementation of odd and even rule, governments across the country should board the reform bandwagon. These days we see many advertisements making people aware of the ill-impact of various particulate matters from vehicles as well as from industry. The government should continue with them and should spread awareness among the masses.

Every developing township is getting clogged with the ever increasing traffic on their roads. Cities which have already acquired a shape can be restructured through implementing metro rail-based mass rapid transit systems (MRTS). It has been observed that road- based MRTS is less effective in the urban centres in India. Most of the Indian cities have developed in a haphazard manner and there is no or little scope for implementation of road-based MRTS.
The use of CNG vehicles should be increased and people should be encouraged to use more and more of it. It could be fuelled further by asking auto manufacturers to assign CNG fitting stations from where people can install CNG kits in their cars without losing their warranty. Conversion percentage of vehicles into CNG will get a shot in the arm with this initiative.
However, it seems impossible for governments to act on their own because unlike the Delhi government, very few governments in the states enjoy such absolute majority. The reason for judicial intervention is the avaricious attitude of the people. The court should reassume its role and put its act together to save them from the self-destructive ways and should pave a way in which pollution could be curbed in India.

Q.

According to the passage, which of the following is true?

Solution:

The passage calls odd and even scheme as anti-populist and thus option 1 is eliminated.

It is mentioned in the passage that this scheme has indeed resulted in a reduction in both the traffic and the resultant pollution and thus it can’t be termed as a complete failure. Option 3 is eliminated.

The criticism received is not due to the limitations of the scheme but because of the failure of certain sections of the society in adherence to the rules of the scheme. Thus, option 4 is eliminated.

The passage states that “taking a lesson from odd and even rule, governments across the country should board the reform bandwagon” indicating that this scheme might pave way for other reforms in the country in future. Thus, option 2 is true.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 19

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
India ranks 4th in carbon emission among nations worldwide. For a developing nation like India, it seems impossible to bring a significant reduction in carbon emissions in near future. The Environment Protection Act, 1986, was one of the first legislations brought about by the legislature to protect the environment from degradation caused by the ever-increasing pollution. The next decade was a witness to economic liberalisation which in turn resulted in industrialisation and a revolutionary increase in automobiles on the road.

The Delhi government recently applied the odd and even plan for automobiles. The odd and even scheme of the Delhi government is laudable for the sheer fact that it takes courage to take such an antipopulist measure. The scheme may not have had a drastic impact on the pollution, but it has indeed resulted in a reduction in both the traffic and the resultant pollution. There are certain sections of society who are still miffed with the government, but then constructive criticism is a sign of a healthy democracy.

Taking a lesson from the successful implementation of odd and even rule, governments across the country should board the reform bandwagon. These days we see many advertisements making people aware of the ill-impact of various particulate matters from vehicles as well as from industry. The government should continue with them and should spread awareness among the masses.

Every developing township is getting clogged with the ever increasing traffic on their roads. Cities which have already acquired a shape can be restructured through implementing metro rail-based mass rapid transit systems (MRTS). It has been observed that road- based MRTS is less effective in the urban centres in India. Most of the Indian cities have developed in a haphazard manner and there is no or little scope for implementation of road-based MRTS.
The use of CNG vehicles should be increased and people should be encouraged to use more and more of it. It could be fuelled further by asking auto manufacturers to assign CNG fitting stations from where people can install CNG kits in their cars without losing their warranty. Conversion percentage of vehicles into CNG will get a shot in the arm with this initiative.
However, it seems impossible for governments to act on their own because unlike the Delhi government, very few governments in the states enjoy such absolute majority. The reason for judicial intervention is the avaricious attitude of the people. The court should reassume its role and put its act together to save them from the self-destructive ways and should pave a way in which pollution could be curbed in India.

Q.

From the passage, which of the following can be inferred?

Solution:

The passage mentions that “for a developing nation like India, it seems impossible to bring a significant reduction in carbon emissions..... ” implying that, in general, it is difficult for developing countries to curb carbon emissions. Hence, option 1 is eliminated and option 2 can be inferred.

Now, the passage mainly talks about vehicular traffic but also mentions industrialization as one of the contributors to the emissions. Thus, option 3, is eliminated as vehicular traffic is not the only reason.

Option 4 is eliminated as industrialization is not ‘the main reason’ but only one of the reasons behind carbon emissions.

Hence, the best answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 20

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
India ranks 4th in carbon emission among nations worldwide. For a developing nation like India, it seems impossible to bring a significant reduction in carbon emissions in near future. The Environment Protection Act, 1986, was one of the first legislations brought about by the legislature to protect the environment from degradation caused by the ever-increasing pollution. The next decade was a witness to economic liberalisation which in turn resulted in industrialisation and a revolutionary increase in automobiles on the road.

