IIFT Mock Test - 2 (New Pattern)


110 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | IIFT Mock Test - 2 (New Pattern)


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This mock test of IIFT Mock Test - 2 (New Pattern) for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 110 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT IIFT Mock Test - 2 (New Pattern) (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IIFT Mock Test - 2 (New Pattern) quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this IIFT Mock Test - 2 (New Pattern) exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IIFT Mock Test - 2 (New Pattern) extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Rectangle TEHF has dimensions 15 m by 30 m, as shown. Tom the Cat begins at T, and Jerry the Mouse begins at J, the midpoint of TE. Jerry runs at 3 m/s in a straight line towards H. Tom starts at the same time as Jerry, and, running at 5 m/s in a straight line, arrives at point C at the same time as Jerry. The time, in seconds, that it takes Tom to catch Jerry is closest to

Solution:

Let the time taken to meet is t
Then TC = 5t
JC = 3t
TJ = 15
∠TJC = 1350
Apply cosine formula
TC2 = JC2 + TJ2 – 2 × JC × TJ Cos 1350

25t2 = 9t2 + 225 - 2 x 3t x 15 x (-1 / √2)
16t2 = 225 + 45√2t

Sol.2
Draw CD ⊥ TE
Then
CT2 = (TJ + JD)2 + CD2
Δ JCD is isosceles triangle.
JD = DC = 3t / √2
So we have Solving it we get 16t2 = 225 + 45√2t
Solving again the same answer will be reached.

QUESTION: 2

A milkman saves milk in two vessels, a cuboidal and the other a cylindrical. The capacity of the cuboidal vessel is 20 litres more than the cylindrical one. When 30 litres of milk is drawn from each of the two full vessels, the amount left in the cuboidal vessel is twice that left in the cylindrical vessel. The capacity (in litres) of the cuboidal vessel is

Solution:

If capacity of cuboidal vessel is x litres, then capacity of cylindrical vessel is x – 20 litres. 

Also (x – 30) = 2(x – 20 – 30)
    ► =>x = 70 litres.

QUESTION: 3

A larger cube is formed from the material obtained by melting three smaller cubes of 3, 4 and 5 cm side. The ratio of the total surface areas of the smaller cubes and the larger cube is

Solution:

Side of larger cube = (33 + 43 + 53)1/3 = 6 cm.

Therefore TSA of smaller cubes = 6 (32 + 42 + 52) - 300 cm2, and TSA of larger cube = 6 x 62 = 216 cm2.

Hence ratio = 300 : 216 = 25 : 18.

QUESTION: 4

An ant starts from point A and covers all the paths to reach point D. What is the Minimum total distance travelled by the ant, if paths AB, BC, CD and DA act as diameters for respective semicircular paths?

Solution:

The path that the ant will have to follow is first all the four sides of the rectangle then one diagonal AC, then the four semicircular paths, then side CB and then diagonal BD
► ∴ Distance = 4 + 3 + 4 + 3 + 5 + π x 3 / 2 + π x 2 + π x 2 + 3 + 5 = 27 + 7π = 27 + 7 x 22 / 7 = 27 + 22 = 49m.

QUESTION: 5

If x = 3 + 2√2, then the value of √x + 1/√x is -

Solution:

Approx. x = 3 + 2(1.4) = 5.8. Now, √5.8 ≈ 2.4.
  ► So, 2.4 + (1 / 2.4)

= (4.8 + 1)/2.4

 = (5.8)/2.4

= 2.8

QUESTION: 6

In a school 30% students are above 5 ft tall. Out of the remaining students, 60% are boys and remaining are girls whereas the percentage reverses in the above 5 ft group. Find the ratio of boys who are above 5 ft tall to the boys below 5 ft.?

Solution:

►Above 5 ft = 30% of total students. Number of boys in this group = 40% which means boys above 5ft = 40% of 30% = 12% of the total students.

►Below 5 ft = 70% of the total students.

►Number of boys in this group = 60% which means boys below 5 ft 
= 60% of 70% = 42% of total students.
So ratio = 12 : 42 or 2 : 7.

QUESTION: 7

A student took five papers in an examination, where full marks were same for each paper. Her marks in these papers were in the proportion of 6 : 7 : 8 : 9 : 10. In all these papers together, the candidate obtained 60 % of the total marks. Then the number of papers in which she got more than 50% marks is

Solution:

►Let full marks in each paper = 100. Therefore total marks = 500. Her score = 300. 

►Ratio = 6 : 7 : 8 : 9 : 10. Hence her scores are 45, 52.5, 60, 67.5 and 75.

►So she got more than 50% in 4 subjects.

QUESTION: 8

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best possible option.
A person can row 7.5 km an hour in still water and he finds that it takes him twice as long to row up as compared to row down the river. The rate of the stream is

Solution:

Rate in still water = 7.5 kmph. Let rate of stream = y.
Therefore 7.5 + y = 2(7.5 - y)
  ► ⇒ 7.5 + y = 15 - 2y ⇒ 3y = 7.5 ⇒ y = 2.5 kmph.

QUESTION: 9

There are 12 towns grouped into four zones with three towns per zone. It is intended to connect the towns with telephone lines such that every two towns are connected with three direct lines if they belong to the same zone, and with only one direct line otherwise. How many direct telephone lines are required?

Solution:

►Consider any one town, it is to be connected with three direct lines with two towns, which are in the same zone and one direct line with each of the other nine towns, which are outside its zone.

►It totally needs 6 + 9 = 15 and there are 12 towns, hence the total direct points to be attached will be 15 × 12 = 180, but every line will be attached to  two points.

►Thus the telephone lines needed are 180 / 2 = 90.

QUESTION: 10

At what time between 8 and 9 pm will the hands of a clock be making an angle of 180 degrees?

Solution:

At 8.00 the angle between the two hands is 240 degrees.

ATQ we need to make it 180, it has to be relatively reduced by 60 degrees.
  ► 60 * 2/11 = 120/11 = 10 10/11 min past 8.

QUESTION: 11

In an examination of n questions, a student answered 15 of the first 20 correctly. Of the remaining questions he answered one-third correctly. All the questions have the same credit. If the students scored 50% marks, how many different values of n can be there (no negative marking)?

Solution:

Let the remaining questions be 3x.

►Now as per the given facts (15 + x)/(20 + 3x)= 1 / 2.

►Solving x = 10. So, total questions will be 20 + 3(10) = 50.

►Hence only one value is possible i.e. option 4.

QUESTION: 12

Flight A and B with equal capacity are scheduled to take off from an airport. Passengers are waiting in a hall of capacity 200. The hall is currently having 10% of the seats unoccupied. 40 % of the waiting passengers are ladies. Both the flights put together have a total capacity equal to 2/3 rd of the total passengers who are waiting. Half the passengers who board flight A are women. After the boarding of flight A, 60% of the seats in the hall are empty. For every 20 passengers now in the hall, there is an airhostess in flight A. What is the ratio of empty seats in Flight B to the number of airhostesses in flight A?

Solution:


Seating capacity of flight 
Number of people in flight A = 100
For flight B = 180 - 100 = 80
Thus, airhostess for A = 80 / 20 = 4
Empty seats in flight B = 120 - 80 = 40
40 : 4 = 10 : 1.

QUESTION: 13

A fruit seller sells an apple, an orange, a mango and a peach at loss of 10%, loss of 40%, profit of 20% and profit of 50% respectively. Let the loss made on an apple and an orange together be as much as in amount as the profit made on a mango and a peach together. Suppose you have the money to buy one apple and four oranges. But instead you buy five peaches. How many mangoes can you buy with the rest of the money?

Solution:

Let the cost prices of an apple, an orange, a mango and a peach be w, x, y and z respectively

►Then  0.1 w + 0.4 x = 0.2 y + 0.5 z, w + 4x = 2y + 5z

►Now the amount we have = 0.9w + 0.6 × 4x .
►Let the required number of mangoes we can buy be n, then 0.9w + 2.4x = 1.2yn + 1.5z × 5, 0.9 w + 2.4 x = 1.2 y n + 1.5 (w + 4x – 2y
=> (3 – 1.2n) y = 0.6w + 3.6x.
Therefore, n cannot be determined.

QUESTION: 14

If x,y,z are positive real numbers, find the value of x + y / z if 28 x 332  x 32 x 7(x + y + z) + 323 + 519 = 24 x 3y3 x 2x2  x 25 x 324 x 78 x 5z2 + 1.

Solution:

 ► 28 x 332  x 32 x 7(x + y + z) + 323 + 519 = 24 x 3y3 x 2x2  x 25 x 324 x 78 x 5z2 + 1.
simplifies to give
 ► x2 + 4 = 13 , 
 ► y3+16 = 17
 ► z2 + 3 = 19
which gives x = 3; y = 1 and z = 4
  ► = (x + y) / z
  ► = 1

QUESTION: 15

In a trapezium, it was found that the sum of the squares of the diagonals is less than the sum of the squares of the sides by 196. If the shorter of the parallel sides is 8cm, what is the length of the longer of the parallel sides?

Solution:


Let the trapezium be ABCD, with AB and CD being the parallel sides. 
Let the lengths of the sides and the height be as shown in the above diagram.
By Pythagoras theorem,
  ► AD2 = a2 + b2
  ► BC2 = a2 + c2
  ► AC2 = a2 + (8 + c)2 (From △  AEC)
  ► BD2 = a2 + (8+b)2 (From △ BFD)
Given, 
   ► AC2 + BD2 = AB2 + BC2 + CD2 + DA2 − 196
   ► a2 + 64 + c2 + 16c + a2 + 64 + b2 + 16b = 64 + a2 + c2 + b2 + c2 + 64 + 2bc + 16c +  16b + a2 + b2 −196
   ► c2 + b2 + 2bc = 196
   ► => b + c = 14
   ► => length of longer side = b + c + 8 = 14 + 8 = 22cm

QUESTION: 16

If α and β are the roots of the equation x2 + 5x + 3 = 0, then (α + 3/α + 3)3 + (β + 3/β + 1)3 = ?

Solution:

α is the root of the equation x2 + 5x + 3 = 0 
=> α2 + 5α + 3 = 0 
=> α + 5 + 3 / β = 0 
=> α + 3 + 3 / β = -2
β is the root of the equation x2 + 5x + 3 = 0
=> β2 + 5β + 3 = 0 
=> β + 5 + 3 / β = 0
=> β + 1 + 3 / β ​= −4
So (α + 3 + 3/β)3 + (β + 3/β + 1)3
= (-2)3 + (-4)3 = -72

QUESTION: 17

Ram and Shyam went out shopping one day. A gift store had an object which was offered at 16.66% discount, was also marked 1.5 times its actual cost. Ram bought it and paid 40 rupees more than Shyam's whole day expense which was Rs 460. What was the cost price of the object?

Solution:

Ram paid 40 more than Shyam.
Ram's total expense = 460 + 40 = 500.
Let the CP be x,
Now,
    ► ⇒ (100 - 16.66)% of 150% of x = 500
    ► ⇒ (5 / 6) * (3 / 2) * x = 500
    ► ⇒ 5 / 4 * x = 500
    ► ⇒ x = 4/5 * 500
    ► ⇒ x = Rs.400

QUESTION: 18

How many 3 digit numbers, with digits a,b,c in the hundreds, tens and units place respectively, are there such that a < b < c ?

Solution:

Total number of ways of selecting 3 numbers out of 10 numbers is 10c3 = 120
We can arrange a < b < c in 120 ways
Now we also included a case where a = 0 so, number of ways when a = 0 is 9c2.
∴ Total ways = 10c3 - 9c2 = 84

QUESTION: 19

Ganesh and Kapil went for an adventure that included a vertical flight from a point on the ground. Ganesh took the photos of Kapil while he was flying. He stood some meters away from Kapil at the time of Kapil's flight. Kapil started flying up at a constant speed. Ganesh captured his two photos when Kapil was at angles of 30 and 60 degree w.r.t ground. In the first photo, Kapil was 100 meters up from the ground but his elevation in his later photo was not known. But it is known that time gap in both the photos was 20 seconds. What was the speed at which Kapil was going up?

Solution:


Let Ganesh's distance from Kapil = x;
at the time of first photo;
tan 30  = 100​ / x
1 / √3​ = 100 / x
x = 100√3​
at the time of next photo,
tan 60 = 

y + 100 = 100√3​ × √3​
y = 300 - 100
y = 200
As the gap was 20 seconds, speed = y / 20 m/s = 200 / 20 m/s 
= 10 m/s
= 36 km/hr​

QUESTION: 20

A food study based on a multi-cultural society of 1000 people was carried and the people were asked to choose at most 3 out of Indian, Italian and Chinese food. 450 people who liked only 1 type of food were distributed among Indian, Italian and Chinese in the ratio 4 : 3 : 2. People who liked all and none were 40 and 300 respectively. If people who liked exactly 2 food types were symmetrically distributed, how many people liked exactly Indian and Chinese ?

Solution:


450 in rato 4 : 3 : 2 is 200,150,100 respectively. So , 450 + 40 + exactly 2 = 1000 - 300.
Therefore, exactly 2 = 210 
As exactly 2 people are uniformly divided so 3x = 210, x = 70.

QUESTION: 21

One man travels 180 kilometres in a motorboat from Mathura to Delhi with the flow of the river and comes back the next day against the flow of the river. What is the speed of flow, if it takes 2.4 hours more while coming back? (assume speed of motorboat = 40 km/hr)

Solution:

In upstream speed = 40 - x
In downstream speed = 40 + x
Now equating time
    ► 180 / (40 + x) + 2.4 = 180 / (40 - x)
    ► x = 10

QUESTION: 22

A water tank has 2 inlet and 1 outlet pipe attached to it. Inlet pipes individually require 5 and 10 hours respectively to fill the tank and outlet pipe requires 4 hours to empty the full tank. All pipes were opened for 15 hours. Later outlet pipe and smaller inlet pipe were closed. How much more time is required to fill the tank completely?

