IIFT Mock Test - 3 (New Pattern)


110 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | IIFT Mock Test - 3 (New Pattern)


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This mock test of IIFT Mock Test - 3 (New Pattern) for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 110 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT IIFT Mock Test - 3 (New Pattern) (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IIFT Mock Test - 3 (New Pattern) quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this IIFT Mock Test - 3 (New Pattern) exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IIFT Mock Test - 3 (New Pattern) extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Two cars, an Alto and a Swift, start at the same time in opposite directions from two distinct points P and Q. Starting from P, the Alto reaches Q in 6 hours 20 minutes and the Swift starting from Q, reaches P in 4 hours 45 minutes. What is the speed of the Swift, if the speed of the Alto is 60 km/hr? 

Solution:

The Alto and the Swift take 380 min and 285 min to travel the same distance. Suppose their speeds are A and S respectively.

Then, Distance = 380A = 285S ⇒ A : S = 3 : 4.
Since A = 60 kmph, hence S = 80 kmph.

Hence the answer is option D

QUESTION: 2

Sujoy, Mritunjoy and Paranjoy are three friends, who have worked in software firms Z Solutions, G Softwares and R Mindpoyver respectively for a decade. The friends decided to float a new software firm named XY Infotech in January 2010. However, due to certain compulsions, Mritunjoy and Paranjoy were not able to immediately join the start-up in the appointed time. It was decided between friends that Sujoy will be running the venture as the full time Director during 2010, and Mritunjoy and Paranjoy will be able to join the business only in January 2011. In order to compensate Sujoy for his efforts, it was decided that he will receive 10 percent of the profits and in the first year will invest lesser amount as compared to his friends. The remaining profit will be distributed among the friends in line with their contribution. Sujoy invested Rs. 35,000/- for 12 months, Mritunjoy invested Rs. 1,30,000/- for 6 months and Paranjoy invested Rs. 75,000/- for 8 months. If the total profit earned during 2010 was Rs. 4,50,000/-, then Paranjoy earned a profit of:

Solution:

►Investment of Sanjay = 35000 x 12 = 420000/-

►Investment of Mritunjoy = 130000 x 6 = 780000/-

►Investment of Pranjoy = 75000 x 8 = 600000/-

►Ratio = 420000 : 780000 : 600000 = 7:13:10

►After Deducting 10% the remaining profit = 450000 x 0.9 = 405000

QUESTION: 3

While preparing for a management entrance examination, Romit attempted to solve three papers, namely Mathematics, Verbal English and Logical Analysis, each of which have the full marks of 100. It is observed that one-third of the marks obtained by Romit in Logical Analysis is greater than half of his marks obtained in Verbal English by 5. He has obtained a total of 210 marks in the examination and 70 marks in Mathematics. What is the difference between the marks obtained by him in Mathematics and Verbal English?

Solution:

Let the marks obtained by Ronit in Logical Reasoning and Verbal Ability be 3a and 2b respectively.

►According to the question,
a = b + 5 …(i)

►Also, 3a + 2b + 70 = 210 …(ii)
From equations (i) and (ii),

►Hence the value of a = 30 b = 25
Marks in mathematics = 70 ;  marks in verbal ability = 2*b = 50
required difference = 70-50 = 20.

Hence the answer is option C

QUESTION: 4

Mohan has three wires of the same length. He forms a square S, a rectangle R1 and a rectangle R2 of the three wires. R1 has one side of length 8 cm, and R2 has one side of length 10 cm. The area of S exceeds the area of R1 by 9 cm2, & the area of S exceeds the area of R2 by 1 cm2. What is the length of the wires?

Solution:

Let side of square  = S
Since the length of all wires are same, it means that perimeter of all all shapes will be same.
For R1 
P = 2 (8 + b1)  ⇒  P - 2b1  = 16  …….. (i)

For R2
P = 2(10 + b2) ⇒  P - 2b2 = 20 …….. (ii)

Solving (i) & (ii)

b2 - b1 = - 2
b1 = b2 + 2

Area of square - area of R1 = 9

S2 - 8b1 = 9
S2 = 9 + 8b1

Area of square - area of R2 = 1

S2 - 10b2 = 1
S2 = 10b2 + 1
9 + 8b1 = 10b2 + 1
9 + 8(b2 + 2) = 10b2 + 1
9 + 8b2 + 16 = 10b2 + 1
b2 = 12, b1 = 14
S2 - 8 × 14 = 9
S2 = 121
S = 11

So total length = 4 × 11 = 44.

So option B.

QUESTION: 5

Find the value of x from the following equation: Log10 3 + log10(4x + l) = log10(x + 1) + 1

Solution:

Log103 + Log10(4x + 1) = Log10 (x + 1) + 1

Log103(4x + 1) = Log10 (x + 1) + Log1010

Log103(4x + 1) == Log1010(x+1)

⇒ 3(4x + 1) = 10 (x + 1)
⇒ 12x + 3 = 10x + 10
2x = 7
⇒ x = 7/2

QUESTION: 6

If log3y = 100 and logyx = 100, then the value of x is:

Solution:

log3y =100 means y=3100 and
logyx = 100, x=y100 =310000

QUESTION: 7

If 2, a, b, c, d, e, f and 65 form an arithmetic progression, find out the value of ‘e’. 

Solution:

2, a, b, c, d, e, f & 65 form an AP
⇒ a = 2 + D, b = 2 + 2D, c = 2 + 3D, d = 2 + 4D, e = 2 + 5D, f = 2 + 6D and 65 = 2 + 7D

⇒ D = 9 ⇒ a = 2 + 9 = 11
b = 2 = 18 = 20
c = 2 + 27 = 29
and so on

So the Series 2, 11, 20, 29, 38, 47, 56, 65.
so e = 47

Hence the answer is option B

QUESTION: 8

A contract is to be completed in 56 days and 104 men are set to work, each working 8 hours a day. After 30 days, 2/5th of the work is finished. How many additional men may be employed so that work may be completed on time, each man now working 9 hours per day?

Solution:

According to the question

►104 men → @ 8 hr/day → 30 days → 2/5 the work

►x men → @ 9 hr/day → 26 days → 3/5 the work

Additional Men Required  = 160 -104 = 56 Men

Hence the answer is option A

QUESTION: 9

In a circle, the height of an arc is 21 cm and the diameter is 84 cm. Find the chord of half of the arc?   

Solution:

The given scenario can be depicted in the diagram below.

As, OC ⊥ AB and OC = AO/2
ΔAOC is a 30 - 60 - 90 triangle.
∴ Angle subtended by the arc AB = 2 x 60 = 120°
∴ Angle subtended by half the arc is 60°
∴ Triangle formed by the chord of 'half the arc' and two radiii is equilateral
Hence, length of chord AM = 42 cm

Hence, option 3

QUESTION: 10

The ratio of number of male and female journalists in a newspaper office is 5: 4. The newspaper has two sections, political and sports. If 30 percent of the male journalists and 40 percent of the female journalists are covering political news, what percentage of the journalists (approx.) in the newspaper is currently involved in sports reporting?

Solution:

Let Total no. = 900
No. of Males = 500 & Females = 400
Poltical = 30% of 500 + 40% of 400
= 150 + 160 = 310
Sports = 900 - 310 = 590
Required %age = (590/900) x 100 = 65%
Hence the answer is option A

QUESTION: 11

In an examination paper of 5 questions, 5% of the candidates answered all of them and 5 % none. Of the rest 25% answered only 1 question and 20 % answered only 4 questions. If 24.5% of the entire candidates answered only 2 questions and 200 candidates answered only 3 questions, how many candidates appeared in the examination? 

Solution:

Then, number of candidates who answered all =( x * 5/100)

Number of candidates who answered none =( x * 5/100)

Number of candidates answered only 1 question

Number of candidates answered 4 questions

Candidates who answered 2 questions

by solving this, we get x = 800. Number of candidates appeared = 800

QUESTION: 12

Each of the numbers x1, x2, ...... xn , n ≥ 4, is equal to 1 or —1. Suppose, 
x1 X2 X3 X4 + X2 X3 X4 X5 + X3 X4 XX6 ......  Xn-3 Xn-2 Xn-1 Xn + Xn-2 Xn-1 Xn X1+ Xn-1XX1X2 + Xn X1 X2 X3 =0, then

Solution:

Each term has to be either 1 or –1.

Hence, if the sum of n such terms is 0, then n is even.

QUESTION: 13

Two runners A, B starts simultaneously from the two points where the circle x2 + y2 = 16 cut the X-axis. The speeds of A, B is in the ratio 2: 1 and they are moving in the opposite directions.The coordinates of the point where they meet for the first time is

Solution:

Distance covered by A = (2/3) X (2π x 4/2) = 8π/3

Point C is such that angle COB = 60º, coordinates of C = (2, 2√3)

Since the angle is 60 degrees  we can find coordinates by using 30 - 60 - 90 triangle, The sides are in ratio 1:√3:2 , If hypotenuse is 4,  Then  x axis is 4/2 = 2 and y axis is 4*√3/2 = 2√3

QUESTION: 14

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

The surface area of a spherical balloon is increasing at the rate of 2cm2/sec. At what rate per second is the volume of the balloon increasing when the radius of the balloon is 6 cm?

Solution:

S1/ S2 = V1/V2
S1 = 4π × 62, S2 = 4π × 62 + 2
V1 = (4/3)π × 63, V2 = (4/3)π × 63 + x
On solving, we get x = 4 cm3/ sec

QUESTION: 15

Mr. Akshay stays in a triangular colony. He stays at one vertex, with a bank and a market at the other two vertices. The roads meeting at the market are at 90. Akshay goes to the bank from his home and then to the market totally covering 160 m. He then walks straight back home from the market. If distance from home to bank is 40 m more than what he covered from bank to market, find the distance he walked from market to home.

Solution:

x+y = 160 and x-y = 40
x2 = y2 + z2
thus z = √(1002 - 602) = √6400 = 80

QUESTION: 16

In two alloys, copper and zinc are mixed in the ratios of 4 : 1 and 1 : 3. 10 kg of 1st  alloy, 16 kg of 2nd alloy and some of pure copper are melted together. An alloy was obtained in which the ratio of copper to zinc was 3 : 2. Find the weight of the new alloy. 

Solution:

Copper 1st alloy + Copper 2nd alloy + Pure copper = Copper new alloy

⇒ 4/5 × 10 kg + 1/4 × 16 kg + x = 3/5 × (10 + 16 + x)

⇒ 5 × (12 + x) = 3 (26 + x) ⇒ 2x = 18 ⇒ x = 9 kg ⇒ Weight of new alloy = 35 kg

QUESTION: 17

An artist has a canvas of length 10 inches and breadth 7 inches. He paints a green square of side 1 inch in one corner of the canvas. He then paints the two adjacent squares with blue colour. He continues to paint the entire canvas in such a way that no green square is adjacent to a blue square and vice versa. What is the ratio of number of blue squares to the number of green squares?

Solution:

The canvas along the length would have 5 blue and 5 green squares for each 1 inch breadth.

Hence, they would have equal number of blue and green squares, similar to a chess board but with different dimensions.

QUESTION: 18

ABCD is a rectangle with AB = 6 cm and AD = 8 cm. QR is an arc centered at A which cuts the extension of AD at Q and AB at R. What is the length of the arc QR if C is a point on it?

Solution:

If AB = 6 and AD = 8, then AC or BD = √(82+62) = 10. QR is 1/4th of the circumfrence of a circle whose center is A.

Hence, QR = 1/4 x 2π x 10 = 5π.