The Delhi government recently applied the odd and even plan for automobiles. The odd and even scheme of the Delhi government is laudable for the sheer fact that it takes courage to take such an antipopulist measure. The scheme may not have had a drastic impact on the pollution, but it has indeed resulted in a reduction in both the traffic and the resultant pollution. There are certain sections of society who are still miffed with the government, but then constructive criticism is a sign of a healthy democracy.

Taking a lesson from the successful implementation of odd and even rule, governments across the country should board the reform bandwagon. These days we see many advertisements making people aware of the ill-impact of various particulate matters from vehicles as well as from industry. The government should continue with them and should spread awareness among the masses.

Every developing township is getting clogged with the ever increasing traffic on their roads. Cities which have already acquired a shape can be restructured through implementing metro rail-based mass rapid transit systems (MRTS). It has been observed that road- based MRTS is less effective in the urban centres in India. Most of the Indian cities have developed in a haphazard manner and there is no or little scope for implementation of road-based MRTS.
The use of CNG vehicles should be increased and people should be encouraged to use more and more of it. It could be fuelled further by asking auto manufacturers to assign CNG fitting stations from where people can install CNG kits in their cars without losing their warranty. Conversion percentage of vehicles into CNG will get a shot in the arm with this initiative.
However, it seems impossible for governments to act on their own because unlike the Delhi government, very few governments in the states enjoy such absolute majority. The reason for judicial intervention is the avaricious attitude of the people. The court should reassume its role and put its act together to save them from the self-destructive ways and should pave a way in which pollution could be curbed in India.

Q.

With reference to the passage, which of the following is not mentioned as an effective step to reduce vehicular emissions in any city?

Solution:

Promotion of CNG vehicles, praise of odd and even scheme, and an appeal to government to spread awareness about ill-impact of particulate matters from vehicles are directly mentioned as possible steps to curb vehicular emissions. Thus, options 1,2, and 4 are eliminated.

Use of solar-powered batteries is not mentioned and can be eliminated.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 21

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
India ranks 4th in carbon emission among nations worldwide. For a developing nation like India, it seems impossible to bring a significant reduction in carbon emissions in near future. The Environment Protection Act, 1986, was one of the first legislations brought about by the legislature to protect the environment from degradation caused by the ever-increasing pollution. The next decade was a witness to economic liberalisation which in turn resulted in industrialisation and a revolutionary increase in automobiles on the road.

The Delhi government recently applied the odd and even plan for automobiles. The odd and even scheme of the Delhi government is laudable for the sheer fact that it takes courage to take such an antipopulist measure. The scheme may not have had a drastic impact on the pollution, but it has indeed resulted in a reduction in both the traffic and the resultant pollution. There are certain sections of society who are still miffed with the government, but then constructive criticism is a sign of a healthy democracy.

Taking a lesson from the successful implementation of odd and even rule, governments across the country should board the reform bandwagon. These days we see many advertisements making people aware of the ill-impact of various particulate matters from vehicles as well as from industry. The government should continue with them and should spread awareness among the masses.

Every developing township is getting clogged with the ever increasing traffic on their roads. Cities which have already acquired a shape can be restructured through implementing metro rail-based mass rapid transit systems (MRTS). It has been observed that road- based MRTS is less effective in the urban centres in India. Most of the Indian cities have developed in a haphazard manner and there is no or little scope for implementation of road-based MRTS.
The use of CNG vehicles should be increased and people should be encouraged to use more and more of it. It could be fuelled further by asking auto manufacturers to assign CNG fitting stations from where people can install CNG kits in their cars without losing their warranty. Conversion percentage of vehicles into CNG will get a shot in the arm with this initiative.
However, it seems impossible for governments to act on their own because unlike the Delhi government, very few governments in the states enjoy such absolute majority. The reason for judicial intervention is the avaricious attitude of the people. The court should reassume its role and put its act together to save them from the self-destructive ways and should pave a way in which pollution could be curbed in India.

Q.

Which of the following can be definitely concluded from the above passage?

Solution:

The passage mentions India’s present ranking and talks about possible efforts underway to improve on this, but in the passage, there is no comparative data available about other countries. Thus, a fair comparison would not be possible and one cannot really say if India’s ranking worldwide would improve, worsen, or remain the same. Thus, options 1,2, and 3 are eliminated and the only thing that can be concluded is option 4.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 22

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
India ranks 4th in carbon emission among nations worldwide. For a developing nation like India, it seems impossible to bring a significant reduction in carbon emissions in near future. The Environment Protection Act, 1986, was one of the first legislations brought about by the legislature to protect the environment from degradation caused by the ever-increasing pollution. The next decade was a witness to economic liberalisation which in turn resulted in industrialisation and a revolutionary increase in automobiles on the road.