Solution:

There are 3 pipes;
If one pipe fills a water tank in x hours; Work done by the pipe in 1 hour is 1 / x.
So work done by 3 pipes I1 (5 hours inlet), I2 (10 hours inlet), I3 (4 hours outlet) be 1 / 5, 1 / 10 and -1 / 4.
So total work done by all pipes in 1 hour = 1 / 5 + 1 / 10 - 1 / 4 = 1 / 20.
Work done by all pipes after 15 hours = 15 / 20 = 3 / 4
Work left = 1 / 4
Now we have only I1 to fill the rest of tank which is 1 / 4 empty of its capacity.
Time taken by I1 = total work/ work done by I1 in 1 hour = (1 / 4)/(1 / 5) = 5 / 4 hours
= 1 hour and 15 minutes

QUESTION: 23

If no of points of intersection of e-x2  with ∣x∣ + ∣y∣ = 1 and ∣x∣ + ∣y∣ = 2 are a and b respectively. What is the value of a + b?

Solution:


As the graph depicts; a + b = 2 + 1 = 3

QUESTION: 24

If three friends A, B and C invested Rs 10000, Rs 12000, Rs 15000 respectively at rates 10%, 5%, and 8% respectively for 2 years. After 2 years, A added Rs 4000 to his total sum, B took out all his money and C withdrew Rs 7400 from his total sum. All the rates were constant in 3rd year too. What is their ratio of profit after 3 years?

Solution:

After 2 years ,
sum
A = 10000 + (10000 * .1 * 2) = 12000
B = 12000 + (12000 * .05 * 2) = 13200
C = 15000 + (15000 * .08 * 2) = 17400
profit
A = 2000
B = 1200
C = 2400
Investment for 3rd year=
A = 12000 + 4000 =16000
B = 0
C = 17400 - 7400 = 10000
Profit in 3rd year 
A = 16000*.1 = 1600
C = 10000*.08 = 800
Total profit in 3 years,
A : B : C :: 3600 : 1200 : 3200
Therefore, A : B : C :: 9 : 3 : 8

QUESTION: 25

P(x, y) = x2 + y2 + 3x2y + 3xy2 and Q(x,y) = x2 − y + x2y − x. Find Q(4, P(2, 3))

Solution:

► P(2, 3) = 4 + 9 + 3(4)(3) + 3(2)(9) = 103
► Q(4, 103) = 16 - 103 +16(103) - 4 = 1557

QUESTION: 26

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

I could tolerate and indeed liked a somewhat higher level of noise and activity in my class. But this posed me a problem. I wanted to give children plenty of chance to talk to each other and enjoy each other's company. But children are excitable and tend to get carried away. I needed a way to control the noise. So I invented the Q. So when I wanted quiet I would write a capital Q in a corner of the blackboard. When it was up, the standard school rule went into effect: no talking unless you raise your hand and get permission.
When I first put the Q on the board, in the corner, I drew a little box around it. Children being great lawyers, they began to argue that the Q was not officially on the board until the box had been drawn. I agreed to that. And then, slowly, the children invented or developed a delightful custom. When I began to write the Q they would all make some kind of hum or murmur or sound, which would get louder and louder, rising to a shriek as I boxed in the Q with a flourish. But as soon as my chalk hit the edge of the blackboard, completing the box, dead silence. Now and then I wondered, whether I ought to take some steps about that pre-Q shriek. But I didn't. In the first place, I loved it; in the second place, I realized, at first intuitively, later with much thought, that the shriek was part of what made the Q work--and it worked very well. It was the children's way of making that Q theirs as well as mine, and because it was theirs as well as mine, they respected it.
Only once did the children test the Q. One day when the Q was up, some of the bolder students, including some of my special favorites, began to talk a lot. I began frantically writing down marks. Other children saw what was happening, and began to talk as well. Mutiny! The game began to be, see how fast we can make Mr. Holt write down marks. I stopped everything and gave the class a little speech, about like this: "Look, everyone, I know what's happening here. You're trying to find out whether you can wreck the Q system, and the answer is, of course you can. It only works because basically you think it's a pretty fair and sensible system and are willing to let it work. The only thing is, if we lose the Q system, what are we going to put in its place? I'll have to control it the way the other teachers try to, which is not to let you talk at all."

Q. What would have been the behaviour change of the kids after listening to the sermon of the last paragraph?

Solution:

The students thought it was fair as they did adhere to the Q system.

►Though option B states a fact that is correct the question asks us what  has been the behaviour change of the kids.

►Hence option A is the answer.

►The children adhered to the Q system because they could talk in the class so they would not want to go to the conventional school system.

QUESTION: 27

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

I could tolerate and indeed liked a somewhat higher level of noise and activity in my class. But this posed me a problem. I wanted to give children plenty of chance to talk to each other and enjoy each other's company. But children are excitable and tend to get carried away. I needed a way to control the noise. So I invented the Q. So when I wanted quiet I would write a capital Q in a corner of the blackboard. When it was up, the standard school rule went into effect: no talking unless you raise your hand and get permission.
When I first put the Q on the board, in the corner, I drew a little box around it. Children being great lawyers, they began to argue that the Q was not officially on the board until the box had been drawn. I agreed to that. And then, slowly, the children invented or developed a delightful custom. When I began to write the Q they would all make some kind of hum or murmur or sound, which would get louder and louder, rising to a shriek as I boxed in the Q with a flourish. But as soon as my chalk hit the edge of the blackboard, completing the box, dead silence. Now and then I wondered, whether I ought to take some steps about that pre-Q shriek. But I didn't. In the first place, I loved it; in the second place, I realized, at first intuitively, later with much thought, that the shriek was part of what made the Q work--and it worked very well. It was the children's way of making that Q theirs as well as mine, and because it was theirs as well as mine, they respected it.
Only once did the children test the Q. One day when the Q was up, some of the bolder students, including some of my special favorites, began to talk a lot. I began frantically writing down marks. Other children saw what was happening, and began to talk as well. Mutiny! The game began to be, see how fast we can make Mr. Holt write down marks. I stopped everything and gave the class a little speech, about like this: "Look, everyone, I know what's happening here. You're trying to find out whether you can wreck the Q system, and the answer is, of course you can. It only works because basically you think it's a pretty fair and sensible system and are willing to let it work. The only thing is, if we lose the Q system, what are we going to put in its place? I'll have to control it the way the other teachers try to, which is not to let you talk at all." 

Q. Based on a reading of the passage, complete the following:
Later, realizing that much of the time what I wanted was quiet, not silence, I modified the Q.

Solution:

As what the author wanted was quiet and not silence, he would be quite happy if the children whispered sometimes instead of being completely silent. The shrieks were noises and would not be appreciated by the author at all. 

►If the Q is not written there was a lot of noise.

►Moreover the question states that the author modified the Q, which meant he didn’t discard it.

QUESTION: 28

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

I could tolerate and indeed liked a somewhat higher level of noise and activity in my class. But this posed me a problem. I wanted to give children plenty of chance to talk to each other and enjoy each other's company. But children are excitable and tend to get carried away. I needed a way to control the noise. So I invented the Q. So when I wanted quiet I would write a capital Q in a corner of the blackboard. When it was up, the standard school rule went into effect: no talking unless you raise your hand and get permission.
When I first put the Q on the board, in the corner, I drew a little box around it. Children being great lawyers, they began to argue that the Q was not officially on the board until the box had been drawn. I agreed to that. And then, slowly, the children invented or developed a delightful custom. When I began to write the Q they would all make some kind of hum or murmur or sound, which would get louder and louder, rising to a shriek as I boxed in the Q with a flourish. But as soon as my chalk hit the edge of the blackboard, completing the box, dead silence. Now and then I wondered, whether I ought to take some steps about that pre-Q shriek. But I didn't. In the first place, I loved it; in the second place, I realized, at first intuitively, later with much thought, that the shriek was part of what made the Q work--and it worked very well. It was the children's way of making that Q theirs as well as mine, and because it was theirs as well as mine, they respected it.
Only once did the children test the Q. One day when the Q was up, some of the bolder students, including some of my special favorites, began to talk a lot. I began frantically writing down marks. Other children saw what was happening, and began to talk as well. Mutiny! The game began to be, see how fast we can make Mr. Holt write down marks. I stopped everything and gave the class a little speech, about like this: "Look, everyone, I know what's happening here. You're trying to find out whether you can wreck the Q system, and the answer is, of course you can. It only works because basically you think it's a pretty fair and sensible system and are willing to let it work. The only thing is, if we lose the Q system, what are we going to put in its place? I'll have to control it the way the other teachers try to, which is not to let you talk at all." 

Q. In the first paragraph, when the author qualifies the school rule with the adjective standard, which of the following standard dictionary definitions would fit the meaning best?

Solution:

The school rules were standards which though not the best were okay for the functioning of the school.

Hence acceptable but of a lower quality.

QUESTION: 29

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently issued a report that said, “Greenhouse gas forcing has very likely (>90 percent) caused most of the observed global warming over the last 50 years.” Many climate doubters and global warming deniers have raised some se­rious questions about the 90 percent figure.
Due to these doubts, government representatives were allowed to vote on and revise the IPCC sum­maries, no matter what the data said. As a direct result, China (think coal) and Saudi Arabia (oil) got to veto anything they didn't like. The United States (think do nothing) also had line-by-line veto power.. The deniers call this “politicized Science” and say that the IPCC summaries were just one big, exaggeration, when in fact the reverse is true. They are at most surely understated. It would be like giving a convicted thief a say over the wording of the laws that govern theft. You can bet the final text would go light on thievery. So goes the politicized UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. While politicized science (an oxymoron if there ever was one) is watered down and conveniently misleading, the real science of global climate change is well understood, and its acceptance in the rigorous world of peer- reviewed science is all but universal. How does global warming work? Well, it can be explained in a simple way.
Certain gases carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxide (N2O), methane,(CH4), and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) of all kinds--act like blankets thrown across the globe. They trap heat near the earth’s surface. As atmospheric con­centrations of these gases increase, the blanket thickens and global tempera­tures increase. Business, industry, and you and I and everyone else emit about nine billion tons of carbon into the air each year, including the effect, of deforesta­tion. We do it when we start our cars. We do it when we turn on our lights or burn coal to run a generating station. The earth can capture and sequester about 3.7 billion tons of anthropogenic carbon per year. The difference between what we emit mid what the earth can absorb is 9.0 – 3.7 = 5.3 billion tons excess carbon per year. That 5.3 billion tons goes into the atmosphere and stays there, increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 by 2 or 3 parts per million each year. Unchecked that CO2 will rise and pass that red line that our best scien­tists believe is out there in the vicinity of 450 pm, which will induce a global average temperature change of two degrees Centigrade (3.8 Fahrenheit). .
Also, the world’s oceans and forests are absorbing less of the CO2 released by human activity, adding to the faster rise in atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases. Deforestation is a two-edge sword, as sinks shrinks and CO2 releases from them increase. The ability of ocean to take up carbon decline with warming and acidification and CO2 in water yields carbonic acid, which also threatens any creature that makes a shell. Warming temperatures have prompted earlier springs in the far north and have caused plant species to spread farther into formerly, icy terrain. Meanwhile, summer sea ice in the Artic reached a record low this year. Through melting sea levels, larger expanses of blue Ocean reduce the earth’s albedo (its reflectivity), resulting in greater heat absorption. Also, as forests die and crop¬lands succumb to encroaching deserts, they too are taken of the board as carbon absorbers. As vast regions of tundra and permafrost warm melt they release enormous amount of methane - a greenhouse gas many times, more potent than simple carbon dioxide. Here's the takeaway message: Atmospheric concentrations will continue to increase until the gases we send into the air and the earth’s ability to absorb those gases come into balance.
If we have to sum up the situation, we are emitting nearly three times as much greenhouse gases as the earth is able to absorb. It should be obvious from those numbers that we cannot avoid crossing those  red lines by planting more trees, because there simply is not enough Land. We must reduce our fossil fuel use to reduce the billions of excess tons of carbon we belch into Air. The crisis-climate change-is very real. That is why we, in the developed nations, need to get our act together on this, to show some real leadership, and to seize insurmountable opportunities. But before we can preach the gospel to the world, we need to put our own house in order. We must turn a deaf ear to the voices assuring us, ‘Everything will be fine, don’t worry! It’s all under control!’ That’s the sort of fatal message that kept card players at the tilting tables in the grand salon of the Titanic. Denial is deadly.

Q. Which of the following statements is false?

Solution:

There is an imbalance in emissions and absorption of green house gases. Hence statement 1 is incorrect.

Option 2 is clearly mentioned in the starting of the 4th paragraph.

Option 3 is clearly mentioned in the 4th paragraph.  