QUESTION: 19

y = p/q where 3 ≤ p ≤ 9 and 15 ≤ q ≤ 21, then y lies between 

Solution:

minimum value of y is 3/21 = 1/7. Maximum value of y is 9/15 = 3/5.

so, 1/7 ≤ y ≤ 3/5 is correct

QUESTION: 20

If , Where c < a < b and a, b and c are real numbers, what is the minimum value of n?

Solution:

We know that n must be a natural number (as we have nth root of a), it seems that the minimum value of n is 1 and c = 0.5.

However, we know that for numbers between 0 and 1, the values of squares and cubes keep on reducing.

Since c < a < b, c cannot be 0.5 (if c = 0.5 and a = 0.6, then b=a3 = 0.216 ⇒ b < a).

So, c must be at least 1 and therefore the minimum value of n = 2.

QUESTION: 21

A sum of money is sufficient to pay A’s wages for 18 days and B’s wages for 27 days. The money is sufficient to pay the wages of both for:

Solution:

Let the sum of money = Rs.Y No. of days for which money is sufficient to pay both = n days.

A''s wage for one day = Y/18 and B"s wage for one day = Y/27.

According to the question, (Y/18 + Y/27)n = Y. No. of days, n = (1/18 + 1/27)-1 = 54/5 = 10 4/5 days.
Hence 1st option.

QUESTION: 22

Let a, b, c, d be four integers such that a + b + c + d = 4m + 1 where m is a positive integer. Given m, which one of the following is necessarily true?

Solution:

(a + b + + d)2 = (4m + 1)2 

Thus, a2 + b2 + c2 + d2 + 2(ab + ac + ad + bc + bd + cd) = 16m2 + 8m + 1

a2 + b2 + c2 + d2 will have the minimum value if (ab + ac + ad + be + bd + cd) is the maximum.

This is possible if a=b=c=d= (m + 0.25) ... since a +b+c+d= 4m+ 1

In that case 2(ab + ac + ad + bc + bd + cd) = 12(m + 0.25)2 = 12m2 + 6m + 0.75

Thus, the minimum value of a2 + b2 + c2 + d2 = (16m2 + 8m + 1)— 2(ab + ac + ad + bc + bd + cd) = (16m2 + 8m + 1)— (12m2 + 6m + 0.75) = 4m2 + 2m + 0.25

Since it is an integer, the actual minimum value = 4m2 + 2m + 1

QUESTION: 23

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Boston is 4 hours ahead of Frankfurt and 2 hours behind India. X leaves Frankfurt at 6 p.m. on Friday and reaches Boston the next day. After waiting there for 2 hours, he leaves exactly at noon and reaches India at 1 a.m.on Sunday. On his return journey, he takes the same route as before, but halts at Boston for 1hour less than his previous halt there. He then proceeds to Frankfurt.

Q. If his journey, including stoppage, is covered at an average speed of 180 mph, what is the distance between Frankfurt and India? 

Solution:

Let us convert all the time to same time zone, viz. Boston.

►So X left Frankfurt at 6 p.m. on Friday (Frankfurt time) or 10 p.m. on Friday (Boston time).

►X reached Boston at 10 a.m. on Saturday (Boston time), (since after waiting there for 2 hours, he leaves exactly at noon)

►In other words, X has taken 12hr in all to go from Frankfurt to Boston,

►After 2 hr wait, X leaves at 12 noon on Saturday (Boston time).

►Now X reaches India at 1 a.m. on Sunday (Indian Time) or 11 p.m. on Saturday (Boston Time).

►Thus, X takes 11 hr in all to go from Boston to India.

►Overall, X has travelled for 25 h (including stoppages) at an average speed of 180 miles per hour.

►Hence, the distance between Frankfurt and India is (25 × 180) = 4500 miles.

QUESTION: 24

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Ghosh Babu deposited a certain sum of money in a bank in 1986. The bank calculated interest on the principal at 10 percent simple interest, and credited it to the account once a year. After the 1st year, Ghosh Babu withdrew the entire interest and 20% of the initial amount. After the 2nd year, he withdrew the interest and 50% of the remaining amount. After the 3rd year, he withdrew the interest and 50% of the remaining amount. Finally after the 4th year, Ghosh Babu closed the account and collected the entire balance of Rs. 11,000.

Q. The initial amount in rupees, deposited by Ghosh Babu was:

Solution:

Let us assume that Ghosh Babu had deposited Rs. 100 initially.

Hence, had he deposited Rs.100 initially, he should have withdrawn Rs.22 at the end to close the account.

Since he withdrew Rs.11000, at the end he should have initially deposited Rs.50000.

QUESTION: 25

Ramlal was towing a rubber dinghy by motorboat from town A to town B upstream. At the half way mark, the tow line snapped and the dinghy started drifting downstream. Ramlal realised this when he reached town B. He immediately turned back and travelling at 125% of his former speed, caught up with the dinghy 10 km before town A. It is given that speed of boat in still water remains same on return journey as it was in onward journey. The motorboat’s speed in still water was what percent greater than the speed of the stream? 

Solution:

Since the distance between towns A and B is not known, it seems that the answer is Cannot be determined.

►However, it is not so! The upstream speed is (x – y) and the downstream speed is (x + y).

►From the question, (x + y) = 1.25(x – y) ⇒ 4(x + y) = 5(x – y) ⇒ x/y = 9/1.

►Thus, the speed of boat in still water is 8 times more, i.e., 800% more than the speed of the stream.

QUESTION: 26

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned

Many expectations are implicit. They haven’t been explicitly stated or announced, but people nevertheless bring them to a particular situation.(1) In marriage, for example, a man and woman have implicit expectations of each other in their marriage roles. Although these expectations have not been discussed, or sometimes even recognized by the person who has them, fulfilling them makes great (2) deposits in the society and violating them makes withdrawals.

That’s why it’s so important whenever you come into a new situation to get all the expectations out on the table. (3) People  judge each other based on expectations. And if they feel like their basic expectations have been violated, the reserve of trust is diminished. We create many negative situations by simply assuming that our expectations are self-evident and that they are clearly understood and shared by other people.

The deposit is to make the expectations clear and explicit in the beginning. This takes a real investment of time and effort up front, but it saves great amounts of time (4) and effort down the road. When expectations are not clear and shared, people begin to become emotionally involved and simple misunderstandings become compounded, turning into personality clashes and communication breakdowns.

(5) Really seeking to understand another person is probably one of the most important deposits you can make. Clarifying expectations sometimes takes a great deal of courage, it seems easier to act as though differences don’t exist and to hope things will work out than it is to face the differences and work together to arrive at a mutually agreeable set of expectations. 

Q. Identify the best possible change in the underlined sentence (1)

Solution:

A man and a woman is correct as both are being addressed as separate entity in a marriage. B and C are incorrect because of usage of “or” instead of “and”.

QUESTION: 27

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned

Many expectations are implicit. They haven’t been explicitly stated or announced, but people nevertheless bring them to a particular situation.(1) In marriage, for example, a man and woman have implicit expectations of each other in their marriage roles. Although these expectations have not been discussed, or sometimes even recognized by the person who has them, fulfilling them makes great (2) deposits in the society and violating them makes withdrawals.

That’s why it’s so important whenever you come into a new situation to get all the expectations out on the table. (3) People  judge each other based on expectations. And if they feel like their basic expectations have been violated, the reserve of trust is diminished. We create many negative situations by simply assuming that our expectations are self-evident and that they are clearly understood and shared by other people.

The deposit is to make the expectations clear and explicit in the beginning. This takes a real investment of time and effort up front, but it saves great amounts of time (4) and effort down the road. When expectations are not clear and shared, people begin to become emotionally involved and simple misunderstandings become compounded, turning into personality clashes and communication breakdowns.

(5) Really seeking to understand another person is probably one of the most important deposits you can make. Clarifying expectations sometimes takes a great deal of courage, it seems easier to act as though differences don’t exist and to hope things will work out than it is to face the differences and work together to arrive at a mutually agreeable set of expectations. 

Q. Identify from the given options that best revises the underlined sentence (2) to improve the expression of the idea.

Solution:

The passage clearly talks about maintaining and improving relationships as cited by the example of marriage in the previous sentence. Thus option C is correct. 

QUESTION: 28

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 
For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned

Many expectations are implicit. They haven’t been explicitly stated or announced, but people nevertheless bring them to a particular situation.(1) In marriage, for example, a man and woman have implicit expectations of each other in their marriage roles. Although these expectations have not been discussed, or sometimes even recognized by the person who has them, fulfilling them makes great (2) deposits in the society and violating them makes withdrawals.

That’s why it’s so important whenever you come into a new situation to get all the expectations out on the table. (3) People  judge each other based on expectations. And if they feel like their basic expectations have been violated, the reserve of trust is diminished. We create many negative situations by simply assuming that our expectations are self-evident and that they are clearly understood and shared by other people.

The deposit is to make the expectations clear and explicit in the beginning. This takes a real investment of time and effort up front, but it saves great amounts of time (4) and effort down the road. When expectations are not clear and shared, people begin to become emotionally involved and simple misunderstandings become compounded, turning into personality clashes and communication breakdowns.

(5) Really seeking to understand another person is probably one of the most important deposits you can make. Clarifying expectations sometimes takes a great deal of courage, it seems easier to act as though differences don’t exist and to hope things will work out than it is to face the differences and work together to arrive at a mutually agreeable set of expectations. 

Q. Identify the best possible change from the given options for the underlined sentence (3)

Solution:

Use of word “those” indicates that we are still talking about the same expectations that have been clearly laid out in the open as discussed in the previous sentence.

QUESTION: 29

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 
For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned

Many expectations are implicit. They haven’t been explicitly stated or announced, but people nevertheless bring them to a particular situation.(1) In marriage, for example, a man and woman have implicit expectations of each other in their marriage roles. Although these expectations have not been discussed, or sometimes even recognized by the person who has them, fulfilling them makes great (2) deposits in the society and violating them makes withdrawals.

That’s why it’s so important whenever you come into a new situation to get all the expectations out on the table. (3) People  judge each other based on expectations. And if they feel like their basic expectations have been violated, the reserve of trust is diminished. We create many negative situations by simply assuming that our expectations are self-evident and that they are clearly understood and shared by other people.

The deposit is to make the expectations clear and explicit in the beginning. This takes a real investment of time and effort up front, but it saves great amounts of time (4) and effort down the road. When expectations are not clear and shared, people begin to become emotionally involved and simple misunderstandings become compounded, turning into personality clashes and communication breakdowns.

(5) Really seeking to understand another person is probably one of the most important deposits you can make. Clarifying expectations sometimes takes a great deal of courage, it seems easier to act as though differences don’t exist and to hope things will work out than it is to face the differences and work together to arrive at a mutually agreeable set of expectations. 

Q. Identify from the given options that best revises the underlined sentence (4) to improve the expression of the idea.

Solution:

Effort down the road is the apt expression for the idea that wants to convey that time and effort invested now would pay-off later. 

QUESTION: 30

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 
For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned

Many expectations are implicit. They haven’t been explicitly stated or announced, but people nevertheless bring them to a particular situation.(1) In marriage, for example, a man and woman have implicit expectations of each other in their marriage roles. Although these expectations have not been discussed, or sometimes even recognized by the person who has them, fulfilling them makes great (2) deposits in the society and violating them makes withdrawals.

That’s why it’s so important whenever you come into a new situation to get all the expectations out on the table. (3) People  judge each other based on expectations. And if they feel like their basic expectations have been violated, the reserve of trust is diminished. We create many negative situations by simply assuming that our expectations are self-evident and that they are clearly understood and shared by other people.

The deposit is to make the expectations clear and explicit in the beginning. This takes a real investment of time and effort up front, but it saves great amounts of time (4) and effort down the road. When expectations are not clear and shared, people begin to become emotionally involved and simple misunderstandings become compounded, turning into personality clashes and communication breakdowns.

(5) Really seeking to understand another person is probably one of the most important deposits you can make. Clarifying expectations sometimes takes a great deal of courage, it seems easier to act as though differences don’t exist and to hope things will work out than it is to face the differences and work together to arrive at a mutually agreeable set of expectations. 

Q. The writer is considering deleting the underlined sentence (5). Should the sentence be kept or deleted?

Solution:

The highlighted sentence strays from the topic by bringing in a new concept that is not discussed throughout the passage. The passage talks about stating one’s expectations clearly to the other, while the highlighted sentence talks about understanding the other individual. 

QUESTION: 31

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

In all ages of speculation, one of the strongest obstacles to the reception of the doctrine that Utility or Happiness is the criterion of right and wrong, has been drawn from the idea of Justice, the powerful sentiment, and apparently clear perception, which that word recalls with a rapidity and certainty resembling an instinct, have seemed to the majority of thinkers to point to an inherent quality in things; to show that the Just must have an existence in Nature as something absolute-generically distinct from every variety of the Expedient, and, in idea, opposed to it, though (as is commonly acknowledged) never, in the long run, disjoined from it in fact.
In the case of this, as of our other moral sentiments, there is no necessary connection between the question of its origin, and that of its binding force. That a feeling is bestowed on us by Nature, does not necessarily legitimate all its promptings. The feeling of justice might be a peculiar instinct, and might yet require, like our other instincts, to be controlled and enlightened by a higher reason. If we have intellectual instincts, leading us to judge in a particular way, as well as animal instincts that prompt us to act in a particular way, there is no necessity that the former should be more infallible in their sphere than the latter in theirs: it may as well happen that wrong judgments are occasionally suggested by those, as wrong actions by these. But though it is one thing to believe that we have natural feelings of justice, and another to acknowledge them as an ultimate criterion of conduct, these two opinions are very closely connected in point of fact. Mankind is always predisposed to believe that any subjective feeling, not otherwise accounted for, is a revelation of some objective reality. Our present object is to determine whether the reality, to which the feeling of justice corresponds, is one which needs any such special revelation; whether the justice or injustice of an action is a thing intrinsically peculiar, and distinct from all its other qualities, or only a combination of certain of those qualities, presented under a peculiar aspect. For the purpose of this inquiry, it is practically important to consider whether the feeling itself, of justice and injustice, is sui generis like our sensations of colour and taste, or a derivative feeling, formed by a combination of others. And this it is the more essential to examine, as people are in general willing enough to allow, that objectively the dictates of justice coincide with a part of the field of General Expediency; but in as much as the subjective mental feeling of Justice is different from that which commonly attaches to simple expediency, and, except in extreme cases of the latter, is far more imperative in its demands, people find it difficult to see, in Justice, only a particular kind or branch of general utility, and think that its superior binding force requires a totally different origin.
To throw light upon this question, it is necessary to attempt to ascertain what is the distinguishing character of justice, or of injustice: what is the quality, or whether there is any quality, attributed in common to all modes of conduct designated as unjust (for justice, like many other moral attributes, is best defined by its opposite), and distinguishing them from such modes of conduct as are disapproved, but without having that particular epithet of disapprobation applied to them. If in everything which men are accustomed to characterise as just or unjust, some one common attribute or collection of attributes is always present, we may judge whether this particular attribute or combination of attributes would be capable of gathering round it a sentiment of that peculiar character and intensity by virtue of the general laws of our emotional constitution, or whether the sentiment is inexplicable, and requires to be regarded as a special provision of Nature. If we find the former to be the case, we shall, in resolving this question, have resolved also the main problem: if the latter, we shall have to seek for some other mode of investigating it.

Q. According to the information given in the first paragraph, the ‘Just’ and the ‘Expedient’ are: 

Solution:

The answer can be derived from the lines: To show that the Just must have an existence in Nature as something absolute-generically distinct from every variety of the Expedient, and, in idea, opposed to it, though (as is commonly acknowledged) never, in the long run, disjoined from it in fact.

We can see that option C is the best answer in this case.

QUESTION: 32

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

In all ages of speculation, one of the strongest obstacles to the reception of the doctrine that Utility or Happiness is the criterion of right and wrong, has been drawn from the idea of Justice, the powerful sentiment, and apparently clear perception, which that word recalls with a rapidity and certainty resembling an instinct, have seemed to the majority of thinkers to point to an inherent quality in things; to show that the Just must have an existence in Nature as something absolute-generically distinct from every variety of the Expedient, and, in idea, opposed to it, though (as is commonly acknowledged) never, in the long run, disjoined from it in fact.
In the case of this, as of our other moral sentiments, there is no necessary connection between the question of its origin, and that of its binding force. That a feeling is bestowed on us by Nature, does not necessarily legitimate all its promptings. The feeling of justice might be a peculiar instinct, and might yet require, like our other instincts, to be controlled and enlightened by a higher reason. If we have intellectual instincts, leading us to judge in a particular way, as well as animal instincts that prompt us to act in a particular way, there is no necessity that the former should be more infallible in their sphere than the latter in theirs: it may as well happen that wrong judgments are occasionally suggested by those, as wrong actions by these. But though it is one thing to believe that we have natural feelings of justice, and another to acknowledge them as an ultimate criterion of conduct, these two opinions are very closely connected in point of fact. Mankind is always predisposed to believe that any subjective feeling, not otherwise accounted for, is a revelation of some objective reality. Our present object is to determine whether the reality, to which the feeling of justice corresponds, is one which needs any such special revelation; whether the justice or injustice of an action is a thing intrinsically peculiar, and distinct from all its other qualities, or only a combination of certain of those qualities, presented under a peculiar aspect. For the purpose of this inquiry, it is practically important to consider whether the feeling itself, of justice and injustice, is sui generis like our sensations of colour and taste, or a derivative feeling, formed by a combination of others. And this it is the more essential to examine, as people are in general willing enough to allow, that objectively the dictates of justice coincide with a part of the field of General Expediency; but in as much as the subjective mental feeling of Justice is different from that which commonly attaches to simple expediency, and, except in extreme cases of the latter, is far more imperative in its demands, people find it difficult to see, in Justice, only a particular kind or branch of general utility, and think that its superior binding force requires a totally different origin.
To throw light upon this question, it is necessary to attempt to ascertain what is the distinguishing character of justice, or of injustice: what is the quality, or whether there is any quality, attributed in common to all modes of conduct designated as unjust (for justice, like many other moral attributes, is best defined by its opposite), and distinguishing them from such modes of conduct as are disapproved, but without having that particular epithet of disapprobation applied to them. If in everything which men are accustomed to characterise as just or unjust, some one common attribute or collection of attributes is always present, we may judge whether this particular attribute or combination of attributes would be capable of gathering round it a sentiment of that peculiar character and intensity by virtue of the general laws of our emotional constitution, or whether the sentiment is inexplicable, and requires to be regarded as a special provision of Nature. If we find the former to be the case, we shall, in resolving this question, have resolved also the main problem: if the latter, we shall have to seek for some other mode of investigating it.

Q. What does ‘sui generis’ mean?

Solution:

Refer to the lines: For the purpose of this inquiry, it is practically important to consider whether the feeling itself, of justice and injustice, is sui generis like our sensations of colour and taste, or a derivative feeling, formed by a combination of others.

Sui generis means ‘constituting a class of its own; unique’ and we can see that option A is the best answer here.

QUESTION: 33

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

In all ages of speculation, one of the strongest obstacles to the reception of the doctrine that Utility or Happiness is the criterion of right and wrong, has been drawn from the idea of Justice, the powerful sentiment, and apparently clear perception, which that word recalls with a rapidity and certainty resembling an instinct, have seemed to the majority of thinkers to point to an inherent quality in things; to show that the Just must have an existence in Nature as something absolute-generically distinct from every variety of the Expedient, and, in idea, opposed to it, though (as is commonly acknowledged) never, in the long run, disjoined from it in fact.
In the case of this, as of our other moral sentiments, there is no necessary connection between the question of its origin, and that of its binding force. That a feeling is bestowed on us by Nature, does not necessarily legitimate all its promptings. The feeling of justice might be a peculiar instinct, and might yet require, like our other instincts, to be controlled and enlightened by a higher reason. If we have intellectual instincts, leading us to judge in a particular way, as well as animal instincts that prompt us to act in a particular way, there is no necessity that the former should be more infallible in their sphere than the latter in theirs: it may as well happen that wrong judgments are occasionally suggested by those, as wrong actions by these. But though it is one thing to believe that we have natural feelings of justice, and another to acknowledge them as an ultimate criterion of conduct, these two opinions are very closely connected in point of fact. Mankind is always predisposed to believe that any subjective feeling, not otherwise accounted for, is a revelation of some objective reality. Our present object is to determine whether the reality, to which the feeling of justice corresponds, is one which needs any such special revelation; whether the justice or injustice of an action is a thing intrinsically peculiar, and distinct from all its other qualities, or only a combination of certain of those qualities, presented under a peculiar aspect. For the purpose of this inquiry, it is practically important to consider whether the feeling itself, of justice and injustice, is sui generis like our sensations of colour and taste, or a derivative feeling, formed by a combination of others. And this it is the more essential to examine, as people are in general willing enough to allow, that objectively the dictates of justice coincide with a part of the field of General Expediency; but in as much as the subjective mental feeling of Justice is different from that which commonly attaches to simple expediency, and, except in extreme cases of the latter, is far more imperative in its demands, people find it difficult to see, in Justice, only a particular kind or branch of general utility, and think that its superior binding force requires a totally different origin.
To throw light upon this question, it is necessary to attempt to ascertain what is the distinguishing character of justice, or of injustice: what is the quality, or whether there is any quality, attributed in common to all modes of conduct designated as unjust (for justice, like many other moral attributes, is best defined by its opposite), and distinguishing them from such modes of conduct as are disapproved, but without having that particular epithet of disapprobation applied to them. If in everything which men are accustomed to characterise as just or unjust, some one common attribute or collection of attributes is always present, we may judge whether this particular attribute or combination of attributes would be capable of gathering round it a sentiment of that peculiar character and intensity by virtue of the general laws of our emotional constitution, or whether the sentiment is inexplicable, and requires to be regarded as a special provision of Nature. If we find the former to be the case, we shall, in resolving this question, have resolved also the main problem: if the latter, we shall have to seek for some other mode of investigating it.

Q. Which of the following identifies best with the central idea of the passage?

Solution:

In the given case, the author of the passage constantly explores one question in the passage: what is the nature of justice and what constitutes justice? He goes on to talk about the nature of justice, where it is related to expedient (Appropriate to a purpose; practical), its characteristics and so on.

Keeping this in mind, Option B is the apt answer in the given case.

QUESTION: 34

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

In all ages of speculation, one of the strongest obstacles to the reception of the doctrine that Utility or Happiness is the criterion of right and wrong, has been drawn from the idea of Justice, the powerful sentiment, and apparently clear perception, which that word recalls with a rapidity and certainty resembling an instinct, have seemed to the majority of thinkers to point to an inherent quality in things; to show that the Just must have an existence in Nature as something absolute-generically distinct from every variety of the Expedient, and, in idea, opposed to it, though (as is commonly acknowledged) never, in the long run, disjoined from it in fact.
In the case of this, as of our other moral sentiments, there is no necessary connection between the question of its origin, and that of its binding force. That a feeling is bestowed on us by Nature, does not necessarily legitimate all its promptings. The feeling of justice might be a peculiar instinct, and might yet require, like our other instincts, to be controlled and enlightened by a higher reason. If we have intellectual instincts, leading us to judge in a particular way, as well as animal instincts that prompt us to act in a particular way, there is no necessity that the former should be more infallible in their sphere than the latter in theirs: it may as well happen that wrong judgments are occasionally suggested by those, as wrong actions by these. But though it is one thing to believe that we have natural feelings of justice, and another to acknowledge them as an ultimate criterion of conduct, these two opinions are very closely connected in point of fact. Mankind is always predisposed to believe that any subjective feeling, not otherwise accounted for, is a revelation of some objective reality. Our present object is to determine whether the reality, to which the feeling of justice corresponds, is one which needs any such special revelation; whether the justice or injustice of an action is a thing intrinsically peculiar, and distinct from all its other qualities, or only a combination of certain of those qualities, presented under a peculiar aspect. For the purpose of this inquiry, it is practically important to consider whether the feeling itself, of justice and injustice, is sui generis like our sensations of colour and taste, or a derivative feeling, formed by a combination of others. And this it is the more essential to examine, as people are in general willing enough to allow, that objectively the dictates of justice coincide with a part of the field of General Expediency; but in as much as the subjective mental feeling of Justice is different from that which commonly attaches to simple expediency, and, except in extreme cases of the latter, is far more imperative in its demands, people find it difficult to see, in Justice, only a particular kind or branch of general utility, and think that its superior binding force requires a totally different origin.
To throw light upon this question, it is necessary to attempt to ascertain what is the distinguishing character of justice, or of injustice: what is the quality, or whether there is any quality, attributed in common to all modes of conduct designated as unjust (for justice, like many other moral attributes, is best defined by its opposite), and distinguishing them from such modes of conduct as are disapproved, but without having that particular epithet of disapprobation applied to them. If in everything which men are accustomed to characterise as just or unjust, some one common attribute or collection of attributes is always present, we may judge whether this particular attribute or combination of attributes would be capable of gathering round it a sentiment of that peculiar character and intensity by virtue of the general laws of our emotional constitution, or whether the sentiment is inexplicable, and requires to be regarded as a special provision of Nature. If we find the former to be the case, we shall, in resolving this question, have resolved also the main problem: if the latter, we shall have to seek for some other mode of investigating it.

Q. The author of the passage will agree with which of the following statements?

I. Man is likely to believe subjective feelings.
II. It is not necessary that feelings that seemingly originate from Nature are always valid in all their forms.
III. Animal instincts and intellectual instincts can be treated at par.

Solution:

Each of the statements can be derived from the –passage:

Statement I is derived from the line: Mankind is always predisposed to believe that any subjective feeling, not otherwise accounted for, is a revelation of some objective reality.

Statement II is derived from the line: That a feeling is bestowed on us by Nature, does not necessarily legitimate all its promptings.

Statement III is the problem option. It can be negated from the lines: If we have intellectual instincts, leading us to judge in a particular way, as well as animal instincts that prompt us to act in a particular way, there is no necessity that the former should be more infallible in their sphere than the latter in theirs: it may as well happen that wrong judgments are occasionally suggested by those, as wrong actions by these.

QUESTION: 35

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

They are born that way. They have become that way. They have chosen to be that way. Nature, nurture and choice, these are three 'explanations' of homosexuality that the modern world throws up every now and then. Most often, they are regarded as mutually exclusive alternatives, and might be released into the public domain as the result of genetic, psychiatric or sociological research, or as politicized convictions. These theories, and the various guises in which they become part of 'common knowledge', determine not only perceptions of and attitudes to homosexuality, but also how homosexuals make sense of and live out their own lives. So, when a Canadian psychologist's research suggests that having one or more older brothers boosts the likelihood of a boy growing up to be gay, it is important to be able to put such a 'finding' in its place and think about what is going on behind and around the research. Why is it that, every now and then, the 'causes' of homosexuality have to be located in the genes, or in some form of biological determinism, and linked to left-handedness or red-headedness, or to similar behaviour in mice, fruit-flies, monkeys or penguins' Are these explanations actually justifications ('We/They can't help it') or are they something more mischievous and sinister ('If it's genetic, then maybe something can be done about it')
First, similar explanations are never sought for heterosexuality, which is the 'order of nature', and hence beyond enquiry. Behind most such investigations into homosexuality is profoundly normative thinking. It is deviancy from the norm that requires scientific explanation, and in civilized societies some deviancies need empirically grounded justification. Second, the focus is always on male homosexuality. Lesbians complicate most hypotheses and inferences regarding sexuality, and women come into the picture only as wombs in which the drama of sexual destinies is played out. Third, biological sex, gender-roles, sexual identity and sexual behaviour are distinct but variously overlapping elements within human sexuality. They combine among one another to form complex and shifting configurations most of which cannot be reduced to simple binaries like gay and straight, active and passive, masculine and feminine. Between being absolutely heterosexual and absolutely homosexual, human sexual identity and behaviour show innumerable gradations, variations and changes, some culturally inflected, that defy fixed definitions and categories.
Most research into why homosexuals are homosexuals fails to take into account these essential complexities and variations, and is therefore premised on a limitedness that renders dubious its claims to scientific 'truth'. In the liberal West, where most battles against sexual injustice seem to have been won, the persistence of such research could only point to a deep discomfort with what the Indian Penal Code still deems, more unabashedly, to be 'against the order of nature'.

Q. The author of the passage clearly:

Solution:

What does Option A effectively mean?

That the author is against the emancipation of homosexuality (which goes against what is implied in the passage).

Option C targets the scientific community in general and is too general to be correct.

Option D finds no mention in the passage.

Option B is the correct answer in this case, as it represents the general feeling of the author of the passage.

QUESTION: 36

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

They are born that way. They have become that way. They have chosen to be that way. Nature, nurture and choice, these are three 'explanations' of homosexuality that the modern world throws up every now and then. Most often, they are regarded as mutually exclusive alternatives, and might be released into the public domain as the result of genetic, psychiatric or sociological research, or as politicized convictions. These theories, and the various guises in which they become part of 'common knowledge', determine not only perceptions of and attitudes to homosexuality, but also how homosexuals make sense of and live out their own lives. So, when a Canadian psychologist's research suggests that having one or more older brothers boosts the likelihood of a boy growing up to be gay, it is important to be able to put such a 'finding' in its place and think about what is going on behind and around the research. Why is it that, every now and then, the 'causes' of homosexuality have to be located in the genes, or in some form of biological determinism, and linked to left-handedness or red-headedness, or to similar behaviour in mice, fruit-flies, monkeys or penguins' Are these explanations actually justifications ('We/They can't help it') or are they something more mischievous and sinister ('If it's genetic, then maybe something can be done about it')
First, similar explanations are never sought for heterosexuality, which is the 'order of nature', and hence beyond enquiry. Behind most such investigations into homosexuality is profoundly normative thinking. It is deviancy from the norm that requires scientific explanation, and in civilized societies some deviancies need empirically grounded justification. Second, the focus is always on male homosexuality. Lesbians complicate most hypotheses and inferences regarding sexuality, and women come into the picture only as wombs in which the drama of sexual destinies is played out. Third, biological sex, gender-roles, sexual identity and sexual behaviour are distinct but variously overlapping elements within human sexuality. They combine among one another to form complex and shifting configurations most of which cannot be reduced to simple binaries like gay and straight, active and passive, masculine and feminine. Between being absolutely heterosexual and absolutely homosexual, human sexual identity and behaviour show innumerable gradations, variations and changes, some culturally inflected, that defy fixed definitions and categories.
Most research into why homosexuals are homosexuals fails to take into account these essential complexities and variations, and is therefore premised on a limitedness that renders dubious its claims to scientific 'truth'. In the liberal West, where most battles against sexual injustice seem to have been won, the persistence of such research could only point to a deep discomfort with what the Indian Penal Code still deems, more unabashedly, to be 'against the order of nature'.

Q. In the given context of the passage, the author views "normative thinking" as:

Solution:

In the given context, the author clearly views normative thinking as something which is negative and which creates problems in the understanding of homosexuality.

Two options focus on this negative aspect: impediment (Any structure that makes progress difficult) and curse (Wish harm upon; invoke evil upon).

From the meanings of the two words, we can see that Option A is the better choice in the given context as curse is too extreme a word to use in the given context.

QUESTION: 37

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

They are born that way. They have become that way. They have chosen to be that way. Nature, nurture and choice, these are three 'explanations' of homosexuality that the modern world throws up every now and then. Most often, they are regarded as mutually exclusive alternatives, and might be released into the public domain as the result of genetic, psychiatric or sociological research, or as politicized convictions. These theories, and the various guises in which they become part of 'common knowledge', determine not only perceptions of and attitudes to homosexuality, but also how homosexuals make sense of and live out their own lives. So, when a Canadian psychologist's research suggests that having one or more older brothers boosts the likelihood of a boy growing up to be gay, it is important to be able to put such a 'finding' in its place and think about what is going on behind and around the research. Why is it that, every now and then, the 'causes' of homosexuality have to be located in the genes, or in some form of biological determinism, and linked to left-handedness or red-headedness, or to similar behaviour in mice, fruit-flies, monkeys or penguins' Are these explanations actually justifications ('We/They can't help it') or are they something more mischievous and sinister ('If it's genetic, then maybe something can be done about it')

First, similar explanations are never sought for heterosexuality, which is the 'order of nature', and hence beyond enquiry. Behind most such investigations into homosexuality is profoundly normative thinking. It is deviancy from the norm that requires scientific explanation, and in civilized societies some deviancies need empirically grounded justification. Second, the focus is always on male homosexuality. Lesbians complicate most hypotheses and inferences regarding sexuality, and women come into the picture only as wombs in which the drama of sexual destinies is played out. Third, biological sex, gender-roles, sexual identity and sexual behaviour are distinct but variously overlapping elements within human sexuality. They combine among one another to form complex and shifting configurations most of which cannot be reduced to simple binaries like gay and straight, active and passive, masculine and feminine. Between being absolutely heterosexual and absolutely homosexual, human sexual identity and behaviour show innumerable gradations, variations and changes, some culturally inflected, that defy fixed definitions and categories.

Most research into why homosexuals are homosexuals fails to take into account these essential complexities and variations, and is therefore premised on a limitedness that renders dubious its claims to scientific 'truth'. In the liberal West, where most battles against sexual injustice seem to have been won, the persistence of such research could only point to a deep discomfort with what the Indian Penal Code still deems, more unabashedly, to be 'against the order of nature'.

Q. The terms "Nature, nurture and choice", as used by the author, reflect:

Solution:

In the given case, refer to the lines: They are born that way. They have become that way. They have chosen to be that way. Nature, nurture and choice, these are three ''explanations'' of homosexuality that the modern world throws up every now and then. Most often, they are regarded as mutually exclusive alternatives, and might be released into the public domain as the result of genetic, psychiatric or sociological research, or as politicized convictions.

The lines show that how these three are used by society and scientists to define homosexuality in a very limited and restrictive manner. Thus, Option C is the correct answer here. The other options are clever mutilations of the given information in the passage but these do not match the intended meaning.

QUESTION: 38

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

They are born that way. They have become that way. They have chosen to be that way. Nature, nurture and choice, these are three 'explanations' of homosexuality that the modern world throws up every now and then. Most often, they are regarded as mutually exclusive alternatives, and might be released into the public domain as the result of genetic, psychiatric or sociological research, or as politicized convictions. These theories, and the various guises in which they become part of 'common knowledge', determine not only perceptions of and attitudes to homosexuality, but also how homosexuals make sense of and live out their own lives. So, when a Canadian psychologist's research suggests that having one or more older brothers boosts the likelihood of a boy growing up to be gay, it is important to be able to put such a 'finding' in its place and think about what is going on behind and around the research. Why is it that, every now and then, the 'causes' of homosexuality have to be located in the genes, or in some form of biological determinism, and linked to left-handedness or red-headedness, or to similar behaviour in mice, fruit-flies, monkeys or penguins' Are these explanations actually justifications ('We/They can't help it') or are they something more mischievous and sinister ('If it's genetic, then maybe something can be done about it')

First, similar explanations are never sought for heterosexuality, which is the 'order of nature', and hence beyond enquiry. Behind most such investigations into homosexuality is profoundly normative thinking. It is deviancy from the norm that requires scientific explanation, and in civilized societies some deviancies need empirically grounded justification. Second, the focus is always on male homosexuality. Lesbians complicate most hypotheses and inferences regarding sexuality, and women come into the picture only as wombs in which the drama of sexual destinies is played out. Third, biological sex, gender-roles, sexual identity and sexual behaviour are distinct but variously overlapping elements within human sexuality. They combine among one another to form complex and shifting configurations most of which cannot be reduced to simple binaries like gay and straight, active and passive, masculine and feminine. Between being absolutely heterosexual and absolutely homosexual, human sexual identity and behaviour show innumerable gradations, variations and changes, some culturally inflected, that defy fixed definitions and categories.

Most research into why homosexuals are homosexuals fails to take into account these essential complexities and variations, and is therefore premised on a limitedness that renders dubious its claims to scientific 'truth'. In the liberal West, where most battles against sexual injustice seem to have been won, the persistence of such research could only point to a deep discomfort with what the Indian Penal Code still deems, more unabashedly, to be 'against the order of nature'.

Q. It can be inferred from the passage that:

Solution:

Option B is the correct answer and it can be derived from the lines: They combine among one another to form complex and shifting configurations most of which cannot be reduced to simple binaries like gay and straight, active and passive, masculine and feminine. Between being absolutely heterosexual and absolutely homosexual, human sexual identity and behaviour show innumerable gradations, variations and changes, some culturally inflected, that defy fixed definitions and categories.

You need to know the meaning of the word emasculate in the given case, which means removed or disregards in the given case. Dualistic is a synonym for binary and emasculate is the synonym for disregard in the given option.

QUESTION: 39

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development', TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both. The convention on bio-diversity in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual property right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. The author points out that intellectual property rights and their administration mechanism

Solution:

Para 2 clearly explains that TRIPS is in direct conflict with the agenda of the Rio summit which talked about bio-diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development.

QUESTION: 40

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development', TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both. The convention on bio-diversity in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual property right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. “As per the TRIPs agreement not much differentiation is made between a developed country such as the USA and an undeveloped country such as Sudan."In the light of the passage, this is

Solution:

Para 1 & 2 describe that the purpose of TRIPs is global standardisation and uniformity irrespective of the level of development of a member country

QUESTION: 41

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development', TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both. The convention on bio-diversity in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual property right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. According to the author, a higher-yield seed variety is not always welcome as it also ultimately leads to

Solution:

Para 4 states line 5...... "Narrowing of genetic base... more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics"

Therefore B is the right answer

QUESTION: 42

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development', TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both. The convention on bio-diversity in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual property right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. Out of the countries that signed CBD, the percentage of those that signed the TRIPs also, is about

Solution:

Para 3: 170 countries signed the CBD and common names (countries which signed both)between the TRIPs and CBD are 130. 130 is about 76.5% of 170.

QUESTION: 43

DIRECTIONS for the question:  A number of sentences are given below, sandwiched between sentences labelled

1 and 6, which are at their respective positions. These senteces, when properly sequenced form a coherent paragraph in the context of 1 and 6. Each sentence is labeled with a letter. Choose the logical order of sentences from among the four given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

1. Procrastination also reflects
i. an air-pollution scandal; a eurozone wobble; a court-ruling against the export of data to the US;
ii. the difficult times that Europe is living through
iii. for whatever is the current crisis –
iv. and non-urgent business is pushed aside
6. a sharp increase in migration.

Solution:

In this case, part i and part 6 are a direct link-up (the continuation of the list is the clue here).

Part ii follows part 1 as its form the introductions of the paragraph.

Part iv follows part ii and part iii mentions the crisis which are discussed further in part i.

This is a fairly easy question and all you need to do is be on the lookout for clues.

QUESTION: 44

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the question and mark the appropriate answer.

Solution:

not only is a conjunction, go is a verb

QUESTION: 45

DIRECTIONS for the question: Create a word using all the given letters from the jumbled letters and identify its appropriate meaning

Solution:

The word after rearranging becomes NOVICES which means beginner.

QUESTION: 46

DIRECTIONS for the question: Identify the origin / source of the words given below.

Rucksack

Solution:

A rucksack is another name for a backpack. The word “Ruck” orignates from the German word Rücken (back) and Sack means “bag"

QUESTION: 47

DIRECTIONS for the question: The following sentence has a missing punctuation mark, choose the right answer.

After the cat  frightened the mail man, the cats owner apologized over and over.  

Solution:

The word cat''s is possessive and needs an apostrophe cats'' is possessive version for more than 1 cat while cat''s is for one cat

QUESTION: 48

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

FRAYED: FABRIC

Solution:

Frayed'' is to '' worn down'' - this is what happens to ''fabric'' due to use over a period of time. The best answer is therefore ''dilapidated: building'', ''crumpled: paper'' may seem close nevertheless, when crumpled paper is not exactly worn down

QUESTION: 49

A few clues are given below to figure out the 2 words related to 1. Answer other questions based on these 2 words. The values within the brackets describe the number of letters in the word.

1-Across: A term used to describe pleasing sounds, antonym of cacophony. (7)
1-Top to bottom - Sudden revelation, related to bible (8)

2- Across:

It is an 8 letter word. Which of the following definition best describes the word?

Solution:

Let us start by filling 1-across and 1-top to bottom.

Antonym of cacophony is euphony.

A sudden revelation is known as epiphany.

By filling the first 2 words, we know that the required word must start in ‘p’.

Option A:
The mythical cure for every disease is known as panacea. It is a 7 lettered word. Therefore, we can eliminate option A.

Option C:
A word used to describe the association of a species to a particular geographic area is ‘endemic’. Therefore, we can eliminate option C.

Option D:
The smell of the first rain of the season is known as petrichor. It is a nine lettered word. Therefore, we can eliminate option D too.

Option B:
A widespread epidemic is known by the name Pandemic. It is an 8 lettered word. Therefore, option B is the right answer.

QUESTION: 50

DIRECTIONS for the question: Identify the meaning of the given idiom/ phrase.

To drive home

Solution:

To drive home means to emphasize an important point about something.

QUESTION: 51

A few clues are given below to figure out the 2 words related to 1. Answer other questions based on these 2 words. The values within the brackets describe the number of letters in the word.

1-Across: A term used to describe pleasing sounds, antonym of cacophony. (7)
1-Top to bottom - Sudden revelation, related to bible (8)

A phobia is a term used to describe the fear of something. Eg) Fear of water is called hydrophobia.

In this question, the phobia part is truncated. For hydrophobia, enter hydro as answer.
3-across:
The word that has to fill 3 across is a seven lettered (13 lettered including ‘phobia’.).

Which of the following options describes the word that can fill the spaces?

Solution:

Option A:
Fear of heights is known as acrophobia. ‘ACRO’ is 4 lettered. Therefore, we can eliminate option A.

Option C:
Fear of gold is known as Aurophobia. Therefore, we can eliminate option C too.

Option D:
Fear of being alone is known as Autophobia. Therefore, we can eliminate option D.

Option B:
Fear of spiders is known as Arachnophobia.The ‘ARACHNO’ part contains 7 letters. Therefore, option B is the right answer.

QUESTION: 52

A few clues are given below to figure out the 2 words related to 1. Answer other questions based on these 2 words. The values within the brackets describe the number of letters in the word.

1-Across: A term used to describe pleasing sounds, antonym of cacophony. (7)
1-Top to bottom - Sudden revelation, related to bible (8)

A study about a subject usually ends in ‘logy’. Just like the previous question, the ‘logy’ part has been truncated.

4-across:

The word that has to fill this space is 7 lettered (11 lettered including the -logy part).

Which of the following words can take up the place?

Solution:

Option A: Study of old people and their ailments - Gerontology

Option B: Study of kidneys and allied systems - Nephrology

Option C: Study of new born babies - Neonatology

Option D: Study of brain and nervous system - Neurology

As we can see, only option C can fit in the spaces provided (neonato contains exactly 7 letters and starts with 'n'). Therefore, option C is the right answer.

QUESTION: 53

SOLDIER : WAR : : BON VIVANT : ____

Solution:

Bon Vivant is someone who pursues a social and luxurious lifestyle, someone who goes to parties and social occassions. As a soldier goes to war, a bon vivant goes to a party.

Hence option A.

QUESTION: 54

Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to

CIRCLE : ARC

Solution:

The relationship between the words follows "full element: part of it". For example, circle is a complete geometric figure. An arc is a part of it. Similarly, a line is a geometric element and a segment is part of a line. The first word  needs to be larger than the second word for the relationship to hold. In Options B and D, the first word is smaller than the second word. In Option C, the words are equivalent as percentages can be expressed as fractions. 

Hence Option A is the right answer.

QUESTION: 55

Fill in the blanks with the appropriate word:

Despite his misgivings, Akshay ______________ to the deal

Solution:

The sentence indicates that in spite of doubts Akshay agreed to the deal. Hence the appropriate option would be option C.

QUESTION: 56

What does the idiom 'back to the drawing board' mean?

Solution:

'Back to the drawing board' signifies the start of a new attempt after the failure of the previous attempt. For example, 'After every mistake, our team goes back to the drawing board and comes back stronger.'

QUESTION: 57

Parents who try to improve their children's behaviour by ____ gifts are more likely to encounter _____ than any improvement in their child's behaviour.

Solution:

The second part of the sentence suggests that the efforts of the parents to improve the child's behavior are not successful. This is implied by only the second and the fourth options. Between those two, the second option is more apt than the fourth.

QUESTION: 58

Five sentences are given below. These sentences, when rearranged properly, form a logical and meaningful paragraph. Rearrange the sentences and enter the correct order as the answer.

1. Everyone at the palace saw how kind she was, for when one of the lords, who was very old, stumbled on the steps as he came to pay her homage, she sprang up from her throne to help him.
2. Nothing ever has been more beautiful than the way those two behaved to one another; she never forgetting that he was her husband and she only his wife, and he always remembering that she was really the queen, and that he had no power at all
3. The Princess Victoria, daughter of the Duke of Kent, was but eighteen years old when she was Queen of England.
4. She went with her mother, the Duchess of Kent, to live, sometimes at Buckingham Palace and sometimes at Windsor Castle, and the next year she was crowned in state at Westminster Abbey.
5. Three years later she was married to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg, an excellent man, who made it his whole business to help her in all her duties as sovereign of the great country, without putting himself forward.

Solution:

On carefully reading the sentences, we observe that the paragraph is about Queen Victoria. Hence, sentence 3, which introduces the subject of the paragraph, should be the opening sentence. Sentences 4 and 1 form a pair as the ‘palace’ mentioned in 1 refers to the Buckingham palace in 4. The order, therefore, should be 41. Sentences 5 and 2 also form a pair as ‘they’ in 2 refers to the Queen and her husband, who is introduced in sentence 5.

Hence, the order should be 34152.
34152 forms a coherent paragraph.

QUESTION: 59

DIRECTIONS for the question: Pick the best option which completes the sentence in the most meaningful manner.

_____________ made after English settlers came to Jamestown was a map of Virginia by John Smith, the famous adventurer. 

Solution:

The correct answer has to be a concise' subject' as it is missing from the sentence and it is to be supplied. Only option B is concise in the terms of formal english. Hence option B is concise and logically completes the sentence.

QUESTION: 60

DIRECTIONS for the question: In the question below, there are two sentences containing underlined homonyms, which may either be mis-spelt or inappropriately toed in the context of the sentence.

Select the appropriate answer from the options given below:

I. A vote of censur was passed against the Chairman.
II. Before release, every film is passed by the Censor Board.

Solution:

There is no word as 'censur'. The correct word is 'censure', which means 'strong or vehement expression of disapproval'.

The word 'censor' has been correctly used in sentence 2 which means The Central Board of Film Certification (often referred to as the Censor Board).

QUESTION: 61

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the most appropriate option.

Atul has been assigned the task of allotting offices to six faculty members. The offices are numbered 1-6 and arranged in a row. Only a six-foot high divider separates them. So voices, sounds and cigarette smoke flow easily from one office to another:

I. Sandhya needs to use the telephone quite often through the day
II. Vikas and Kunal need adjacent offices as they need to consult each other often while working.
III. Aditi is a senior employee and has to be allotted the office number 5, having the biggest window.
IV. Mahipal requires silence in the offices next to his
V.  Tejash, Vikas, and Mahipal are all smokers.
VI.  Aditi finds tobacco smoke allergic and the offices next to hers have to be occupied by non-smokers.

Unless specifically stated, all the employees maintain an atmosphere of silence during office hours.

Q. The ideal candidate to occupy the office number adjacent to Sandhya would be

Solution:

The information can be gathered as follows-

So, Aditi would be adjacent to Sandhya

QUESTION: 62

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the most appropriate option.

Atul has been assigned the task of allotting offices to six faculty members. The offices are numbered 1-6 and arranged in a row. Only a six-foot high divider separates them. So voices, sounds and cigarette smoke flow easily from one office to another:

I. Sandhya needs to use the telephone quite often through the day
II. Vikas and Kunal need adjacent offices as they need to consult each other often while working.
III. Aditi is a senior employee and has to be allotted the office number 5, having the biggest window.
IV. Mahipal requires silence in the offices next to his
V.  Tejash, Vikas, and Mahipal are all smokers.
VI.  Aditi finds tobacco smoke allergic and the offices next to hers have to be occupied by non-smokers.

Unless specifically stated, all the employees maintain an atmosphere of silence during office hours.

Q. The three employees who are smokers should be seated in the offices

Solution:

The information can be gathered as follows-

So, Tejash, Manipal and Vikas should be seated in the offices 1, 2 and 3.

QUESTION: 63

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the most appropriate option.

Atul has been assigned the task of allotting offices to six faculty members. The offices are numbered 1-6 and arranged in a row. Only a six-foot high divider separates them. So voices, sounds and cigarette smoke flow easily from one office to another:

I. Sandhya needs to use the telephone quite often through the day
II. Vikas and Kunal need adjacent offices as they need to consult each other often while working.
III. Aditi is a senior employee and has to be allotted the office number 5, having the biggest window.
IV. Mahipal requires silence in the offices next to his
V.  Tejash, Vikas, and Mahipal are all smokers.
VI.  Aditi finds tobacco smoke allergic and the offices next to hers have to be occupied by non-smokers.

Unless specifically stated, all the employees maintain an atmosphere of silence during office hours.

Q. The ideal office for Vikas would be

Solution:

The information can be gathered as follows-

So, the ideal office for Vikas would be 3.

QUESTION: 64

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the most appropriate option.

Atul has been assigned the task of allotting offices to six faculty members. The offices are numbered 1-6 and arranged in a row. Only a six-foot high divider separates them. So voices, sounds and cigarette smoke flow easily from one office to another:

I. Sandhya needs to use the telephone quite often through the day
II. Vikas and Kunal need adjacent offices as they need to consult each other often while working.
III. Aditi is a senior employee and has to be allotted the office number 5, having the biggest window.
IV. Mahipal requires silence in the offices next to his
V.  Tejash, Vikas, and Mahipal are all smokers.
VI.  Aditi finds tobacco smoke allergic and the offices next to hers have to be occupied by non-smokers.

Unless specifically stated, all the employees maintain an atmosphere of silence during office hours.

Q. In the event of what occurrence, within a period of one month since the assignment of the offices, would a request for a change in office be put forth by one or more employees?

Solution:

The information can be gathered as follows-

If Tejash taking duties of Sandhya, he must talk on the phone and therefore he cannot be next to Manipal as Manipal requires silence. Thus Tejash or Manipal must ask for a change in seating plan.

QUESTION: 65

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Moody’s, a modelling agency, was on the lookout for new models. It had called 150 candidates for the purpose of recruiting models who were tall, dark and handsome. The break-up of the candidates with different attributes in that group of 150 was:

  • Tall and handsome but not dark = 9
  • Dark and handsome but not tall = 12
  • Tall or dark but not handsome = 107

Each candidate had at least one of the three attributes that the agency was looking for. The agency could find only one person who satisfied its criteria and so was considering relaxing the requirements a little. It was also found that, for any attribute, the number of candidates who had that attribute alone did not exceed one-third of the total number of candidates called.

Q. If the number of candidates who were dark is less than those who were tall, then at least how many candidates were dark as well as tall?

Solution:

Drawing the Venn diagram with the given conditions:

Only handsome = 150 – (107 + 9 + 1 + 12) = 21.
Here

x + z +13 < 10 + x + y
⇒ y – z > 3.

To get least number of candidates who were dark as well as tall take y = 50 and z = 46 such that
50 – 46 = 4 > 3.
Now x + y + z = 107

⇒ 50 + 46 + x = 107
⇒ x = 11.

So least number of candidates = 11 + 1 = 12.

QUESTION: 66

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Moody’s, a modelling agency, was on the lookout for new models. It had called 150 candidates for the purpose of recruiting models who were tall, dark and handsome. The break-up of the candidates with different attributes in that group of 150 was:

  • Tall and handsome but not dark = 9
  • Dark and handsome but not tall = 12
  • Tall or dark but not handsome = 107

Each candidate had at least one of the three attributes that the agency was looking for. The agency could find only one person who satisfied its criteria and so was considering relaxing the requirements a little. It was also found that, for any attribute, the number of candidates who had that attribute alone did not exceed one-third of the total number of candidates called.

Q. If exactly half of the candidates who were tall were also dark and exactly half of the candidates who were dark were also tall, then how many candidates were only tall?

Solution:

Drawing the Venn diagram with the given conditions:

Only handsome = 150 – (107 + 9 + 1 + 12) = 21.
Given, 50% of tall are also dark, 50% of dark are also tall
⇒ 9 + y = 1 + x   ______ (i)
and also z + 12 = x + 1  _____ (ii)

(i) + (ii)
21 + y + z = 2x + 2, 21 + (107 – x) = 2x + 2
128 – 2 = 3x, x = 126/3 = 42

Only tall = y = x – 8 (from (i)) = 34.

QUESTION: 67

DIRECTIONS for the question: Answer the question on the basis of the information given below. 

Car A starts running from Mumbai to Kolhapur. At the same time. car B starts running from Kolhapur to Mumbai Table 1 shows the distance between them at different time intervals. 

Velocity versus time graph for car A

Q. What is the maximum velocity of car B before the two cars cross each other?  

Solution:

From the given data, we can find out only the average velocity of car B during different time intervals and not maximum velocity.

Hence the answer is option D

QUESTION: 68

DIRECTIONS for the question: Answer the question on the basis of the information given below. 

Car A starts running from Mumbai to Kolhapur. At the same time. car B starts running from Kolhapur to Mumbai Table 1 shows the distance between them at different time intervals. 

Velocity versus time graph for car A

Q. If car A starts from Mumbai, what is its distance from Kolhapur after 5 hours?

Solution:

Distance covered by car A in 5 hours is equal to the area under the curve from t = 0 to 5 hours.

∴ Distance of car A from Mumbai after 5 hours

Since total distance between Mumbai and Kolhapur is 1,800 km. distance of car A from Kolhapur after 5 hours. 1,800 — 800 = 1,000 km

Hence the answer is option C 

QUESTION: 69

DIRECTIONS for the question: Answer the question on the basis of the information given below. 

Car A starts running from Mumbai to Kolhapur. At the same time. car B starts running from Kolhapur to Mumbai Table 1 shows the distance between them at different time intervals. 

Velocity versus time graph for car A

Q. What is the ratio of the average velocities of car A and B before the two cars cross each other?

Solution:

The distance covered by two cars before crossing each other is proportional to the average velocitites of car A and B.
∴ Distance covered by car A 1,050 km. ∴ Distance covered by car B 

QUESTION: 70

DIRECTIONS for the question: Analyse the graphs given below and answer the question that follows.

The pie chart shows percentage turnover of each item in Tanzania by a company M/s AYZM. The bar graph gives the turnover in $ millions in Africa of various items by M/s AYZM. Rest of Africa refers to those countries which are in Africa other than Tanzania.

Q. The turnover from Ivory and Garments together from Tanzania is what percent of the turnover from the Rest of Africa for Electrical and Leather goods together?

Solution:

The turnover from Ivory and Garments together from Tanzania is 50 % of total ,
Turnover for Rest of Africa for Ivory and Garment can be calculated by Subtracting turnover from Tanzania of Electrical and leather from the total share i.e

45 x 106- 35% of 40 x 106

QUESTION: 71

DIRECTIONS for the question: Analyse the graphs given below and answer the question that follows.

The pie chart shows percentage turnover of each item in Tanzania by a company M/s AYZM. The bar graph gives the turnover in $ millions in Africa of various items by M/s AYZM. Rest of Africa refers to those countries which are in Africa other than Tanzania.

Q. If the turnover from Rest of Africa for Electrical goods increases by 20%, then what is the ratio of turnover from Tanzania for Handicrafts item to that from Rest of Africa for Electrical goods?

Solution:

Handicraft from Tanzania is 15 % of total , i.e 40 million = 6 million

Turnover of Electrical from  R.O Africa 

Handicraft from Tanzania = 6
Hence ratio is 6 : 13 option  3.

QUESTION: 72

DIRECTIONS for the question: Given an input line ;  the machine arranges the words and numbers in steps in a systematic manner as illustrated afterwards : Study the pattern and answer the question that follows.

Input line: 56 dress fine shine 32 66 72 offer
Step I:  72 56 dress fine shine 32 66 offer
Step II: 72 shine 56 dress fine 32 66 offer
Step III: 72 shine 66 56 dress fine 32 offer
Step IV: 72 shine 66 offer 56 dress fine 32
Step V: 72 shine 66 offer 56 fine dress 32
Step VI: 72 shine 66 offer 56 fine 32 dress
Step VI is the last step and the output in Step VI is the final output.
As per the rules followed in the above steps, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Q. Step II of an input is '53 window 42 50 door lock key 36'. How many more steps will be required to complete the arrangement?

Solution:

In Step I the largest number occupies the leftmost position, pushing ‘he rest of the line rightwards. In the next step the word that comes last in the alphabetical order occupies the second position from the left and the re­maining terms move rightwards. This goes on alternately till all the numbers get arranged in descending order and the words in reverse al­phabetical order at alternate positions. In case a term is already arranged, the machine moves on to the next one.
Step II : 53 window 42 50 door lock key 36

Step III : 53 window 50 42 door lock key 36

Step IV : 53 window 50 lock 42 door key 36

Step V : 53 window 50 lock 42 key door 36

Step VI : 53 window 50 lock 42 key 36 door.

Hence, four more steps are required.

QUESTION: 73

DIRECTIONS for the question: Given an input line ;  the machine arranges the words and numbers in steps in a systematic manner as illustrated afterwards : Study the pattern and answer the question that follows.

Input line: 56 dress fine shine 32 66 72 offer
Step I:  72 56 dress fine shine 32 66 offer
Step II: 72 shine 56 dress fine 32 66 offer
Step III: 72 shine 66 56 dress fine 32 offer
Step IV: 72 shine 66 offer 56 dress fine 32
Step V: 72 shine 66 offer 56 fine dress 32
Step VI: 72 shine 66 offer 56 fine 32 dress
Step VI is the last step and the output in Step VI is the final output.
As per the rules followed in the above steps, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Q. Step IV of an input is '62 sound 56 sleep roam present 33 49'. What will be the input definitely?

Solution:

In Step I the largest number occupies the leftmost position, pushing the rest of the line rightwards. In the next step the word that comes last in the alphabetical order occupies the second position from the left and the re­maining terms move rightwards. This goes on alternately till all the numbers get arranged in descending order and the words in reverse al­phabetical order at alternate positions. In case a term is already arranged, the machine moves on to the next one.

We cannot determine the arrangement in the reverse direction.

QUESTION: 74

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

0, 3, 8, 15, 24, 35, 48 ?

Solution:

The difference between consecutive terms is, 3 , 5, 7, 9, 11, 13. so the next difference should be 15.

? = 48 + 15 = 63.

QUESTION: 75

Following candlestick shows the data of cracku's stock price for the span of 50 minutes on a very volatile day.

The candlestick chart has candles of 5 minutes starting from 12:00 pm to ending at 12:50 pm.

Candlesticks are explained in the following figure.
The candle having its open value greater than its close value, is red in color while candle having its open value lesser than its close value , is green in color. 

A different type of candle which has no color is known to have equal open and close value.

Also, Typical price of a candlestick = (high+low+close)/3

Please answer the following questions on the basis of 50 minutes data.

Q. Which candlestick has the maximum typical price?

Solution:

►The typical price for the duration 12 : 05 - 12 : 10 = (140 + 120 + 160)/3 = 140

►The typical price for the duration 12 : 20 - 12 : 25 = (160 + 60 + 80)/3 = 100

►The typical price for the duration 12 : 15 - 12 : 20 = (140 + 80 + 120)/3 = 133.33

►The typical price for the duration 12 : 00 - 12 : 05 = (140 + 120 + 100)/3 = 120

►Hence the maximum typical price is for the candle at 12 : 05 - 12 : 10

QUESTION: 76

Following candlestick shows the data of cracku's stock price for the span of 50 minutes on a very volatile day.

The candlestick chart has candles of 5 minutes starting from 12:00 pm to ending at 12:50 pm.

Candlesticks are explained in the following figure.
The candle having its open value greater than its close value, is red in color while candle having its open value lesser than its close value , is green in color. 

A different type of candle which has no color is known to have equal open and close value.

Also, Typical price of a candlestick = (high+low+close)/3

Please answer the following questions on the basis of 50 minutes data.

Q. What is the average of (high value - low value) of all candlesticks.

Solution:

The average value of (high - low) = (40 + 40 + 40 + 60 + 100 + 40 + 60 + 80 + 60 + 60)/10 = 58

QUESTION: 77

Following candlestick shows the data of cracku's stock price for the span of 50 minutes on a very volatile day.

The candlestick chart has candles of 5 minutes starting from 12:00 pm to ending at 12:50 pm.

Candlesticks are explained in the following figure.
The candle having its open value greater than its close value, is red in color while candle having its open value lesser than its close value , is green in color. 

A different type of candle which has no color is known to have equal open and close value.

Also, Typical price of a candlestick = (high+low+close)/3

Please answer the following questions on the basis of 50 minutes data.

Q. What is the average of (open value - close value) of all candlesticks.

Solution:

Open-close is calculated and added for all the candles. The average is (-1 -2 +0 -2 +4 -2 +4 -6 + 4 +2) = 1.

QUESTION: 78

Following candlestick shows the data of cracku's stock price for the span of 50 minutes on a very volatile day.

The candlestick chart has candles of 5 minutes starting from 12:00 pm to ending at 12:50 pm.

Candlesticks are explained in the following figure.
The candle having its open value greater than its close value, is red in color while candle having its open value lesser than its close value , is green in color. 

A different type of candle which has no color is known to have equal open and close value.

Also, Typical price of a candlestick = (high+low+close)/3

Please answer the following questions on the basis of 50 minutes data.

Q. If candlesticks are assigned weights of 1 to 10 respectively what is approximate weighted average of close value?

Solution:

The weighted average
 
We can see that this above fraction will be less than 100 (55*100 = 5500) and greater than 98 (5500 - 2*55 = 5390). Hence the answer is 98.

QUESTION: 79

A group of 6 employees A, B, C, D, E, F were asked to rate  5 verticals - HR, Sales, Technology, Operations and Marketing of a company on a scale of 1-10. The below graph depicts the ratings of each individual.

Q. What is the average of all ratings provided by all the employees of the company? 

Solution:

Based on the information given in the radar graph, we can form the table below:-

The Sums of ratings for HR, Sales, Tech, Operations and Marketing verticals are 27, 36, 36, 36, 39 respectively. 

Hence the average rating = (27 + 36 + 36 + 36 + 39)/30 = 5.8

QUESTION: 80

A group of 6 employees A, B, C, D, E, F were asked to rate  5 verticals - HR, Sales, Technology, Operations and Marketing of a company on a scale of 1-10. The below graph depicts the ratings of each individual.

Q. What is the difference between the median of ratings given to the Sales vertical median of the ratings given to the HR vertical?

Solution:

Based on the information given in the radar graph, we can form the table below:-

Median of the ratings given to Sales vertical = (4 + 7)/2 = 5.5
Median of the ratings given to HR vertical = (3 + 6)/2 = 4.5

Hence difference in medians = 1

QUESTION: 81

A group of 6 employees A, B, C, D, E, F were asked to rate  5 verticals - HR, Sales, Technology, Operations and Marketing of a company on a scale of 1-10. The below graph depicts the ratings of each individual.

Q. What is the sum of medians of ratings given by each employee?

Solution:

Based on the information given in the radar graph, we can form the table below:-

⇒ Median of the ratings give by employee A = 6
⇒ Median of the ratings give by employee B = 5
⇒ Median of the ratings give by employee C = 6
⇒ Median of the ratings give by employee D = 6
⇒ Median of the ratings give by employee E = 8
⇒ Median of the ratings give by employee F = 5

Sum of the medians = 6 + 5 + 6 + 6 + 8 + 5 = 36

QUESTION: 82

A group of 6 employees A, B, C, D, E, F were asked to rate  5 verticals - HR, Sales, Technology, Operations and Marketing of a company on a scale of 1-10. The below graph depicts the ratings of each individual.

Q. Which employee gave the maximum number of highest ratings in each vertical?

Solution:

Based on the information given in the radar graph, we can form the table below:-

E gave the highest ratings in two verticals ( Sales and Tech)

QUESTION: 83

In a corporate meeting, Aryan, Bablu, Cena, Deepak, and Eda were sitting to discuss the current financial crisis.

A total of 3 attributes were tagged to all 5 people which were Skill, City, and University.
The skills included were ADL, TT, R, and SQL. One person could have more than one skills.
Cities included were Delhi, Calcutta, Bombay, Fatehabad, and Ambala. 
Universities included SRM, VIT, Thapar, Shivnadar, and Anna University. 
All of them hail from different cities and universities.
Initial letters of the person's name, skill's name, city's name, and university's name of any particular person were different.

Some interlinking information was also given
1. Deepak was not from Ambala.
2. Ankush belonged to Fatehabad and studied at VIT University.
3. Bablu had his studies from Anna University and had SQL and TT in his skills.
4. Cena belonged to Bombay and studied at Thapar University.
5. Eda didn't study at ShivNadar University.
6. Only one person didn't have TT as his skill.
7. Only two people didn't have SQL as their skill.
8. Only people from Delhi and Calcutta didn't have R as their skills.
9. Only students of Thapar and Shivnadar had ADL as their skill.

Q. How many of them had at most 2 skills?

Solution:

1. Deepak was not from Ambala.

2. Ankush belonged to Fatehabad and studied at VIT University.

3. Bablu had his studies from Anna University and had SQL and TT in his skills.

4. Cena belonged to Bombay and studied at Thapar University.

Bablu can't be from ambala as anna and ambala have same initial letters.

5. Eda didn't study at ShivNadar University.


6. Only one person didn't have TT as his skill.

The person from thapar can't have TT as skill due to initials.


7. Only two people didn't have SQL as their skill.

People from SRM and Shivnadar can't have SQL due to initials.

8. Only people from Delhi and Calcutta didn't have R as their skills.

9. Only students of Thapar and Shivnadar had ADL as their skill.

This is our final table.

atmost 2 skills - 3 people.

QUESTION: 84

In a corporate meeting, Aryan, Bablu, Cena, Deepak, and Eda were sitting to discuss the current financial crisis.

A total of 3 attributes were tagged to all 5 people which were Skill, City, and University.
The skills included were ADL, TT, R, and SQL. One person could have more than one skills.
Cities included were Delhi, Calcutta, Bombay, Fatehabad, and Ambala. 
Universities included SRM, VIT, Thapar, Shivnadar, and Anna University. 
All of them hail from different cities and universities.
Initial letters of the person's name, skill's name, city's name, and university's name of any particular person were different.

Some interlinking information was also given
1. Deepak was not from Ambala.
2. Ankush belonged to Fatehabad and studied at VIT University.
3. Bablu had his studies from Anna University and had SQL and TT in his skills.
4. Cena belonged to Bombay and studied at Thapar University.
5. Eda didn't study at ShivNadar University.
6. Only one person didn't have TT as his skill.
7. Only two people didn't have SQL as their skill.
8. Only people from Delhi and Calcutta didn't have R as their skills.
9. Only students of Thapar and Shivnadar had ADL as their skill.

Q. Which of the following is correct?

Solution:

1. Deepak was not from Ambala.

2. Ankush belonged to Fatehabad and studied at VIT University.

3. Bablu had his studies from Anna University and had SQL and TT in his skills.

4. Cena belonged to Bombay and studied at Thapar University.

Bablu can't be from ambala as anna and ambala have same initial letters.

5. Eda didn't study at ShivNadar University.


6. Only one person didn't have TT as his skill.

The person from thapar can't have TT as skill due to initials.


7. Only two people didn't have SQL as their skill.

People from SRM and Shivnadar can't have SQL due to initials.

8. Only people from Delhi and Calcutta didn't have R as their skills.

9. Only students of Thapar and Shivnadar had ADL as their skill.

This is our final table.

Ankush - SQL, TT, R - Fatehabad - VIT is the correct match.

QUESTION: 85

In a corporate meeting, Aryan, Bablu, Cena, Deepak, and Eda were sitting to discuss the current financial crisis.

A total of 3 attributes were tagged to all 5 people which were Skill, City, and University.
The skills included were ADL, TT, R, and SQL. One person could have more than one skills.
Cities included were Delhi, Calcutta, Bombay, Fatehabad, and Ambala. 
Universities included SRM, VIT, Thapar, Shivnadar, and Anna University. 
All of them hail from different cities and universities.
Initial letters of the person's name, skill's name, city's name, and university's name of any particular person were different.

Some interlinking information was also given
1. Deepak was not from Ambala.
2. Ankush belonged to Fatehabad and studied at VIT University.
3. Bablu had his studies from Anna University and had SQL and TT in his skills.
4. Cena belonged to Bombay and studied at Thapar University.
5. Eda didn't study at ShivNadar University.
6. Only one person didn't have TT as his skill.
7. Only two people didn't have SQL as their skill.
8. Only people from Delhi and Calcutta didn't have R as their skills.
9. Only students of Thapar and Shivnadar had ADL as their skill.

Q. Who belong to Shivnadar university?

Solution:

1. Deepak was not from Ambala.

2. Ankush belonged to Fatehabad and studied at VIT University.

3. Bablu had his studies from Anna University and had SQL and TT in his skills.

4. Cena belonged to Bombay and studied at Thapar University.

Bablu can't be from ambala as anna and ambala have same initial letters.

5. Eda didn't study at ShivNadar University.


6. Only one person didn't have TT as his skill.

The person from thapar can't have TT as skill due to initials.


7. Only two people didn't have SQL as their skill.

People from SRM and Shivnadar can't have SQL due to initials.

8. Only people from Delhi and Calcutta didn't have R as their skills.

9. Only students of Thapar and Shivnadar had ADL as their skill.

This is our final table.

Deepak belonged to ShivNadar university.

QUESTION: 86

Amay and Bunty, as a team, won the state quiz contest. Being from the same school, they want to organize a quiz event in their school. After the semi-final, 6 students were left to participate in the final - Chandu, Dileep, Elora, Farza, Gautam and Hari. These six students are distributed into two teams, one headed by Amay and the other by Bunty. Amay gets to choose 2, 3 or 4 members among the six and the remaining go into Bunty's team. Further:

(1) Amay must choose exactly one between Chandu and Hari.
(2) If Amay chooses Elora, then Farza will go to Bunty's team.
(3) If Farza is in Amay's team, then Hari must be in Amay's team.
(4) If Farza is in Bunty's team, then Dileep must also be in Bunty's team.

Q. If Chandu is in Amay's team, then which of the following is true?

Solution:

If Chandu is Amay's team, then Hari must be in Bunty's team.

But, according to the information given, if Farza is in Amay's team, then Hari must also be in Amay's team.

⇒ Farza cannot be in Amay's team.
⇒ Option C is the answer.

QUESTION: 87

Amay and Bunty, as a team, won the state quiz contest. Being from the same school, they want to organize a quiz event in their school. After the semi-final, 6 students were left to participate in the final - Chandu, Dileep, Elora, Farza, Gautam and Hari. These six students are distributed into two teams, one headed by Amay and the other by Bunty. Amay gets to choose 2, 3 or 4 members among the six and the remaining go into Bunty's team. Further:

(1) Amay must choose exactly one between Chandu and Hari.
(2) If Amay chooses Elora, then Farza will go to Bunty's team.
(3) If Farza is in Amay's team, then Hari must be in Amay's team.
(4) If Farza is in Bunty's team, then Dileep must also be in Bunty's team.

Q. If Amay chooses 4 members from the group of six, then who among the following must be in Bunty's team?

Solution:

If Elora is in Amay's team, then Farza will go to Bunty's team.

If Farza goes to Bunty's team, then Dileep will be in Bunty's team.

One between Chandu and Hari will be in Bunty's team.

⇒ There will be at least 3 in Bunty's team which is not possible.

Hence, Elora cannot be in Amay's team and must be in Bunty's team.

QUESTION: 88

Amay and Bunty, as a team, won the state quiz contest. Being from the same school, they want to organize a quiz event in their school. After the semi-final, 6 students were left to participate in the final - Chandu, Dileep, Elora, Farza, Gautam and Hari. These six students are distributed into two teams, one headed by Amay and the other by Bunty. Amay gets to choose 2, 3 or 4 members among the six and the remaining go into Bunty's team. Further:

(1) Amay must choose exactly one between Chandu and Hari.
(2) If Amay chooses Elora, then Farza will go to Bunty's team.
(3) If Farza is in Amay's team, then Hari must be in Amay's team.
(4) If Farza is in Bunty's team, then Dileep must also be in Bunty's team.

Q. In how many ways can Amay choose four members from the group of six?

Solution:

Only one such team is possible:

A: FHDG and B:CE

QUESTION: 89

A word arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following in a particular rule. Following is the illustration of the input and the steps of arrangement:

Input: 14 17 28 Ram an supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26
Step 1: an 17 28 Ram supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26 14
Step 2: an is 28 Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 26 17 14
Step 3: an is Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 28 26 17 14
Step 4: an is Ram honest supervisor 55 45 28 26 17 14

Step 4 is the last step of the given input. Now study the logic and rules followed in the above steps, find out appropriate step for the question given below for the given input.

Q. Which of the following will be the last step of the input given below?
Input: 14 Jaipur 16 is also 24 22 known 26 06 as the 27 pink city

Solution:

We care given that:
Input: 14 17 28 Ram an supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26

Step 1: an 17 28 Ram supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26 14
Step 2: an is 28 Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 26 17 14
Step 3: an is Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 28 26 17 14
Step 4: an is Ram honest supervisor 55 45 28 26 17 14

On careful observation we can find that the words are rearranged in increasing order of their length and in case of a tie, they are arranged according to the dictionary, from left to right. For example, both ‘an’ and ‘is’ have two letters each so ‘an’ will come first as it comes first in the dictionary. Also, numbers are rearranged in ascending order from right to left. Each step arranges a word and a number.

Input: 14 Jaipur 16 is also 24 22 known 26 06 as the 27 pink city

Step 1: as 14 Jaipur 16 is also 24 22 known 26 the 27 pink city 06
Step 2: as is Jaipur 16 also 24 22 known 26 the 27 pink city 14 06
Step 3: as is the Jaipur also 24 22 known 26 27 pink city 16 14 06
Step 4: as is the also Jaipur 24 known 26 27 pink city 22 16 14 06
Step 5: as is the also city Jaipur known 26 27 pink 24 22 16 14 06
Step 6: as is the also city pink Jaipur known 27 26 24 22 16 14 06
Step 7: as is the also city pink known Jaipur 27 26 24 22 16 14 06

Hence, we can say that option A is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 90

A word arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following in a particular rule. Following is the illustration of the input and the steps of arrangement:

Input: 14 17 28 Ram an supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26
Step 1: an 17 28 Ram supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26 14
Step 2: an is 28 Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 26 17 14
Step 3: an is Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 28 26 17 14
Step 4: an is Ram honest supervisor 55 45 28 26 17 14

Step 4 is the last step of the given input. Now study the logic and rules followed in the above steps, find out appropriate step for the question given below for the given input.

Q. How many steps are required to reach the last step for the input given below?
Input: 14 Jaipur 16 is also 24 22 known 26 06 as the 27 pink city

Solution:

We care given that:
Input: 14 17 28 Ram an supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26

Step 1: an 17 28 Ram supervisor 45 is 55 honest 26 14
Step 2: an is 28 Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 26 17 14
Step 3: an is Ram supervisor 45 55 honest 28 26 17 14
Step 4: an is Ram honest supervisor 55 45 28 26 17 14

On careful observation we can find that the words are rearranged in increasing order of their length and in case of a tie, they are arranged according to the dictionary, from left to right. For example, both ‘an’ and ‘is’ have two letters each so ‘an’ will come first as it comes first in the dictionary. Also, numbers are rearranged in ascending order from right to left. Each step arranges a word and a number.

Input: 14 Jaipur 16 is also 24 22 known 26 06 as the 27 pink city

Step 1: as 14 Jaipur 16 is also 24 22 known 26 the 27 pink city 06
Step 2: as is Jaipur 16 also 24 22 known 26 the 27 pink city 14 06
Step 3: as is the Jaipur also 24 22 known 26 27 pink city 16 14 06
Step 4: as is the also Jaipur 24 known 26 27 pink city 22 16 14 06
Step 5: as is the also city Jaipur known 26 27 pink 24 22 16 14 06
Step 6: as is the also city pink Jaipur known 27 26 24 22 16 14 06
Step 7: as is the also city pink known Jaipur 27 26 24 22 16 14 06

We can see that a total of 7 steps are required to reach the final result. Hence, we can say that option D is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 91

In April 2020, TVS motors Company announced the acquisition of the UK’s most iconic sporting motorcycle for £16 million, which brand did it acquire?

Solution:

Recently, TVS Motor Company announced the acquisition of the UK’s most iconic sporting motorcycle Norton for £16 million, by acquiring certain assets of Norton Motorcycles (U.K.)

QUESTION: 92

Which financial software solution has entered into a strategic partnership with PayU to innovate and accelerate the digital loan repayment solutions for small finance banks, Microfinance Institutions and Non Banking Financial Companies?

Solution:

Craft Silicon has entered into a strategic partnership with PayU to innovate and accelerate the digital loan repayment solutions for small finance banks, MFI and NBFCs.

QUESTION: 93

To launch ‘iTurmeric FinCloud’ platform to switch to the latest tools and technologies, which tech giant has tie up with Intellect Design Arena Limited?

Solution:

The tie up between IBM and Intellect Design Arena Limited for iTurmeric FinCloud will enable the new digital banking systems to be tested and run in isolation or in parallel with core legacy systems.

QUESTION: 94

Alfanar group of Saudi Arabia is to sell 300MW wind power projects in which country.

Solution:

Saudi Arabia based Alfanar Group has a clean energy portfolio of 1.4 gigawatts in West Asia, Africa, Europe and Asia and in India, Alfanar has a wind project portfolio of around 600MW and Alfanar group is to sell 300MW wind power projects in India which is likely to be among the largest wind energy deals in India.

QUESTION: 95

Which institution has won the first prize in the Smart India Hackathon 2020, a national digital product building competition?

Solution:

Defence Institute of Advanced Technology has won the first prize in the Smart India Hackathon 2020, a national digital product building competition.

QUESTION: 96

Name the election Commissioner of India who has recently resigned from hispost to join Asian Development Bank as a Vice-President.

Solution:

Election Commissioner Ashok Lavasa recently resigned from the post two years before the end of his tenure as Lavasa will join the Asian Development Bank as its vice president soon.

QUESTION: 97

Which industrial body has organized the ‘India@75 Summit - Mission 2022’?

Solution:

Confederation of Indian Industries has organized the India@75 Summit - Mission 2022.

QUESTION: 98

Who won the 70th Anniversary Grand Prix?

Solution:

Max Verstappen has won the 70th Anniversary Grand Prix

QUESTION: 99

Which of the following Countries is one of the participating countries of the 20th SAARC summit 2020?

Solution:

The participating countries in the 20th SAARC summit are Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

QUESTION: 100

Tropic of Cancer passes through how many states of India?

Solution:

The Tropic of Cancer passes through 8 states of India and they are Mizoram, Tripura, West Bengal, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Gujarat.

QUESTION: 101

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Name the organization which plans to establish research cell at IIT-Hyderabad to meet the future defence technological requirements of the country.

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

The central government has formed a committee headed by Rajnath Singh for the implementation of Emergency Credit Line Guarantee Scheme (ECLGS) for MSME. What is the amount that was allocated under ECLGS scheme by GoI?

Solution:
QUESTION: 103

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option.

In Greek mythology, Nike was  

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Which among the following is the world’s oldest known land animal as per research published in the journal Historical Biology?

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

For the 1st time in human history scientists from France have witnessed the birth of a new planet. The study was published in which journal?

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Pench National Park is located in which state of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Bharti Airtel (Singapore) has acquired additional _____% stake (acquired 25% earlier) in Robi Axiata from NTT Docomo.

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

With which company CBSE partnered to launch a curriculum on Digital Safety and Augmented Reality for students and educators?

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Lawrencedale Agro Processing India (LEAF) has entered into an agreement with the Government of which state to expand the scope of food processing in the State?

Solution:

Sol. Government of Andhra Pradesh and Lawrencedale Agro Processing India (LEAF) has signed an agreement to expand the scope of food processing in the State.

QUESTION: 110

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

The Patrika Gate has been inaugurated in which city by PM Narendra Modi recently?

Solution:

Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi inaugurated the Patrika Gate in Jaipur, Rajasthan through video conference on 8th September 2020.

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