The Delhi government recently applied the odd and even plan for automobiles. The odd and even scheme of the Delhi government is laudable for the sheer fact that it takes courage to take such an antipopulist measure. The scheme may not have had a drastic impact on the pollution, but it has indeed resulted in a reduction in both the traffic and the resultant pollution. There are certain sections of society who are still miffed with the government, but then constructive criticism is a sign of a healthy democracy.

Taking a lesson from the successful implementation of odd and even rule, governments across the country should board the reform bandwagon. These days we see many advertisements making people aware of the ill-impact of various particulate matters from vehicles as well as from industry. The government should continue with them and should spread awareness among the masses.

Every developing township is getting clogged with the ever increasing traffic on their roads. Cities which have already acquired a shape can be restructured through implementing metro rail-based mass rapid transit systems (MRTS). It has been observed that road- based MRTS is less effective in the urban centres in India. Most of the Indian cities have developed in a haphazard manner and there is no or little scope for implementation of road-based MRTS.
The use of CNG vehicles should be increased and people should be encouraged to use more and more of it. It could be fuelled further by asking auto manufacturers to assign CNG fitting stations from where people can install CNG kits in their cars without losing their warranty. Conversion percentage of vehicles into CNG will get a shot in the arm with this initiative.
However, it seems impossible for governments to act on their own because unlike the Delhi government, very few governments in the states enjoy such absolute majority. The reason for judicial intervention is the avaricious attitude of the people. The court should reassume its role and put its act together to save them from the self-destructive ways and should pave a way in which pollution could be curbed in India.

Q.

In a city like Mumbai, which of the following systems possibly would be more effective to curb traffic with reference to the discussion in the passage?

Solution:

The passage states that road-based MRTS is less effective in the urban centres in India and adds that cities which have already acquired a shape can be restructured through implementing metro rail-based mass rapid transit systems.

In light of this, options 1,3, and 4 are eliminated and the correct answer would be option 2.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 23

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

In Western literature, the term "renga" has been applied to alternating accretive poetry, not necessarily in the classical Japanese form. Examples include Octavio Paz and Charles Tomlinson's sonnet-renga "Airborne", 1979, and to the work of Canadians P. K. Page and Philip Stratford, whose collaboration between 1997 and 1999 became the sonnet collection "And Once More Saw The Stars", 2001.

With the rise of the internet, renga is once again becoming a popular form. People from anywhere at any time can easily contribute to a work. An early online collaborative renga, done by many writers on the fly was White Roads led by Jane Reichhold in 1996. Live renga are being conducted increasingly in the West, including in the UK where artists/poets including Alec Finlay, Gavin Wade, Gerry Loose, and Paul Conneally explore and develop the form. Finlay has created two dedicated renga platforms for renga days, at the hidden gardens, Glasgow, and Garden Station, near Hexham. His press, Platform Projects, has published two collections of renga, Verse Chain and Shared Writing. Finlay has collaborated with a number of renga poets to expand the renga form, composing what he refers to as word-map renga which describe specific locations; some of these poems are typeset in the shapes or forms of the place in question - coastline, river or a skyline. He is currently working on a renga word-map of The Peak District in England.

Finlay has also collaborated on hyakuin renga 24 hour renga; and, with Linda France, solo and duet year-long renga.

The first magazine devoted entirely to renga in English was started by Jim Wilson of Monte Rio, California, in 1986. It was called APA- RENGA because it was a continuation of the Amateur Press Association model magazines in which all members could post whatever they wanted. This meant that the members would read the renga being offered and then could write a connecting link. Wilson tabulated these links and then all the possible links were sent back to the participants. This meant that instead of having linear links, the renga expanded outward into many versions of the same poem. When Wilson passed APA-RENGA on to Terri Lee Grell in 1989, she renamed the magazine Lynx and added short stories and other poetry and published quarterly. In 1992 Grell passed Lynx on to Jane and Werner Reichhold.

Q.

What can we deduce about the definition of Rengas from the passage?

Solution:

Option 1 mentions the Renga to be “prose” when it’s clearly poetry - “the term "renga" has been applied to alternating accretive poetry.” There is nothing in the passage about a comparison between a Renga and a haiku as indicated in option 2. Option 4 can be eliminated as Renga existed even before the Internet.

The passage states, “An early online collaborative renga, done by many writers on the fly was White Roads led by Jane Reichhold in 1996.” Any form of Renga, according to the passage, has at least two contributors. Also, we know that it was embraced by the West, because of the passage’s many mentions of it being used in countries like the UK and USA. Furthermore, we know that it is Japanese because the passage states that it was embraced “not necessarily in the classical Japanese form.”