►Ocean''s capacity decreases with increasing temperature.Hence statement 4 is correct

QUESTION: 30

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently issued a report that said, “Greenhouse gas forcing has very likely (>90 percent) caused most of the observed global warming over the last 50 years.” Many climate doubters and global warming deniers have raised some se­rious questions about the 90 percent figure.
Due to these doubts, government representatives were allowed to vote on and revise the IPCC sum­maries, no matter what the data said. As a direct result, China (think coal) and Saudi Arabia (oil) got to veto anything they didn't like. The United States (think do nothing) also had line-by-line veto power.. The deniers call this “politicized Science” and say that the IPCC summaries were just one big, exaggeration, when in fact the reverse is true. They are at most surely understated. It would be like giving a convicted thief a say over the wording of the laws that govern theft. You can bet the final text would go light on thievery. So goes the politicized UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. While politicized science (an oxymoron if there ever was one) is watered down and conveniently misleading, the real science of global climate change is well understood, and its acceptance in the rigorous world of peer- reviewed science is all but universal. How does global warming work? Well, it can be explained in a simple way.
Certain gases carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxide (N2O), methane,(CH4), and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) of all kinds--act like blankets thrown across the globe. They trap heat near the earth’s surface. As atmospheric con­centrations of these gases increase, the blanket thickens and global tempera­tures increase. Business, industry, and you and I and everyone else emit about nine billion tons of carbon into the air each year, including the effect, of deforesta­tion. We do it when we start our cars. We do it when we turn on our lights or burn coal to run a generating station. The earth can capture and sequester about 3.7 billion tons of anthropogenic carbon per year. The difference between what we emit mid what the earth can absorb is 9.0 – 3.7 = 5.3 billion tons excess carbon per year. That 5.3 billion tons goes into the atmosphere and stays there, increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 by 2 or 3 parts per million each year. Unchecked that CO2 will rise and pass that red line that our best scien­tists believe is out there in the vicinity of 450 pm, which will induce a global average temperature change of two degrees Centigrade (3.8 Fahrenheit). .
Also, the world’s oceans and forests are absorbing less of the CO2 released by human activity, adding to the faster rise in atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases. Deforestation is a two-edge sword, as sinks shrinks and CO2 releases from them increase. The ability of ocean to take up carbon decline with warming and acidification and CO2 in water yields carbonic acid, which also threatens any creature that makes a shell. Warming temperatures have prompted earlier springs in the far north and have caused plant species to spread farther into formerly, icy terrain. Meanwhile, summer sea ice in the Artic reached a record low this year. Through melting sea levels, larger expanses of blue Ocean reduce the earth’s albedo (its reflectivity), resulting in greater heat absorption. Also, as forests die and crop¬lands succumb to encroaching deserts, they too are taken of the board as carbon absorbers. As vast regions of tundra and permafrost warm melt they release enormous amount of methane - a greenhouse gas many times, more potent than simple carbon dioxide. Here's the takeaway message: Atmospheric concentrations will continue to increase until the gases we send into the air and the earth’s ability to absorb those gases come into balance.
If we have to sum up the situation, we are emitting nearly three times as much greenhouse gases as the earth is able to absorb. It should be obvious from those numbers that we cannot avoid crossing those  red lines by planting more trees, because there simply is not enough Land. We must reduce our fossil fuel use to reduce the billions of excess tons of carbon we belch into Air. The crisis-climate change-is very real. That is why we, in the developed nations, need to get our act together on this, to show some real leadership, and to seize insurmountable opportunities. But before we can preach the gospel to the world, we need to put our own house in order. We must turn a deaf ear to the voices assuring us, ‘Everything will be fine, don’t worry! It’s all under control!’ That’s the sort of fatal message that kept card players at the tilting tables in the grand salon of the Titanic. Denial is deadly.

Q. Why has ‘politicized science’ been referred to as an oxymoron?

Solution:

Oxymoron means a combination of two paradoxical terms.
Science is something fact based and quantifiable while politics (in context of passage) by various countries has diluted the scientific findings and hence it no more remains fact based, rather based on whims and political exigencies of various countries.

QUESTION: 31

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently issued a report that said, “Greenhouse gas forcing has very likely (>90 percent) caused most of the observed global warming over the last 50 years.” Many climate doubters and global warming deniers have raised some se­rious questions about the 90 percent figure.
Due to these doubts, government representatives were allowed to vote on and revise the IPCC sum­maries, no matter what the data said. As a direct result, China (think coal) and Saudi Arabia (oil) got to veto anything they didn't like. The United States (think do nothing) also had line-by-line veto power.. The deniers call this “politicized Science” and say that the IPCC summaries were just one big, exaggeration, when in fact the reverse is true. They are at most surely understated. It would be like giving a convicted thief a say over the wording of the laws that govern theft. You can bet the final text would go light on thievery. So goes the politicized UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. While politicized science (an oxymoron if there ever was one) is watered down and conveniently misleading, the real science of global climate change is well understood, and its acceptance in the rigorous world of peer- reviewed science is all but universal. How does global warming work? Well, it can be explained in a simple way.
Certain gases carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxide (N2O), methane,(CH4), and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) of all kinds--act like blankets thrown across the globe. They trap heat near the earth’s surface. As atmospheric con­centrations of these gases increase, the blanket thickens and global tempera­tures increase. Business, industry, and you and I and everyone else emit about nine billion tons of carbon into the air each year, including the effect, of deforesta­tion. We do it when we start our cars. We do it when we turn on our lights or burn coal to run a generating station. The earth can capture and sequester about 3.7 billion tons of anthropogenic carbon per year. The difference between what we emit mid what the earth can absorb is 9.0 – 3.7 = 5.3 billion tons excess carbon per year. That 5.3 billion tons goes into the atmosphere and stays there, increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 by 2 or 3 parts per million each year. Unchecked that CO2 will rise and pass that red line that our best scien­tists believe is out there in the vicinity of 450 pm, which will induce a global average temperature change of two degrees Centigrade (3.8 Fahrenheit). .
Also, the world’s oceans and forests are absorbing less of the CO2 released by human activity, adding to the faster rise in atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases. Deforestation is a two-edge sword, as sinks shrinks and CO2 releases from them increase. The ability of ocean to take up carbon decline with warming and acidification and CO2 in water yields carbonic acid, which also threatens any creature that makes a shell. Warming temperatures have prompted earlier springs in the far north and have caused plant species to spread farther into formerly, icy terrain. Meanwhile, summer sea ice in the Artic reached a record low this year. Through melting sea levels, larger expanses of blue Ocean reduce the earth’s albedo (its reflectivity), resulting in greater heat absorption. Also, as forests die and crop¬lands succumb to encroaching deserts, they too are taken of the board as carbon absorbers. As vast regions of tundra and permafrost warm melt they release enormous amount of methane - a greenhouse gas many times, more potent than simple carbon dioxide. Here's the takeaway message: Atmospheric concentrations will continue to increase until the gases we send into the air and the earth’s ability to absorb those gases come into balance.
If we have to sum up the situation, we are emitting nearly three times as much greenhouse gases as the earth is able to absorb. It should be obvious from those numbers that we cannot avoid crossing those  red lines by planting more trees, because there simply is not enough Land. We must reduce our fossil fuel use to reduce the billions of excess tons of carbon we belch into Air. The crisis-climate change-is very real. That is why we, in the developed nations, need to get our act together on this, to show some real leadership, and to seize insurmountable opportunities. But before we can preach the gospel to the world, we need to put our own house in order. We must turn a deaf ear to the voices assuring us, ‘Everything will be fine, don’t worry! It’s all under control!’ That’s the sort of fatal message that kept card players at the tilting tables in the grand salon of the Titanic. Denial is deadly.

Q. What is the author trying to achieve through this passage?

Solution:

The main purpose of passage is to bring to the notice various factors leading to reduced carbon sequestration, increasing carbon emissions and some of the adaptation measures.Option 4 states the same. 

Option 1 is not the main idea as its purpose is to highlight how the problem of climate change is handled at IPCC level. Option 2 is clearly wrong.

Option 3 is also a wrong statement as passage talks about reducing fossil fuels usage and not eliminating them completely and in any case it is not the main idea

QUESTION: 32

DIRECTIONS for the question:  Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Come with me to Kiebera: the largest shantytown in sub-Saharan Africa. More than 500,000 people live in this vast illegal section of Nairobi, in mud huts on mud streets, with no fresh water or sanitation. Walk down Kiebera's sodden pathways and you'll see a great deal of hunger, poverty, and disease. But you'll also find health clinics, beauty salons, grocery stores, bars, restaurants, tailors, clothiers, churches, and schools. In the midst of squalor and open sewage, business is booming.
Indeed, Kiebera's underground economy is so vibrant that it has produced its own squatter millionaire, someone I have known for years. From his start a generation ago selling cigarettes and biscuits from the window of his hut, this Kenyan (he asked to remain unnamed) has assembled an empire that includes pharmacies, groceries, bars, beverage-distribution outlets, transportation and manufacturing firms, and even real estate.
Families flock to Kiebera for the same reason country folk have always migrated to the city - in search of opportunity. In the city they find work but not a place to live. So they build illegally on land they don't own. There are a billion squatters in the world today, almost one in six people on the planet. And their numbers are on the rise. Current projections are that by 2030 there will be two billion squatters, and by 2050, three billion, better than one in three people on the planet.
In itself, it is nothing to worry about, for squatting has long had a positive role in urban development. Many urban neighbourhoods in Europe and North America began as squatter outposts. London and Paris boasted huge swaths of mud-and-stick homes, even during the glory years of the British and French monarchies. Squatters were a significant force in most U.S. cities too. It would no doubt surprise residents paying millions for co-op apartments on Manhattens' Upper East and West Sides to know that squatters occupied much of the turf under their buildings until the start of the 20th century.

Q. The author argues that Kiebera becoming the shantytown is not unusual because

Solution:

(Refer to para1 )The rest are not the reasons for the phenomenon mentioned, they are just secondary facts.

QUESTION: 33

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Come with me to Kiebera: the largest shantytown in sub-Saharan Africa. More than 500,000 people live in this vast illegal section of Nairobi, in mud huts on mud streets, with no fresh water or sanitation. Walk down Kiebera's sodden pathways and you'll see a great deal of hunger, poverty, and disease. But you'll also find health clinics, beauty salons, grocery stores, bars, restaurants, tailors, clothiers, churches, and schools. In the midst of squalor and open sewage, business is booming.
Indeed, Kiebera's underground economy is so vibrant that it has produced its own squatter millionaire, someone I have known for years. From his start a generation ago selling cigarettes and biscuits from the window of his hut, this Kenyan (he asked to remain unnamed) has assembled an empire that includes pharmacies, groceries, bars, beverage-distribution outlets, transportation and manufacturing firms, and even real estate.
Families flock to Kiebera for the same reason country folk have always migrated to the city - in search of opportunity. In the city they find work but not a place to live. So they build illegally on land they don't own. There are a billion squatters in the world today, almost one in six people on the planet. And their numbers are on the rise. Current projections are that by 2030 there will be two billion squatters, and by 2050, three billion, better than one in three people on the planet.
In itself, it is nothing to worry about, for squatting has long had a positive role in urban development. Many urban neighbourhoods in Europe and North America began as squatter outposts. London and Paris boasted huge swaths of mud-and-stick homes, even during the glory years of the British and French monarchies. Squatters were a significant force in most U.S. cities too. It would no doubt surprise residents paying millions for co-op apartments on Manhattens' Upper East and West Sides to know that squatters occupied much of the turf under their buildings until the start of the 20th century.

Q. The prosperity of Kiebera's underground economy is described by the author through

Solution:

The prosperity of Kiebera''s underground is described through the description of Kiebera .
(Line 4,para1),"But you will also find health clinics,beauty saloons,grocery stores,bars..............,business is booming".

QUESTION: 34

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Come with me to Kiebera: the largest shantytown in sub-Saharan Africa. More than 500,000 people live in this vast illegal section of Nairobi, in mud huts on mud streets, with no fresh water or sanitation. Walk down Kiebera's sodden pathways and you'll see a great deal of hunger, poverty, and disease. But you'll also find health clinics, beauty salons, grocery stores, bars, restaurants, tailors, clothiers, churches, and schools. In the midst of squalor and open sewage, business is booming.
Indeed, Kiebera's underground economy is so vibrant that it has produced its own squatter millionaire, someone I have known for years. From his start a generation ago selling cigarettes and biscuits from the window of his hut, this Kenyan (he asked to remain unnamed) has assembled an empire that includes pharmacies, groceries, bars, beverage-distribution outlets, transportation and manufacturing firms, and even real estate.
Families flock to Kiebera for the same reason country folk have always migrated to the city - in search of opportunity. In the city they find work but not a place to live. So they build illegally on land they don't own. There are a billion squatters in the world today, almost one in six people on the planet. And their numbers are on the rise. Current projections are that by 2030 there will be two billion squatters, and by 2050, three billion, better than one in three people on the planet.
In itself, it is nothing to worry about, for squatting has long had a positive role in urban development. Many urban neighbourhoods in Europe and North America began as squatter outposts. London and Paris boasted huge swaths of mud-and-stick homes, even during the glory years of the British and French monarchies. Squatters were a significant force in most U.S. cities too. It would no doubt surprise residents paying millions for co-op apartments on Manhattens' Upper East and West Sides to know that squatters occupied much of the turf under their buildings until the start of the 20th century.

Q. The author puts forward the thesis that

Solution:

Refer para 3 of passage,"There are billion of squatters in the world today,almost one in six people on the planet ...................................... ...... one in three people on the planet".

QUESTION: 35

Read the following passage and answer the following question.