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 24

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

In Western literature, the term "renga" has been applied to alternating accretive poetry, not necessarily in the classical Japanese form. Examples include Octavio Paz and Charles Tomlinson's sonnet-renga "Airborne", 1979, and to the work of Canadians P. K. Page and Philip Stratford, whose collaboration between 1997 and 1999 became the sonnet collection "And Once More Saw The Stars", 2001.

With the rise of the internet, renga is once again becoming a popular form. People from anywhere at any time can easily contribute to a work. An early online collaborative renga, done by many writers on the fly was White Roads led by Jane Reichhold in 1996. Live renga are being conducted increasingly in the West, including in the UK where artists/poets including Alec Finlay, Gavin Wade, Gerry Loose, and Paul Conneally explore and develop the form. Finlay has created two dedicated renga platforms for renga days, at the hidden gardens, Glasgow, and Garden Station, near Hexham. His press, Platform Projects, has published two collections of renga, Verse Chain and Shared Writing. Finlay has collaborated with a number of renga poets to expand the renga form, composing what he refers to as word-map renga which describe specific locations; some of these poems are typeset in the shapes or forms of the place in question - coastline, river or a skyline. He is currently working on a renga word-map of The Peak District in England.

Finlay has also collaborated on hyakuin renga 24 hour renga; and, with Linda France, solo and duet year-long renga.

The first magazine devoted entirely to renga in English was started by Jim Wilson of Monte Rio, California, in 1986. It was called APA- RENGA because it was a continuation of the Amateur Press Association model magazines in which all members could post whatever they wanted. This meant that the members would read the renga being offered and then could write a connecting link. Wilson tabulated these links and then all the possible links were sent back to the participants. This meant that instead of having linear links, the renga expanded outward into many versions of the same poem. When Wilson passed APA-RENGA on to Terri Lee Grell in 1989, she renamed the magazine Lynx and added short stories and other poetry and published quarterly. In 1992 Grell passed Lynx on to Jane and Werner Reichhold.

Q.

What is Alec Finlay’s contribution to Renga?

Solution:

According to the passage, Finley has “two dedicated renga platforms for renga days, at the hidden gardens, Glasgow, and Garden Station, near Hexham,” which count as “onground” platforms, and “His press, Platform Projects, has published two collections of renga” which counts as print.

This is in consonance with option 2.

Option 1 stretches it beyond the scope of the passage- there is no data to suggest that he was responsible for its popularity. The passage just lists his work.

Option 3 erroneously mentions “world-map” instead of “word-map.”

Option 4 is a fact but it is not his contribution to renga.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 25

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

In Western literature, the term "renga" has been applied to alternating accretive poetry, not necessarily in the classical Japanese form. Examples include Octavio Paz and Charles Tomlinson's sonnet-renga "Airborne", 1979, and to the work of Canadians P. K. Page and Philip Stratford, whose collaboration between 1997 and 1999 became the sonnet collection "And Once More Saw The Stars", 2001.

With the rise of the internet, renga is once again becoming a popular form. People from anywhere at any time can easily contribute to a work. An early online collaborative renga, done by many writers on the fly was White Roads led by Jane Reichhold in 1996. Live renga are being conducted increasingly in the West, including in the UK where artists/poets including Alec Finlay, Gavin Wade, Gerry Loose, and Paul Conneally explore and develop the form. Finlay has created two dedicated renga platforms for renga days, at the hidden gardens, Glasgow, and Garden Station, near Hexham. His press, Platform Projects, has published two collections of renga, Verse Chain and Shared Writing. Finlay has collaborated with a number of renga poets to expand the renga form, composing what he refers to as word-map renga which describe specific locations; some of these poems are typeset in the shapes or forms of the place in question - coastline, river or a skyline. He is currently working on a renga word-map of The Peak District in England.

Finlay has also collaborated on hyakuin renga 24 hour renga; and, with Linda France, solo and duet year-long renga.

The first magazine devoted entirely to renga in English was started by Jim Wilson of Monte Rio, California, in 1986. It was called APA- RENGA because it was a continuation of the Amateur Press Association model magazines in which all members could post whatever they wanted. This meant that the members would read the renga being offered and then could write a connecting link. Wilson tabulated these links and then all the possible links were sent back to the participants. This meant that instead of having linear links, the renga expanded outward into many versions of the same poem. When Wilson passed APA-RENGA on to Terri Lee Grell in 1989, she renamed the magazine Lynx and added short stories and other poetry and published quarterly. In 1992 Grell passed Lynx on to Jane and Werner Reichhold.

Q.

“Instead of having linear links, the renga expanded outward into many versions of the same poem” implies:

Solution:

The passage states that renga is collaborative. This implies that many renga that can sprout from a single starting renga by different groups of people working on them. This is in consonance with option 1.

Options 2, 3 and 4 present a convoluted meaning of the sentence in the context.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 26

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

Roots bend in response to gravity due to a regulated movement of the plant hormone auxin known as polar auxin transport. In roots, an increase in the concentration of auxin will inhibit cell expansion, therefore, the redistribution of auxin in the root can initiate differential growth in the elongation zone resulting in root curvature. A "tropism" is a plant movement triggered by stimuli. The term "geotropic" refers to a plant whose roots grow down into the soil as a response to gravity. Plants commonly exist in a state of "anisotropic growth," where roots grow downward and shoots grow upward. Anisotropic growth will continue even as a plant is turned sideways or upside down. In other words, no matter what you do to a plant within Earth's atmosphere, it will still grow roots down and stem up. The reason for this comes from the nature of a plant and its general response to gravity.

Upward growth of plant parts, against gravity, is called "negative geotropism", and downward growth of roots is called "positive geotropism".
In shoots, increasing the local concentration of auxin promotes cell expansion; this is the opposite of root cells.

In both roots and stems, auxin accumulates towards the gravity vector on the lower side. In roots, this results in the inhibition of cell expansion on the lower side and the concomitant curvature of the roots towards gravity. In stems, the auxin also accumulates on the lower side, however in this tissue it increases cell expansion and results in the shoot curving up.

Q.

Which of the following statements is not true:

Solution:

Option 1 is true because it is mentioned that “Upward growth of plant parts, against gravity, is called "negative geotropism"”, Option 2 is true because it is mentioned, “the concomitant curvature of the roots towards gravity”.

Option 4 is true because it is mentioned “Plants commonly exist in a state of "anisotropic growth"”.

Option 3 is untrue because it has been mentioned that auxin increases cell expansion in the shoots.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 27

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

Roots bend in response to gravity due to a regulated movement of the plant hormone auxin known as polar auxin transport. In roots, an increase in the concentration of auxin will inhibit cell expansion, therefore, the redistribution of auxin in the root can initiate differential growth in the elongation zone resulting in root curvature. A "tropism" is a plant movement triggered by stimuli. The term "geotropic" refers to a plant whose roots grow down into the soil as a response to gravity. Plants commonly exist in a state of "anisotropic growth," where roots grow downward and shoots grow upward. Anisotropic growth will continue even as a plant is turned sideways or upside down. In other words, no matter what you do to a plant within Earth's atmosphere, it will still grow roots down and stem up. The reason for this comes from the nature of a plant and its general response to gravity.

Upward growth of plant parts, against gravity, is called "negative geotropism", and downward growth of roots is called "positive geotropism".
In shoots, increasing the local concentration of auxin promotes cell expansion; this is the opposite of root cells.

In both roots and stems, auxin accumulates towards the gravity vector on the lower side. In roots, this results in the inhibition of cell expansion on the lower side and the concomitant curvature of the roots towards gravity. In stems, the auxin also accumulates on the lower side, however in this tissue it increases cell expansion and results in the shoot curving up.

Q.

What is the antonym of the word “concomitant”?

Solution:

The word “concomitant” means ‘contributing to’, or ‘accompanying something’. In this passage it is used in the sentence: “this results in the inhibition of cell expansion on the lower side and the concomitant curvature of the roots”. Therefore, the antonym would be “unrelated”.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 28

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

Roots bend in response to gravity due to a regulated movement of the plant hormone auxin known as polar auxin transport. In roots, an increase in the concentration of auxin will inhibit cell expansion, therefore, the redistribution of auxin in the root can initiate differential growth in the elongation zone resulting in root curvature. A "tropism" is a plant movement triggered by stimuli. The term "geotropic" refers to a plant whose roots grow down into the soil as a response to gravity. Plants commonly exist in a state of "anisotropic growth," where roots grow downward and shoots grow upward. Anisotropic growth will continue even as a plant is turned sideways or upside down. In other words, no matter what you do to a plant within Earth's atmosphere, it will still grow roots down and stem up. The reason for this comes from the nature of a plant and its general response to gravity.

Upward growth of plant parts, against gravity, is called "negative geotropism", and downward growth of roots is called "positive geotropism".
In shoots, increasing the local concentration of auxin promotes cell expansion; this is the opposite of root cells.

In both roots and stems, auxin accumulates towards the gravity vector on the lower side. In roots, this results in the inhibition of cell expansion on the lower side and the concomitant curvature of the roots towards gravity. In stems, the auxin also accumulates on the lower side, however in this tissue it increases cell expansion and results in the shoot curving up.