It is no surprise that the whip is synonymous with New World slavery: its continual crack remained an audible threat to enslaved workers to keep at their work, reminding them that their lives and bodies were not their own, and that they should maintain (outwardly at least) a demeanour of dutiful subordination to their overlords. The whip was a cruel and effective instrument of torture - part of the brutal technology that kept the productive machine of plantation America at work. Nowhere was this more obvious than on the islands of the Caribbean. By the middle of the 18th century, these were the most valuable parts of the British empire, and the large island of Jamaica, with its huge sugar plantations and brutal slave regime, was the jewel in the imperial crown.
As elsewhere in the Americas, the right of masters in Jamaica to punish slaves was enshrined in law, and the violence that sustained slavery went far beyond whipping. Punishments could include amputation, disfiguring, branding and more. Slaves could also be put to death - a penalty most often enforced during the aftermath of rebellions. And they were rarely killed quickly. The torturous executions meted out to those who led uprisings or who were accused of collaborating in rebellious plots provide some of the most lurid examples of human cruelty on record.
But physical abuse alone could not keep the lucrative plantations of the British Caribbean productive. It is impossible to get large groups of people to perform sustained labour effectively and consistently for years on end simply through doling out pain and raw terror. Even the most brutal of slaveholders were therefore compelled to develop a sophisticated system of management that exploited the most human aspirations and fears of the people they dominated.
Creating divisions between slaves was essential to this. Enslaved people outnumbered free whites in the British Caribbean. In Jamaica the ratio was higher than 10 to one, and on some big plantations it was about 100 to one. Managers therefore needed to divide slaves in order to rule over them. The slave trade from Africa provided them with one opportunity. As a manager of several large Jamaican sugar estates remarked in 1804, it was a general policy to ‘have the Negroes on an estate a mixture of nations so as to balance one set against another, to be sure of having two-thirds join the whites’ (in the event of an uprising). The theory behind this was that enslaved people from one African ‘nation’ would refuse to join rebellions plotted by those from others, or by creole (locally born) slaves, choosing instead to serve their white masters in the hope of rewards for loyal service.
Privileging some enslaved people above others was another effective means of sowing discord. Slaveholders encouraged complex social hierarchies on the plantations that amounted to something like a system of ‘class’. At the top of plantation slave communities in the sugar colonies of the Caribbean were skilled men, trained up at the behest of white managers to become sugar boilers, blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, masons and drivers. Such men were, in general, materially better-off than field slaves (most of whom were women), and they tended to live longer.
The most important members of this enslaved elite were the drivers, responsible for enforcing discipline and work routines among the other enslaved workers. These men were essential to effective plantation management - a conduit for orders and, sometimes, for negotiations between white overseers and the massed ranks of field workers. They were also among the strongest survivors of the system.
The privileges conferred on the enslaved elite came in several forms: better food, more food, better clothing, more clothing, better and bigger housing, even the prospect (in some rare cases) that a master might use his last will and testament to free them. It could even be demonstrated in a name. The ledgers are dominated by lists of people identified only by a single diminutive slave name, conferred on them by plantation managers: page after page of Nancys, Marys, Sallys, Junos, Eves, and Venuses; of Toms and Joes, Hectors and Hamlets, Londons and Dublins.
The Anglican Church was one of the pillars of the white establishment in Jamaica, and so being baptised into it conferred prestige. None of this meant that the enslaved elite was being invited to live as the equals of their white masters. Far from it. But slaveholders evidently knew that things such as smarter clothes, superior nutrition, the occasional drink of ‘port wine’, or even initiation into the rigidly hierarchical Anglican communion could help to diminish the prospect of successful open resistance. This, coupled with the inevitably grisly consequences of a failed rebellion, helped to persuade large numbers of enslaved people to attempt to survive their ordeal by negotiating within the system.
The various privileges extended to the enslaved elite helped to create a conservative attitude among some - keen to protect what they had gained. They also produced an aspirational culture, of sorts, within the slave community - a bleak and tragic shadow of the ‘American dream’ of independence and riches that motivated the slaveholders. Those slaves who lived long enough and were not physically or psychologically broken by plantation work could aim to join the ranks of the skilled, privileged plantation elite. And there is evidence that those who won the favour of white managers and avoided fieldwork cherished those advantages. One slave in Barbados even killed his successor, and then committed suicide when a white manager stripped him of his job as a watchman.
Such stories upset common assumptions about slavery - and about slaves. In the popular imagination and in much historical scholarship, there has been a tendency to perceive enslaved people either as downtrodden victims or as romantic rebels: we often prefer to think of slaves as having been innocent drudges, suffering inescapable torments, or as brave resisters and rebels, taking decisive action against their oppressors. It is a contradictory simplification. The bland confining categories of ‘victim’ or ‘rebel’ (or even ‘collaborator’) cannot properly capture the experiences or choices of enslaved people, including those of drivers, of enslaved Anglican converts, or of a thwarted Barbadian watchman.
Those people show us, instead, that slavery was as complex as it was cruel. Negotiating its grim realities required determination and skill, even selfishness; and it was next to impossible to endure without making compromises of one kind or other. All enslaved people - from newly trafficked Africans to seasoned field workers; from children forced to work as soon as they could use a small hoe, to experienced drivers such as Reid - responded to their predicaments in ordinary ways, albeit under extraordinary pressures. They did what they could to keep alive and, if possible, to capitalise on scant opportunities within the system in which they were trapped.
And their stories remind us that they were all trapped. However complex and divided the slave community, however many people we find who were able carve out precarious positions of relative comfort, we find them struggling to live within a system designed to promote disunity, anxiety and fear. Even the most valued of drivers could be demoted on a whim. Some brave or desperate souls chose to flee. But the fine-tuned system of divide and rule helped to deter all but the most determined of rebels.
Before the late-18th century, the sophisticated and cruel management strategies of white slaveholders were highly effective: overt challenges to white authority foundered, and slave-run sugar plantations prospered. It was only with the outbreak of the Haitian Revolution in 1791 and the growing influence of humanitarian campaigning that the inner workings of the British slave system began to buckle and break, as enslaved people in the Caribbean seized new opportunities to undermine the world that the slaveholders had made.

Q. What is the primary purpose of the passage?

Solution:

In the passage, the author has explained the many ways that slaveowners adopted to control their slaves. Also, the author has thrown light on the obscure complexity of slavery which was a fallout of the various tactics played on the slaves by the owners. Option A is the most relevant in this context.

QUESTION: 36

Read the following passage and answer the following question.

It is no surprise that the whip is synonymous with New World slavery: its continual crack remained an audible threat to enslaved workers to keep at their work, reminding them that their lives and bodies were not their own, and that they should maintain (outwardly at least) a demeanour of dutiful subordination to their overlords. The whip was a cruel and effective instrument of torture - part of the brutal technology that kept the productive machine of plantation America at work. Nowhere was this more obvious than on the islands of the Caribbean. By the middle of the 18th century, these were the most valuable parts of the British empire, and the large island of Jamaica, with its huge sugar plantations and brutal slave regime, was the jewel in the imperial crown.
As elsewhere in the Americas, the right of masters in Jamaica to punish slaves was enshrined in law, and the violence that sustained slavery went far beyond whipping. Punishments could include amputation, disfiguring, branding and more. Slaves could also be put to death - a penalty most often enforced during the aftermath of rebellions. And they were rarely killed quickly. The torturous executions meted out to those who led uprisings or who were accused of collaborating in rebellious plots provide some of the most lurid examples of human cruelty on record.
But physical abuse alone could not keep the lucrative plantations of the British Caribbean productive. It is impossible to get large groups of people to perform sustained labour effectively and consistently for years on end simply through doling out pain and raw terror. Even the most brutal of slaveholders were therefore compelled to develop a sophisticated system of management that exploited the most human aspirations and fears of the people they dominated.
Creating divisions between slaves was essential to this. Enslaved people outnumbered free whites in the British Caribbean. In Jamaica the ratio was higher than 10 to one, and on some big plantations it was about 100 to one. Managers therefore needed to divide slaves in order to rule over them. The slave trade from Africa provided them with one opportunity. As a manager of several large Jamaican sugar estates remarked in 1804, it was a general policy to ‘have the Negroes on an estate a mixture of nations so as to balance one set against another, to be sure of having two-thirds join the whites’ (in the event of an uprising). The theory behind this was that enslaved people from one African ‘nation’ would refuse to join rebellions plotted by those from others, or by creole (locally born) slaves, choosing instead to serve their white masters in the hope of rewards for loyal service.
Privileging some enslaved people above others was another effective means of sowing discord. Slaveholders encouraged complex social hierarchies on the plantations that amounted to something like a system of ‘class’. At the top of plantation slave communities in the sugar colonies of the Caribbean were skilled men, trained up at the behest of white managers to become sugar boilers, blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, masons and drivers. Such men were, in general, materially better-off than field slaves (most of whom were women), and they tended to live longer.
The most important members of this enslaved elite were the drivers, responsible for enforcing discipline and work routines among the other enslaved workers. These men were essential to effective plantation management - a conduit for orders and, sometimes, for negotiations between white overseers and the massed ranks of field workers. They were also among the strongest survivors of the system.
The privileges conferred on the enslaved elite came in several forms: better food, more food, better clothing, more clothing, better and bigger housing, even the prospect (in some rare cases) that a master might use his last will and testament to free them. It could even be demonstrated in a name. The ledgers are dominated by lists of people identified only by a single diminutive slave name, conferred on them by plantation managers: page after page of Nancys, Marys, Sallys, Junos, Eves, and Venuses; of Toms and Joes, Hectors and Hamlets, Londons and Dublins.
The Anglican Church was one of the pillars of the white establishment in Jamaica, and so being baptised into it conferred prestige. None of this meant that the enslaved elite was being invited to live as the equals of their white masters. Far from it. But slaveholders evidently knew that things such as smarter clothes, superior nutrition, the occasional drink of ‘port wine’, or even initiation into the rigidly hierarchical Anglican communion could help to diminish the prospect of successful open resistance. This, coupled with the inevitably grisly consequences of a failed rebellion, helped to persuade large numbers of enslaved people to attempt to survive their ordeal by negotiating within the system.
The various privileges extended to the enslaved elite helped to create a conservative attitude among some - keen to protect what they had gained. They also produced an aspirational culture, of sorts, within the slave community - a bleak and tragic shadow of the ‘American dream’ of independence and riches that motivated the slaveholders. Those slaves who lived long enough and were not physically or psychologically broken by plantation work could aim to join the ranks of the skilled, privileged plantation elite. And there is evidence that those who won the favour of white managers and avoided fieldwork cherished those advantages. One slave in Barbados even killed his successor, and then committed suicide when a white manager stripped him of his job as a watchman.
Such stories upset common assumptions about slavery - and about slaves. In the popular imagination and in much historical scholarship, there has been a tendency to perceive enslaved people either as downtrodden victims or as romantic rebels: we often prefer to think of slaves as having been innocent drudges, suffering inescapable torments, or as brave resisters and rebels, taking decisive action against their oppressors. It is a contradictory simplification. The bland confining categories of ‘victim’ or ‘rebel’ (or even ‘collaborator’) cannot properly capture the experiences or choices of enslaved people, including those of drivers, of enslaved Anglican converts, or of a thwarted Barbadian watchman.
Those people show us, instead, that slavery was as complex as it was cruel. Negotiating its grim realities required determination and skill, even selfishness; and it was next to impossible to endure without making compromises of one kind or other. All enslaved people - from newly trafficked Africans to seasoned field workers; from children forced to work as soon as they could use a small hoe, to experienced drivers such as Reid - responded to their predicaments in ordinary ways, albeit under extraordinary pressures. They did what they could to keep alive and, if possible, to capitalise on scant opportunities within the system in which they were trapped.
And their stories remind us that they were all trapped. However complex and divided the slave community, however many people we find who were able carve out precarious positions of relative comfort, we find them struggling to live within a system designed to promote disunity, anxiety and fear. Even the most valued of drivers could be demoted on a whim. Some brave or desperate souls chose to flee. But the fine-tuned system of divide and rule helped to deter all but the most determined of rebels.
Before the late-18th century, the sophisticated and cruel management strategies of white slaveholders were highly effective: overt challenges to white authority foundered, and slave-run sugar plantations prospered. It was only with the outbreak of the Haitian Revolution in 1791 and the growing influence of humanitarian campaigning that the inner workings of the British slave system began to buckle and break, as enslaved people in the Caribbean seized new opportunities to undermine the world that the slaveholders had made.

Q. Which of the following is not a way adopted by the slaveowners to control their slaves?

Solution:

Select whether you would like to reattempt all questions by default while analysing the mock. If set to true, we will hide your responses allowing you to answer the question. Once you select an option, your attempt and the correct answer will be revealed.

QUESTION: 37

Read the following passage and answer the following question.