Q.

Which of the following statements can be inferred?

Solution:

Option 1 can be inferred from the passage since it is mentioned that ‘no matter what you do to a plant within Earth's atmosphere, it will still grow roots down and stem up. The reason for this comes from the nature of a plant and its general response to gravity’.

Option 2 can also be inferred because it has been mentioned that ‘the redistribution of auxin in the root can initiate differential growth in the elongation zone resulting in root curvature1.

Option 3 has also been paraphrased from the passage: ‘anisotropic growth will continue even as a plant is turned sideways or upside down’.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 29

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum. On the left, it is regarded as a simple and potentially comprehensive antidote to poverty. On the right, it is viewed as a means to demolish complex welfare bureaucracies while recognizing the need for some social transfer obligations in a way that doesn’t weaken incentives significantly. It also provides some assurance for the dreaded future when robots may replace workers in many sectors.
The main drawback, according to critics, is that a basic income would weaken the motivation to work, particularly among the poor. Given that the value of work extends beyond income, the logic goes, this could pose a serious problem. European social democrats, for example, worry that a basic income could undermine the worker solidarity that underpins current social-insurance programs. But, in developing countries, workers in the dominant informal sector are already excluded from social-insurance programs. And no feasible basic income would be large enough, at least for now, to enable people simply to leave work behind.
In fact, among the poorest groups, basic incomes would enhance the dignity- and solidarity-enhancing effects of work, by easing some of the pressure on people - particularly women - who are now vastly overworked. Instead of constantly fearing for their livelihoods, self-employed people, such as small-scale producers and vendors, could engage in more strategic decision-making, taking advantage of their enhanced bargaining power against traders, middlemen, creditors, and landlords.
The final argument against basic income is that the poor will use the money to fund personally or socially detrimental activities, such as gambling and alcohol consumption. But experiences with direct cash transfers in a range of countries, including Ecuador, India, Mexico, and Uganda, have not provided much evidence of such misuse; in general, the cash is spent on worthwhile goods and services.
Proposals for a universal basic income, fancied by utopian socialists and libertarians, may be premature in the advanced countries. But such schemes should not be dismissed in the developing world, where conditions are such that they could offer an affordable alternative to administratively unwieldy and ineffective welfare programs. Basic incomes are no panacea; but for overworked developing-country citizens living in extreme poverty, they would certainly be a relief.

Q.

Which of the following is least true according to the passage?

Solution:

Options 1 is supported by the last paragraph which says what the scheme means to the developing and the developed countries.

Option 4 is supported by “The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum.”

Option 3 is supported by the statement “It also provides some assurance for the dreaded future when robots may replace workers in many sectors.”

Only option 2 is not entirely true. The passage does not mention that the universal basic income scheme is not feasible, it merely states, “But such schemes ...ineffective welfare programs.”

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 30

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum. On the left, it is regarded as a simple and potentially comprehensive antidote to poverty. On the right, it is viewed as a means to demolish complex welfare bureaucracies while recognizing the need for some social transfer obligations in a way that doesn’t weaken incentives significantly. It also provides some assurance for the dreaded future when robots may replace workers in many sectors.
The main drawback, according to critics, is that a basic income would weaken the motivation to work, particularly among the poor. Given that the value of work extends beyond income, the logic goes, this could pose a serious problem. European social democrats, for example, worry that a basic income could undermine the worker solidarity that underpins current social-insurance programs. But, in developing countries, workers in the dominant informal sector are already excluded from social-insurance programs. And no feasible basic income would be large enough, at least for now, to enable people simply to leave work behind.
In fact, among the poorest groups, basic incomes would enhance the dignity- and solidarity-enhancing effects of work, by easing some of the pressure on people - particularly women - who are now vastly overworked. Instead of constantly fearing for their livelihoods, self-employed people, such as small-scale producers and vendors, could engage in more strategic decision-making, taking advantage of their enhanced bargaining power against traders, middlemen, creditors, and landlords.
The final argument against basic income is that the poor will use the money to fund personally or socially detrimental activities, such as gambling and alcohol consumption. But experiences with direct cash transfers in a range of countries, including Ecuador, India, Mexico, and Uganda, have not provided much evidence of such misuse; in general, the cash is spent on worthwhile goods and services.
Proposals for a universal basic income, fancied by utopian socialists and libertarians, may be premature in the advanced countries. But such schemes should not be dismissed in the developing world, where conditions are such that they could offer an affordable alternative to administratively unwieldy and ineffective welfare programs. Basic incomes are no panacea; but for overworked developing-country citizens living in extreme poverty, they would certainly be a relief.

Q.