It is no surprise that the whip is synonymous with New World slavery: its continual crack remained an audible threat to enslaved workers to keep at their work, reminding them that their lives and bodies were not their own, and that they should maintain (outwardly at least) a demeanour of dutiful subordination to their overlords. The whip was a cruel and effective instrument of torture - part of the brutal technology that kept the productive machine of plantation America at work. Nowhere was this more obvious than on the islands of the Caribbean. By the middle of the 18th century, these were the most valuable parts of the British empire, and the large island of Jamaica, with its huge sugar plantations and brutal slave regime, was the jewel in the imperial crown.
As elsewhere in the Americas, the right of masters in Jamaica to punish slaves was enshrined in law, and the violence that sustained slavery went far beyond whipping. Punishments could include amputation, disfiguring, branding and more. Slaves could also be put to death - a penalty most often enforced during the aftermath of rebellions. And they were rarely killed quickly. The torturous executions meted out to those who led uprisings or who were accused of collaborating in rebellious plots provide some of the most lurid examples of human cruelty on record.
But physical abuse alone could not keep the lucrative plantations of the British Caribbean productive. It is impossible to get large groups of people to perform sustained labour effectively and consistently for years on end simply through doling out pain and raw terror. Even the most brutal of slaveholders were therefore compelled to develop a sophisticated system of management that exploited the most human aspirations and fears of the people they dominated.
Creating divisions between slaves was essential to this. Enslaved people outnumbered free whites in the British Caribbean. In Jamaica the ratio was higher than 10 to one, and on some big plantations it was about 100 to one. Managers therefore needed to divide slaves in order to rule over them. The slave trade from Africa provided them with one opportunity. As a manager of several large Jamaican sugar estates remarked in 1804, it was a general policy to ‘have the Negroes on an estate a mixture of nations so as to balance one set against another, to be sure of having two-thirds join the whites’ (in the event of an uprising). The theory behind this was that enslaved people from one African ‘nation’ would refuse to join rebellions plotted by those from others, or by creole (locally born) slaves, choosing instead to serve their white masters in the hope of rewards for loyal service.
Privileging some enslaved people above others was another effective means of sowing discord. Slaveholders encouraged complex social hierarchies on the plantations that amounted to something like a system of ‘class’. At the top of plantation slave communities in the sugar colonies of the Caribbean were skilled men, trained up at the behest of white managers to become sugar boilers, blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, masons and drivers. Such men were, in general, materially better-off than field slaves (most of whom were women), and they tended to live longer.
The most important members of this enslaved elite were the drivers, responsible for enforcing discipline and work routines among the other enslaved workers. These men were essential to effective plantation management - a conduit for orders and, sometimes, for negotiations between white overseers and the massed ranks of field workers. They were also among the strongest survivors of the system.
The privileges conferred on the enslaved elite came in several forms: better food, more food, better clothing, more clothing, better and bigger housing, even the prospect (in some rare cases) that a master might use his last will and testament to free them. It could even be demonstrated in a name. The ledgers are dominated by lists of people identified only by a single diminutive slave name, conferred on them by plantation managers: page after page of Nancys, Marys, Sallys, Junos, Eves, and Venuses; of Toms and Joes, Hectors and Hamlets, Londons and Dublins.
The Anglican Church was one of the pillars of the white establishment in Jamaica, and so being baptised into it conferred prestige. None of this meant that the enslaved elite was being invited to live as the equals of their white masters. Far from it. But slaveholders evidently knew that things such as smarter clothes, superior nutrition, the occasional drink of ‘port wine’, or even initiation into the rigidly hierarchical Anglican communion could help to diminish the prospect of successful open resistance. This, coupled with the inevitably grisly consequences of a failed rebellion, helped to persuade large numbers of enslaved people to attempt to survive their ordeal by negotiating within the system.
The various privileges extended to the enslaved elite helped to create a conservative attitude among some - keen to protect what they had gained. They also produced an aspirational culture, of sorts, within the slave community - a bleak and tragic shadow of the ‘American dream’ of independence and riches that motivated the slaveholders. Those slaves who lived long enough and were not physically or psychologically broken by plantation work could aim to join the ranks of the skilled, privileged plantation elite. And there is evidence that those who won the favour of white managers and avoided fieldwork cherished those advantages. One slave in Barbados even killed his successor, and then committed suicide when a white manager stripped him of his job as a watchman.
Such stories upset common assumptions about slavery - and about slaves. In the popular imagination and in much historical scholarship, there has been a tendency to perceive enslaved people either as downtrodden victims or as romantic rebels: we often prefer to think of slaves as having been innocent drudges, suffering inescapable torments, or as brave resisters and rebels, taking decisive action against their oppressors. It is a contradictory simplification. The bland confining categories of ‘victim’ or ‘rebel’ (or even ‘collaborator’) cannot properly capture the experiences or choices of enslaved people, including those of drivers, of enslaved Anglican converts, or of a thwarted Barbadian watchman.
Those people show us, instead, that slavery was as complex as it was cruel. Negotiating its grim realities required determination and skill, even selfishness; and it was next to impossible to endure without making compromises of one kind or other. All enslaved people - from newly trafficked Africans to seasoned field workers; from children forced to work as soon as they could use a small hoe, to experienced drivers such as Reid - responded to their predicaments in ordinary ways, albeit under extraordinary pressures. They did what they could to keep alive and, if possible, to capitalise on scant opportunities within the system in which they were trapped.
And their stories remind us that they were all trapped. However complex and divided the slave community, however many people we find who were able carve out precarious positions of relative comfort, we find them struggling to live within a system designed to promote disunity, anxiety and fear. Even the most valued of drivers could be demoted on a whim. Some brave or desperate souls chose to flee. But the fine-tuned system of divide and rule helped to deter all but the most determined of rebels.
Before the late-18th century, the sophisticated and cruel management strategies of white slaveholders were highly effective: overt challenges to white authority foundered, and slave-run sugar plantations prospered. It was only with the outbreak of the Haitian Revolution in 1791 and the growing influence of humanitarian campaigning that the inner workings of the British slave system began to buckle and break, as enslaved people in the Caribbean seized new opportunities to undermine the world that the slaveholders had made.

Q. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?

Solution:

Thought it has been mentioned that the condition of slaves in Jamaica was bad, we cannot infer it was the worst in the world. 
Option B can be inferred from the seventh paragraph.
The mention of the Haitian revolt shows that though the Whites tried to suppress all revolts, they were not successful in doing so. Option C cannot be inferred.
There is only one such incident mentioned in the passage. Option D is an exaggerated assumption.

QUESTION: 38

Read the following passage and answer the following question.
It is no surprise that the whip is synonymous with New World slavery: its continual crack remained an audible threat to enslaved workers to keep at their work, reminding them that their lives and bodies were not their own, and that they should maintain (outwardly at least) a demeanour of dutiful subordination to their overlords. The whip was a cruel and effective instrument of torture - part of the brutal technology that kept the productive machine of plantation America at work. Nowhere was this more obvious than on the islands of the Caribbean. By the middle of the 18th century, these were the most valuable parts of the British empire, and the large island of Jamaica, with its huge sugar plantations and brutal slave regime, was the jewel in the imperial crown.
As elsewhere in the Americas, the right of masters in Jamaica to punish slaves was enshrined in law, and the violence that sustained slavery went far beyond whipping. Punishments could include amputation, disfiguring, branding and more. Slaves could also be put to death - a penalty most often enforced during the aftermath of rebellions. And they were rarely killed quickly. The torturous executions meted out to those who led uprisings or who were accused of collaborating in rebellious plots provide some of the most lurid examples of human cruelty on record.
But physical abuse alone could not keep the lucrative plantations of the British Caribbean productive. It is impossible to get large groups of people to perform sustained labour effectively and consistently for years on end simply through doling out pain and raw terror. Even the most brutal of slaveholders were therefore compelled to develop a sophisticated system of management that exploited the most human aspirations and fears of the people they dominated.
Creating divisions between slaves was essential to this. Enslaved people outnumbered free whites in the British Caribbean. In Jamaica the ratio was higher than 10 to one, and on some big plantations it was about 100 to one. Managers therefore needed to divide slaves in order to rule over them. The slave trade from Africa provided them with one opportunity. As a manager of several large Jamaican sugar estates remarked in 1804, it was a general policy to ‘have the Negroes on an estate a mixture of nations so as to balance one set against another, to be sure of having two-thirds join the whites’ (in the event of an uprising). The theory behind this was that enslaved people from one African ‘nation’ would refuse to join rebellions plotted by those from others, or by creole (locally born) slaves, choosing instead to serve their white masters in the hope of rewards for loyal service.
Privileging some enslaved people above others was another effective means of sowing discord. Slaveholders encouraged complex social hierarchies on the plantations that amounted to something like a system of ‘class’. At the top of plantation slave communities in the sugar colonies of the Caribbean were skilled men, trained up at the behest of white managers to become sugar boilers, blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, masons and drivers. Such men were, in general, materially better-off than field slaves (most of whom were women), and they tended to live longer.
The most important members of this enslaved elite were the drivers, responsible for enforcing discipline and work routines among the other enslaved workers. These men were essential to effective plantation management - a conduit for orders and, sometimes, for negotiations between white overseers and the massed ranks of field workers. They were also among the strongest survivors of the system.
The privileges conferred on the enslaved elite came in several forms: better food, more food, better clothing, more clothing, better and bigger housing, even the prospect (in some rare cases) that a master might use his last will and testament to free them. It could even be demonstrated in a name. The ledgers are dominated by lists of people identified only by a single diminutive slave name, conferred on them by plantation managers: page after page of Nancys, Marys, Sallys, Junos, Eves, and Venuses; of Toms and Joes, Hectors and Hamlets, Londons and Dublins.
The Anglican Church was one of the pillars of the white establishment in Jamaica, and so being baptised into it conferred prestige. None of this meant that the enslaved elite was being invited to live as the equals of their white masters. Far from it. But slaveholders evidently knew that things such as smarter clothes, superior nutrition, the occasional drink of ‘port wine’, or even initiation into the rigidly hierarchical Anglican communion could help to diminish the prospect of successful open resistance. This, coupled with the inevitably grisly consequences of a failed rebellion, helped to persuade large numbers of enslaved people to attempt to survive their ordeal by negotiating within the system.
The various privileges extended to the enslaved elite helped to create a conservative attitude among some - keen to protect what they had gained. They also produced an aspirational culture, of sorts, within the slave community - a bleak and tragic shadow of the ‘American dream’ of independence and riches that motivated the slaveholders. Those slaves who lived long enough and were not physically or psychologically broken by plantation work could aim to join the ranks of the skilled, privileged plantation elite. And there is evidence that those who won the favour of white managers and avoided fieldwork cherished those advantages. One slave in Barbados even killed his successor, and then committed suicide when a white manager stripped him of his job as a watchman.
Such stories upset common assumptions about slavery - and about slaves. In the popular imagination and in much historical scholarship, there has been a tendency to perceive enslaved people either as downtrodden victims or as romantic rebels: we often prefer to think of slaves as having been innocent drudges, suffering inescapable torments, or as brave resisters and rebels, taking decisive action against their oppressors. It is a contradictory simplification. The bland confining categories of ‘victim’ or ‘rebel’ (or even ‘collaborator’) cannot properly capture the experiences or choices of enslaved people, including those of drivers, of enslaved Anglican converts, or of a thwarted Barbadian watchman.
Those people show us, instead, that slavery was as complex as it was cruel. Negotiating its grim realities required determination and skill, even selfishness; and it was next to impossible to endure without making compromises of one kind or other. All enslaved people - from newly trafficked Africans to seasoned field workers; from children forced to work as soon as they could use a small hoe, to experienced drivers such as Reid - responded to their predicaments in ordinary ways, albeit under extraordinary pressures. They did what they could to keep alive and, if possible, to capitalise on scant opportunities within the system in which they were trapped.
And their stories remind us that they were all trapped. However complex and divided the slave community, however many people we find who were able carve out precarious positions of relative comfort, we find them struggling to live within a system designed to promote disunity, anxiety and fear. Even the most valued of drivers could be demoted on a whim. Some brave or desperate souls chose to flee. But the fine-tuned system of divide and rule helped to deter all but the most determined of rebels.
Before the late-18th century, the sophisticated and cruel management strategies of white slaveholders were highly effective: overt challenges to white authority foundered, and slave-run sugar plantations prospered. It was only with the outbreak of the Haitian Revolution in 1791 and the growing influence of humanitarian campaigning that the inner workings of the British slave system began to buckle and break, as enslaved people in the Caribbean seized new opportunities to undermine the world that the slaveholders had made.

Q. What do the various names mentioned at the end of the seventh paragraph signify?

Solution:

Through the seventh paragraph, the author is trying to show how the whites created a class demarcation by allowing only few slaves to have a last name. A vast majority of the slaves had only a first name. Thus, through this, the author is trying to show how the whites created privileges out of bare necessities by denying a vast majority of slaves of those necessities.

QUESTION: 39

Read the following passage and answer the questions which follow.

It’s easy and convenient to label those who support Donald Trump as “anachronistic” or “racist” or “bigoted.” Indeed, for many of those who either support Hillary Clinton, or who simply do not see the allure of Trump’s message, his campaign’s slogan, “Make America Great Again,” appears to be nothing more than a desire to return America to a time when minorities were in the margins and Americans of European descent had little to worry about other than an increasingly belligerent Russia.
Yet the hard truth is that many older Americans, and many younger Trump supporters, are not spurred by racist sentiments, but nostalgia for the greatness of America as it once was from their own, fully real perspectives. Older, white Americans may remember the economic boom of the post-war 1950s with a significant amount of fondness. They may remember the excitement of American industry and the growth of the American economy at the time. Although that America was not “great” for minorities, it was certainly great for the largest percentage of Americans. In the 1950s, the U.S. unemployment rate was among the lowest it had ever been. Good paying jobs were plentiful, America was safe and respected worldwide. America was, for many, a great place to be.
But what about for those Americans who were not around in the 1950s, but who still support Trump? Much of the “greatness” they seek lies not in a return to an economic boom they never experienced, but to an America that looks more like what it did before their time, or when they were younger, One in which conservatives were not alienated. One in which the family consisted of two parents of opposite gender, One where unborn children were not wantonly disposed of because they were unwanted, One in which alternative lifestyles were not openly paraded on television and in the media. One in which America was both feared and respected overseas, and where, at home, American interests came before those of individuals who are new to the country.
If that doesn’t sound like a “great” America to you, that’s simply a matter of perspective. One does not necessarily have to believe that those ideals are right for the country. One needs to understand and respect that those ideals are important to a very large proportion of the country. Taking a step back, one should also recognize that the culture that our media presents no longer represents any of those ideals, at least not positively. Is it any wonder that so many people find solace and hope in Trump’s message?
Before you write off Trump’s supporters, it may be a good idea to look at the past. Those who feel economically disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), and culturally disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), are pushed toward the “fight or flight” reaction. Do not assume, however, that a Trump vote is the end-all for the “fight” mentality, or that Trump supporters will choose “flight” should Trump lose. It may be a dangerous error as well to believe that Americans have evolved past more violent ends to political and cultural marginalization. Many may see the final option -- the same course taken by the Founding Fathers and Germany -- as the only reasonable course of action that remains.