What is the primary concern of the passage?

Solution:

The primary concern can be discerned from two points in the passage, the first being the issue of poverty in developing countries and the second being the features of universal basic income.
Thus, option 4 aptly relates these two points.

Option 1 only focuses on “poverty” and misses out on the topic of “universal basic income”.

Option 2 with “welfare schemes it very generic.

Option 3 although mentioned in the passage, does not constitute the main theme of the passage.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 31

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum. On the left, it is regarded as a simple and potentially comprehensive antidote to poverty. On the right, it is viewed as a means to demolish complex welfare bureaucracies while recognizing the need for some social transfer obligations in a way that doesn’t weaken incentives significantly. It also provides some assurance for the dreaded future when robots may replace workers in many sectors.
The main drawback, according to critics, is that a basic income would weaken the motivation to work, particularly among the poor. Given that the value of work extends beyond income, the logic goes, this could pose a serious problem. European social democrats, for example, worry that a basic income could undermine the worker solidarity that underpins current social-insurance programs. But, in developing countries, workers in the dominant informal sector are already excluded from social-insurance programs. And no feasible basic income would be large enough, at least for now, to enable people simply to leave work behind.
In fact, among the poorest groups, basic incomes would enhance the dignity- and solidarity-enhancing effects of work, by easing some of the pressure on people - particularly women - who are now vastly overworked. Instead of constantly fearing for their livelihoods, self-employed people, such as small-scale producers and vendors, could engage in more strategic decision-making, taking advantage of their enhanced bargaining power against traders, middlemen, creditors, and landlords.
The final argument against basic income is that the poor will use the money to fund personally or socially detrimental activities, such as gambling and alcohol consumption. But experiences with direct cash transfers in a range of countries, including Ecuador, India, Mexico, and Uganda, have not provided much evidence of such misuse; in general, the cash is spent on worthwhile goods and services.
Proposals for a universal basic income, fancied by utopian socialists and libertarians, may be premature in the advanced countries. But such schemes should not be dismissed in the developing world, where conditions are such that they could offer an affordable alternative to administratively unwieldy and ineffective welfare programs. Basic incomes are no panacea; but for overworked developing-country citizens living in extreme poverty, they would certainly be a relief.

Q.

A suitable title for the passage would be:

Solution:

The passage proposes an unconditional universal basic income mainly for the upliftment of the poor and discusses its effects on different countries with different economies. Thus, option 2 is the most suitable title.

Option 1 is not a suitable interpretation of the passage as it is not specific.

Option 3 is misleading as the passage is not about the developing countries but a particular scheme.

Option 4 goes beyond the idea of the passage as one cannot label the basic income incentive as “an utopian model”.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 32

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum. On the left, it is regarded as a simple and potentially comprehensive antidote to poverty. On the right, it is viewed as a means to demolish complex welfare bureaucracies while recognizing the need for some social transfer obligations in a way that doesn’t weaken incentives significantly. It also provides some assurance for the dreaded future when robots may replace workers in many sectors.
The main drawback, according to critics, is that a basic income would weaken the motivation to work, particularly among the poor. Given that the value of work extends beyond income, the logic goes, this could pose a serious problem. European social democrats, for example, worry that a basic income could undermine the worker solidarity that underpins current social-insurance programs. But, in developing countries, workers in the dominant informal sector are already excluded from social-insurance programs. And no feasible basic income would be large enough, at least for now, to enable people simply to leave work behind.
In fact, among the poorest groups, basic incomes would enhance the dignity- and solidarity-enhancing effects of work, by easing some of the pressure on people - particularly women - who are now vastly overworked. Instead of constantly fearing for their livelihoods, self-employed people, such as small-scale producers and vendors, could engage in more strategic decision-making, taking advantage of their enhanced bargaining power against traders, middlemen, creditors, and landlords.
The final argument against basic income is that the poor will use the money to fund personally or socially detrimental activities, such as gambling and alcohol consumption. But experiences with direct cash transfers in a range of countries, including Ecuador, India, Mexico, and Uganda, have not provided much evidence of such misuse; in general, the cash is spent on worthwhile goods and services.
Proposals for a universal basic income, fancied by utopian socialists and libertarians, may be premature in the advanced countries. But such schemes should not be dismissed in the developing world, where conditions are such that they could offer an affordable alternative to administratively unwieldy and ineffective welfare programs. Basic incomes are no panacea; but for overworked developing-country citizens living in extreme poverty, they would certainly be a relief.

Q.

With reference to the passage, the poor are likely to spend their basic income on harmful activities like

1. Gambling

2. Useful goods and services

3. Family and children

Solution:

The passage mentions “..the poor will use the money to fund personally or socially detrimental activities, such as gambling and alcohol consumption.”, supports option 1.