Q. “If that doesn’t sound like a ‘great’ America to you, that’s simply a matter of perspective.” What does the author want to convey through these lines?

Solution:

The author first describes why America of 1950’s and olden times is considered great by many Trump supporters.

►He then quotes some characteristics of those times to demonstrate why Trump supporters consider that America to be great. He then uses the above mentioned lines.

►Through these lines, he simply wants to imply that greatness can be a subjective thing. Thus option A best represents the meaning that he is trying to convey through these lines.

QUESTION: 40

Read the following passage and answer the questions which follow.

It’s easy and convenient to label those who support Donald Trump as “anachronistic” or “racist” or “bigoted.” Indeed, for many of those who either support Hillary Clinton, or who simply do not see the allure of Trump’s message, his campaign’s slogan, “Make America Great Again,” appears to be nothing more than a desire to return America to a time when minorities were in the margins and Americans of European descent had little to worry about other than an increasingly belligerent Russia.
Yet the hard truth is that many older Americans, and many younger Trump supporters, are not spurred by racist sentiments, but nostalgia for the greatness of America as it once was from their own, fully real perspectives. Older, white Americans may remember the economic boom of the post-war 1950s with a significant amount of fondness. They may remember the excitement of American industry and the growth of the American economy at the time. Although that America was not “great” for minorities, it was certainly great for the largest percentage of Americans. In the 1950s, the U.S. unemployment rate was among the lowest it had ever been. Good paying jobs were plentiful, America was safe and respected worldwide. America was, for many, a great place to be.
But what about for those Americans who were not around in the 1950s, but who still support Trump? Much of the “greatness” they seek lies not in a return to an economic boom they never experienced, but to an America that looks more like what it did before their time, or when they were younger, One in which conservatives were not alienated. One in which the family consisted of two parents of opposite gender, One where unborn children were not wantonly disposed of because they were unwanted, One in which alternative lifestyles were not openly paraded on television and in the media. One in which America was both feared and respected overseas, and where, at home, American interests came before those of individuals who are new to the country.
If that doesn’t sound like a “great” America to you, that’s simply a matter of perspective. One does not necessarily have to believe that those ideals are right for the country. One needs to understand and respect that those ideals are important to a very large proportion of the country. Taking a step back, one should also recognize that the culture that our media presents no longer represents any of those ideals, at least not positively. Is it any wonder that so many people find solace and hope in Trump’s message?
Before you write off Trump’s supporters, it may be a good idea to look at the past. Those who feel economically disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), and culturally disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), are pushed toward the “fight or flight” reaction. Do not assume, however, that a Trump vote is the end-all for the “fight” mentality, or that Trump supporters will choose “flight” should Trump lose. It may be a dangerous error as well to believe that Americans have evolved past more violent ends to political and cultural marginalization. Many may see the final option -- the same course taken by the Founding Fathers and Germany -- as the only reasonable course of action that remains.

Q. Which of the following can be a appropriate title for this passage?

Solution:

The passage does not mention anything about presidency. It talks about Hillary and Trump but from the passage the context in which he is referring to these people cannot be inferred.

►Hence A can be eliminated. The passage does not focus on Hillary vs Trump debate. Hence, we can eliminate option D also.

►Among B and C, Option B is a better choice because the author is trying to explore the reasons for Donald Trump’s immense support. Hence among the given choices, option B is the best choice.

QUESTION: 41

Read the following passage and answer the questions which follow.

It’s easy and convenient to label those who support Donald Trump as “anachronistic” or “racist” or “bigoted.” Indeed, for many of those who either support Hillary Clinton, or who simply do not see the allure of Trump’s message, his campaign’s slogan, “Make America Great Again,” appears to be nothing more than a desire to return America to a time when minorities were in the margins and Americans of European descent had little to worry about other than an increasingly belligerent Russia.
Yet the hard truth is that many older Americans, and many younger Trump supporters, are not spurred by racist sentiments, but nostalgia for the greatness of America as it once was from their own, fully real perspectives. Older, white Americans may remember the economic boom of the post-war 1950s with a significant amount of fondness. They may remember the excitement of American industry and the growth of the American economy at the time. Although that America was not “great” for minorities, it was certainly great for the largest percentage of Americans. In the 1950s, the U.S. unemployment rate was among the lowest it had ever been. Good paying jobs were plentiful, America was safe and respected worldwide. America was, for many, a great place to be.
But what about for those Americans who were not around in the 1950s, but who still support Trump? Much of the “greatness” they seek lies not in a return to an economic boom they never experienced, but to an America that looks more like what it did before their time, or when they were younger, One in which conservatives were not alienated. One in which the family consisted of two parents of opposite gender, One where unborn children were not wantonly disposed of because they were unwanted, One in which alternative lifestyles were not openly paraded on television and in the media. One in which America was both feared and respected overseas, and where, at home, American interests came before those of individuals who are new to the country.
If that doesn’t sound like a “great” America to you, that’s simply a matter of perspective. One does not necessarily have to believe that those ideals are right for the country. One needs to understand and respect that those ideals are important to a very large proportion of the country. Taking a step back, one should also recognize that the culture that our media presents no longer represents any of those ideals, at least not positively. Is it any wonder that so many people find solace and hope in Trump’s message?
Before you write off Trump’s supporters, it may be a good idea to look at the past. Those who feel economically disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), and culturally disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), are pushed toward the “fight or flight” reaction. Do not assume, however, that a Trump vote is the end-all for the “fight” mentality, or that Trump supporters will choose “flight” should Trump lose. It may be a dangerous error as well to believe that Americans have evolved past more violent ends to political and cultural marginalization. Many may see the final option -- the same course taken by the Founding Fathers and Germany -- as the only reasonable course of action that remains.

Q. What is the main reason behind young people supporting Trump?

Solution:

In the second and the third paragraphs, the author explains the reasons due to which people support Trump. In the third paragraph the author explains the reasons behind young people supporting Trump. Option B rightly captures the essence of the third paragraph. 

QUESTION: 42

Read the following passage and answer the questions which follow.

It’s easy and convenient to label those who support Donald Trump as “anachronistic” or “racist” or “bigoted.” Indeed, for many of those who either support Hillary Clinton, or who simply do not see the allure of Trump’s message, his campaign’s slogan, “Make America Great Again,” appears to be nothing more than a desire to return America to a time when minorities were in the margins and Americans of European descent had little to worry about other than an increasingly belligerent Russia.
Yet the hard truth is that many older Americans, and many younger Trump supporters, are not spurred by racist sentiments, but nostalgia for the greatness of America as it once was from their own, fully real perspectives. Older, white Americans may remember the economic boom of the post-war 1950s with a significant amount of fondness. They may remember the excitement of American industry and the growth of the American economy at the time. Although that America was not “great” for minorities, it was certainly great for the largest percentage of Americans. In the 1950s, the U.S. unemployment rate was among the lowest it had ever been. Good paying jobs were plentiful, America was safe and respected worldwide. America was, for many, a great place to be.
But what about for those Americans who were not around in the 1950s, but who still support Trump? Much of the “greatness” they seek lies not in a return to an economic boom they never experienced, but to an America that looks more like what it did before their time, or when they were younger, One in which conservatives were not alienated. One in which the family consisted of two parents of opposite gender, One where unborn children were not wantonly disposed of because they were unwanted, One in which alternative lifestyles were not openly paraded on television and in the media. One in which America was both feared and respected overseas, and where, at home, American interests came before those of individuals who are new to the country.
If that doesn’t sound like a “great” America to you, that’s simply a matter of perspective. One does not necessarily have to believe that those ideals are right for the country. One needs to understand and respect that those ideals are important to a very large proportion of the country. Taking a step back, one should also recognize that the culture that our media presents no longer represents any of those ideals, at least not positively. Is it any wonder that so many people find solace and hope in Trump’s message?
Before you write off Trump’s supporters, it may be a good idea to look at the past. Those who feel economically disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), and culturally disabled (most of Trump’s supporters do), are pushed toward the “fight or flight” reaction. Do not assume, however, that a Trump vote is the end-all for the “fight” mentality, or that Trump supporters will choose “flight” should Trump lose. It may be a dangerous error as well to believe that Americans have evolved past more violent ends to political and cultural marginalization. Many may see the final option -- the same course taken by the Founding Fathers and Germany -- as the only reasonable course of action that remains.

Q. Which of the following is/are true as per the passage?

I. America’s unemployment rate was lowest in 1950’s
II. Minorities in America are not getting as much respect today as they used to get in olden times.
III. America’s economy is not as large as it used to be in 1950’s.

Solution:

►Statement I is a bit distorted. The author says that unemployment rate was among the lowest in 1950’s but he does not say that it was the lowest. Hence I is incorrect.

►II is also incorrect as the author says that maybe America was not good for minorities in olden times but it was certainly good for most of the population. Hence II is also wrong.

►There is not enough information about III. We cannot say anything because of inconclusive information. The author does say that growth was more in 1950’s but overall economic scenario is not discussed anywhere.

►Hence III is also wrong. Thus the correct answer is option D.

QUESTION: 43

DIRECTION for the question: Create a word using all the given letters from the jumbled letters and identify its appropriate meaning:

Solution:

The word is Abject, which means the state of being extremely unhappy, poor, unsuccessful, etc. or of the most contemptible kind

QUESTION: 44

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

Nobody will really know if you're___________ huge quantities of leadership and motivation or if you're just walking around bothering people.

Solution:

Exuding means: (of a person) display (an emotion or quality) strongly and openly.
In this case, the ''or'' indicates that the two parts of the sentence contain words that contradict each other. Considering that, the first part needs to be positive and the word that helps us ensure a positive sentiment is exuding.

►The meanings of the other words are:

►Debasing: Used of conduct; characterized by dishonour.

►Ensconcing: Fix firmly.

►Shielding: Protect, hide, or conceal from danger or harm.
None of the other words fit in the given case.

QUESTION: 45

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the option which is grammatically correct and expresses the meaning of sentence correctly.

Each of Singh’s works-Train to Pakistan, The Sikhs and The Company of Women- were licentious and stimulating novels, very different from the mild and diplomatically correct Indian literature.

Solution:

► Option 1:  Each does not agree with the plural verb were.
► Option 2: ‘Each of them Singh''s works’ is illogical.
► Option 3: This is the correct answer. In this sentence, the plural subject “works” matches the plural verb “were”.
► Option 4: Everyone is singular and does not agree with “works” or “were”.

QUESTION: 46

DIRECTIONS for the question: The question consists of five statements labelled A, B, C, D and E which when logically ordered form a coherent passage. Choose the option that represents the most logical order.

A. Males of very few other species help procure food year-round for the entire family, assist in raising their young to full maturity and defend their packs year-round against others of their species who threaten their safety
B. If you watch wolves, it’s hard to escape the conclusion that perhaps no two species are more alike behaviourally than wolves and humans.
C. No wonder Native Americans recognized in wolves a sibling spirit.
D. Living as we do in families, we can easily recognize the social structures and status quests in wolf packs.
E. The similarities between male wolves and male humans can be quite striking.

Solution:

The paragraph talks about wolves and humans and how they are alike in terms of behaviour. Hence B is the opening sentence. Then what is common between wolves and humans is the social structure and status quests. Hence D is the next sentence.
C follows D.
So option B is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 47

DIRECTIONS for the question: The question consists of four/five sentences on a topic. Select the option that indicates grammatically correct or appropriate sentence/s.

Solution:

► Sentence 1: Ham and eggs ‘is’ instead of ‘are’, as it is taken as a collective entity (name of a dish or item and not individual items).
► Sentence 2: ‘Currents’ should be replaced by ‘currants.’
► Sentence 3: Six tins of hot chocolate ‘were’ instead of ‘was’.
► Sentence 4 is correct.

QUESTION: 48

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the question and mark the appropriate answer.

Solution:

QUESTION: 49

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

One never gets a good feeling when one sees one's friend go down like a ____ balloon.

Solution:

The correct idiom is: go down like a lead balloon, which means to be received badly by an audience.

QUESTION: 50

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the question and mark the appropriate answer.

Solution:

► Dilgently means in a way that shows care and conscientiousness in one''s work or duties.
► Corroboarte means confirm
► Aromatic means having a pleasant and distinctive smell.
► benevolent means kindhearted

QUESTION: 51

DIRECTIONS for the question: Identify the nature of the underlined word (parts of speech) in the given sentences-

Some people buy expensive cars simply because they can.

Solution:

This clause answers the question "why," showing cause, so it is an adverb clause. It does not act as a subject or object, and it does not modify a noun or pronoun.

QUESTION: 52

DIRECTIONS for the question: Identify the origin / source of the words given below.

Quid pro quo

Solution:

It is from Latin and means something for something, usually an equal exchange.

QUESTION: 53

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

IMPLACABLE: APPEASE::_______:_______

Solution:

An implacable person cannot be placated or appeased. Similarly, an unconquerable person cannot be subdued.

QUESTION: 54

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the option which is most Opposite in meaning of the underlined word as used in the context of the sentence.

My first speech was a fiasco.

Solution:

Fiasco means a disaster or failure. Success is the correct antonym.

QUESTION: 55

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the question and mark the appropriate answer.

Solution:

Affable is an adjective, talk is verb both conditions are satisfied in Option D.

QUESTION: 56

DIRECTIONS for the question: The question has five statements A, B, C, D and E, which when arranged logically form a coherent sequence. From the options given choose the best sequence.

A. Without the distribution and manufacturing efficiencies of the modern age, without the toll-free numbers and express delivery and bar codes and scanners and, above all, computer, the choices would not be multiplying like this.
B. Everywhere you turn, someone is offering advice on things like which of the thousands of mutual funds to buy.
C. Consumer psychologists say this sea of choices is driving us bonkers.
D. Or the right MBA program from among hundreds of business schools.
E. Superior performance in this competitive world is all about mastering business basics.

Solution:

‘this sea of choices’ of C refers to the mutual funds (B) and MBA programs (D) giving us the sequence BDC. From ‘the choices would not multiply like this’, we can infer that A will follow BDC. E provides a prescription to survive in this competitive world.

QUESTION: 57

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

A. The point here is that it is not sufficient to simply not intend to harm noncombatants; rather, one must intend not to harm noncombatants in every conceivable way.
B. To illustrate this point, Walzer cites as an example the efforts of a soldier in WWI whose mission was to clear cellars of enemy combatants in a recently seized urban area and in doing so, he took the additional measure of shouting out a warning in order to give noncombatants the opportunity to identify themselves and thus avoid harm.
C. What requires the soldiers to assume such additional risk are those instances where efforts to discriminate will be imperfect and that no matter how precise the combatants try to be, some noncombatants will be harmed.
D. Discrimination does not, however, directly entail a requirement to assume additional risk beyond what is required to accomplish the mission.
E. In those instances, the soldiers must take additional measures to mitigate the risk to noncombatants, even if that means assuming additional risks themselves.

Solution:

Line C clarifies and qualifies the point on discrimination and risk-taking raised in line D (D-C). Notice those instances in line E, which places it immediately next to line C which mentions such instances (D-C-E).  The example quoted in line B seeks to illustrate the point discussed in line E only while line A clarifies the nuances of this idea (D-C-E-BA).

QUESTION: 58

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

Because my passion has been exposing government-funded sacred cows and disrupting statist narratives, I am a___________.

Solution:

In this case, we need a word which highlights how the given person does not follow state directives and does not follow the established norms. We need a word which implies the sentiment of being a rebel. Let us have a look at the meanings of the given words to identify the correct answer:
► Cannibal: A person who eats human flesh.
► Turncoat: A disloyal person who betrays or deserts his cause or religion or political party or friend etc.
► Heretic: a person holding an opinion at odds with what is generally accepted.
► Revisionist: A Communist who tries to rewrite Marxism to justify a retreat from the revolutionary position.
In the given context, we can see that option 3 is the best fit in the given case.

QUESTION: 59

DIRECTIONS for the question: A sentence or a part of the sentence is underlined. Four alternatives are given as substitutions for the highlighted part, one of which will improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative.

It is well established in the automobile industry that how deliveries are made and the frequency of post-sale services can be crucial for long term viability.

Solution:

In this case, the two elements in the list (how deliveries are made and the frequency of post-sale services) are not in similar form. They lack parallel structure. The correct way of expressing the two parts of the list are: how deliveries are made and how frequently post-sales services are provided.

This configuration places these two parts in parallel structure. The given expression is present in option 4.

QUESTION: 60

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

PELLUCID : MUDDY

Solution:

Pellucid means ''transparently clear; easily understandable'' and muddy means ''not clear to the mind/dirty and messy; covered with mud or muck''. Thus, these two words are antonyms of one another.
The meanings of the other words are:
► Confused: Perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements; filled with bewilderment.
► Defiled: Morally blemished; stained or impure.
► Obscure: Make less visible or unclear.
► Vague: Not clearly understood or expressed.
► Vivid: Evoking life like images within the mind/Having the clarity and freshness of immediate experience.
► Murky: Deliberately unclear; unclear in a dishonest or bad way.
► Tenuous: Having thin consistency/Lacking substance or significance.
► Obtuse: Taking more than usual time to learn or understand; lacking intellectual acuity.
We can see from the above word meanings that option 3 is the best answer in the given case.

QUESTION: 61

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following Graph & table given below and answer the question that follows.

Q. If 60% of boys and 70% of girls are successful in the courses taken by them, what is the combined pass percentage?

Solution:

Total Girl = 25 + 25 + 23 + 20 + 25 + 12 + 12 + 3 = 145
Total Boys = 45 + 186 - 120 + 100 - 65 - 32 +
58 + 5 = 611
60% of Boys = 6 * 611 = 366.6, 70% of Girls = 0.7 * 145 = 101.5
So combined pass percentage = 366.6 - 101.5 = 

QUESTION: 62

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following Graph & table given below and answer the question that follows.

Q. Percentage of girls among total number of students doing which course is higher than the percentage of girls in any other course?

Solution:

Business Management: 50 / 160 × 100 = 31.25%.
Typewritng: 43 / 261 × 100 = 16% approx.
Costing: 37 / 215 × 100 = 17% approx.
Typewriting and costing: 15 / 120 × 100 = 12.5%.
Hence, it is highest for business management.

QUESTION: 63

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following Graph & table given below and answer the question that follows.

Q. By what percent, the number of students doing Typewriting only is more than the number of students doing Business Management only?

Solution:

The required %age = (261- 160) × 100 / 160 = 63%.

QUESTION: 64

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following Graph & table given below and answer the question that follows.

Q. Percentage of students of Arts faculty doing Costing only is

Solution:

Student of Art = 85 + 451 = 536, 
Student Doing Costing only = 25 + 120 = 145
So Required% = = 2900 / 107 = 27.10%

QUESTION: 65

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following Graph & table given below and answer the question that follows.

Q. Taking all the courses together, by what percentage the boys exceed girls?

Solution:

QUESTION: 66

DIRECTIONS for the question: Analyse the graph/s given below and answer the question that follows.
The table below shows the Revenue and Net Profit for different companies in 2006 and 2007 while the bar graph shows the amount of taxes paid by these companies over the two years. Gross profit is calculated as Revenue less Operating Costs and 30% of Gross Profit is deducted as Taxes to arrive at Net Profit. All values are in Rs. Crore.

Q. For which of the following companies was the total Operating Cost for the two years greater than 70% of the total revenue for the two years?

Solution:

Since Net Profit = 70% of Gross Profit, Gross Profit can be calculated as Net Profit × (100/70). Operating cost can be calculated as Revenue - Gross Profit.
► Bir. Corp.: GP = (717 + 419) × (100/70) = 1622. Op.Cost = (2049 + 1996) - 1622 = 2423. The required percentage is 2423/4045 = 60%.
► Ind. Cem.: GP = (672 + 498) ×(100/70) = 1671. Op.Cost = (3839 + 3554) - 1671 = 5722. The required percentage is 5722/7393 = 77%.
► UltTech: GP = (1760 + 3007) ×(100/70) = 6810. Op.Cost = (6286 + 7160) -6810 = 6636. The required percentage is 6636/13446 = 49%.
► Chet. Cem.: GP = (311 + 370) × (100/70) = 972. Op.Cost = (1110 + 1322) - 972 = 1460. The required percentage is 1460/2432 = 60%.
It is more than 70% for india cement. Hence second option.

QUESTION: 67

DIRECTIONS for the question: Analyse the graph/s given below and answer the question that follows.
The table below shows the Revenue and Net Profit for different companies in 2006 and 2007 while the bar graph shows the amount of taxes paid by these companies over the two years. Gross profit is calculated as Revenue less Operating Costs and 30% of Gross Profit is deducted as Taxes to arrive at Net Profit. All values are in Rs. Crore.

Q. For all the companies together, the total Gross Profit over the two years was approximately what percent of the total Revenue over the two years?

Solution:

Total net profit = (9858 + 10897) = 20,755
Total Gross Profit = 20755 × (100 / 70) = 29650.
Total revenue over the two years = (33600 + 35052) = 68,652
The required percentage is (29650 / 68652 ) × 100 = 43% (approx)

QUESTION: 68

DIRECTIONS for the question: The following graph gives the data about Foreign Equity Inflow (FEI) for the four countries for two years 97 and 98. FEI is taken as the ratio of foreign equity inflow to the country's GDP, which is expressed as percentage in the graph. For answering you can use the data from the preceding questions.

Q. The country with the largest %age change in FEI in 1998 relative to its FEI in 1997, is:

Solution:

Find the difference between FEI in 1998 relative to its FEI in 1997. Hence, for India it is 0.72 – 1.71 = –0.99.

►For China it is 4.8 – 5.96 = – 1.16. For Malaysia it is 9.92 – 10.67 = –0.75 and for Thailand it is 5.82 – 5.09 = 0.73.

►Change in FEI in 1998 relative to its FEI in 1997.

►For India, percentage = -0.99 / 1.71 × 100 = -57.89

►For Malaysia, percentage = -0.75 / 10.67 × 100 = -7.02.

►For Thailand, change is 14.34%.

►For China and Korea, changes are - 19.46% and  15.74% respectively.

►Hence, we can see that the country with the largest change in FEI is India.

QUESTION: 69

DIRECTIONS for the question: The following graph gives the data about Foreign Equity Inflow (FEI) for the four countries for two years 97 and 98. FEI is taken as the ratio of foreign equity inflow to the country's GDP, which is expressed as percentage in the graph. For answering you can use the data from the preceding questions.

Q. Based on the data provided, it can be concluded that

Solution:

Since the absolute values are not given, it cannot be calculated.

QUESTION: 70

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Two self-contained teams (Alpha and Beta) work simultaneously in a factory, each team constructing the same vehicle composed of five separate sections: J, K, M, Q, and Z. However, each team may assemble in whatever order they choose, as long as they follow these restrictions:

  • Each section takes exactly one workday to assemble.
  • Both teams start Monday morning and end on Friday afternoon.
  • Because of tool limitations, both teams may not be assembling the same section on the same day.
  • The Beta team must assemble section Z on Thursday.
  • On Monday, only sections M, Q, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Tuesday, only sections J and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Wednesday, only sections K, M, Q, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Thursday, only sections K, M, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Friday, all sections are available for assembly.

Q. Which of the following sections must the Alpha team assemble on Friday?

Solution:

From the given data, Following table can be drawn

Alpha assemble J on Friday

QUESTION: 71

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Two self-contained teams (Alpha and Beta) work simultaneously in a factory, each team constructing the same vehicle composed of five separate sections: J, K, M, Q, and Z. However, each team may assemble in whatever order they choose, as long as they follow these restrictions:

  • Each section takes exactly one workday to assemble.
  • Both teams start Monday morning and end on Friday afternoon.
  • Because of tool limitations, both teams may not be assembling the same section on the same day.
  • The Beta team must assemble section Z on Thursday.
  • On Monday, only sections M, Q, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Tuesday, only sections J and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Wednesday, only sections K, M, Q, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Thursday, only sections K, M, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Friday, all sections are available for assembly.

Q. Which of the following statements must be true?

Solution:

QUESTION: 72

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Two self-contained teams (Alpha and Beta) work simultaneously in a factory, each team constructing the same vehicle composed of five separate sections: J, K, M, Q, and Z. However, each team may assemble in whatever order they choose, as long as they follow these restrictions:

  • Each section takes exactly one workday to assemble.
  • Both teams start Monday morning and end on Friday afternoon.
  • Because of tool limitations, both teams may not be assembling the same section on the same day.
  • The Beta team must assemble section Z on Thursday.
  • On Monday, only sections M, Q, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Tuesday, only sections J and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Wednesday, only sections K, M, Q, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Thursday, only sections K, M, and Z are available for assembly.
  • On Friday, all sections are available for assembly.

Q. Which of the following could be true?

Solution:

From the given data, Following table can be drawn

Option number1, 2, 3 are definitely false by the table.
 

QUESTION: 73

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

(i) Mohan‘s reading schedule consists of reading only subject on a given day of the week.
(ii) The subjects are Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology, and Social Science.
(iii) Monday to Saturday are reading days including one day only for play. Sunday is a complete holiday for Mohan.
(iv) Mathematics day is neither on the first day nor on the last day but earlier than the Chemistry day.
(v) Biology day is on the immediate next day of Chemistry day.
(vi) Physics day is on the immediate previous day of the play day.
(vii) Biology day and Social Science day have a gap of two days between them.
(viii) Social Science day is on the immediate next day of the play day.

Q. Which of the following day is the play day?

Solution:


1. Sunday is HOLIDAY, PLACE IT.
2. MATHS is not on MONDAY & SATURDAY
3. CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY are together where chemistry is before  Biology
4. Plays is immediately after Physics
5. Biology & S. Science has 2 days gap to Physics & Play are in between Biology & S.
Science as Chemistry is before Biology. See (3) above.
Now, you have Bio ⇒ Physics ⇒  Play ⇒ S. Science
6. Maths is before Chemistry so Maths ⇒ Chemistry ⇒ Bio
7. Apply above & fill the table above
Option 2nd  (Tuesday) is answer

QUESTION: 74

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

(i) Mohan‘s reading schedule consists of reading only subject on a given day of the week.
(ii) The subjects are Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology, and Social Science.
(iii) Monday to Saturday are reading days including one day only for play. Sunday is a complete holiday for Mohan.
(iv) Mathematics day is neither on the first day nor on the last day but earlier than the Chemistry day.
(v) Biology day is on the immediate next day of Chemistry day.
(vi) Physics day is on the immediate previous day of the play day.
(vii) Biology day and Social Science day have a gap of two days between them.
(viii) Social Science day is on the immediate next day of the play day.