Although statement B is mentioned in the later part of the fourth paragraph, the question mentions “drawbacks” which hint at the negative aspects of receiving the basic income.

Statement C cannot be corroborated from the passage.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 33

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum. On the left, it is regarded as a simple and potentially comprehensive antidote to poverty. On the right, it is viewed as a means to demolish complex welfare bureaucracies while recognizing the need for some social transfer obligations in a way that doesn’t weaken incentives significantly. It also provides some assurance for the dreaded future when robots may replace workers in many sectors.

The main drawback, according to critics, is that a basic income would weaken the motivation to work, particularly among the poor. Given that the value of work extends beyond income, the logic goes, this could pose a serious problem. European social democrats, for example, worry that a basic income could undermine the worker solidarity that underpins current social-insurance programs. But, in developing countries, workers in the dominant informal sector are already excluded from social-insurance programs. And no feasible basic income would be large enough, at least for now, to enable people simply to leave work behind.
In fact, among the poorest groups, basic incomes would enhance the dignity- and solidarity-enhancing effects of work, by easing some of the pressure on people - particularly women - who are now vastly overworked. Instead of constantly fearing for their livelihoods, self-employed people, such as small-scale producers and vendors, could engage in more strategic decision-making, taking advantage of their enhanced bargaining power against traders, middlemen, creditors, and landlords.

The final argument against basic income is that the poor will use the money to fund personally or socially detrimental activities, such as gambling and alcohol consumption. But experiences with direct cash transfers in a range of countries, including Ecuador, India, Mexico, and Uganda, have not provided much evidence of such misuse; in general, the cash is spent on worthwhile goods and services.

Proposals for a universal basic income, fancied by utopian socialists and libertarians, may be premature in the advanced countries. But such schemes should not be dismissed in the developing world, where conditions are such that they could offer an affordable alternative to administratively unwieldy and ineffective welfare programs. Basic incomes are no panacea; but for overworked developing-country citizens living in extreme poverty, they would certainly be a relief.

Q.

“And no feasible basic income would be large enough, at least for now, to enable people simply to leave work behind” implies that:

Solution:

The quoted text implies that the amount of basic income will be significantly lower initially and thus the poor wouldn’t be able to completely rely on it for survival.Hence, from the given options only option 1 reflects this.

Options 1,3 and 4 cannot be inferred from the passage.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 34

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum. On the left, it is regarded as a simple and potentially comprehensive antidote to poverty. On the right, it is viewed as a means to demolish complex welfare bureaucracies while recognizing the need for some social transfer obligations in a way that doesn’t weaken incentives significantly. It also provides some assurance for the dreaded future when robots may replace workers in many sectors.

The main drawback, according to critics, is that a basic income would weaken the motivation to work, particularly among the poor. Given that the value of work extends beyond income, the logic goes, this could pose a serious problem. European social democrats, for example, worry that a basic income could undermine the worker solidarity that underpins current social-insurance programs. But, in developing countries, workers in the dominant informal sector are already excluded from social-insurance programs. And no feasible basic income would be large enough, at least for now, to enable people simply to leave work behind.
In fact, among the poorest groups, basic incomes would enhance the dignity- and solidarity-enhancing effects of work, by easing some of the pressure on people - particularly women - who are now vastly overworked. Instead of constantly fearing for their livelihoods, self-employed people, such as small-scale producers and vendors, could engage in more strategic decision-making, taking advantage of their enhanced bargaining power against traders, middlemen, creditors, and landlords.

The final argument against basic income is that the poor will use the money to fund personally or socially detrimental activities, such as gambling and alcohol consumption. But experiences with direct cash transfers in a range of countries, including Ecuador, India, Mexico, and Uganda, have not provided much evidence of such misuse; in general, the cash is spent on worthwhile goods and services.

Proposals for a universal basic income, fancied by utopian socialists and libertarians, may be premature in the advanced countries. But such schemes should not be dismissed in the developing world, where conditions are such that they could offer an affordable alternative to administratively unwieldy and ineffective welfare programs. Basic incomes are no panacea; but for overworked developing-country citizens living in extreme poverty, they would certainly be a relief.

Q.

“Basic incomes are no panacea; but for overworked developing-country citizens living in extreme poverty, they would certainly be a relief.” Which of the following would strengthen this argument?

Solution:

The sentence clearly states that provisions for a basic income for the overworked poor would benefit them. Taking this into consideration, option 3 is apt as it states that basic income would assist the poor in times of hardship.

The remaining options are drawbacks, stated in the passage, of instituting an unconditional universal basic income. Thus, options 1,2 and 4 can be eliminated.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

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