Q. Physics day and Biology day have a gap of how many days between them?

Solution:


1. Sunday is HOLIDAY, PLACE IT.
2. MATHS is not on MONDAY & SATURDAY
3. CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY are together where chemistry is before  Biology
4. Plays is immediately after Physics
5. Biology & S. Science has 2 days gap to Physics & Play are in between Biology & S.
Science as Chemistry is before Biology. See (3) above.
Now, you have Bio ⇒ Physics ⇒  Play ⇒ S. Science
6. Maths is before Chemistry so Maths ⇒ Chemistry ⇒ Bio
7. Apply above & fill the table above
Option 4th (Four) is answer

QUESTION: 75

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

(i) Mohan‘s reading schedule consists of reading only subject on a given day of the week.
(ii) The subjects are Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology, and Social Science.
(iii) Monday to Saturday are reading days including one day only for play. Sunday is a complete holiday for Mohan.
(iv) Mathematics day is neither on the first day nor on the last day but earlier than the Chemistry day.
(v) Biology day is on the immediate next day of Chemistry day.
(vi) Physics day is on the immediate previous day of the play day.
(vii) Biology day and Social Science day have a gap of two days between them.
(viii) Social Science day is on the immediate next day of the play day.

Q. Which day is Social Science day?

Solution:


1. Sunday is HOLIDAY, PLACE IT.
2. MATHS is not on MONDAY & SATURDAY
3. CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY are together where chemistry is before  Biology
4. Plays is immediately after Physics
5. Biology & S. Science has 2 days gap to Physics & Play are in between Biology & S.
Science as Chemistry is before Biology. See (3) above.
Now, you have Bio ⇒ Physics ⇒  Play ⇒ S. Science
6. Maths is before Chemistry so Maths ⇒ Chemistry ⇒ Bio
7. Apply above & fill the table above
Option 3rd  (Wednesday) is answer

QUESTION: 76

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

(i) Mohan‘s reading schedule consists of reading only subject on a given day of the week.
(ii) The subjects are Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology, and Social Science.
(iii) Monday to Saturday are reading days including one day only for play. Sunday is a complete holiday for Mohan.
(iv) Mathematics day is neither on the first day nor on the last day but earlier than the Chemistry day.
(v) Biology day is on the immediate next day of Chemistry day.
(vi) Physics day is on the immediate previous day of the play day.
(vii) Biology day and Social Science day have a gap of two days between them.
(viii) Social Science day is on the immediate next day of the play day.

Q. Which day is Mathematics day?

Solution:


1. Sunday is HOLIDAY, PLACE IT.
2. MATHS is not on MONDAY & SATURDAY
3. CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY are together where chemistry is before  Biology
4. Plays is immediately after Physics
5. Biology & S. Science has 2 days gap to Physics & Play are in between Biology & S.
Science as Chemistry is before Biology. See (3) above.
Now, you have Bio ⇒ Physics ⇒  Play ⇒ S. Science
6. Maths is before Chemistry so Maths ⇒ Chemistry ⇒ Bio
7. Apply above & fill the table above
Hence answer is Thursday

QUESTION: 77

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following table and bar graph graph to answer the question

Q. Between 2004 and 2005, the increase in yield per tonne km in April as a ratio to the increase in yield per tonne km in July is closest to which of the following?

Solution:

Increase in yield per tonne km in April = 8.73 - 7.46 = 1.27.
Increase in yield per tonne km in July = 10 - 8.31 = 1.69 ⇒ ratio =  1.27 / 1.69 ≌ 5 : 7. 

QUESTION: 78

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following table and bar graph graph to answer the question

Q. Air India’s average profit from 2001 – 02 to 2004 – 05 was

Solution:

Average profit from 2001 - 02 to 2004 - 05 was : 66 + 30 + 43 + 4 / 4 = 35.47cr ⇒ 3547 Lakhs.

QUESTION: 79

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the following table and bar graph graph to answer the question

Q. Air India’s yield per tonne km from April to May 2004 increased by

Solution:

Air India yield per tonne km in April 2004 = Rs. 7.46.

Air India yield per tonne km in May 2004 = 7.48.

∴ percentage increase = 

QUESTION: 80

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

There are five teams - Paraguay, Qatar, Russia, Spain and Turkey playing in a tournament where each team plays against every other team only once. These are the following possibilities: each match can result in a draw where each team scores two points; or a team can win where it scores three points, while the losing team scores one point.

Q. If Paraguay has won all the matches and Turkey has lost all the matches and all the remaining three teams score equal points, how many points have each of the three remaining teams scored?

Solution:

►Score of  P= 4 matches × 3 points for all wins = 12.

►Score of T = 4 Matches × 1 point for all lost matches = 4,

►Score of Q, R, S= Each team has lost 1 match against P & won 1 match against T= 4 Points each.

►Now, for Q,R,S, to have equal total score, the remaining matches should result in a draw.

►Therefore, Score of Q / R / S= 8

QUESTION: 81

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

There are five teams - Paraguay, Qatar, Russia, Spain and Turkey playing in a tournament where each team plays against every other team only once. These are the following possibilities: each match can result in a draw where each team scores two points; or a team can win where it scores three points, while the losing team scores one point.

Q. If all the five teams have an equal score, what is the number of points scored by each team?

Solution:

The total score of all five teams must be a multiple of 4 as there are 4 points for each match. Going by the choices the total score possible

As per Ist choice = 5 × 5 = 25 which is not a multiple of 4 and hence not the right choice;

As per IInd choice = 6 × 5 = 30 which is also not a multiple of 4 and cannot be right choice;

As per IIIrd choice = 7 × 5 = 35 which is not a multiple of 4 hence wrong;

As per IVth choice = 8 × 5 = 40 which is amultiple of 4 and hence the right choice. Thus, only option D is possible.

QUESTION: 82

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Data on the 468 students, who took an examination in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics, is as follows

Q. How many failed in Chemistry only?

Solution:

Here 64 students passed in Chemistry only i.e. they failed in Physics and Math.

51 students passed in Physics only so they failed in Math and Chemistry. 46 students passed in Math only, so they failed in Physics and Chemistry.

Hence we can make the following Venn diagram of the number of students who failed in one or more subjects.


Hence 3 students failed in Chemistry only.

QUESTION: 83

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Data on the 468 students, who took an examination in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics, is as follows

Q. How many failed in one subject only?

Solution:

Here 64 students passed in Chemistry only i.e. they failed in Physics and Math.

51 students passed in Physics only so they failed in Math and Chemistry. 46 students passed in Math only, so they failed in Physics and Chemistry.

Hence we can make the following Venn diagram of the number of students who failed in one or more subjects.



The number of students who failed in one subject only = 30 + 3 + 7 = 40

QUESTION: 84

DIRECTIONS for the question: A coding machine generates pass codes in steps. The process begins at 10am and each step is a hour in duration. There is a rest period of an hour at 2pm after which the duration of each step is 45 minutes.

Input: trucks 49 carry 36 massive 25 load 16
Step I: carry trucks 49 36 massive 25 load 16
Step II: carry 16 trucks 49 36 massive 25 load
Step III: carry 16 load trucks 49 36 massive 25
Step IV: carry 16 load 25 trucks 49 36 massive
Step V: carry 16 load 25 massive trucks 49 36
Step VI: carry 16 load 25 massive 36 trucks 49
Step VI is the last step for the above input.
Now answer the questions, following the same rules as illustrated above for rearrangement of the input line.

Q. What will be the third step of the input "ministers 25 solved 36 their 81 problems 64"?

Solution:

The machine ends up arranging words and numbers alternately in ascending order. In each step, the word or the number is moved to the correct position and all other words and numbers are moved right. The process stops when all words and numbers are arranged in ascending order.
Input: ministers 25 solved 36 their 81 problems 64
Step I: ministers 25 problems solved 36 their 81 64
Step II: ministers 25 problems 36 solved their 8164
Step III: ministers 25 problems 36 solved 64 their 81

QUESTION: 85

DIRECTIONS for the question: A coding machine generates pass codes in steps. The process begins at 10am and each step is a hour in duration. There is a rest period of an hour at 2pm after which the duration of each step is 45 minutes.

Input: trucks 49 carry 36 massive 25 load 16
Step I: carry trucks 49 36 massive 25 load 16
Step II: carry 16 trucks 49 36 massive 25 load
Step III: carry 16 load trucks 49 36 massive 25
Step IV: carry 16 load 25 trucks 49 36 massive
Step V: carry 16 load 25 massive trucks 49 36
Step VI: carry 16 load 25 massive 36 trucks 49
Step VI is the last step for the above input.
Now answer the questions, following the same rules as illustrated above for rearrangement of the input line.

Q. If the input is "the 36 issue 49 became 9 serious 25" how many steps will be required to complete the rearrange­ment?

Solution:

The machine ends up arranging words and numbers alternately in ascending order. In each step, the word or the number is moved to the correct position and all other words and numbers are moved right. The process stops when all words and numbers are arranged in ascending order.
Input: the 36 issue 49 became 9 serious 25
Step I: became the 36 issue 49 9 serious 25
Step II: became 9 the 36 issue 49 serious 25
Step III: became 9 issue the 36 49 serious 25
Step IV: became 9 issue 25 the 36 49 serious
Step V: became 9 issue 25 serious the 36 49
Step VI: became 9 issue 25 serious 36 the 49

QUESTION: 86

DIRECTIONS for question: Refer to the bar graph and answer the question that follows.

Q. The per capita consumption of power in 1960 – 61 was less by how many percent than per capita consumption in 1980 – 81?

Solution:

In 196061, the per capita consumption of power = 38.2 (from the table), while in 198081, consumption = 132.3.

The percentage decrease = [(132.338.2)/132.3] × 100 =71%.

QUESTION: 87

DIRECTIONS for question: Refer to the bar graph and answer the question that follows.

Q. What is the approximate ratio of hydel power generated in 1950 – 51 to that generated by non-utilities a decade later?

Solution:

Hydel power in 195051 = 2860; nonutilities in 196061 = 3186.

The approximate ratio = 29: 32= 9:10.

QUESTION: 88

DIRECTIONS for question: Refer to the bar graph and answer the question that follows.

Q. The non-utilities in 1984 – 85 formed what percent of the sum of the other three sources in 1980 – 81?

Solution:

In 198485, the nonutilities were 12210; generation by the other three = [Total – nonutilities ] = 1197608416 =111344.
The required percentage  [(12210 / 111344) ×100] = 121 / 11 =11%.

QUESTION: 89

DIRECTIONS for question: Refer to the bar graph and answer the question that follows.

Q. At what simple rate has nuclear energy grown annually since its inception (approximately)?

Solution:

Generation of nuclear energy began in 1970 71, and the generation in that year was 2417. 198485, the generation was 4075.
The percent growth = [(4075 – 2417) / 2417] × 100 =  67%.The simple annual growth = 67 / 14 = 4.8%.

QUESTION: 90

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Out of a total of 120 musicians in a club, 5% can play all the three instruments – guitar, violin and flute. It so happens that the number of musicians who can play any two and only two of the above instruments is 30. The number of musicians who can play the guitar alone is 40. What is the total number of those who can play violin alone or flute alone?

Solution:


From figure a + b + c = 30
and a + b + c + d + e + 40 + 6 = 120
30 + d + e + 40 + 6 = 120
d+e = 44
so the total number of those who can play violin alone or flute alone = 44

QUESTION: 91

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Who amongst the following is currently chairman of the National Commissioner for Protection of Child Rights?

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Which country has filed a notice to withdraw from UN Education, Science and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) effect 31 December, 2018?

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

The temperate grasslands of South America are called

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

“Tianyan” the world’s largest filled aperture radio telescope has built by which country?

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Which former Indian cricket captain currently became the first Indian sportsperson to win a Laureus World Sports Award?

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Name the person who heads the 25-member development council constituted by DPIIT under commerce and Industry ministry for pulp, paper and allied industries.

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

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Falguni Nayar, who has been presented with the EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award for 2019 in the start-up category, is the founder of which online store company?

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

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Which is the correct Country - Currency Match?

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

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Shirley Ann Grau who passed away recently has won Pulitzer Prize for which book?

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

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Which is the most valuable brand in the world as per FutureBrand Index 2020?

Solution:
QUESTION: 101

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Who has been appointed as the UNADAP’s ‘Goodwill Ambassador to the Poor’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

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The Procedure for the amendment of the Constitution has been adopted from which country?

Solution:
QUESTION: 103

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India’s first mobile RT-PCR COVID lab named ‘Mobile Infection Testing and Reporting lab (MITR)’ was developed by which institute?

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

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Our eyes can see depth, despite a two-dimensional retina, due to the

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

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The Rajya Sabha currently passed a bill to merge which two union territories (UTs) into one unit?

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

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Which became the first state in India to pass a resolution scrapping the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA)?

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

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Which is the first company to pull out of an alliance that is trying to launch Facebook’s digital currency Libra?

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Senior diplomat Harsh Vardhan Shringla has been appointed as the new:

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

In which year did the UN General-Assembly adopt the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?

Solution:
QUESTION: 110

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Union Minister of State for Youth Affairs & Sports Kiren Rijiju recently appointed Ripu Daman Bevli as the first ‘Plogging Ambassador of India’. Plogging is a modern-day fitness trend of jogging and picking up litter that has been coined by which country?

Solution: