IIFT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern)


110 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | IIFT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern)


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This mock test of IIFT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 110 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT IIFT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IIFT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this IIFT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IIFT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The endless struggle between the flesh and the spirit found an end in Greek art. The Greek artists were unaware of it. They were spiritual materialists, never denying the importance of the body and ever seeing in the body a spiritual significance. Mysticism on the whole was alien to the Greeks, thinkers as they were. Thought and mysticism never go well together and there is little symbolism in Greek art. Athena was not a symbol of wisdom but an embodiment of it and her statues were beautiful grave women, whose seriousness might mark them as wise, but who were marked in no other way. The Apollo Belvedere is not a symbol of the sun, nor the Versailles Artemis of the moon. There could be nothing less akin to the ways of symbolism than their beautiful, normal humanity. Nor did decoration really interest the Greeks. In all their art they were preoccupied with what they wanted to express, not with ways of expressing it, and lovely expression, merely as lovely expression, did not appeal to them at all.

Greek art is intellectual art, the art of men who were clear and lucid thinkers, and it is therefore plain art. Artists than whom the world has never seen greater, men endowed with the spirit's best gift, found their natural method of expression in the simplicity and clarity which are the endowment of the unclouded reason. “Nothing in excess,” the Greek axiom of art, is the dictum of men who would brush aside all obscuring, entangling superfluity, and see clearly: plainly, unadorned, what they wished to express. Structure belongs in an especial degree to the province of the mind in art, and architectonics were pre-eminently a mark of the Greek. The power that made a unified whole of the trilogy of a Greek tragedy, that envisioned the sure, precise, decisive scheme of the Greek statue, found its most conspicuous expression in Greek architecture. The Greek temple is the creation, par excellence, of mind and spirit in equilibrium.

A Hindoo temple is a conglomeration of adornment. The lines of the building are completely hidden by the decorations. Sculptured figures and ornaments crowd its surface, stand out from it in thick masses, break it up into a bewildering series of irregular tiers. It is not a unity but a collection, rich, confused. It looks like something not planned but built this way and that as the ornament required. The conviction underlying it can be perceived: each bit of the exquisitely wrought detail had a mystical meaning and the temple‟s exterior was important only as a means for the artist to inscribe thereon the symbols of the truth. It is decoration, not architecture.

Again, the gigantic temples of Egypt, those massive immensities of granite which look as if only the power that moves in the earthquake were mighty enough to bring them into existence, are something other than the creation of geometry balanced by beauty. The science and the spirit are there, but what is there most of all is force, inhuman force, calm but tremendous, overwhelming. It reduces to nothingness all that belongs to man. He is annihilated. The Egyptian architects were possessed by the consciousness of the awful, irresistible domination of the ways of nature; they had no thought to give to the insignificant atom that was man.

Greek architecture of the great age is the expression of men who were, first of all, intellectual artists, kept firmly within the visible world by their mind, but, only second to that, lovers of the human world. The Greek temple is the perfect expression of the pure intellect illumined by the spirit. No other great buildings anywhere approach its simplicity. In the Parthenon straight columns rise to plain capitals; a pediment is sculptured in bold, relief; there is nothing more. And yet-here is the Greek miracle-this absolute simplicity of structure is alone in majesty of beauty among all the temples and cathedrals and palaces of the world. Majestic but human, truly Greek. No superhuman force as in Egypt; no strange supernatural shapes as in India; the Parthenon is the home of humanity! At ease, calm, ordered, sure of itself and the world. The Greeks flung a challenge to nature in the fullness of their joyous strength. They set their temples on the summit of a hill overlooking the wide sea, outlined against the circle of the sky. They would build what was more beautiful than hill and sea and sky and greater than all these. It matters not at all if the temple is large or small; one never thinks of the size. It matters not how much it is in ruins. A few white columns dominate the lofty height at Sunion as securely as the greatmass of the Parthenon dominates all the sweep of sea and land around Athens. To the Greek architect man was the master of the world. His mind could understand its laws; his spirit could discover its beauty.

Q. From the passage, which of the following combinations can be inferred to be correct?

Solution:

Only option 2 can be inferred from lines 2 – 6 of the last paragraph- ‘The Greek temple is the perfect expression of the pure intellect illumined by the spirit. No other great buildings anywhere approach its simplicity. In the Parthenon, straight columns rise to plain capitals; a pediment is sculptured in bold relief; there is nothing more. And yet- here is the Greek miracle- this absolute simplicity of structure...’

Rest of the options cannot be derived from the passage.

Hence, they can be negated.

QUESTION: 2

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The endless struggle between the flesh and the spirit found an end in Greek art. The Greek artists were unaware of it. They were spiritual materialists, never denying the importance of the body and ever seeing in the body a spiritual significance. Mysticism on the whole was alien to the Greeks, thinkers as they were. Thought and mysticism never go well together and there is little symbolism in Greek art. Athena was not a symbol of wisdom but an embodiment of it and her statues were beautiful grave women, whose seriousness might mark them as wise, but who were marked in no other way. The Apollo Belvedere is not a symbol of the sun, nor the Versailles Artemis of the moon. There could be nothing less akin to the ways of symbolism than their beautiful, normal humanity. Nor did decoration really interest the Greeks. In all their art they were preoccupied with what they wanted to express, not with ways of expressing it, and lovely expression, merely as lovely expression, did not appeal to them at all.

Greek art is intellectual art, the art of men who were clear and lucid thinkers, and it is therefore plain art. Artists than whom the world has never seen greater, men endowed with the spirit's best gift, found their natural method of expression in the simplicity and clarity which are the endowment of the unclouded reason. “Nothing in excess,” the Greek axiom of art, is the dictum of men who would brush aside all obscuring, entangling superfluity, and see clearly: plainly, unadorned, what they wished to express. Structure belongs in an especial degree to the province of the mind in art, and architectonics were pre-eminently a mark of the Greek. The power that made a unified whole of the trilogy of a Greek tragedy, that envisioned the sure, precise, decisive scheme of the Greek statue, found its most conspicuous expression in Greek architecture. The Greek temple is the creation, par excellence, of mind and spirit in equilibrium.

A Hindoo temple is a conglomeration of adornment. The lines of the building are completely hidden by the decorations. Sculptured figures and ornaments crowd its surface, stand out from it in thick masses, break it up into a bewildering series of irregular tiers. It is not a unity but a collection, rich, confused. It looks like something not planned but built this way and that as the ornament required. The conviction underlying it can be perceived: each bit of the exquisitely wrought detail had a mystical meaning and the temple‟s exterior was important only as a means for the artist to inscribe thereon the symbols of the truth. It is decoration, not architecture.

Again, the gigantic temples of Egypt, those massive immensities of granite which look as if only the power that moves in the earthquake were mighty enough to bring them into existence, are something other than the creation of geometry balanced by beauty. The science and the spirit are there, but what is there most of all is force, inhuman force, calm but tremendous, overwhelming. It reduces to nothingness all that belongs to man. He is annihilated. The Egyptian architects were possessed by the consciousness of the awful, irresistible domination of the ways of nature; they had no thought to give to the insignificant atom that was man.

Greek architecture of the great age is the expression of men who were, first of all, intellectual artists, kept firmly within the visible world by their mind, but, only second to that, lovers of the human world. The Greek temple is the perfect expression of the pure intellect illumined by the spirit. No other great buildings anywhere approach its simplicity. In the Parthenon straight columns rise to plain capitals; a pediment is sculptured in bold, relief; there is nothing more. And yet-here is the Greek miracle-this absolute simplicity of structure is alone in majesty of beauty among all the temples and cathedrals and palaces of the world. Majestic but human, truly Greek. No superhuman force as in Egypt; no strange supernatural shapes as in India; the Parthenon is the home of humanity! At ease, calm, ordered, sure of itself and the world. The Greeks flung a challenge to nature in the fullness of their joyous strength. They set their temples on the summit of a hill overlooking the wide sea, outlined against the circle of the sky. They would build what was more beautiful than hill and sea and sky and greater than all these. It matters not at all if the temple is large or small; one never thinks of the size. It matters not how much it is in ruins. A few white columns dominate the lofty height at Sunion as securely as the greatmass of the Parthenon dominates all the sweep of sea and land around Athens. To the Greek architect man was the master of the world. His mind could understand its laws; his spirit could discover its beauty.

Q. Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of Greek architecture, according to the passage?

Solution:

The question asked is what is not a characteristic. So, we have to find that which is incorrect or not true as per the passage. It is given, "Greek art is intellectual art, the art of men who were clear and lucid thinkers, and it is therefore plain art. .......method of expression in the simplicity and clarity which are the endowment of the unclouded reason. "Nothing in excess," the Greek axiom of art...."
So, options 1, 2 and 3 are correct.

The passage states in the beginning, "Mysticism on the whole was alien to the Greeks, thinkers as they were. Thought and mysticism never go well together and there is little symbolism in Greek art." So, option 4 is incorrect
 

QUESTION: 3

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The endless struggle between the flesh and the spirit found an end in Greek art. The Greek artists were unaware of it. They were spiritual materialists, never denying the importance of the body and ever seeing in the body a spiritual significance. Mysticism on the whole was alien to the Greeks, thinkers as they were. Thought and mysticism never go well together and there is little symbolism in Greek art. Athena was not a symbol of wisdom but an embodiment of it and her statues were beautiful grave women, whose seriousness might mark them as wise, but who were marked in no other way. The Apollo Belvedere is not a symbol of the sun, nor the Versailles Artemis of the moon. There could be nothing less akin to the ways of symbolism than their beautiful, normal humanity. Nor did decoration really interest the Greeks. In all their art they were preoccupied with what they wanted to express, not with ways of expressing it, and lovely expression, merely as lovely expression, did not appeal to them at all.

Greek art is intellectual art, the art of men who were clear and lucid thinkers, and it is therefore plain art. Artists than whom the world has never seen greater, men endowed with the spirit's best gift, found their natural method of expression in the simplicity and clarity which are the endowment of the unclouded reason. “Nothing in excess,” the Greek axiom of art, is the dictum of men who would brush aside all obscuring, entangling superfluity, and see clearly: plainly, unadorned, what they wished to express. Structure belongs in an especial degree to the province of the mind in art, and architectonics were pre-eminently a mark of the Greek. The power that made a unified whole of the trilogy of a Greek tragedy, that envisioned the sure, precise, decisive scheme of the Greek statue, found its most conspicuous expression in Greek architecture. The Greek temple is the creation, par excellence, of mind and spirit in equilibrium.

A Hindoo temple is a conglomeration of adornment. The lines of the building are completely hidden by the decorations. Sculptured figures and ornaments crowd its surface, stand out from it in thick masses, break it up into a bewildering series of irregular tiers. It is not a unity but a collection, rich, confused. It looks like something not planned but built this way and that as the ornament required. The conviction underlying it can be perceived: each bit of the exquisitely wrought detail had a mystical meaning and the temple‟s exterior was important only as a means for the artist to inscribe thereon the symbols of the truth. It is decoration, not architecture.

Again, the gigantic temples of Egypt, those massive immensities of granite which look as if only the power that moves in the earthquake were mighty enough to bring them into existence, are something other than the creation of geometry balanced by beauty. The science and the spirit are there, but what is there most of all is force, inhuman force, calm but tremendous, overwhelming. It reduces to nothingness all that belongs to man. He is annihilated. The Egyptian architects were possessed by the consciousness of the awful, irresistible domination of the ways of nature; they had no thought to give to the insignificant atom that was man.

Greek architecture of the great age is the expression of men who were, first of all, intellectual artists, kept firmly within the visible world by their mind, but, only second to that, lovers of the human world. The Greek temple is the perfect expression of the pure intellect illumined by the spirit. No other great buildings anywhere approach its simplicity. In the Parthenon straight columns rise to plain capitals; a pediment is sculptured in bold, relief; there is nothing more. And yet-here is the Greek miracle-this absolute simplicity of structure is alone in majesty of beauty among all the temples and cathedrals and palaces of the world. Majestic but human, truly Greek. No superhuman force as in Egypt; no strange supernatural shapes as in India; the Parthenon is the home of humanity! At ease, calm, ordered, sure of itself and the world. The Greeks flung a challenge to nature in the fullness of their joyous strength. They set their temples on the summit of a hill overlooking the wide sea, outlined against the circle of the sky. They would build what was more beautiful than hill and sea and sky and greater than all these. It matters not at all if the temple is large or small; one never thinks of the size. It matters not how much it is in ruins. A few white columns dominate the lofty height at Sunion as securely as the greatmass of the Parthenon dominates all the sweep of sea and land around Athens. To the Greek architect man was the master of the world. His mind could understand its laws; his spirit could discover its beauty.

Q. According to the passage, what conception of man can be inferred from Egyptian architecture?

Solution:

The characteristic of the Egyptian temples are mentioned in the 4th paragraph by the author. A reading of this paragraph will easily lead to the elimination of options 1, 2 and 3.

Option (4) can be inferred directly. Hence, it is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 4

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The endless struggle between the flesh and the spirit found an end in Greek art. The Greek artists were unaware of it. They were spiritual materialists, never denying the importance of the body and ever seeing in the body a spiritual significance. Mysticism on the whole was alien to the Greeks, thinkers as they were. Thought and mysticism never go well together and there is little symbolism in Greek art. Athena was not a symbol of wisdom but an embodiment of it and her statues were beautiful grave women, whose seriousness might mark them as wise, but who were marked in no other way. The Apollo Belvedere is not a symbol of the sun, nor the Versailles Artemis of the moon. There could be nothing less akin to the ways of symbolism than their beautiful, normal humanity. Nor did decoration really interest the Greeks. In all their art they were preoccupied with what they wanted to express, not with ways of expressing it, and lovely expression, merely as lovely expression, did not appeal to them at all.

Greek art is intellectual art, the art of men who were clear and lucid thinkers, and it is therefore plain art. Artists than whom the world has never seen greater, men endowed with the spirit's best gift, found their natural method of expression in the simplicity and clarity which are the endowment of the unclouded reason. “Nothing in excess,” the Greek axiom of art, is the dictum of men who would brush aside all obscuring, entangling superfluity, and see clearly: plainly, unadorned, what they wished to express. Structure belongs in an especial degree to the province of the mind in art, and architectonics were pre-eminently a mark of the Greek. The power that made a unified whole of the trilogy of a Greek tragedy, that envisioned the sure, precise, decisive scheme of the Greek statue, found its most conspicuous expression in Greek architecture. The Greek temple is the creation, par excellence, of mind and spirit in equilibrium.

A Hindoo temple is a conglomeration of adornment. The lines of the building are completely hidden by the decorations. Sculptured figures and ornaments crowd its surface, stand out from it in thick masses, break it up into a bewildering series of irregular tiers. It is not a unity but a collection, rich, confused. It looks like something not planned but built this way and that as the ornament required. The conviction underlying it can be perceived: each bit of the exquisitely wrought detail had a mystical meaning and the temple's exterior was important only as a means for the artist to inscribe thereon the symbols of the truth. It is decoration, not architecture.

Again, the gigantic temples of Egypt, those massive immensities of granite which look as if only the power that moves in the earthquake were mighty enough to bring them into existence, are something other than the creation of geometry balanced by beauty. The science and the spirit are there, but what is there most of all is force, inhuman force, calm but tremendous, overwhelming. It reduces to nothingness all that belongs to man. He is annihilated. The Egyptian architects were possessed by the consciousness of the awful, irresistible domination of the ways of nature; they had no thought to give to the insignificant atom that was man.

Greek architecture of the great age is the expression of men who were, first of all, intellectual artists, kept firmly within the visible world by their mind, but, only second to that, lovers of the human world. The Greek temple is the perfect expression of the pure intellect illumined by the spirit. No other great buildings anywhere approach its simplicity. In the Parthenon straight columns rise to plain capitals; a pediment is sculptured in bold, relief; there is nothing more. And yet-here is the Greek miracle-this absolute simplicity of structure is alone in majesty of beauty among all the temples and cathedrals and palaces of the world. Majestic but human, truly Greek. No superhuman force as in Egypt; no strange supernatural shapes as in India; the Parthenon is the home of humanity! At ease, calm, ordered, sure of itself and the world. The Greeks flung a challenge to nature in the fullness of their joyous strength. They set their temples on the summit of a hill overlooking the wide sea, outlined against the circle of the sky. They would build what was more beautiful than hill and sea and sky and greater than all these. It matters not at all if the temple is large or small; one never thinks of the size. It matters not how much it is in ruins. A few white columns dominate the lofty height at Sunion as securely as the greatmass of the Parthenon dominates all the sweep of sea and land around Athens. To the Greek architect man was the master of the world. His mind could understand its laws; his spirit could discover its beauty.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following best explains why there is little symbolism in Greek art?

Solution:

The author talks about symbolism in Greek art in the first paragraph.

Option (1), (2) and (4) are facts mentioned, but do not explain the reason why there is little symbolism in Greek art.

Only (3) gives the reason.

QUESTION: 5

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The endless struggle between the flesh and the spirit found an end in Greek art. The Greek artists were unaware of it. They were spiritual materialists, never denying the importance of the body and ever seeing in the body a spiritual significance. Mysticism on the whole was alien to the Greeks, thinkers as they were. Thought and mysticism never go well together and there is little symbolism in Greek art. Athena was not a symbol of wisdom but an embodiment of it and her statues were beautiful grave women, whose seriousness might mark them as wise, but who were marked in no other way. The Apollo Belvedere is not a symbol of the sun, nor the Versailles Artemis of the moon. There could be nothing less akin to the ways of symbolism than their beautiful, normal humanity. Nor did decoration really interest the Greeks. In all their art they were preoccupied with what they wanted to express, not with ways of expressing it, and lovely expression, merely as lovely expression, did not appeal to them at all.

Greek art is intellectual art, the art of men who were clear and lucid thinkers, and it is therefore plain art. Artists than whom the world has never seen greater, men endowed with the spirit's best gift, found their natural method of expression in the simplicity and clarity which are the endowment of the unclouded reason. “Nothing in excess,” the Greek axiom of art, is the dictum of men who would brush aside all obscuring, entangling superfluity, and see clearly: plainly, unadorned, what they wished to express. Structure belongs in an especial degree to the province of the mind in art, and architectonics were pre-eminently a mark of the Greek. The power that made a unified whole of the trilogy of a Greek tragedy, that envisioned the sure, precise, decisive scheme of the Greek statue, found its most conspicuous expression in Greek architecture. The Greek temple is the creation, par excellence, of mind and spirit in equilibrium.

A Hindoo temple is a conglomeration of adornment. The lines of the building are completely hidden by the decorations. Sculptured figures and ornaments crowd its surface, stand out from it in thick masses, break it up into a bewildering series of irregular tiers. It is not a unity but a collection, rich, confused. It looks like something not planned but built this way and that as the ornament required. The conviction underlying it can be perceived: each bit of the exquisitely wrought detail had a mystical meaning and the temple's exterior was important only as a means for the artist to inscribe thereon the symbols of the truth. It is decoration, not architecture.

Again, the gigantic temples of Egypt, those massive immensities of granite which look as if only the power that moves in the earthquake were mighty enough to bring them into existence, are something other than the creation of geometry balanced by beauty. The science and the spirit are there, but what is there most of all is force, inhuman force, calm but tremendous, overwhelming. It reduces to nothingness all that belongs to man. He is annihilated. The Egyptian architects were possessed by the consciousness of the awful, irresistible domination of the ways of nature; they had no thought to give to the insignificant atom that was man.

Greek architecture of the great age is the expression of men who were, first of all, intellectual artists, kept firmly within the visible world by their mind, but, only second to that, lovers of the human world. The Greek temple is the perfect expression of the pure intellect illumined by the spirit. No other great buildings anywhere approach its simplicity. In the Parthenon straight columns rise to plain capitals; a pediment is sculptured in bold, relief; there is nothing more. And yet-here is the Greek miracle-this absolute simplicity of structure is alone in majesty of beauty among all the temples and cathedrals and palaces of the world. Majestic but human, truly Greek. No superhuman force as in Egypt; no strange supernatural shapes as in India; the Parthenon is the home of humanity! At ease, calm, ordered, sure of itself and the world. The Greeks flung a challenge to nature in the fullness of their joyous strength. They set their temples on the summit of a hill overlooking the wide sea, outlined against the circle of the sky. They would build what was more beautiful than hill and sea and sky and greater than all these. It matters not at all if the temple is large or small; one never thinks of the size. It matters not how much it is in ruins. A few white columns dominate the lofty height at Sunion as securely as the greatmass of the Parthenon dominates all the sweep of sea and land around Athens. To the Greek architect man was the master of the world. His mind could understand its laws; his spirit could discover its beauty.

Q. “The Greeks flung a challenge to nature in the fullness of their joyous strength.” Which of the following best captures the” challenge that is being referred to?

Solution:

In the last paragraph: ‘They would build what was more beautiful than hill and sea and sky and greater than all these. It matters not at all if the temple is large or small; one never thinks of the size...........To the Greek architect man was the master of the world. His mind could understand its laws; his spirit could discover its beauty’,

The author explains what he meant by the challenge that the Greeks flung to nature.

QUESTION: 6

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The tight calendar had calmed hint, as did the constant exertion of his authority as a judge. How he relished his powerover the classes that had kept his family pinned under their heels for centuries - like the stenographer, for example, who was a Brahmin. There he was, now crawling into a tiny tent to the side, and there was Jemubhai reclining like a king in a bed carved out of teak, hung with mosquito netting."Bed tea", the cook would shout "Baaadtee". He would sit up to drink.6.30: he'd bathe in water that had been heated over the fire so it was redolent with the smell of wood smoke and flocked with ash. With a dusting of powder he graced his newly washed face, with a daub of pomade, his hair. Crunched up toast like charcoal from having been toasted upon the flame, with marmalade over the burn.8.30: he rode into the fields with the local officials and everyone else in the village going along for fun. Followed by an orderly holding an umbrella over his head to shield him from the glare, he measured the fields and checked to make sure his yield estimate matched the headman's statement. Farms were growing less than ten maunds an acre of rice or wheat, and at two rupees a maund, every single man in a village, sometimes, was in debt to the bania.

(Nobody knew that Jemuhhai himself was noosed, of course, that long ago in the little town of Piphit in Gujarat, moneylenders had sniffed out in him a winning combination of ambition and poverty that they still sat waiting cross-legged on a soiled mat in the market, snapping their toes, cracking their knuckles in anticipation of repayment) 2.00: after lunch, the judge sat at his desk under a tree to try cases, usually in a cross mood, for he disliked the informality, hated the splotch of leaf shadow on him imparting an untidy mongrel look. Also, there was a worse aspect of contamination and corruption; he heard cases in Hindi, but they were recorded in Urdu by the stenographer and translated by the judge into a second record in English, although his own command of Hindi and Urdu was tenuous; the witnesses who couldn't read at all put their thumbprints at the bottom of "Read Over and Acknowledged Correct", as instructed.

Nobody could be sure how much of the truth had fallen between languages, between languages and illiteracy; the clarity that justice demanded was nonexistent. Still, despite the leaf shadow and language confusion, he acquired a fearsome reputation for his speech that seemed to belong to no language at all, and for his face like a mask that conveyed something beyond human fallibility. The expression and manner honed here would carry him, eventually, all the way to the high court in Lucknow where, annoyed by lawless pigeons shuttlecocking about those tall, shadowy halls, he would preside, white powdered wig over white powdered face, hammer in hand. His photograph, thus attired, thus annoyed, was still up on the wall, in a parade of history glorifying the progress of Indian law and order.4:30: tea had to be perfect, drop scones made in the frying pan. He would embark on them with forehead wrinkled, as if angrily mulling over something important, and then, as it would into his retirement, the draw of the sweet took over, and his stern workface would hatch an expression of tranquillity. 5:30: out he went into the countryside with his fishing rod or gun. The countryside was full of game; lariats of migratory birds lassoed the sky in October; quail and partridge with lines of babies strung out behind whirred by like nursery toys that emit sound with movement; pheasant - fat foolish creatures, made to be shot - went scurrying, through the bushes. The thunder of gunshot rolled away, the leaves shivered, and he experienced the profound silence that could come only after violence. One thing was always missing, though, the proof of the pudding, the prize of the action, the manliness in manhood, the partridge for the pot, because he returned with - Nothing! He was a terrible shot.8:00. the cook saved his reputation, cooked a chicken, brought it forth, proclaimed it "roast bastard", just as in the Englishman's favourite joke book of natives using incorrect English.

But sometimes, eating that roast bustard, the judge felt the joke might also be on him, and he called for another rum, took a big gulp, and kept eating feeling as if he were eating himself, since he, too, was (was he?) part of the fun.... 9:00: sipping Ovaltine, he filled out the registers with the day's gleanings. The Petromax lantern would be lit - what as noise it made - insects fording the black to dive - bomb him with soft flowers (moths), with iridescence (beetles). Lines, columns, and squares. He realized truth was best looked at in tiny aggregates,for many baby truths could yet add up to one big size unsavory lie. Last, in his diary also to be submitted to his superiors, he recorded the random observations of a cultured man, someone who was observant, schooled in literature as well as economics; and he made up bunting triumphs: two partridge.... one deer with thirty-inch horns....11:00 : he had a hot water bottle in winter, and, in all seasons, to the sound of the wind buffeting the trees and the cook's snoring, he fell asleep.

Q. Which of the following statements is incorrect?

Solution:

The 4th para clearly states that the judge's command over Hindi and Urdu was tenuous. So (c) is incorrect.

(a) is correct as is clear from the 7th para (5:30).

(b) is correct as it was the stenographer who was Brahmin. Refer para 1.

(d) is correct as mentioned in second half of the 3rd, '' Nobody knew......... of repayment''.

QUESTION: 7

Read the following passage carefullyand answer the questions given at the end.

The tight calendar had calmed hint, as did the constant exertion of his authority as a judge. How he relished his powerover the classes that had kept his family pinned under their heels for centuries - like the stenographer, for example, who was a Brahmin. There he was, now crawling into a tiny tent to the side,and there was Jemubhai reclining like a king in a bed carved out of teak, hung with mosquito netting."Bed tea", the cook would shout "Baaadtee".He would sit up to drink.6.30: he'd bathe in water that had been heated over the fire so it was redolent with the smell of wood smoke and flocked with ash. With a dusting of powder he graced his newly washed face, with a daub of pomade, his hair. Crunched up toast like charcoal from having been toasted upon the flame, with marmalade over the burn.8.30: he rode into the fields with the local officials and everyone else in the village going along for fun. Followed by an orderly holding an umbrella over his head to shield him from the glare, he measured the fields and checked to make sure his yield estimate matched the headman's statement. Farms were growing less than ten maunds an acre of rice or wheat, and at two rupees a maund, every single man in a village, sometimes, was in debt to the bania.

(Nobody knew that Jemuhhai himself was noosed, of course, that long ago in the little town of Piphit in Gujarat, moneylenders had sniffed out in him a winning combination of ambition and poverty … that they still sat waiting cross-legged on a soiled mat in the market, snapping their toes, cracking their knuckles in anticipation of repayment….) 2.00: after lunch, the judge sat at his desk under a tree to try cases, usually in a cross mood, for he disliked the informality, hated the splotch of leaf shadow on him imparting an untidy mongrel look. Also, there was a worse aspect of contamination and corruption; he heard cases in Hindi, but they were recorded in Urdu by the stenographer and translated by the judge into a second record in English, although his own command of Hindi and Urdu was tenuous; the witnesses who couldn't read at all put their thumbprints at the bottom of "Read Over and Acknowledged Correct", as instructed.

Nobody could be sure how much of the truth had fallen between languages, between languages and illiteracy; the clarity that justice demanded was nonexistent. Still, despite the leaf shadow and language confusion, he acquired a fearsome reputation for his speech that seemed to belong to no language at all, and for his face like a mask that conveyed something beyond human fallibility. The expression and manner honed here would carry him, eventually, all the way to the high court in Lucknow where, annoyed by lawless pigeons shuttlecocking about those tall, shadowy halls, he would preside, white powdered wig over white powdered face, hammer in hand. His photograph, thus attired, thus annoyed, was still up on the wall, in a parade of history glorifying the progress of Indian law and order.4:30: tea had to be perfect, drop scones made in the frying pan. He would embark on them with forehead wrinkled, as if angrily mulling over something important, and then, as it would into his retirement, the draw of the sweet took over, and his stern workface would hatch an expression of tranquillity. 5:30: out he went into the countryside with his fishing rod or gun. The countryside was full of game; lariats of migratory birds lassoed the sky in October; quail and partridge with lines of babies strung out behind whirred by like nursery toys that emit sound with movement; pheasant - fat foolish creatures, made to be shot - went scurrying, through the bushes. The thunder of gunshot rolled away, the leaves shivered, and he experienced the profound silence that could come only after violence. One thing was always missing, though, the proof of the pudding, the prize of the action, the manliness in manhood, the partridge for the pot, because he returned with - Nothing! He was a terrible shot.8:00: the cook saved his reputation, cooked a chicken, brought it forth, proclaimed it "roast bastard", just as in the Englishman's favourite joke book of natives using incorrect English.

But sometimes, eating that roast bustard, the judge felt the joke might also be on him, and he called for another rum, took a big gulp, and kept eating feeling as if he were eating himself, since he, too, was (was he?) part of the fun.... 9:00: sipping Ovaltine, he filled out the registers with the day's gleanings. The Petromax lantern would be lit - what as noise it made - insects fording the black to dive - bomb him with soft flowers (moths), with iridescence (beetles). Lines, columns, and squares. He realized truth was best looked at in tiny aggregates,for many baby truths could yet add up to one big size unsavory lie. Last, in his diary also to be submitted to his superiors, he recorded the random observations of a cultured man, someone who was observant, schooled in literature as well as economics; and he made up bunting triumphs: two partridge.... one deer with thirty-inch horns....11:00 : he had a hot water bottle in winter, and, in all seasons, to the sound of the wind buffeting the trees and the cook's snoring, he fell asleep.

Q. What always happened when the judge went to the countryside?

Solution:

The judge could never manage to hit a single bird. It is clear from the last line of 7th para because he returned with - nothing!

(a), (c) & (d) are clearly mentioned in the 7th para.

QUESTION: 8

Read the following passage carefullyand answer the questions given at the end.

The tight calendar had calmed hint, as did the constant exertion of his authority as a judge. How he relished his powerover the classes that had kept his family pinned under their heels for centuries - like the stenographer, for example, who was a Brahmin. There he was, now crawling into a tiny tent to the side,and there was Jemubhai reclining like a king in a bed carved out of teak, hung with mosquito netting."Bed tea", the cook would shout "Baaadtee".He would sit up to drink.6.30: he'd bathe in water that had been heated over the fire so it was redolent with the smell of wood smoke and flocked with ash. With a dusting of powder he graced his newly washed face, with a daub of pomade, his hair. Crunched up toast like charcoal from having been toasted upon the flame, with marmalade over the burn.8.30: he rode into the fields with the local officials and everyone else in the village going along for fun. Followed by an orderly holding an umbrella over his head to shield him from the glare, he measured the fields and checked to make sure his yield estimate matched the headman's statement. Farms were growing less than ten maunds an acre of rice or wheat, and at two rupees a maund, every single man in a village, sometimes, was in debt to the bania.

(Nobody knew that Jemuhhai himself was noosed, of course, that long ago in the little town of Piphit in Gujarat, moneylenders had sniffed out in him a winning combination of ambition and poverty … that they still sat waiting cross-legged on a soiled mat in the market, snapping their toes, cracking their knuckles in anticipation of repayment….) 2.00: after lunch, the judge sat at his desk under a tree to try cases, usually in a cross mood, for he disliked the informality, hated the splotch of leaf shadow on him imparting an untidy mongrel look. Also, there was a worse aspect of contamination and corruption; he heard cases in Hindi, but they were recorded in Urdu by the stenographer and translated by the judge into a second record in English, although his own command of Hindi and Urdu was tenuous; the witnesses who couldn't read at all put their thumbprints at the bottom of "Read Over and Acknowledged Correct", as instructed.

Nobody could be sure how much of the truth had fallen between languages, between languages and illiteracy; the clarity that justice demanded was nonexistent. Still, despite the leaf shadow and language confusion, he acquired a fearsome reputation for his speech that seemed to belong to no language at all, and for his face like a mask that conveyed something beyond human fallibility. The expression and manner honed here would carry him, eventually, all the way to the high court in Lucknow where, annoyed by lawless pigeons shuttlecocking about those tall, shadowy halls, he would preside, white powdered wig over white powdered face, hammer in hand. His photograph, thus attired, thus annoyed, was still up on the wall, in a parade of history glorifying the progress of Indian law and order.4:30: tea had to be perfect, drop scones made in the frying pan. He would embark on them with forehead wrinkled, as if angrily mulling over something important, and then, as it would into his retirement, the draw of the sweet took over, and his stern workface would hatch an expression of tranquillity. 5:30: out he went into the countryside with his fishing rod or gun. The countryside was full of game; lariats of migratory birds lassoed the sky in October; quail and partridge with lines of babies strung out behind whirred by like nursery toys that emit sound with movement; pheasant - fat foolish creatures, made to be shot - went scurrying, through the bushes. The thunder of gunshot rolled away, the leaves shivered, and he experienced the profound silence that could come only after violence. One thing was always missing, though, the proof of the pudding, the prize of the action, the manliness in manhood, the partridge for the pot, because he returned with - Nothing! He was a terrible shot.8:00: the cook saved his reputation, cooked a chicken, brought it forth, proclaimed it "roast bastard", just as in the Englishman's favourite joke book of natives using incorrect English.

But sometimes, eating that roast bustard, the judge felt the joke might also be on him, and he called for another rum, took a big gulp, and kept eating feeling as if he were eating himself, since he, too, was (was he?) part of the fun.... 9:00: sipping Ovaltine, he filled out the registers with the day's gleanings. The Petromax lantern would be lit - what as noise it made - insects fording the black to dive - bomb him with soft flowers (moths), with iridescence (beetles). Lines, columns, and squares. He realized truth was best looked at in tiny aggregates,for many baby truths could yet add up to one big size unsavory lie. Last, in his diary also to be submitted to his superiors, he recorded the random observations of a cultured man, someone who was observant, schooled in literature as well as economics; and he made up bunting triumphs: two partridge.... one deer with thirty-inch horns....11:00 : he had a hot water bottle in winter, and, in all seasons, to the sound of the wind buffeting the trees and the cook's snoring, he fell asleep.

Q. People were in "debt to the "bania" because:

Solution:

The 3rd para clearly tells the low production of the farms–less than 10 maunds per acre and the price
they got for it (` 2 per maund).This has forced the villagers to be under debt of the bania.

(b) is wrong as Piphit is related to the judge not the villagers. Refer 3rd para.
(c) & (d) are irrelevent.

QUESTION: 9

Read the following passage carefullyand answer the questions given at the end.

The tight calendar had calmed hint, as did the constant exertion of his authority as a judge. How he relished his powerover the classes that had kept his family pinned under their heels for centuries - like the stenographer, for example, who was a Brahmin. There he was, now crawling into a tiny tent to the side,and there was Jemubhai reclining like a king in a bed carved out of teak, hung with mosquito netting."Bed tea", the cook would shout "Baaadtee".He would sit up to drink.6.30: he'd bathe in water that had been heated over the fire so it was redolent with the smell of wood smoke and flocked with ash. With a dusting of powder he graced his newly washed face, with a daub of pomade, his hair. Crunched up toast like charcoal from having been toasted upon the flame, with marmalade over the burn.8.30: he rode into the fields with the local officials and everyone else in the village going along for fun. Followed by an orderly holding an umbrella over his head to shield him from the glare, he measured the fields and checked to make sure his yield estimate matched the headman's statement. Farms were growing less than ten maunds an acre of rice or wheat, and at two rupees a maund, every single man in a village, sometimes, was in debt to the bania.

(Nobody knew that Jemuhhai himself was noosed, of course, that long ago in the little town of Piphit in Gujarat, moneylenders had sniffed out in him a winning combination of ambition and poverty … that they still sat waiting cross-legged on a soiled mat in the market, snapping their toes, cracking their knuckles in anticipation of repayment….) 2.00: after lunch, the judge sat at his desk under a tree to try cases, usually in a cross mood, for he disliked the informality, hated the splotch of leaf shadow on him imparting an untidy mongrel look. Also, there was a worse aspect of contamination and corruption; he heard cases in Hindi, but they were recorded in Urdu by the stenographer and translated by the judge into a second record in English, although his own command of Hindi and Urdu was tenuous; the witnesses who couldn't read at all put their thumbprints at the bottom of "Read Over and Acknowledged Correct", as instructed.

Nobody could be sure how much of the truth had fallen between languages, between languages and illiteracy; the clarity that justice demanded was nonexistent. Still, despite the leaf shadow and language confusion, he acquired a fearsome reputation for his speech that seemed to belong to no language at all, and for his face like a mask that conveyed something beyond human fallibility. The expression and manner honed here would carry him, eventually, all the way to the high court in Lucknow where, annoyed by lawless pigeons shuttlecocking about those tall, shadowy halls, he would preside, white powdered wig over white powdered face, hammer in hand. His photograph, thus attired, thus annoyed, was still up on the wall, in a parade of history glorifying the progress of Indian law and order.4:30: tea had to be perfect, drop scones made in the frying pan. He would embark on them with forehead wrinkled, as if angrily mulling over something important, and then, as it would into his retirement, the draw of the sweet took over, and his stern workface would hatch an expression of tranquillity. 5:30: out he went into the countryside with his fishing rod or gun. The countryside was full of game; lariats of migratory birds lassoed the sky in October; quail and partridge with lines of babies strung out behind whirred by like nursery toys that emit sound with movement; pheasant - fat foolish creatures, made to be shot - went scurrying, through the bushes. The thunder of gunshot rolled away, the leaves shivered, and he experienced the profound silence that could come only after violence. One thing was always missing, though, the proof of the pudding, the prize of the action, the manliness in manhood, the partridge for the pot, because he returned with - Nothing! He was a terrible shot.8:00: the cook saved his reputation, cooked a chicken, brought it forth, proclaimed it "roast bastard", just as in the Englishman's favourite joke book of natives using incorrect English.

But sometimes, eating that roast bustard, the judge felt the joke might also be on him, and he called for another rum, took a big gulp, and kept eating feeling as if he were eating himself, since he, too, was (was he?) part of the fun.... 9:00: sipping Ovaltine, he filled out the registers with the day's gleanings. The Petromax lantern would be lit - what as noise it made - insects fording the black to dive - bomb him with soft flowers (moths), with iridescence (beetles). Lines, columns, and squares. He realized truth was best looked at in tiny aggregates,for many baby truths could yet add up to one big size unsavory lie. Last, in his diary also to be submitted to his superiors, he recorded the random observations of a cultured man, someone who was observant, schooled in literature as well as economics; and he made up bunting triumphs: two partridge.... one deer with thirty-inch horns....11:00 : he had a hot water bottle in winter, and, in all seasons, to the sound of the wind buffeting the trees and the cook's snoring, he fell asleep.

Q. Which is the odd one out:

Solution:

Lariat is a long, noosed rope to catch horses, cattle or other livestock. So it is the odd one out.

Brood is a family of birds and so is flock and flight.

QUESTION: 10

Read the Following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The movement to expel the Austrians from Italy and unite Italy under a republican government had been gaining momentum while Garibaldi was away. There was a growing clamour, not just from Giuseppe Mazzini's republicans, but from moderates as well, for a General capable of leading Italy to independence. Even the King of Piedmont, for whom Garibaldi was still an outlaw under sentence of death, subscribed to an appeal for a sword for the returning hero. Meanwhile, the 'year of revolutions', 1848, had occurred in which Louis Philippe had been toppled from the French throne.

In Austria, an uprising triggered off insurrections in Venice and Milan, and the Austrian garrisons were forced out. The King of Piedmont. Charles Albert ordered his troops to occupy these cities. There had also been instruction in Sicily, causing the King Ferdinand II, to grant major constitutional freedoms in 1849, prompting both the Pope and Charles Albert to grant further concessions.Meanwhile, largely ignorant of these developments, Garibaldi was approaching Italy at a leisurely pace, arriving at Nice on 23June 1848 to a tumultuous reception. The hero declared himself willing to fight and lay down his life for Charles Albert, who he now regarded as a bastion of Italian nationalism.

Mazzini and the republicans were horrified, regarding this as outright betrayal: did it reflect Garibaldi's innate simplemindedness,his patriotism in the war against Austria, or was it part of a deal with the monarchy'? Charles Albert had pardoned Garibaldi, but to outward appearances he was still very wary of the General and the ltalian Legion he had amassed of 150 'brigands'.The two men met near Mantua, and the King appeared to dislike him instantly. He suggested that Garibaldi's men should join his army and that Garibaldi should go to Venice and captain a ship as a privateer against the Austrians. Garibaldi, meanwhile, met his former hero Mazzini for the first time, and again the encounter was frosty. Seemingly rebuffed on all sides. Garibaldi considered going to Sicily to fight King Ferdinand II of Naples, but changed his mind when the Milanese offered him the post of General - something they badly needed when Charles Albert's Piedmontese army was defeated at Custoza by the Austrians. With around 1,000 men, Garibaldi marched into  the mountains at Varese, commenting bitterly: 'The King of Sardinia may have a crown that he holds on to by dint of misdeeds and  cowardice, but my comrades and I do not wish to hold on to our lives by shameful actions'.

The King of Piedmont offered an armistice to the Austrians and all the gains in northern Italy were lost again. Garibaldi returned to Nice and then across to Genoa, where he learned that, in September 1848, Ferdinand II had bombed Messina as a prelude to invasion - an atrocity which caused him to be dubbed 'King Bomba'. Reaching Livorno he was diverted yet again and set off  across the Italian peninsula with 350 men to come to Venice's assistance, but on the way, in Bologna, he learned that the Pope had taken refuge with King Bomba. Garibaldi promptly altered course southwards towards Rome where he was greeted once  again as a hero. Rome proclaimed itself a Republic. Garibaldi's Legion had swollen to nearly 1,300 men, and the Grand Duke of Tuscany fled Florence before the advancing republican force.

However, the Austrians marched southwards to place the Grand Duke of Tuscany back on his throne. Prince Louis Napoleon of France -despatched an army of 7,000 men under General Charles Oudinot to the port of Civitavecchia to seize the city. Garibaldi was appointed as a General to defend Rome.The republicans had around 9,000 men, and Garibaldi was given control of more than 4,000 to defend the Janiculum Hill, which was crucial to the defence of Rome, as it commanded the city over the Tiber. Some 5,000 well-equipped French troops arrived on 30 April 1849 at Porta Cavallegeri in the old walls of Rome, but failed to get through, and were attacked from behind by Garibaldi,who led a baton charge and was grazed by a bullet slightly on his side. The French lost 500 dead and wounded, along with some 350 prisoners, to the Italians, 200 dead and wounded. It was a famous victory, wildly celebrated by the Romans into the night,and the French signed a tactical truce.However, other armies were on the march: Bomba's 12,500- strong Neapolitan army was approaching from the south, while the Austrians had attacked Bologna in the north. Garibaldi took a force out of Rome and engaged in a flanking movement across the Neapolitan army's rear at Castelli Romani; the Neapolitans attacked and were driven off, leaving 50 dead. Garibaldi accompanied the Roman General, Piero Roselli, in an attack on the retreating Neapolitan army. Foolishly leading a patrol of his men right out infront of his forces, he tried to stop a group of his cavalry reheating and fell under their horses, with the enemy clashing at him with their sabres. He was rescued by his legionnaires, narrowly having avoided being killed, but Roselli had missed the chance to encircle the Neapolitan army. Garibaldi boldly wanted to carry the fight down into theKingdom of Naples, but Mazzini, who by now was effectively in charge of Rome, ordered him back to the capital to face the danger of Austrian attack from the north. In fact, it was the French who arrived on the outskirts of Rome first, with an army now reinforced by 30,000.

Mazzini realized that Rome could not resist and ordered a symbolic stand within the city itself, rather than surrender, for the purposes of international propaganda and to keep the struggle alive, whatever the cost. On 3 June the French arrived in force and seized the strategic country house, 'Villa Pamphili. Garibaldi rallied his forces and fought feverishly to retake the villa up narrow and steep city streets, capturing it, then losing it again. By the end of the day, the sides had 1,000 dead between them. Garibaldi once again had been in the thick of the fray, giving orders to his troops and fighting, it was said, like a lion. Although beaten off for the moment, the French imposed a siege in the morning, starving the city of provisions and bombarding its beautiful centre. On 30 June the French attacked again in force, while Garibaldi, at the head of his troops, fought back ferociously. But there was no prospect of holding the French off indefinitely, and Garibaldi decided to take his men out of the city to continue resistance inthe mountains. Mazzini fled to Britain while Garibaldi remained to fight for the cause. He had just 4,000 men, divided into two legions, and faced some 17,000 Austrians and Tuscans in the north, 30,000 Neapolitans and Spanish in the south, and 40,000 French in the west. He was being directly pursued by 8,000 French and was approaching Neapolitan and Spanish divisions of some 18,000 men. He stood no chance whatever. The rugged hill country wasideal, however, for his style of irregular guerrilla warfare, and he rnanoeuvred skilfully, marching and counter-marching in different directions, confounding his pursuers before finally aiming for Arezzo in the north. But his men were deserting in droves and local people were hostile to his army: he was soon reduced to 1500 men who struggled across the high mountain passes to San Marino where he found temporary refuge. The Austrians, now approaching, demanded that he go into exile in America. He was determined to fight on and urged the ill and pregnant Anita, his wife, to stay behind in San Marino, but she would not hear of it. The pair set off with 200 loyal soldiers along the mountain tracks to the Adriatic coast, from where Garibaldi intended to embark for Venice which was still valiantly holding out against the Austrians. They embarked aboard 13 fishing boats and managed to sail to within 50 miles of the Venetian lagoon before being spotted by an Austrian flotilla and fired upon. Only two of Garibaldi's boats escaped.

He carried Anita through the shallows to a beach and they moved further inland. The ailing Anita was placed in a cart and they reached a farmhouse, where she died. Her husband broke down into inconsolable wailing and she was buried in a shallow grave near the farmhouse, but was transferred to a churchyard a few days later. Garibaldi had no time to lose; he and his faithful companion Leggero escaped across the Po towards Ravenna.At last Garibaldi was persuaded to abandon his insane attempts to reach Venice by sea and to return along less guarded routes on the perilous mountain paths across the Apennines towards the western coast of Italy. He visited his family in Nice for an emotional reunion with his mother and his three children but lacked the courage to tell them what had happened to their mother.

Q. Find the correct statement:

Solution:

The last 3rd para (12th para) clearly mentions that they were accompanied by 200 loyal soldiers.

(c) is wrong as a total of 87000 foreign soldiers (refer para 11) and not 80000.

(b) is wrong as it was not a Spanish flotilla but a Austrian flotilla.

(a) is not clear from the passage.

QUESTION: 11

Read the Following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The movement to expel the Austrians from Italy and unite Italy under a republican government had been gaining momentum while Garibaldi was away. There was a growing clamour, not just from Giuseppe Mazzini's republicans, but from moderates as well, for a General capable of leading Italy to independence. Even the King of Piedmont, for whom Garibaldi was still an outlaw under sentence of death, subscribed to an appeal for a sword for the returning hero. Meanwhile, the 'year of revolutions', 1848, had occurred in which Louis Philippe had been toppled from the French throne.

In Austria, an uprising triggered off insurrections in Venice and Milan, and the Austrian garrisons were forced out. The King of Piedmont. Charles Albert ordered his troops to occupy these cities. There had also been instruction in Sicily, causing the King Ferdinand II, to grant major constitutional freedoms in 1849, prompting both the Pope and Charles Albert to grant further concessions.Meanwhile, largely ignorant of these developments, Garibaldi was approaching Italy at a leisurely pace, arriving at Nice on 23June 1848 to a tumultuous reception. The hero declared himself willing to fight and lay down his life for Charles Albert, who he now regarded as a bastion of Italian nationalism.

Mazzini and the republicans were horrified, regarding this as outright betrayal: did it reflect Garibaldi's innate simplemindedness,his patriotism in the war against Austria, or was it part of a deal with the monarchy'? Charles Albert had pardoned Garibaldi, but to outward appearances he was still very wary of the General and the ltalian Legion he had amassed of 150 'brigands'.The two men met near Mantua, and the King appeared to dislike him instantly. He suggested that Garibaldi's men should join his army and that Garibaldi should go to Venice and captain a ship as a privateer against the Austrians. Garibaldi, meanwhile, met his former hero Mazzini for the first time, and again the encounter was frosty. Seemingly rebuffed on all sides. Garibaldi considered going to Sicily to fight King Ferdinand II of Naples, but changed his mind when the Milanese offered him the post of General - something they badly needed when Charles Albert's Piedmontese army was defeated at Custoza by the Austrians. With around 1,000 men, Garibaldi marched into  the mountains at Varese, commenting bitterly: 'The King of Sardinia may have a crown that he holds on to by dint of misdeeds and  cowardice, but my comrades and I do not wish to hold on to our lives by shameful actions'.

The King of Piedmont offered an armistice to the Austrians and all the gains in northern Italy were lost again. Garibaldi returned to Nice and then across to Genoa, where he learned that, in September 1848, Ferdinand II had bombed Messina as a prelude to invasion - an atrocity which caused him to be dubbed 'King Bomba'. Reaching Livorno he was diverted yet again and set off  across the Italian peninsula with 350 men to come to Venice's assistance, but on the way, in Bologna, he learned that the Pope had taken refuge with King Bomba. Garibaldi promptly altered course southwards towards Rome where he was greeted once  again as a hero. Rome proclaimed itself a Republic. Garibaldi's Legion had swollen to nearly 1,300 men, and the Grand Duke of Tuscany fled Florence before the advancing republican force.

However, the Austrians marched southwards to place the Grand Duke of Tuscany back on his throne. Prince Louis Napoleon of France -despatched an army of 7,000 men under General Charles Oudinot to the port of Civitavecchia to seize the city. Garibaldi was appointed as a General to defend Rome.The republicans had around 9,000 men, and Garibaldi was given control of more than 4,000 to defend the Janiculum Hill, which was crucial to the defence of Rome, as it commanded the city over the Tiber. Some 5,000 well-equipped French troops arrived on 30 April 1849 at Porta Cavallegeri in the old walls of Rome, but failed to get through, and were attacked from behind by Garibaldi,who led a baton charge and was grazed by a bullet slightly on his side. The French lost 500 dead and wounded, along with some 350 prisoners, to the Italians, 200 dead and wounded. It was a famous victory, wildly celebrated by the Romans into the night,and the French signed a tactical truce.However, other armies were on the march: Bomba's 12,500- strong Neapolitan army was approaching from the south, while the Austrians had attacked Bologna in the north. Garibaldi took a force out of Rome and engaged in a flanking movement across the Neapolitan army's rear at Castelli Romani; the Neapolitans attacked and were driven off, leaving 50 dead. Garibaldi accompanied the Roman General, Piero Roselli, in an attack on the retreating Neapolitan army. Foolishly leading a patrol of his men right out infront of his forces, he tried to stop a group of his cavalry reheating and fell under their horses, with the enemy clashing at him with their sabres. He was rescued by his legionnaires, narrowly having avoided being killed, but Roselli had missed the chance to encircle the Neapolitan army. Garibaldi boldly wanted to carry the fight down into theKingdom of Naples, but Mazzini, who by now was effectively in charge of Rome, ordered him back to the capital to face the danger of Austrian attack from the north. In fact, it was the French who arrived on the outskirts of Rome first, with an army now reinforced by 30,000.

Mazzini realized that Rome could not resist and ordered a symbolic stand within the city itself, rather than surrender, for the purposes of international propaganda and to keep the struggle alive, whatever the cost. On 3 June the French arrived in force and seized the strategic country house, 'Villa Pamphili. Garibaldi rallied his forces and fought feverishly to retake the villa up narrow and steep city streets, capturing it, then losing it again. By the end of the day, the sides had 1,000 dead between them. Garibaldi once again had been in the thick of the fray, giving orders to his troops and fighting, it was said, like a lion. Although beaten off for the moment, the French imposed a siege in the morning, starving the city of provisions and bombarding its beautiful centre. On 30 June the French attacked again in force, while Garibaldi, at the head of his troops, fought back ferociously. But there was no prospect of holding the French off indefinitely, and Garibaldi decided to take his men out of the city to continue resistance inthe mountains. Mazzini fled to Britain while Garibaldi remained to fight for the cause. He had just 4,000 men, divided into two legions, and faced some 17,000 Austrians and Tuscans in the north, 30,000 Neapolitans and Spanish in the south, and 40,000 French in the west. He was being directly pursued by 8,000 French and was approaching Neapolitan and Spanish divisions of some 18,000 men. He stood no chance whatever. The rugged hill country wasideal, however, for his style of irregular guerrilla warfare, and he rnanoeuvred skilfully, marching and counter-marching in different directions, confounding his pursuers before finally aiming for Arezzo in the north. But his men were deserting in droves and local people were hostile to his army: he was soon reduced to 1500 men who struggled across the high mountain passes to San Marino where he found temporary refuge. The Austrians, now approaching, demanded that he go into exile in America. He was determined to fight on and urged the ill and pregnant Anita, his wife, to stay behind in San Marino, but she would not hear of it. The pair set off with 200 loyal soldiers along the mountain tracks to the Adriatic coast, from where Garibaldi intended to embark for Venice which was still valiantly holding out against the Austrians. They embarked aboard 13 fishing boats and managed to sail to within 50 miles of the Venetian lagoon before being spotted by an Austrian flotilla and fired upon. Only two of Garibaldi's boats escaped.

He carried Anita through the shallows to a beach and they moved further inland. The ailing Anita was placed in a cart and they reached a farmhouse, where she died. Her husband broke down into inconsolable wailing and she was buried in a shallow grave near the farmhouse, but was transferred to a churchyard a few days later. Garibaldi had no time to lose; he and his faithful companion Leggero escaped across the Po towards Ravenna.At last Garibaldi was persuaded to abandon his insane attempts to reach Venice by sea and to return along less guarded routes on the perilous mountain paths across the Apennines towards the western coast of Italy. He visited his family in Nice for an emotional reunion with his mother and his three children but lacked the courage to tell them what had happened to their mother.

Q. Which of the following statements can be deduced from the passage?

Solution:

(c) is correct as mentioned in the last para.
(a) is wrong as 'King Bomba' bombed Messina and not Milan (refer para 5).
(b) is wrong as Garibaldi was given control of 4000 soldiers to defend Janiculum Hill. Refer 7th para.
(d) is wrong as Mazzini was a leader of Republicans and not moderates. Refer para 1.

QUESTION: 12

Read the Following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The movement to expel the Austrians from Italy and unite Italy under a republican government had been gaining momentum while Garibaldi was away. There was a growing clamour, not just from Giuseppe Mazzini's republicans, but from moderates as well, for a General capable of leading Italy to independence. Even the King of Piedmont, for whom Garibaldi was still an outlaw under sentence of death, subscribed to an appeal for a sword for the returning hero. Meanwhile, the 'year of revolutions', 1848, had occurred in which Louis Philippe had been toppled from the French throne.

In Austria, an uprising triggered off insurrections in Venice and Milan, and the Austrian garrisons were forced out. The King of Piedmont. Charles Albert ordered his troops to occupy these cities. There had also been instruction in Sicily, causing the King Ferdinand II, to grant major constitutional freedoms in 1849, prompting both the Pope and Charles Albert to grant further concessions.Meanwhile, largely ignorant of these developments, Garibaldi was approaching Italy at a leisurely pace, arriving at Nice on 23June 1848 to a tumultuous reception. The hero declared himself willing to fight and lay down his life for Charles Albert, who he now regarded as a bastion of Italian nationalism.

Mazzini and the republicans were horrified, regarding this as outright betrayal: did it reflect Garibaldi's innate simple mindedness, his patriotism in the war against Austria, or was it part of a deal with the monarchy'? Charles Albert had pardoned Garibaldi, but to outward appearances he was still very wary of the General and the ltalian Legion he had amassed of 150 'brigands'.The two men met near Mantua, and the King appeared to dislike him instantly. He suggested that Garibaldi's men should join his army and that Garibaldi should go to Venice and captain a ship as a privateer against the Austrians. Garibaldi, meanwhile, met his former hero Mazzini for the first time, and again the encounter was frosty. Seemingly rebuffed on all sides. Garibaldi considered going to Sicily to fight King Ferdinand II of Naples, but changed his mind when the Milanese offered him the post of General - something they badly needed when Charles Albert's Piedmontese army was defeated at Custoza by the Austrians. With around 1,000 men, Garibaldi marched into  the mountains at Varese, commenting bitterly: 'The King of Sardinia may have a crown that he holds on to by dint of misdeeds and  cowardice, but my comrades and I do not wish to hold on to our lives by shameful actions'.

The King of Piedmont offered an armistice to the Austrians and all the gains in northern Italy were lost again. Garibaldi returned to Nice and then across to Genoa, where he learned that, in September 1848, Ferdinand II had bombed Messina as a prelude to invasion - an atrocity which caused him to be dubbed 'King Bomba'. Reaching Livorno he was diverted yet again and set off  across the Italian peninsula with 350 men to come to Venice's assistance, but on the way, in Bologna, he learned that the Pope had taken refuge with King Bomba. Garibaldi promptly altered course southwards towards Rome where he was greeted once  again as a hero. Rome proclaimed itself a Republic. Garibaldi's Legion had swollen to nearly 1,300 men, and the Grand Duke of Tuscany fled Florence before the advancing republican force.

However, the Austrians marched southwards to place the Grand Duke of Tuscany back on his throne. Prince Louis Napoleon of France -despatched an army of 7,000 men under General Charles Oudinot to the port of Civitavecchia to seize the city. Garibaldi was appointed as a General to defend Rome.The republicans had around 9,000 men, and Garibaldi was given control of more than 4,000 to defend the Janiculum Hill, which was crucial to the defence of Rome, as it commanded the city over the Tiber. Some 5,000 well-equipped French troops arrived on 30 April 1849 at Porta Cavallegeri in the old walls of Rome, but failed to get through, and were attacked from behind by Garibaldi,who led a baton charge and was grazed by a bullet slightly on his side. The French lost 500 dead and wounded, along with some 350 prisoners, to the Italians, 200 dead and wounded. It was a famous victory, wildly celebrated by the Romans into the night,and the French signed a tactical truce.However, other armies were on the march: Bomba's 12,500- strong Neapolitan army was approaching from the south, while the Austrians had attacked Bologna in the north. Garibaldi took a force out of Rome and engaged in a flanking movement across the Neapolitan army's rear at Castelli Romani; the Neapolitans attacked and were driven off, leaving 50 dead. Garibaldi accompanied the Roman General, Piero Roselli, in an attack on the retreating Neapolitan army. Foolishly leading a patrol of his men right out infront of his forces, he tried to stop a group of his cavalry reheating and fell under their horses, with the enemy clashing at him with their sabres. He was rescued by his legionnaires, narrowly having avoided being killed, but Roselli had missed the chance to encircle the Neapolitan army. Garibaldi boldly wanted to carry the fight down into theKingdom of Naples, but Mazzini, who by now was effectively in charge of Rome, ordered him back to the capital to face the danger of Austrian attack from the north. In fact, it was the French who arrived on the outskirts of Rome first, with an army now reinforced by 30,000.

Mazzini realized that Rome could not resist and ordered a symbolic stand within the city itself, rather than surrender, for the purposes of international propaganda and to keep the struggle alive, whatever the cost. On 3 June the French arrived in force and seized the strategic country house, 'Villa Pamphili. Garibaldi rallied his forces and fought feverishly to retake the villa up narrow and steep city streets, capturing it, then losing it again. By the end of the day, the sides had 1,000 dead between them. Garibaldi once again had been in the thick of the fray, giving orders to his troops and fighting, it was said, like a lion. Although beaten off for the moment, the French imposed a siege in the morning, starving the city of provisions and bombarding its beautiful centre. On 30 June the French attacked again in force, while Garibaldi, at the head of his troops, fought back ferociously. But there was no prospect of holding the French off indefinitely, and Garibaldi decided to take his men out of the city to continue resistance inthe mountains. Mazzini fled to Britain while Garibaldi remained to fight for the cause. He had just 4,000 men, divided into two legions, and faced some 17,000 Austrians and Tuscans in the north, 30,000 Neapolitans and Spanish in the south, and 40,000 French in the west. He was being directly pursued by 8,000 French and was approaching Neapolitan and Spanish divisions of some 18,000 men. He stood no chance whatever. The rugged hill country wasideal, however, for his style of irregular guerrilla warfare, and he rnanoeuvred skilfully, marching and counter-marching in different directions, confounding his pursuers before finally aiming for Arezzo in the north. But his men were deserting in droves and local people were hostile to his army: he was soon reduced to 1500 men who struggled across the high mountain passes to San Marino where he found temporary refuge. The Austrians, now approaching, demanded that he go into exile in America. He was determined to fight on and urged the ill and pregnant Anita, his wife, to stay behind in San Marino, but she would not hear of it. The pair set off with 200 loyal soldiers along the mountain tracks to the Adriatic coast, from where Garibaldi intended to embark for Venice which was still valiantly holding out against the Austrians. They embarked aboard 13 fishing boats and managed to sail to within 50 miles of the Venetian lagoon before being spotted by an Austrian flotilla and fired upon. Only two of Garibaldi's boats escaped.

He carried Anita through the shallows to a beach and they moved further inland. The ailing Anita was placed in a cart and they reached a farmhouse, where she died. Her husband broke down into inconsolable wailing and she was buried in a shallow grave near the farmhouse, but was transferred to a churchyard a few days later. Garibaldi had no time to lose; he and his faithful companion Leggero escaped across the Po towards Ravenna.At last Garibaldi was persuaded to abandon his insane attempts to reach Venice by sea and to return along less guarded routes on the perilous mountain paths across the Apennines towards the western coast of Italy. He visited his family in Nice for an emotional reunion with his mother and his three children but lacked the courage to tell them what had happened to their mother.

Q. Match the Following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Read the Following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The movement to expel the Austrians from Italy and unite Italy under a republican government had been gaining momentum while Garibaldi was away. There was a growing clamour, not just from Giuseppe Mazzini's republicans, but from moderates as well, for a General capable of leading Italy to independence. Even the King of Piedmont, for whom Garibaldi was still an outlaw under sentence of death, subscribed to an appeal for a sword for the returning hero. Meanwhile, the 'year of revolutions', 1848, had occurred in which Louis Philippe had been toppled from the French throne.

In Austria, an uprising triggered off insurrections in Venice and Milan, and the Austrian garrisons were forced out. The King of Piedmont. Charles Albert ordered his troops to occupy these cities. There had also been instruction in Sicily, causing the King Ferdinand II, to grant major constitutional freedoms in 1849, prompting both the Pope and Charles Albert to grant further concessions.Meanwhile, largely ignorant of these developments, Garibaldi was approaching Italy at a leisurely pace, arriving at Nice on 23June 1848 to a tumultuous reception. The hero declared himself willing to fight and lay down his life for Charles Albert, who he now regarded as a bastion of Italian nationalism.

Mazzini and the republicans were horrified, regarding this as outright betrayal: did it reflect Garibaldi's innate simplemindedness,his patriotism in the war against Austria, or was it part of a deal with the monarchy'? Charles Albert had pardoned Garibaldi, but to outward appearances he was still very wary of the General and the ltalian Legion he had amassed of 150 'brigands'.The two men met near Mantua, and the King appeared to dislike him instantly. He suggested that Garibaldi's men should join his army and that Garibaldi should go to Venice and captain a ship as a privateer against the Austrians. Garibaldi, meanwhile, met his former hero Mazzini for the first time, and again the encounter was frosty. Seemingly rebuffed on all sides. Garibaldi considered going to Sicily to fight King Ferdinand II of Naples, but changed his mind when the Milanese offered him the post of General - something they badly needed when Charles Albert's Piedmontese army was defeated at Custoza by the Austrians. With around 1,000 men, Garibaldi marched into  the mountains at Varese, commenting bitterly: 'The King of Sardinia may have a crown that he holds on to by dint of misdeeds and  cowardice, but my comrades and I do not wish to hold on to our lives by shameful actions'.

The King of Piedmont offered an armistice to the Austrians and all the gains in northern Italy were lost again. Garibaldi returned to Nice and then across to Genoa, where he learned that, in September 1848, Ferdinand II had bombed Messina as a prelude to invasion - an atrocity which caused him to be dubbed 'King Bomba'. Reaching Livorno he was diverted yet again and set off  across the Italian peninsula with 350 men to come to Venice's assistance, but on the way, in Bologna, he learned that the Pope had taken refuge with King Bomba. Garibaldi promptly altered course southwards towards Rome where he was greeted once  again as a hero. Rome proclaimed itself a Republic. Garibaldi's Legion had swollen to nearly 1,300 men, and the Grand Duke of Tuscany fled Florence before the advancing republican force.

However, the Austrians marched southwards to place the Grand Duke of Tuscany back on his throne. Prince Louis Napoleon of France -despatched an army of 7,000 men under General Charles Oudinot to the port of Civitavecchia to seize the city. Garibaldi was appointed as a General to defend Rome.The republicans had around 9,000 men, and Garibaldi was given control of more than 4,000 to defend the Janiculum Hill, which was crucial to the defence of Rome, as it commanded the city over the Tiber. Some 5,000 well-equipped French troops arrived on 30 April 1849 at Porta Cavallegeri in the old walls of Rome, but failed to get through, and were attacked from behind by Garibaldi,who led a baton charge and was grazed by a bullet slightly on his side. The French lost 500 dead and wounded, along with some 350 prisoners, to the Italians, 200 dead and wounded. It was a famous victory, wildly celebrated by the Romans into the night,and the French signed a tactical truce.However, other armies were on the march: Bomba's 12,500- strong Neapolitan army was approaching from the south, while the Austrians had attacked Bologna in the north. Garibaldi took a force out of Rome and engaged in a flanking movement across the Neapolitan army's rear at Castelli Romani; the Neapolitans attacked and were driven off, leaving 50 dead. Garibaldi accompanied the Roman General, Piero Roselli, in an attack on the retreating Neapolitan army. Foolishly leading a patrol of his men right out infront of his forces, he tried to stop a group of his cavalry reheating and fell under their horses, with the enemy clashing at him with their sabres. He was rescued by his legionnaires, narrowly having avoided being killed, but Roselli had missed the chance to encircle the Neapolitan army. Garibaldi boldly wanted to carry the fight down into theKingdom of Naples, but Mazzini, who by now was effectively in charge of Rome, ordered him back to the capital to face the danger of Austrian attack from the north. In fact, it was the French who arrived on the outskirts of Rome first, with an army now reinforced by 30,000.

Mazzini realized that Rome could not resist and ordered a symbolic stand within the city itself, rather than surrender, for the purposes of international propaganda and to keep the struggle alive, whatever the cost. On 3 June the French arrived in force and seized the strategic country house, 'Villa Pamphili. Garibaldi rallied his forces and fought feverishly to retake the villa up narrow and steep city streets, capturing it, then losing it again. By the end of the day, the sides had 1,000 dead between them. Garibaldi once again had been in the thick of the fray, giving orders to his troops and fighting, it was said, like a lion. Although beaten off for the moment, the French imposed a siege in the morning, starving the city of provisions and bombarding its beautiful centre. On 30 June the French attacked again in force, while Garibaldi, at the head of his troops, fought back ferociously. But there was no prospect of holding the French off indefinitely, and Garibaldi decided to take his men out of the city to continue resistance inthe mountains. Mazzini fled to Britain while Garibaldi remained to fight for the cause. He had just 4,000 men, divided into two legions, and faced some 17,000 Austrians and Tuscans in the north, 30,000 Neapolitans and Spanish in the south, and 40,000 French in the west. He was being directly pursued by 8,000 French and was approaching Neapolitan and Spanish divisions of some 18,000 men. He stood no chance whatever. The rugged hill country wasideal, however, for his style of irregular guerrilla warfare, and he rnanoeuvred skilfully, marching and counter-marching in different directions, confounding his pursuers before finally aiming for Arezzo in the north. But his men were deserting in droves and local people were hostile to his army: he was soon reduced to 1500 men who struggled across the high mountain passes to San Marino where he found temporary refuge. The Austrians, now approaching, demanded that he go into exile in America. He was determined to fight on and urged the ill and pregnant Anita, his wife, to stay behind in San Marino, but she would not hear of it. The pair set off with 200 loyal soldiers along the mountain tracks to the Adriatic coast, from where Garibaldi intended to embark for Venice which was still valiantly holding out against the Austrians. They embarked aboard 13 fishing boats and managed to sail to within 50 miles of the Venetian lagoon before being spotted by an Austrian flotilla and fired upon. Only two of Garibaldi's boats escaped.

He carried Anita through the shallows to a beach and they moved further inland. The ailing Anita was placed in a cart and they reached a farmhouse, where she died. Her husband broke down into inconsolable wailing and she was buried in a shallow grave near the farmhouse, but was transferred to a churchyard a few days later. Garibaldi had no time to lose; he and his faithful companion Leggero escaped across the Po towards Ravenna.At last Garibaldi was persuaded to abandon his insane attempts to reach Venice by sea and to return along less guarded routes on the perilous mountain paths across the Apennines towards the western coast of Italy. He visited his family in Nice for an emotional reunion with his mother and his three children but lacked the courage to tell them what had happened to their mother.

Q. After his failure to reach Venice, Garibaldi left towards ______ with ______.

Solution:

The 13th para (last second) clearly tells that Garibaldi and his faithful companion Leggero escaped across Po towards Ravenna.

QUESTION: 14

Read the Following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

The movement to expel the Austrians from Italy and unite Italy under a republican government had been gaining momentum while Garibaldi was away. There was a growing clamour, not just from Giuseppe Mazzini's republicans, but from moderates as well, for a General capable of leading Italy to independence. Even the King of Piedmont, for whom Garibaldi was still an outlaw under sentence of death, subscribed to an appeal for a sword for the returning hero. Meanwhile, the 'year of revolutions', 1848, had occurred in which Louis Philippe had been toppled from the French throne.

In Austria, an uprising triggered off insurrections in Venice and Milan, and the Austrian garrisons were forced out. The King of Piedmont. Charles Albert ordered his troops to occupy these cities. There had also been instruction in Sicily, causing the King Ferdinand II, to grant major constitutional freedoms in 1849, prompting both the Pope and Charles Albert to grant further concessions.Meanwhile, largely ignorant of these developments, Garibaldi was approaching Italy at a leisurely pace, arriving at Nice on 23June 1848 to a tumultuous reception. The hero declared himself willing to fight and lay down his life for Charles Albert, who he now regarded as a bastion of Italian nationalism.

Mazzini and the republicans were horrified, regarding this as outright betrayal: did it reflect Garibaldi's innate simplemindedness,his patriotism in the war against Austria, or was it part of a deal with the monarchy'? Charles Albert had pardoned Garibaldi, but to outward appearances he was still very wary of the General and the ltalian Legion he had amassed of 150 'brigands'.The two men met near Mantua, and the King appeared to dislike him instantly. He suggested that Garibaldi's men should join his army and that Garibaldi should go to Venice and captain a ship as a privateer against the Austrians. Garibaldi, meanwhile, met his former hero Mazzini for the first time, and again the encounter was frosty. Seemingly rebuffed on all sides. Garibaldi considered going to Sicily to fight King Ferdinand II of Naples, but changed his mind when the Milanese offered him the post of General - something they badly needed when Charles Albert's Piedmontese army was defeated at Custoza by the Austrians. With around 1,000 men, Garibaldi marched into  the mountains at Varese, commenting bitterly: 'The King of Sardinia may have a crown that he holds on to by dint of misdeeds and  cowardice, but my comrades and I do not wish to hold on to our lives by shameful actions'.

The King of Piedmont offered an armistice to the Austrians and all the gains in northern Italy were lost again. Garibaldi returned to Nice and then across to Genoa, where he learned that, in September 1848, Ferdinand II had bombed Messina as a prelude to invasion - an atrocity which caused him to be dubbed 'King Bomba'. Reaching Livorno he was diverted yet again and set off  across the Italian peninsula with 350 men to come to Venice's assistance, but on the way, in Bologna, he learned that the Pope had taken refuge with King Bomba. Garibaldi promptly altered course southwards towards Rome where he was greeted once  again as a hero. Rome proclaimed itself a Republic. Garibaldi's Legion had swollen to nearly 1,300 men, and the Grand Duke of Tuscany fled Florence before the advancing republican force.

However, the Austrians marched southwards to place the Grand Duke of Tuscany back on his throne. Prince Louis Napoleon of France -despatched an army of 7,000 men under General Charles Oudinot to the port of Civitavecchia to seize the city. Garibaldi was appointed as a General to defend Rome.The republicans had around 9,000 men, and Garibaldi was given control of more than 4,000 to defend the Janiculum Hill, which was crucial to the defence of Rome, as it commanded the city over the Tiber. Some 5,000 well-equipped French troops arrived on 30 April 1849 at Porta Cavallegeri in the old walls of Rome, but failed to get through, and were attacked from behind by Garibaldi,who led a baton charge and was grazed by a bullet slightly on his side. The French lost 500 dead and wounded, along with some 350 prisoners, to the Italians, 200 dead and wounded. It was a famous victory, wildly celebrated by the Romans into the night,and the French signed a tactical truce.However, other armies were on the march: Bomba's 12,500- strong Neapolitan army was approaching from the south, while the Austrians had attacked Bologna in the north. Garibaldi took a force out of Rome and engaged in a flanking movement across the Neapolitan army's rear at Castelli Romani; the Neapolitans attacked and were driven off, leaving 50 dead. Garibaldi accompanied the Roman General, Piero Roselli, in an attack on the retreating Neapolitan army. Foolishly leading a patrol of his men right out infront of his forces, he tried to stop a group of his cavalry reheating and fell under their horses, with the enemy clashing at him with their sabres. He was rescued by his legionnaires, narrowly having avoided being killed, but Roselli had missed the chance to encircle the Neapolitan army. Garibaldi boldly wanted to carry the fight down into theKingdom of Naples, but Mazzini, who by now was effectively in charge of Rome, ordered him back to the capital to face the danger of Austrian attack from the north. In fact, it was the French who arrived on the outskirts of Rome first, with an army now reinforced by 30,000.

Mazzini realized that Rome could not resist and ordered a symbolic stand within the city itself, rather than surrender, for the purposes of international propaganda and to keep the struggle alive, whatever the cost. On 3 June the French arrived in force and seized the strategic country house, 'Villa Pamphili. Garibaldi rallied his forces and fought feverishly to retake the villa up narrow and steep city streets, capturing it, then losing it again. By the end of the day, the sides had 1,000 dead between them. Garibaldi once again had been in the thick of the fray, giving orders to his troops and fighting, it was said, like a lion. Although beaten off for the moment, the French imposed a siege in the morning, starving the city of provisions and bombarding its beautiful centre. On 30 June the French attacked again in force, while Garibaldi, at the head of his troops, fought back ferociously. But there was no prospect of holding the French off indefinitely, and Garibaldi decided to take his men out of the city to continue resistance inthe mountains. Mazzini fled to Britain while Garibaldi remained to fight for the cause. He had just 4,000 men, divided into two legions, and faced some 17,000 Austrians and Tuscans in the north, 30,000 Neapolitans and Spanish in the south, and 40,000 French in the west. He was being directly pursued by 8,000 French and was approaching Neapolitan and Spanish divisions of some 18,000 men. He stood no chance whatever. The rugged hill country wasideal, however, for his style of irregular guerrilla warfare, and he rnanoeuvred skilfully, marching and counter-marching in different directions, confounding his pursuers before finally aiming for Arezzo in the north. But his men were deserting in droves and local people were hostile to his army: he was soon reduced to 1500 men who struggled across the high mountain passes to San Marino where he found temporary refuge. The Austrians, now approaching, demanded that he go into exile in America. He was determined to fight on and urged the ill and pregnant Anita, his wife, to stay behind in San Marino, but she would not hear of it. The pair set off with 200 loyal soldiers along the mountain tracks to the Adriatic coast, from where Garibaldi intended to embark for Venice which was still valiantly holding out against the Austrians. They embarked aboard 13 fishing boats and managed to sail to within 50 miles of the Venetian lagoon before being spotted by an Austrian flotilla and fired upon. Only two of Garibaldi's boats escaped.

He carried Anita through the shallows to a beach and they moved further inland. The ailing Anita was placed in a cart and they reached a farmhouse, where she died. Her husband broke down into inconsolable wailing and she was buried in a shallow grave near the farmhouse, but was transferred to a churchyard a few days later. Garibaldi had no time to lose; he and his faithful companion Leggero escaped across the Po towards Ravenna.At last Garibaldi was persuaded to abandon his insane attempts to reach Venice by sea and to return along less guarded routes on the perilous mountain paths across the Apennines towards the western coast of Italy. He visited his family in Nice for an emotional reunion with his mother and his three children but lacked the courage to tell them what had happened to their mother.

Q. Find the incorrect statement:

Solution:

The Pope had taken refuge with the King Bomba (Ferdinand II of Naples). Refer para 5.
So (a) is incorrect one.
(b) is correct as mentioned in para 3.
(c) is correct as mentioned in para 9.
(d) is correct as mentioned in para 6.

QUESTION: 15

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

I was recently shocked to read that several city councils in the UK are getting ready to expunge everyday Latin words from the English lexicon. Along with ‘via’ and ‘etc’ would be banished ‘viz’ and ‘i.e.’, not to speak of ‘inter alia’ and ‘bona fide’. There goes away that exotic literary advantage. It was only recently that Amrita, my 10-year-old, fighting against a tide of domestic protestations voted against romantic French and prevalent Spanish and chose Latin as her second language in middle school. I had cheered her and actually promised to help out with the homework, given that three out of five words in English are of Latin origin. Blame this vicarious decision on my formative years but growing up in Mumbai, Latin was never an option in my school, as our national language Hindi was strictly enforced. Shiv Sainiks had decreed that local Marathi was de rigueur for all citizens of the city. I therefore ended up needing to speak three additional languages, not to forget Tamil, my mother tongue.

Languages rarely heard have always fascinated me. I always had this burning desire to speak them, particularly when my travel stints exposed me to the strangest of tongues. Language CDs didn’t help me a whole lot. The thing about languages is that though you may be gifted with the art of penmanship, spoken word skills are mostly inherited or acquired after birth. I have always packed my dog-eared phrasebook along with my toothbrush and shaving cream for my travels. These haven’t helped me much either, often eliciting that controlled giggle or even outright laughter at my stuttered attempts. Printed words won’t tell you that Thai is a tonal language with grammatical minefields or Mandarin and Cantonese have a lilt to them flowing like Indian ink applied with a Chinese brush. These city councils argue that they needed to create a language devoid of such linguistic minefields. However, there could be far-reaching consequences in the professional community. Just like abstruse scientific papers and brain-twisting mathematical theorems, legal documents are made to sound pompous with Latin words sprinkled generously all over those reams of printed matter. With Latin slowly oozing out of our English dictionary our lawyers will be hard-pressed to retain their mystifying status quo.

Q. Which of the following is a suitable title for the passage?

Solution:

The title of the passage should express its central idea in a succinct manner. The author begins by talking about the decision of city councils in the UK to expunge everyday Latin words from the English lexicon. The author discusses the motivations behind this pruning- “to create a language devoid of such linguistic minefields...” and then goes on to talk about ‘far reaching consequences.’ He wonders whether English should be pruned or not.

Hence, option (C) is the correct answer. 
Though he mentions his fascination with languages, but this is not the main point being discussed. Hence, option 1 can be eliminated.

Option (B) can be ruled out because the author’s main purpose is not to discuss languages rarely spoken.

Option (D) is beyond the scope of the passage; the author mentions that a few Latin words are used by lawyers. However, it can’t be inferred that Latin is ‘the legal language.’ Hence, it can be ruled out.

QUESTION: 16

Read the following passagecarefully and answer the questions given at the end.

I was recently shocked to read that several city councils in the UK are getting ready to expunge everyday Latin words from the English lexicon. Along with ‘via’ and ‘etc’ would be banished ‘viz’ and ‘i.e.’, not to speak of ‘inter alia’ and ‘bona fide’. There goes away that exotic literary advantage. It was only recently that Amrita, my 10-year-old, fighting against a tide of domestic protestations voted against romantic French and prevalent Spanish and chose Latin as her second language in middle school. I had cheered her and actually promised to help out with the homework, given that three out of five words in English are of Latin origin. Blame this vicarious decision on my formative years but growing up in Mumbai, Latin was never an option in my school, as our national language Hindi was strictly enforced. Shiv Sainiks had decreed that local Marathi was de rigueur for all citizens of the city. I therefore ended up needing to speak three additional languages, not to forget Tamil, my mother tongue.

Languages rarely heard have always fascinated me. I always had this burning desire to speak them, particularly when my travel stints exposed me to the strangest of tongues. Language CDs didn’t help me a whole lot. The thing about languages is that though you may be gifted with the art of penmanship, spoken word skills are mostly inherited or acquired after birth. I have always packed my dog-eared phrasebook along with my toothbrush and shaving cream for my travels. These haven’t helped me much either, often eliciting that controlled giggle or even outright laughter at my stuttered attempts. Printed words won’t tell you that Thai is a tonal language with grammatical minefields or Mandarin and Cantonese have a lilt to them flowing like Indian ink applied with a Chinese brush. These city councils argue that they needed to create a language devoid of such linguistic minefields. However, there could be far-reaching consequences in the professional community. Just like abstruse scientific papers and brain-twisting mathematical theorems, legal documents are made to sound pompous with Latin words sprinkled generously all over those reams of printed matter. With Latin slowly oozing out of our English dictionary our lawyers will be hard-pressed to retain their mystifying status quo.

Q. According to the passage, why did the author choose to help his daughter?

Solution:

The sixth line of the first paragraph provides the answer to this question.

Option (B) is incorrect because there is no information in the passage to suggest that the author was not allowed to study Latin.

Option (C) is also incorrect because the author does not say that his daughter’s choice of Latin was better than the choice of French and Spanish. In fact the phrase used, “domestic protestations” indicates the opposite.

Though the author does mention that the use of Latin words provides an exotic literary advantage, this is not the reason for his deciding to help his daughter. So, option (D) is incorrect.

QUESTION: 17

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

I was recently shocked to read that several city councils in the UK are getting ready to expunge everyday Latin words from the English lexicon. Along with ‘via’ and ‘etc’ would be banished ‘viz’ and ‘i.e.’, not to speak of ‘inter alia’ and ‘bona fide’. There goes away that exotic literary advantage. It was only recently that Amrita, my 10-year-old, fighting against a tide of domestic protestations voted against romantic French and prevalent Spanish and chose Latin as her second language in middle school. I had cheered her and actually promised to help out with the homework, given that three out of five words in English are of Latin origin. Blame this vicarious decision on my formative years but growing up in Mumbai, Latin was never an option in my school, as our national language Hindi was strictly enforced. Shiv Sainiks had decreed that local Marathi was de rigueur for all citizens of the city. I therefore ended up needing to speak three additional languages, not to forget Tamil, my mother tongue.

Languages rarely heard have always fascinated me. I always had this burning desire to speak them, particularly when my travel stints exposed me to the strangest of tongues. Language CDs didn’t help me a whole lot. The thing about languages is that though you may be gifted with the art of penmanship, spoken word skills are mostly inherited or acquired after birth. I have always packed my dog-eared phrasebook along with my toothbrush and shaving cream for my travels. These haven’t helped me much either, often eliciting that controlled giggle or even outright laughter at my stuttered attempts. Printed words won’t tell you that Thai is a tonal language with grammatical minefields or Mandarin and Cantonese have a lilt to them flowing like Indian ink applied with a Chinese brush. These city councils argue that they needed to create a language devoid of such linguistic minefields. However, there could be far-reaching consequences in the professional community. Just like abstruse scientific papers and brain-twisting mathematical theorems, legal documents are made to sound pompous with Latin words sprinkled generously all over those reams of printed matter. With Latin slowly oozing out of our English dictionary our lawyers will be hard-pressed to retain their mystifying status quo.

Q. According to the passage, why have councils in the UK decided to remove Latin from the English lexicon?

Solution:

Refer to the last half of the second paragraph. The author says that there are linguistic minefields and problems that are associated with languages like Thai, Mandarin, Cantonese and Latin. The city council wanted to create a language that did not have these hurdles and so is getting ready to remove Latin from the English lexicon. Option (b) is the answer.

Option (a) is incorrect as there is no suggestion that mastery over Latin is the issue at hand here. Option c and d can be ruled out as they not mentioned by the author.

QUESTION: 18

Read the following sets of four sentences and arrange them in the most logical sequence to form a meaningful and coherent paragraph.

I. Doubts linger about Facebooks ability to be a business. Financial markets had also cratered since the Microsoft deal. 
II. Big, as that is, it's considerably less than the $15 billion valuation that Microsoft and Li Ka-shing accepted in October 2007. 
III. Milner's confidence that Facebook will eventually be profitable at a gigantic scale is what emboldened him to invest initially at a price that valued the company at $10 billion. 
IV. But Milner's enthusiasm is such that not only did he buy stock: from Facebook, he will also be spending as much as $300 million more buying stock from employees and outside investors.

Solution:

The clear link is III II, as II refers to the $ 10 billion to be considerably less than the $ 15 billion valuation. Although the students can mark (c) as answer as no other choice gives this link, there is another link I IV. The use of But Milner's enthusiasm is such' in IV is clearly linked to the ' Facebook's inability to be a business' mentioned in I. So the correct order is III, II, I, IV.

QUESTION: 19

Read the following sets of four sentences and arrange them in the most logical sequence to form a meaningful and coherent paragraph.

I. No light, no sound comes in from the world.
II. My violin misses him more than I do. I tune it, and we enter my soundproof cell.
III. Electrons along copper, horsehair across acrylic create my only impressions of sense.
IV. I have not played Schubert for more than a month.

Solution:

IV II is a clear link. 'Him' referred in II is difinitely pointing to Schubert mentioned in IV. II is followed by I as I describe's the sound proof cell mentioned in II. So the correct order is IV, II, I, III.

QUESTION: 20

Which of the following words is spelled correctly? 

Solution:

Only 'Decrepit' is the correctly spelled word. It means worn out or ruined because of age or neglect.

QUESTION: 21

Which of the following options has both words spelled correctly ? 

Solution:

Correct spellings Receive, Deceive, Perceive and believe

QUESTION: 22

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate option.

Mrs. Kapoor hovered around the patient in a display of great.......... . 

Solution:

Solicititude and Chivelry are no words (wrong spelling) Solicititude means care or concern for something.

Chivalry means courteous, moral, religious etc.

In the context of the statement solicititude is the perfect choice as a patient needs care.

QUESTION: 23

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate option.

Whenever she asked the doctor how long she had left to live, he would dive off into long-winded explanations about the uncertainties inherent in medicine, and eventually tail off as if he had forgotten her original question altogether; it was the worst form of ................. she'd ever come across.

Solution:

Prevarication means evasive language.

Insinuation means an unpleasant hint or suggestion of something bad.

Perambulation means to travel over.

Abrogation means to cancel.

In the context of the given statement prevarication is the most suitable option as the sentence is about a person evading somebody's question about how long will she live.

QUESTION: 24

For the underlined part of the given sentence, choose the option that is grammatically correct, effective and reduces ambiguity and redundancy. 

Q. Many of the workers currently deployed on the assembly line, hope for the exchanging of their routine jobs for new assignments that are interesting. 

Solution:

For the exchanging is clearly wrong.

(d) is the most concise and to the point statement of all as it rightly states 'new and interesting assignments.'

Rest of the options unnecessary stretches the modifier and are redundant.

QUESTION: 25

For the underlined part of the given sentence, choose the option that is grammatically correct, effective and reduces ambiguity and redundancy. 

Q. Saundarya's Skin Nourishing cream sold 5 lakh packs last quarter, 20% more than their Face Wash did and nearly five times as much as their Anti-Ageing cream sales

Solution:

The correct option would be one that makes right comparison and keeps the structure parallel while comparing the 3 things.

Option (a) is wrong because the two parts ' their Face wash did' and 'their anti ageing cream sales' is not parallel; instead of sales it should have been 'did' or 'sales were'.

Option (b) is wrong because of the same reason, as mentioned for option (a).

Option (c) is wrong because it should have been '20% more than their face wash did'; 'did' is missing, that's why it leads to a wrong comparison.

Option (d) makes right comparison and keeps the structure parallel. Use of 'did' and 'were' makes it appropriate.

QUESTION: 26

Select the option which expresses a relationship similar to the one expressed in the capitalized pair.

MUMBLE : INDISTINCT :: 

Solution:

Mumble means not speaking clearly. Mumbling leads to unclear and indistinct conversation. The option that is closest in the relationship to this is option (c) as scribbling leads to illegible handwriting.

Rest of the options is related in some different manner.

Swagger means to walk or behave in a very confident and arrogant way whereas timid shows a lack of courage.So they are opposite to each other.

Exacerbate means make something worse and cure is its opposite.

Drizzle is light rain whereas downpour is heavy rainfall.

QUESTION: 27

Select the option which expresses a relationship similar to the one expressed in the capitalized pair.

RUFFLE : EQUANIMTY ::

Solution:

Ruffle means disorder or disarrange.

Equanimity means calm and composed.

Ruffle and equanimity are almost antonyms. The only option that has this antonymous relationship is (b).

Bewilderment means confusion.

Flounce means an exaggerated action intended to express annoyance or impatience.

Turmoil means a state of great disturbance, confusion or uncertainty.

Interest and Astound are unrelated.

Astound means shock or greatly surprise.

QUESTION: 28

The first and last part of the sentence are marked 1 and 6. The rest of the sentence is split into five parts and marked i, ii, iii, iv and v. These five parts are not given in their proper order. From the options given, please choose the most appropriate order to form a coherent, logical and grammatically correct sentence. 

1. Having started 

i. in less time than it takes 
ii. more than half of your capital 
iii. with just $5.8 million 
iv. you squandered 
v. in seed financing 

6. to soft-boil an egg 

Solution:

One clear hint is (i) 6, 'in less time than it takes to softboil an egg'. So (b) & (c) are incorrect.

Further (iii) (v) is also another clear connection as seed financing in (v) refers to the $ 5.8 million in (iii).

QUESTION: 29

The first and last part of the sentence are marked 1 and 6. The rest of the sentence is split into five parts and marked i, ii, iii, iv and v. These five parts are not given in their proper order. From the options given, please choose the most appropriate order to form a coherent, logical and grammatically correct sentence. 

1. You could behave badly, say you were sorry,

i. who now had both to suffer the crime
ii. in the same position
iii. and the difficulty of forgiving
iv. you would get extra fun and be reinstated
v. as the one who had done nothing

6. with no goodies in addition at all

Solution:

(i) (iii) is a clear connection. 'Both' in (i) refers to 'suffer the crime' and 'difficulty of forgiving'.

Use of 'and' in (iii) clearly helps us in identifying this. So (a) is wrong.

Another connection is (iv) (ii) as 'reinstated in the same position' is the perfect link.

QUESTION: 30

Select the option which is grammatically correct. 

Solution:

‘I forgot that they are coming today’ is the grammatically correct sentence.

Option (b) is wrong because parallelism between the two parts is not correct.

Option (c) should have ‘inspiring’ instead of ‘inspiration’.

In option (d), confident should be followed by ‘of’ and it should have been ‘she is confident of speaking English.

QUESTION: 31

Select the option which is grammatically correct. 

Solution:

In option (a), the sentence structure is wrong; it should be ‘to have fled the country’ instead of ‘to flee the country.’

Option (b) is inconsistent in using the preposition. The preposition ‘by’ before ‘plain’ is redundant.

Option (d) should be structured as ‘… but not for my neighbour.’

QUESTION: 32

Pick out the odd option.

Solution:

Expiate means atone for (guilt or sin) or make amends for or make up for; Banish means to send (someone) away from a country or place as an official punishment which is synonymous with expatriate and exile

QUESTION: 33

Pick out the odd option.

Solution:

Brevity means concise and exact use of words in writing or speech which is synonymous with conciseness and succinctness; Circumlocution means the use of many words where fewer would do, especially in a deliberate attempt to be vague or evasive

QUESTION: 34

Fill in the blanks with the word or phrase that completes the idiom correctly in the given sentences. 

The bigger they come, _________ they fall, or so it is said. 

Solution:

'The bigger they come, the harder they fall' is the correct idiom. The use of comparative degree and usage of hard with fall is appropriate in the context.

QUESTION: 35

Fill in the blanks with the word or phrase that completes the idiom correctly in the given sentences. 

You almost frightened the life _________ me.

Solution:

You almost frightened the life out of me. Rest are not appropriate usage.

QUESTION: 36

HCF of 3 natural numbers is 10 and their product is 24000. How many such triplets exist?

Solution:

Let numbers be 10a , 10b , 10 c. 
10a x 10 b x 10 c = 24000 .
Therefore abc  = 24.
Now ( 1, 1, 24) ; ( 1, 2, 12) ; ( 1, 3 , 8) ;
( 1, 4 , 6 ) ; ( 2, 3, 4 ) are cases.

QUESTION: 37

In a school, students were called for the Flag Hoisting ceremony on August 15. After the ceremony, small boxes of sweets were distributed among the students. In each class, the student with roll no. 1 got one box of sweets, student with roll number 2 got 2 boxes of sweets, student with roll no. 3 got 3 boxes of sweets and so on. In class III, a total of 1200 boxes of sweets were distributed. By mistake one of the students of class III got double the sweets he was entitled to get. Identify the roll number of the student who got twice as many boxes of sweets as compared to his entitlement.

Solution:

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +..................+ n < 1200
and
We need to calculate value of n.
Using first and second inequality,
n(n + 1) / 2 < 1200
N = 48
Total number of boxes of sweets distributed is: 48*49/2 = 1176
So, roll no 24 got doubles number of boxes. 

QUESTION: 38

A Boat is being rowed away in still water, from a 210 metres high cliff at the speed of 3 km/hr. What is the approximate time taken for the angle of depression of the cliff at the boat to change from 60 deg. To 45 deg.?

Solution:


tan 60o = 210/d
d = 121.3 m
The distance of boat from bottom of cliff when angle of depression is 45 deg is
tan 45o = 210/d
d = 210 m
The distance covered by boat is 210 - 121.3 = 88.7 m
Speed of boat given is 3 km/hr
In m/s it is 3*5/18 = 5/6 m/s = 0.83 m/s
Time taken to cover 88.7 m is 88.7/0.83 = 106.44 sec ≅ 2 min

QUESTION: 39

X and Y are the two alloys which were made by mixing Zinc and Copper in the ratio 6 : 9 and 7 : 11 respectively. If 40 grams of alloy X and 60 grams of alloy Y are melted and mixed to form another alloy Z, what is the ratio of Zinc and Copper in the new alloy Z?

Solution:

Here X and Y are two alloys which is made of zincand copper.

Quantity of zinc in 40 g of alloy X

Quantity of copper in 40 g of alloy X
= 40 g – 16g = 24 g
Now, in alloy Y

Quantity of zinc in 60 g of alloy Y


Quantity of copper in 60 g of alloy Y

Quantity of copper in alloy Z

QUESTION: 40

ABCDEF is a regular hexagon and PQR is an equilateral triangle of side  a. The area of the shaded portion is X and CD : PQ:: 2 : 1. Find the area of the circle circumscribing the hexagon in terms of X

Solution:

Here, side of equilateral triangle = a
and O is the centre of circle and side of Hexagonal
= 2a
Area of Hexagonal (ABCDEF) 

Here n = 6

Now, Area of equilateral triangle PQR

So, area of shaded region of hexagonal

Hence, radius of circle OA = 2a

QUESTION: 41

Gajendra and Rakhi got married 10 years ago, their ages were in the ratio of 5:4. Today Gajendra's age is one sixth more than Rakhi's age. After marriage, they had 6 children including a triplet and twins. The age of the triplets, twins and the sixth child is in the ratio ol 3:2:1. What is the largest possible value of the present total age of the family?

Solution:

Let present age of Gajendra = 5x years
present age of Rakhi = 4x years
10 years before their ages are
(5x + 10) and (4x + 10)
According to questions,
Gajendra age = 1/6 (4x + 10) +(4x + 10)
⇒ 5x + 10 = 7/6 (4x +10)
⇒ 6(5x + 10) = 7 (4x +10)
⇒ 30x +60= 28x + 70
⇒ 2x = 10
⇒ x = 5 

Present age of Gajendra = 5 × 5 + 10 = 25 + 10 = 35 years
Present age of Rakhi  = 4 × 5 + 10 = 20 + 10 = 30 years
Present age of total family
= 35 + 30 + 3α+ 2β+ γ
(Because ratio of ages of children is 3 : 2 : 1
2 × 6 = 12
Age of each triplet son = 3 × 9 = 27
Age of each two son = 3 × 2 = 6 years
Age of single son = 1 × 3 = 3 years
So, total present family age = 30 + 35 + 27 + 12 + 3 = 107 years

QUESTION: 42

In the BBA Programme of a B-School, there are two sections X and Y, 1/4th of the students in Section X and 4/9th of the students in section Y are girls. If two students are chosen at random, one each from section X and Section Y as class representative, the probability that exactly one of the students chosen is a girl is:

Solution:

Selecting a girl from section X
and section Y is 1/4 and 4/9 respectively
Selecting a boy from section X and section Y is 3/4  and 5/9 respectively

Case 1 — A girl from section X and a boy from section  Y


Case 2 — A girl from section X and a boy from section Y

Required probability = P1 + P2 = 17/36 

QUESTION: 43

Anmol Yadav  sells 10 lts of wine form a can containing 40 litres of pure wine to the 1st customer. He then adds 10 litres of water to the wine can. He again sells 10 litres of mixture to the 2nd customer and then adds 10 litres of water to the can.Again he sells 10 litres of mixture to the 3rd customer and then adds 10 litres of water to the can and so on. What amount of pure wine will the 5th customer receive?

Solution:

Final concentration of wine after I customer
 

Final concentration of wine after II customer
 
Final concentration of wine after III customer

Final concentration of wine after IV customer

Final concentration of wine after V customer

QUESTION: 44

A boat carries passengers to Rock of Vivekananda and back from Kanchipuram. The distance of Rock of Vivekananda from Kanchipuram is 100 km. One day, the ferry started for Rock of Vivekananda with passengers on board, at a speed of 20 km per hour. After 90 minuts, the crew realized that there is a hole in the ferry and 15 gallons of sea water had already entered the ferry. Sea water is entering the ferry at the rate of 10 gallons per hour. It requires 60 gallons of water to sink the ferry. At what speed should the driver now drive the ferry so that it can reach the Rock of Vivekananda and return back to Kanchipuram just in time before thee ferry sinks? (Current of the sea water from Rock of Vivekananda to Kanchipuram is 2km per hour.)

Solution:

Speed of boat in upstream = 20 – 2 = 18 km/h
Time after which hole was detected = 90 min
So distance covered 18 x (90/60) = 27 km
Distance yet to be covered = 100 – 27 = 73 km
Now the boat has to travel 73 km towards Vivekanand rock and then 100 km back to Kanchipuram is 

Let x1 be the speed of boat towards
Vivekanand rock and x2 be the speed of boat towards Kanchipuram

In this equation if we substitute
x1 = 42 km/hr
x2 = 36 km/hr

which is true.

QUESTION: 45

The sum of  

Solution:


Further terms can be neglected as value is very small
√3/2 = 0.866
So (d) is correct option. 

QUESTION: 46

The value of

Solution:




Hence option C

QUESTION: 47

The total number of eight-digit landline telephone numbers that can be formed having at least one of their digits repeated is :

Solution:

The total number of 8-digit landline telephone number that can be formed having at least one of their digits
Related.

The total number of 8-digitlandline number = 108 = 10,00,00,000

The no of 8-digit landline number in which no digitis repeated = 10/2
∴ Number of required landline number
= 10000000 – 1814400 = 98185600

So option (a) is correct. 

QUESTION: 48

The business consulting division of MCY has overseas operations in 3 locations: Singapore, New York and London. The Company has 22 analysts covering Singapore. 28 covering New York and 24 covering London. 6 analysts cover Singapore and New York but not London. 4 analysts cover Singapore and London but not New York, and 8 analysts cover New York and London but not Singapore. If MCY has it total of 42 business analysts covering at least one of the three locations: Singapore, New York and London, then the number of analysts covering New York alone is:

Solution:


No. of analysts covering New York alone
= 28 – (8 + 6 + 7) = 7

Let the number of analysts covering all three locations
be x
∴ 28 + (12 – x + 4) + (12 – x) = 42

⇒ 56 – 2x = 42
⇒ x = 7

The number of analysts covering
New York alone is 14 – x = 7
x = 7
So choice (d) is correct. 

QUESTION: 49

Mr. Anil started his business 8 years after passing out from SIBM, Pune. He investedRs 30,00,000 in the business that is expected to give him a return of 6%, compounded annually. If the expected number of yearswhich his investment shall double is 72/r, where r is the percent interest rate, the approximate expected total valueof investment (in INR) from his business 43 years later is:

Solution:

Here rate of interest is compounded annually
The investment amount is double
in year = 72/6 year

Now, amount after 48 years

From eqn. (i), we put value
A = 30,00,000(2)4
= 480,00,000

QUESTION: 50

Amit has a toy which is in the shape of circular cylinder. Its radius was 6 and it had a height of 24. A rectangular solid with a square base and a height of 20, was placed in the cylinder such that each of the corners of the solid is tangent to the cylinder wall. If milk is then poured into the cylinder such that it reaches the rim, the volume of milk is:

Solution:

Given, r = 6, Height = 24
Volume of circular cylinder =πr2h

= πr2
= π(6)2 × 24
= 864π

Side of rectangular solid

Volume of rectangular solid 

Milk into the cylinder
= Volume of cylinder – volume of solid
= (864 π– 1440)
= 288(3π– 5) 

QUESTION: 51

The student fest in an Ganguram Engineering College is to be held in one month's time and no sponsorship has yet been arranged by the students. Finally the General Secretary  of the student body took the initiative and decided to go alone for sponsorship collection. In fact, he is the only student doing t he fund raising job on the first day. However, seeing his enthusiasm, other students also joined him as follows: on the second day, 2 more students join him: on the third day. 3 more students join the group of the previous day, and so on. In this manner, the sponsorship collection is completed in exactly 20 days. If an MBA student is twice as efficient as an Engineering student, the number of days which ll MBA students would take to do the some activity, is:

Solution:

no. of days No. of student
Here, 1st day raising fund= 1
2nd day raising fund by = 1 + 2
3rd day raising fund by = 1 + 2 + 3
4th day raising fund by = 1 + 2 + 3 + 4
5th day raising fund by = 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5
.
.
.
20th day raising fund is completed
= 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + ......... + 20
So, sequence is
= 1 + (1 + 2) + (1 + 2 + 3) + (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5) +… … … (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + … 20)
So, sequence is
= 1 + (1 + 2) + (1 + 2 + 3) + (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5) +… … … (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + … 20)
This can be written as 

We know that sum of square of natural number

Here n = 20

= So, total no of students = 1540
Now, Efficiency of MBA student is double as compared to B.Tech student.
no. of total days = 1540/2 x 11 = 70 days.

QUESTION: 52

Healthy company  of USA manufacturers 6000 pcs of prescribed blood pressure drugs for 8,00,000 every month, In July 2014, the company supplied 600 pcs of free medicines to doctors at various hospitals. Of the remaining medicines, it was able to sell 4/5th of the pcs at 25 percent discount and the balance at the printed price of 250. Assuming vendor's discount at the rate of a uniform 30 percent of the total revenue, the approximate percentage profit/loss of the pharmaceutical company in July 2014 is:

Solution:

After 600 strips of free medicines,
no of strips remains = 6000 – 600 = 5400.

After 25% discount on printed price
Total amount earned by selling (4/5) strips

Remaining strips after (4/5) strip
Selling price of 1080 strips
= 1080 × 250
= Rs. 270000
Total revenue earned by selling 5400 strips
= 810000 + 270000
= Rs. 1080000
Now, vendor discount 30% at total revenue

Loss percent

QUESTION: 53

A  ball is dropped from a height of 32 metre. Each time the ball rebounds to a height equal to half the height of the previous bounce. Find the total  distance travelled by the ball when it hits the ground for the 11th time, is :

Solution:

Here A ball rebounds for half of its previous. height
and ball continue for hit the ground upto 11th time.
Distance travelled for 1st time hit ground = 32 m.
Distance travelled for 2nd time hit ground = 16 + 16 = 32 m
Distance travelled for 3rd time hit ground = 8 + 8 = 16 m
Distance travelled for 4th time hit the ground = 4 + 4 = 8 m
So continue upto 11th time then sequence
Required distance

Here 1st term 
a = 32, r = 16/32 = 1/2

= 32 + 32 × 2
= 32 + 64 = 96m 

QUESTION: 54

From SINGHAD college  in Ranchi , 8 males and 7 females have appeared for  Science Committee selection process, 3 males and 4 females are to be selected. The total number of ways in which the Committee can he formed, given that Mr. Rahul is not to be included in the Committee if Ms. Rashmi is selected, is:

Solution:

Here, 8 male and 7 females. Out of them 3 males and 4 female to be selected.
no. of ways in which total committee formed
= 8C3 x 7C4 
= 1960
Now, committee formed without Raj and Rani
Selection of both Raj and Rani can happen in
7C2 x 6C3 = 420
∴ Required number of ways = 1960 – 420 = 1540

QUESTION: 55

How many 3 - digit even number can you form such that if one of the digits is 5 and the following digit must be 7?

Solution:

There could be two possibilities.

(i) The number ends is 57 (in which case the number would not be even) and

(ii) the number begins with 57 (in which case we have only 5 even numbers viz. 570, 572, 574, 576, 578).

QUESTION: 56

Anil got an order from a garment manufacturer for 480 Kurtas . He brought 12 sewing machines and appointed some expert tailors to do the job. However, many didn’t report to duty. As a result, each of those who did, had to stitch 32 more kurtas than originally planned by Anil, with equal distribution of work. How many tailors had been appointed earlier and how many had not reported for work?

Solution:

The best way to solve this question is the methods of reverse substitution i.e. check out for the answer choices. We find that the option (c) is the most appropriate one. Thus if he had appointed 10 tailors earlier, each one would have had to do 48 kurtas. Now if 4 of them don’t report to the duty, each one of them would have to do 80, which is 32 more than originally planned per head.

QUESTION: 57

Anil dealt some cards to Rohit and himself from a full pack of playing cards and laid the rest aside. Anil then said to Rohit. “If you give me a certain number of your cards, I will have four times as many cards as you will have. If I give you the same number of cards, I will have thrice as many cards as you will have “. Of the given choices, which could represent the number of cards with Anil?

Solution:

Let Rohit have m cards, and let Anil have l cards. If Rohit gives Anil x cards, then we the equation : l + x = 4(M – x) i.e. 4M – I = 5x.
Conversely if Anil gives Rohit x cards, then we have the equation : I – x = 3(M + x) i.e. I – 3M = 4x.
Solving the two equations
we get, M = 9x and I = 31x.
In a pack of 52 cards the only possible value for I could be 31.

QUESTION: 58

Three times the first of three consecutive odd integers is 3 more than twice the third. What is the third integer ?

Solution:

Let the 3 odd numbers be (x – 2), x and (x + 2). It is given that 3(x – 2) = 3 + 2(x + 2).

Hence x = 13.
So the third integer is (x + 2) = 15.

QUESTION: 59

273 – 272 – 271 is the same as

Solution:

273 – 272 – 271 = 271 (22 – 2 – 1) = 271 (4 – 2 – 1) = 271.

QUESTION: 60

What is the value of k for which the following system of equations has no solution:
2x – 8y = 3 and kx +4y = 10
 

Solution:

We know that for a system of two equations :
a1x + b1y = c1 and a2x + b2y = c2 to have no solution, the following condition should be satisfied : a1/a2 = b1/b2 =c1/c2.
Hence, in our equations 2/k = -8/4 = 3/10. So, k = -1.

QUESTION: 61

Read the following information and answer the questions given below it. For selection of films produced before December 2020 for the Bhojpuri film festival, following criteria are given.

1. The film must be submitted to the Bhojpuri Film Development Corporation (BFDC) by 31.10.2020.
2. The production cost of the film should not exceed Rupees Five crores.
3. The director of the film should have passed a three year course either from the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) or from Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute.
4. The length of the film should not exceed 150 minutes.
5. The film must have been approved by the film censor board of India.
6. However, if the film fulfils all the above criteria except
(a) criteria 2 above, it must be sent to the finance secretary
(b) criteria 3 above, the director has done at least a one year course from FTII or Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute, the film is kept as a stand-bye

On the basis of above information and information provided below, decide the course of action in each case. No further information is available. You are not to assume anything.

Mark answer:

  1. if the film is to be selected
  2. if the film is not to be selected
  3. if the film should be sent to the finance secretary
  4. if the film should be kept as a stand-bye
  5. if the data given about the film are not adequate to make a decision.

Q. Film Saajan was produced at the cost of Rupees 2.5 crore. It was submitted to the BFDC on 29th September 2020. The director of the film raj bhimani passed a 3-year course from FTII. Length of film was 120 minutes and has been approved by the censor board of India.

Solution:

We are given that:- 

Film Saajan was produced at the cost of Rupees 2.5 crore(thus fulfills 2).

It was submitted to the BFDC on 29th September 2020(thus, fulfills 1).

The director of the film Govind Chadha passed a 3-year course from FTII(thus fulfills 3).

Length of film was 120 minutes(thus fulfills 4) and has been approved by the censor board of India(thus fulfills 5)

Hence, as the given film fulfills all the conditions it has to be selected.
Hence, option A is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 62

Read the following information and answer the questions given below it. For selection of films produced before December 2020 for the Bhojpuri film festival, following criteria are given.

1. The film must be submitted to the Bhojpuri Film Development Corporation (BFDC) by 31.10.2020.
2. The production cost of the film should not exceed Rupees Five crores.
3. The director of the film should have passed a three year course either from the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) or from Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute.
4. The length of the film should not exceed 150 minutes.
5. The film must have been approved by the film censor board of India.
6. However, if the film fulfils all the above criteria except
(a) criteria 2 above, it must be sent to the finance secretary
(b) criteria 3 above, the director has done at least a one year course from FTII or Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute, the film is kept as a stand-bye

On the basis of above information and information provided below, decide the course of action in each case. No further information is available. You are not to assume anything.

Mark answer:

  1. if the film is to be selected
  2. if the film is not to be selected
  3. if the film should be sent to the finance secretary
  4. if the film should be kept as a stand-bye
  5. if the data given about the film are not adequate to make a decision.

Q. Coolie is a 135-minute film directed by Anurag, who was a student of Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute from 1996 to 1999. The cost of producing the film was Rupees 2.3 crore and it was submitted to BFDC on 24th July 2007. The film has been approved by the censor board of India.

Solution:

We are told that, 

Coolie is a 135-minute film directed(thus fulfills 4) by Anurag, who was a student of Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute from 1996 to 1999(3 may or not be fulfilled). The cost of producing the film was Rupees 2.3 crore(thus, 2 is fulfilled) and it was submitted to BFDC on 24th July 2007(thus, fulfilling 1). The film has been approved by the censor board of India(thus it fulfills 5). Thus, as we are not sure about 3, we cannot make any decision.
Hence, option B is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 63

Read the following information and answer the questions given below it. For selection of films produced before December 2020 for the Bhojpuri film festival, following criteria are given.

1. The film must be submitted to the Bhojpuri Film Development Corporation (BFDC) by 31.10.2020.
2. The production cost of the film should not exceed Rupees Five crores.
3. The director of the film should have passed a three year course either from the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) or from Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute.
4. The length of the film should not exceed 150 minutes.
5. The film must have been approved by the film censor board of India.
6. However, if the film fulfils all the above criteria except
(a) criteria 2 above, it must be sent to the finance secretary
(b) criteria 3 above, the director has done at least a one year course from FTII or Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute, the film is kept as a stand-bye

On the basis of above information and information provided below, decide the course of action in each case. No further information is available. You are not to assume anything.

Mark answer:

  1. if the film is to be selected
  2. if the film is not to be selected
  3. if the film should be sent to the finance secretary
  4. if the film should be kept as a stand-bye
  5. if the data given about the film are not adequate to make a decision.

Q. Rakesh Mohan, the director of film Ek Bar Achanak, has successfully completed a 2-years course at Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute. The 150-minute film was produced at rupees 4.85 crore. It has approved by the censor board of India and submitted to BFDC on 30th Nov. 2007.

Solution:

The film must be submitted to theBhojpuri Film Development Corporation (NFDC) by 31.10.2007 The given film was approved by the censor board of India and submitted to NFDC on 30th Nov. 2007. Thus, the given film does not fulfill condition 1 and as there is no alternative to condition 1, thus, the given film should not be selected.

Hence, option D is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 64

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

Mr. Arman has five sons – Anil, Manoj, Rohit, Pankaj and Saroj, and three daughters – Payal, Aditi and Saloni. Three sons of Mr. Arman were born first followed by two daughters. Saroj is the eldest child and Jay is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Payal and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Aditi, the eldest daughter, plays chess. DPS school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at DPS school have been born in succession. Manoj and Pankaj are cricketers while Anil plays football. Rohit who was born just before Jay, plays hockey.

Q. Anil is the _________ child of Mr. Arman. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

Mr. Arman has five sons – Anil, Manoj, Rohit, Pankaj and Saroj, and three daughters – Payal, Aditi and Saloni. Three sons of Mr. Arman were born first followed by two daughters. Saroj is the eldest child and Jay is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Payal and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Aditi, the eldest daughter, plays chess. DPS school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at DPS school have been born in succession. Manoj and Pankaj are cricketers while Anil plays football. Rohit who was born just before Jay, plays hockey.

Q. Saroj is a student of which school?

Solution:

Let A, M, R, N, S, T, K and J represent Anil, Manoj, Rohit, Pankaj, Saroj, Payal, Aditi and Saloni. Let us formulate the given information is a table form:

We are given that, Saroj is the eldest child and Jay is the youngest. Thus, S is 1 and J is 8. Rohit who was born just before Jay, plays hockey. Thus, Rohit is 7 and plays hockey. Three sons of Mr. Arman were born first followed by two daughters. Thus, 1,2,3 are sons and 4,5 are daughters. Aditi, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Thus, Aditi is 4 and plays chess.


The updated table is:-
Payal and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. DPS school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Thus, Aditi studies in Trinity. Manoj and Pankaj are cricketers while Anil plays football Thus, Manoj and Pankaj studies in Mansarovar. we are given The children who are at DPS school have been born in succession and thus, Manoj and Pankaj are 2/3. Thus, Payal is 5 and Anil is 6. Thus, the table is:-

Thus, Saroj studies in Trinity. Hence, option A is the correct answer

QUESTION: 66

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

Mr. Arman has five sons – Anil, Manoj, Rohit, Pankaj and Saroj, and three daughters – Payal, Aditi and Saloni. Three sons of Mr. Arman were born first followed by two daughters. Saroj is the eldest child and Jay is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Payal and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Aditi, the eldest daughter, plays chess. DPS school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at DPS school have been born in succession. Manoj and Pankaj are cricketers while Anil plays football. Rohit who was born just before Jay, plays hockey.

Q. What game does Payal play? 

Solution:

Let A, M, R, N, S, T, K and J represent Anil, Manoj, Rohit, Pankaj, Saroj, Payal, Aditi and Saloni. Let us formulate the given information is a table form:

We are given that, Saroj is the eldest child and Jay is the youngest. Thus, S is 1 and J is 8. Rohit who was born just before Jay, plays hockey. Thus, Rohit is 7 and plays hockey. Three sons of Mr. Arman were born first followed by two daughters. Thus, 1,2,3 are sons and 4,5 are daughters. Aditi, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Thus, Aditi is 4 and plays chess.


The updated table is:-
Payal and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. DPS school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Thus, Aditi studies in Trinity. Manoj and Pankaj are cricketers while Anil plays football Thus, Manoj and Pankaj studies in Mansarovar. we are given The children who are at DPS school have been born in succession and thus, Manoj and Pankaj are 2/3. Thus, Payal is 5 and Anil is 6. Thus, the table is:-

Thus, we cannot determine what game tammana plays. Hence, option D is the correct answer. 

QUESTION: 67

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

Mr. Arman has five sons – Anil, Manoj, Rohit, Pankaj and Saroj, and three daughters – Payal, Aditi and Saloni. Three sons of Mr. Arman were born first followed by two daughters. Saroj is the eldest child and Jay is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Payal and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Aditi, the eldest daughter, plays chess. DPS school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at DPS school have been born in succession. Manoj and Pankaj are cricketers while Anil plays football. Rohit who was born just before Jay, plays hockey.

Q. Which of the following pairs was not born in succession (ignore the order)? 

Solution:

Let A, M, R, N, S, T, K and J represent Anil, Manoj, Rohit, Pankaj, Saroj, Payal, Aditi and Saloni. Let us formulate the given information is a table form:

We are given that, Saroj is the eldest child and Jay is the youngest. Thus, S is 1 and J is 8. Rohit who was born just before Jay, plays hockey. Thus, Rohit is 7 and plays hockey. Three sons of Mr. Arman were born first followed by two daughters. Thus, 1,2,3 are sons and 4,5 are daughters. Aditi, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Thus, Aditi is 4 and plays chess.


The updated table is:-
Payal and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. DPS school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Thus, Aditi studies in Trinity. Manoj and Pankaj are cricketers while Anil plays football Thus, Manoj and Pankaj studies in Mansarovar. we are given The children who are at DPS school have been born in succession and thus, Manoj and Pankaj are 2/3. Thus, Payal is 5 and Anil is 6. Thus, the table is:-

Thus, Aditi and Anil are not born in succession
Hence, option B is the correct answer. 

QUESTION: 68

Answer the questions based on the following information. In each question below three statements (I, II, III) are given followed by four conclusions numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Choose the correct options (A & D) presented below. 

Statements:
I. Some drivers are technicians
II. All technicians are engineers
III. Some engineers are lecturers

Conclusions:
1. Some technicians are lecturers
2. Some lecturers are drivers
3. All engineers are technicians
​4. Some engineers are drivers

Solution:

The given condition is as shown below:- 


From this we can see that only conclusion 4 follows.
Hence, option B is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 69

Answer the questions based on the following information. In each question below three statements (I, II, III) are given followed by four conclusions numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Choose the correct options (A & D) presented below. 

Statements: 
I. Some barbers are fashion designers 
II. No fashion designers are businessmen 
III. Some businessmen are traders 

Conclusions: 
1. No Fashion designers are traders 
2. Some traders are not fashion designers 
3. Some fashion designers are traders 
4. Some barbers are not businessmen 

Solution:

The given situation is:


From this we can see either No Fashion designers are traders or Some fashion designers are traders. As some barbers are Fashion designers thus, some barbers are not businessman. As some traders are Businessman thus, some traders are not Fashion designers. Hence, Either 1 or 3 and 2 and 4 follows.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 70

Answer the questions based on the following information : 
Doranda Institute of Management (DIM) is a college in Ranchi. Its give admission to students who fulfils the following criteria :

A student must: 
1. be a graduate from a recognized university with minimum 54 percent marks. 
2. not be more than 33 years of age as on 1.4.2008. 
3. have secured 60 percent or more marks in the entrance test. 
4. pay one-time deposit fee of Rs. 2,00,000 at time of admission. 
5. pay tuition fee of Rs.4,000 per month. 

Any candidate who fails to fulfill the condition (4) at above, he/she may be referred to the chairman-admission. Any candidate who has scored 80 percent mark in the entrance test but does not fulfill the condition (1) at above, he/she may be referred to the director. Any candidate having work experience of at least 10 years in supervisory cadre and does not satisfy the condition (2) at above, he/she may be admitted under sponsored quota. Given the above information and condition in each of the following questions, you have to decide which of the following course of action should be taken. You should not assume anything in case of any of the candidates. Mark answer 

I. if the candidate is admitted                 
II. if the candidate is not admitted 
III. if the candidate is referred to the director 
IV. if the candidate is referred to the chairman- admission 
V. if the candidate is admitted under sponsor quota 

Q. Kamlesh secured 60 percent marks in graduation and was born on 10th April 1977. He scored 56 percent marks in the entrance test. He can pay one-time deposit of Rs. 2,00,000 and monthly tuition fee of Rs. 4,000. 

Solution:

Kamlesh secured 60 percent marks in graduation and was born on 15th April 1976. He scored 56 percent marks in the entrance test. He can pay one-time deposit of Rs. 2,00,000 and monthly tuition fee of Rs. 4,000. Thus, Kamlesh fulfills all the conditions except condition 3. As there is no other alternative to condition 3, thus, Kamlesh cannot be admitted.

Hence, option B is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 71

Answer the questions based on the following information : 
Doranda Institute of Management (DIM) is a college in Ranchi. Its give admission to students who fulfils the following criteria :

A student must: 
1. be a graduate from a recognized university with minimum 54 percent marks. 
2. not be more than 33 years of age as on 1.4.2008. 
3. have secured 60 percent or more marks in the entrance test. 
4. pay one-time deposit fee of Rs. 2,00,000 at time of admission. 
5. pay tuition fee of Rs.4,000 per month. 

Any candidate who fails to fulfill the condition (4) at above, he/she may be referred to the chairman-admission. Any candidate who has scored 80 percent mark in the entrance test but does not fulfill the condition (1) at above, he/she may be referred to the director. Any candidate having work experience of at least 10 years in supervisory cadre and does not satisfy the condition (2) at above, he/she may be admitted under sponsored quota. Given the above information and condition in each of the following questions, you have to decide which of the following course of action should be taken. You should not assume anything in case of any of the candidates. Mark answer 

I. if the candidate is admitted                 
II. if the candidate is not admitted 
III. if the candidate is referred to the director 
IV. if the candidate is referred to the chairman- admission 
V. if the candidate is admitted under sponsor quota 

Q. Sunil is an arts graduate ( 1st class)  who obtained 81 percent marks in the entrance test. He has 12 years of work experience in supervisory cadre. He can pay the stipulated one- time deposit and monthly tuition fees. His date of birth is 20th October, 1970.

Solution:

We are given that:- 

Sunil is a first-class science graduate who obtained 81 percent marks in the entrance test. He has 12 years of work experience in supervisory cadre. He can pay the stipulated one- time deposit and monthly tuition fees. His date of birth is 20th October, 1970. 

Thus, Sunilfulfills all the conditions except (2) and thus, he may be admitted under sponsored quota.

Hence, option D is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 72

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below.

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689 
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689 
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689 
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689 
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689 

Step 4 is the last step for the given input 

Q. If the input is given as “655, 436, 764, 799, 977, 572, 333”, which of the following step will be “333, 436, 572, 655, 977, 764, 799”?

Solution:

The machine is arranging the numbers in the increasing order of the sum of the digits on the number. 

Input: 245 (11), 316 (10), 436 (13), 519 (15), 868 (22), 710 (8), 689 (23). 
The number in the bracket indicates the sum of digits of the given number. 

Step 1: 710 (8), 316 (10), 436 (13), 519 (15), 868 (22), 245 (11), 689 (23). 

∴ The machine has swapped 710 (8) with 245 (11).

Step 2: 710 (8), 316 (10), 245 (11), 519 (15), 868 (22), 436 (13), 689 (23). 
Thus it has swapped 436 (13) with 245 (11). 

Step 3: 710 (8), 316 (10), 245 (11), 436 (13), 868 (22), 519 (15), 689 (23). 
Thus it has swapped 436 (13) with 519 (15). 

Step 4: 710 (8), 316 (10), 245 (11), 436 (13), 519 (15), 868 (22), 689 (23). 
Thus it has swapped 519 (15) with 868 (22). 

Going by the logic mentioned above, 
Input: 655 (16), 436 (13), 764 (17), 799 (25), 977 (23), 572 (14), 333 (9). 

Step 1: 333 (9), 436 (13), 764 (17), 799 (25), 977 (23), 572 (14), 655 (16). 

Step 2: 333 (9), 436 (13), 572 (14), 799 (25), 977 (23), 764 (17), 655 (16). 

Step 3: 333 (9), 436 (13), 572 (14), 655 (16), 977 (23), 764 (17), 799 (25). 

This is the required sequence which is achieved in  Step 3. 
Hence, option A is the correct answer. 

QUESTION: 73

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below.

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689 
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689 
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689 
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689 
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689 

Step 4 is the last step for the given input 

Q. How many steps will be required to get the final output from the following input? 
Input: 544, 653, 325, 688, 461, 231, 857 

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below.

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689 
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689 
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689 
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689 
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689 

Step 4 is the last step for the given input 

Q. Step third for an input is “432, 433, 542, 666, 734, 355, 574” What will be the first step for the input?

Solution:

The machine is arranging the numbers in the increasing order of the sum of the digits on the number. 

Input: 245 (11), 316 (10), 436 (13), 519 (15), 868 (22), 710 (8), 689 (23). 
The number in the bracket indicates the sum of digits of the given number. 

Step 1: 710 (8), 316 (10), 436 (13), 519 (15), 868 (22), 245 (11), 689 (23). 
∴ The machine has swapped 710 (8) with 245 (11).

Step 2: 710 (8), 316 (10), 245 (11), 519 (15), 868 (22), 436 (13), 689 (23). 
Thus it has swapped 436 (13) with 245 (11). 

Step 3: 710 (8), 316 (10), 245 (11), 436 (13), 868 (22), 519 (15), 689 (23). 
Thus it has swapped 436 (13) with 519 (15). 

Step 4: 710 (8), 316 (10), 245 (11), 436 (13), 519 (15), 868 (22), 689 (23). 
Thus it has swapped 519 (15) with 868 (22). 

We are given the result obtained in step 3rd. We can't go backward as there is no logic for processing backward.

Hence, option D is the correct answer. 

QUESTION: 75

Answer the questions based on the following information. 

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below.

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689 
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689 
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689 
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689 
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689 

Step 4 is the last step for the given input 

Q. What will be the third step for the following input? 
Input: 653, 963, 754, 345, 364, 861, 541

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

Answer the questions based on the following information :

Rahul is sales manager of XYZ Computers Ltd. and looks after Delhi market. The company sells laptops in India. He is currently trying to select a distributor for coming five years. The distributor ensures that the products are accessible to the customers in the market. Market share of a company depends on the coverage by the distributor. The total profit potential of the entire laptop market in Delhi is Rs. 5 crores in the current year and present value of next four years’ cumulative profit potential is Rs. 15 crores. The first choice for Rahul is to enter into long-term contract with a distributor M/s Jayshree with whom XYZ company has done business in the past, and whose distribution system reaches 55 percent of all potential customers. At the last moment, however, a colleague suggests Rahul to consider signing a oneyear contract with other distributors. Distributors M/s Bola and M/s James are willing to be partner with Dubin. Although a year ago M/s Bola’s and M/s James’s coverage reached only 40 and 25 percent of customers respectively, they claim to have invested heavily in distribution resources and now expect to be able to reach 60 percent and 75 percent of customers respectively. The probability of M/s Bola’s claim and M/s James’s claim to be true is 0.60 and 0.20 respectively. The knowledge about distributors’ coverage will evolve over time. The assumption is that the true level of coverage offered by the new distributors could be discovered, with certainty, through a one-year trail, and this trail will reveal exactly one of the two levels of coverage: for example in case of M/s Bola – 40 percent (as it was last year) or 60 percent (as claimed). In addition, it is also assumed that whatever the coverage is for both distributors, it will not change over time. Rahul narrows down on three choices, which are as follows:
Choice 1. Give a five year contract to the familiar distributor M/s Jayshree. 
Choice 2. Give a one year contract to the new distributor M/s Bola, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s Bola on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years' contract with M/s Jayshree. 
Choice 3. Give a one-year contract to the new distributor M/s James, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s James on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years contract with M/s Jayshree.. 

Q. The expected present value of the five years cumulative profit with choice 3 is: 

Solution:

We are left with 3 choices. 
Choice 1: 
The first choice is to give the contract to M/S Jayshree. In this case, we know that Jayshree's market reach is 55%. It has been given that the total profit potential is 5 crores in the present year and 15 crores in the next 4 years. Therefore, the expected value of profit earned for choice 1 is 0.55*(5+15) = Rs.11 crore.

Choice 2: 
Give the contract to M/s Bola for one year and based on the performance, renew the contract with him for the next 4 years or give M/S Jayshree the contract for the next 4 years.

Let us assume that M/S Bola retains the contract for all 5 years. Rahul will renew the contract only if M/S Bola's claim that their market reach is 60% is true. The probability of the claim being true is 0.6. 

Therefore, the EV of return if M/S Bola bags the contract for all 5 years = 0.6*0.6*(5+15) = Rs. 7.2 crores. 

Let us assume that M/S Bola's claim is false. The probability of the claim being false is 1-0.6 = 0.4. Now, if the claim is false, Rahul will terminate the contract by the end of the year and will partner with M/S Jayshree for the next 4 years. Also, we have historic data that M/S Bola reaches 40% of the customers. Even if the claim is false, the laptops will reach 40% of the customers in the first year and 55% of the customers from the second year (Since M/S Jayshree will bag the contract). 

Therefore, the EV of profit in this case is 0.4*0.4*5+0.4*0.55*15 = 0.8 + 3.3 = Rs.4.1 crores. Therefore, the total EV if M/S Bola bags the contract the first year is 7.2+4.1 = Rs.11.3 crores. 

Choice 3: 
Give the contract to M/s James for one year and based on the performance, renew the contract with him for the next 4 years or give M/S Jayshree the contract for the next 4 years. 

Let us assume that M/S James retains the contract for all 5 years. Rahul will renew the contract only if M/S Jame's claim that their market reach is 75% is true. The probability of the claim being true is 0.2. 

Therefore, the EV of return if M/S James bags the contract for all 5 years = 0.2*0.75*(5+15) = Rs. 3 crores. 

Let us assume that M/S James's claim is false. The probability of the claim being false is 1-0.2 = 0.8. 
Now, if the claim is false, Rahul will terminate the contract by the end of the year and will partner with M/S Jayshree for the next 4 years. Also, we have historic data that M/S James reaches 25% of the customers. Even if the claim is false, the laptops will reach 25% of the customers in the first year and 55% of the customers from the second year (Since M/S Jayshree will bag the contract). 
Therefore, the EV of profit in this case is 0.8*0.25*5+0.8*0.55*15 = 1 + 6.6 = Rs.7.6 crores. 

Therefore, the total EV if M/S Bola bags the contract the first year is 3+7.6 = Rs.10.6 crores. 

EV of choice 1 = Rs. 11 crores 
EV of choice 2 = Rs. 11.3 crores 
EV of choice 3 = Rs. 10.6 crores 

The expected value of choice 3 is Rs.10.6 crores. Therefore, option B is the right answer. 

QUESTION: 77

Answer the questions based on the following information :

Rahul is sales manager of XYZ Computers Ltd. and looks after Delhi market. The company sells laptops in India. He is currently trying to select a distributor for coming five years. The distributor ensures that the products are accessible to the customers in the market. Market share of a company depends on the coverage by the distributor. The total profit potential of the entire laptop market in Delhi is Rs. 5 crores in the current year and present value of next four years’ cumulative profit potential is Rs. 15 crores. The first choice for Rahul is to enter into long-term contract with a distributor M/s Jayshree with whom XYZ company has done business in the past, and whose distribution system reaches 55 percent of all potential customers. At the last moment, however, a colleague suggests Rahul to consider signing a oneyear contract with other distributors. Distributors M/s Bola and M/s James are willing to be partner with Dubin. Although a year ago M/s Bola’s and M/s James’s coverage reached only 40 and 25 percent of customers respectively, they claim to have invested heavily in distribution resources and now expect to be able to reach 60 percent and 75 percent of customers respectively. The probability of M/s Bola’s claim and M/s James’s claim to be true is 0.60 and 0.20 respectively. The knowledge about distributors’ coverage will evolve over time. The assumption is that the true level of coverage offered by the new distributors could be discovered, with certainty, through a one-year trail, and this trail will reveal exactly one of the two levels of coverage: for example in case of M/s Bola – 40 percent (as it was last year) or 60 percent (as claimed). In addition, it is also assumed that whatever the coverage is for both distributors, it will not change over time. Rahul narrows down on three choices, which are as follows:
Choice 1. Give a five year contract to the familiar distributor M/s Jayshree. 
Choice 2. Give a one year contract to the new distributor M/s Bola, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s Bola on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years' contract with M/s Jayshree. 
Choice 3. Give a one-year contract to the new distributor M/s James, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s James on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years contract with M/s Jayshree.. 

Q. Which of the following statements is TRUE? 

Solution:

We are left with 3 choices. 

Choice 1: 
The first choice is to give the contract to M/S Jayshree. In this case, we know that Jayshree's market reach is 55%. It has been given that the total profit potential is 5 crores in the present year and 15 crores in the next 4 years. 

Therefore, the expected value of profit earned for choice 1 is 0.55*(5+15) = Rs.11 crore. 

Choice 2: 
Give the contract to M/s Bola for one year and based on the performance, renew the contract with him for the next 4 years or give M/S Jayshree the contract for the next 4 years. 

Let us assume that M/S Bola retains the contract for all 5 years. Rahul will renew the contract only if M/S Bola's claim that their market reach is 60% is true. The probability of the claim being true is 0.6. 

Therefore, the EV of return if M/S Bola bags the contract for all 5 years = 0.6*0.6*(5+15) = Rs. 7.2 crores. 

Let us assume that M/S Bola's claim is false. The probability of the claim being false is 1-0.6 = 0.4. 
Now, if the claim is false, Rahul will terminate the contract by the end of the year and will partner with M/S Jayshree for the next 4 years. Also, we have historic data that M/S Bola reaches 40% of the customers. Even if the claim is false, the laptops will reach 40% of the customers in the first year and 55% of the customers from the second year (Since M/S Jayshree will bag the contract). 

Therefore, the EV of profit in this case is 0.4*0.4*5+0.4*0.55*15 = 0.8 + 3.3 = Rs.4.1 crores. 
Therefore, the total EV if M/S Bola bags the contract the first year is 7.2+4.1 = Rs.11.3 crores. 

Choice 3:
Give the contract to M/s James for one year and based on the performance, renew the contract with him for the next 4 years or give M/S Jayshree the contract for the next 4 years. 
Let us assume that M/S James retains the contract for all 5 years. Rahul will renew the contract only if M/S Jame's claim that their market reach is 75% is true. The probability of the claim being true is 0.2. 

Therefore, the EV of return if M/S James bags the contract for all 5 years = 0.2*0.75*(5+15) = Rs. 3 crores. 

Let us assume that M/S James's claim is false. The probability of the claim being false is 1-0.2 = 0.8. Now, if the claim is false, Rahul will terminate the contract by the end of the year and will partner with M/S Jayshree for the next 4 years. Also, we have historic data that M/S James reaches 25% of the customers. Even if the claim is false, the laptops will reach 25% of the customers in the first year and 55% of the customers from the second year (Since M/S Jayshree will bag the contract). 

Therefore, the EV of profit in this case is 0.8*0.25*5+0.8*0.55*15 = 1 + 6.6 = Rs.7.6 crores.

Therefore, the total EV if M/S Bola bags the contract the first year is 3+7.6 = Rs.10.6 crores. 

EV of choice 1 = Rs. 11 crores 
EV of choice 2 = Rs. 11.3 crores 
EV of choice 3 = Rs. 10.6 crores 

Arranging the choices in terms of their EV, we get, Choice 2 > Choice 1 > Choice 3. 

Option A: 
Choice 1 is more profitable than Choice 2 

Option B: 
Choice 3 is more profitable than Choice 2 

Option C: 
Choice 3 is more profitable than Choice 1 

As we can see, all three options are false.
Therefore, option D is the right answer. 

QUESTION: 78

Answer the questions based on the following information :

Rahul is sales manager of XYZ Computers Ltd. and looks after Delhi market. The company sells laptops in India. He is currently trying to select a distributor for coming five years. The distributor ensures that the products are accessible to the customers in the market. Market share of a company depends on the coverage by the distributor. The total profit potential of the entire laptop market in Delhi is Rs. 5 crores in the current year and present value of next four years’ cumulative profit potential is Rs. 15 crores. The first choice for Rahul is to enter into long-term contract with a distributor M/s Jayshree with whom XYZ company has done business in the past, and whose distribution system reaches 55 percent of all potential customers. At the last moment, however, a colleague suggests Rahul to consider signing a oneyear contract with other distributors. Distributors M/s Bola and M/s James are willing to be partner with Dubin. Although a year ago M/s Bola’s and M/s James’s coverage reached only 40 and 25 percent of customers respectively, they claim to have invested heavily in distribution resources and now expect to be able to reach 60 percent and 75 percent of customers respectively. The probability of M/s Bola’s claim and M/s James’s claim to be true is 0.60 and 0.20 respectively. The knowledge about distributors’ coverage will evolve over time. The assumption is that the true level of coverage offered by the new distributors could be discovered, with certainty, through a one-year trail, and this trail will reveal exactly one of the two levels of coverage: for example in case of M/s Bola – 40 percent (as it was last year) or 60 percent (as claimed). In addition, it is also assumed that whatever the coverage is for both distributors, it will not change over time. Rahul narrows down on three choices, which are as follows:
Choice 1. Give a five year contract to the familiar distributor M/s Jayshree. 
Choice 2. Give a one year contract to the new distributor M/s Bola, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s Bola on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years' contract with M/s Jayshree. 
Choice 3. Give a one-year contract to the new distributor M/s James, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s James on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years contract with M/s Jayshree.. 

Q. If the distributor M/s James claims a coverage of 55% instead of 75% and probability of this claim to be true is 0.70 instead of 0.20 then which of the following statement is true? 

Solution:

We are left with 3 choices. 

Choice 1: 
The first choice is to give the contract to M/S Jayshree. In this case, we know that Jayshree's market reach is 55%. It has been given that the total profit potential is 5 crores in the present year and 15 crores in the next 4 years. Therefore, the expected value of profit earned for choice 1 is 0.55*(5+15) = Rs.11 crore. 

Choice 2: 
Give the contract to M/s Bola for one year and based on the performance, renew the contract with him for the next 4 years or give M/S Jayshree the contract for the next 4 years. 

Let us assume that M/S Bola retains the contract for all 5 years. Rahul will renew the contract only if M/S Bola's claim that their market reach is 60% is true. The probability of the claim being true is 0.6. 

Therefore, the EV of return if M/S Bola bags the contract for all 5 years = 0.6*0.6*(5+15) = Rs. 7.2 crores. 

Let us assume that M/S Bola's claim is false. The probability of the claim being false is 1-0.6 = 0.4. Now, if the claim is false, Rahul will terminate the contract by the end of the year and will partner with M/S Jayshree for the next 4 years. Also, we have historic data that M/S Bola reaches 40% of the customers. Even if the claim is false, the laptops will reach 40% of the customers in the first year and 55% of the customers from the second year (Since M/S Jayshree will bag the contract). 

Therefore, the EV of profit in this case is 0.4*0.4*5+0.4*0.55*15 = 0.8 + 3.3 = Rs.4.1 crores. 

Therefore, the total EV if M/S Bola bags the contract the first year is 7.2+4.1 = Rs.11.3 crores. 

It has been given in this question that M/S James claims a coverage of 55% and the probability of this being true is 0.7. 

Choice 3: 
Give the contract to M/s James for one year and based on the performance, renew the contract with him for the next 4 years or give M/S Jayshree the contract for the next 4 years. 

Let us assume that M/S James retains the contract for all 5 years. Rahul will renew the contract only if M/S Jame's claim that their market reach is 55% is true. The probability of the claim being true is 0.7. 

Therefore, the EV of return if M/S James bags the contract for all 5 years = 0.7*0.55*(5+15) = Rs. 7.7 crores. 

Let us assume that M/S James's claim is false. The probability of the claim being false is 1-0.7 = 0.3. 
Now, if the claim is false, Rahul will terminate the contract by the end of the year and will partner with M/S Jayshree for the next 4 years. Also, we have historic data that M/S James reaches 25% of the customers. Even if the claim is false, the laptops will reach 25% of the customers in the first year and 55% of the customers from the second year (Since M/S Jayshree will bag the contract). 

Therefore, the EV of profit in this case is 0.3*0.25*5+0.3*0.55*15 = 0.375 + 2.475 = Rs.2.85 crores.
Therefore, the total EV if M/S Bola bags the contract the first year is 7.7+2.85 = Rs.10.55 crores. 

EV of choice 1 = Rs. 11 crores 
EV of choice 2 = Rs. 11.3 crores 
EV of choice 3 = Rs. 10.55 crores 

Arranging the choices by EV, we get, Choice 2 > Choice 1 > Choice 3. 
Choice 2 is more profitable than choice 3. Therefore, option B is true and hence, option B is the right answer.

QUESTION: 79

Read the following information on  Mergers & Acquisitions in India (2001-02 to 2006-07)' given in Tables below and answer the questions.

Table 1 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers & Acquisitions

Table 2 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers'

What is the approximate proportion of 'mergers' to 'acquisitions' for the entire period (2001-02 to 2006-07)?

Solution:

Total no of merger for entire period = 1499
Total no of merger and acquisition = 5646

No of acquisition = 5646 – 1499 = 4197.
Percentage of merger to acquisition
= 1499/4147* 100 = 36.15%

QUESTION: 80

Read the following information on  Mergers & Acquisitions in India (2001-02 to 2006-07)' given in Tables below and answer the questions.

Table 1 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers & Acquisitions

Table 2 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers'

Q. For how many sectors is the proportion of 'mergers' to 'mergers & acquisitions' greater than 20% for the entire period(2001-02 to 2006-07)?

Solution:

So 5 sectors are more than 20% in proportion of mergers to mergers and acquisitions.

QUESTION: 81

Read the following information on  Mergers & Acquisitions in India (2001-02 to 2006-07)' given in Tables below and answer the questions.

Table 1 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers & Acquisitions

Table 2 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers'

Q. For how many sectors merger activity (measured by number of mergers) is more in the first 3 years as compared to thelast 3 years?

Solution:

It is clear from the table given on previous question, 5 sectors i.e. food & Beverage, IT & Telecom, Diversified, Financial services and other services have more mergers in first 3 years as compared to the last 3 years.

QUESTION: 82

Read the following information on  Mergers & Acquisitions in India (2001-02 to 2006-07)' given in Tables below and answer the questions.

Table 1 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers & Acquisitions

Table 2 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers'

Q. If the turbulence over a period is defined by the sum of each of the differences (in absolute terms) in number of mergersand acquisitions on a year-on-year basis, then which sector is considered most turbulent for the entire period (2001-02to 2006-07)?

Solution:

Turbulence = sum of differences (in absolute terms)

So from the table it is clear that 'other services' can be considered as the most turbulent for the entire period.

QUESTION: 83

Read the following information on  Mergers & Acquisitions in India (2001-02 to 2006-07)' given in Tables below and answer the questions.

Table 1 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers & Acquisitions

Table 2 : Sector wise Number of 'Mergers'

Q. In which year maximum sectors have exhibited higher numberof acquisitions compared to previous year?

Solution:

The table given below shows sector which exhibited higher number of acquisitions as compared to previous years.

So in the year 2005-06 maximum acquisition were there.

QUESTION: 84

Given below are the shares of sectoral FDI inflow to India in different years (figures in percentage). Answer the questions on the basis of following data.

Q. Among the four sectors mentioned below, the increase in share of FDI inflow between the terminal years 2007 and 2012 has been HIGHEST for

Solution:

The increase in share of FDI inflow between the terminal years 2007 ad 2012 of the given sectors are : 
Services sector : 2.6

Construction Development: 2.9
Automobile Industry : 3
Power : 1.9

Therefore, it is the highest for the Automobile Industry.

QUESTION: 85

Given below are the shares of sectoral FDI inflow to India in different years (figures in percentage). Answer the questions on the basis of following data.

Q. Over 2007 to 2012, the simple average share of FDI inflows has been SECOND LOWEST for

Solution:

Since the average share for each sector is to be calculated over the same period, the sector with the highest FDI inflow over the given period will also have the highest average. The actual average need not to be found.
The share of total FDI inflows from the period 2007 to 2012 for the given sectors is:

Chemicals (other than Fertilizers): 25.1 
Automobile Industry: 23.7
Metallurgical Industries: 25.3
Hotel and Tourism: 25.0

Thus the share has been second lowest for the chemicals (other than Fertilizers)

QUESTION: 86

Given below are the shares of sectoral FDI inflow to India in different years (figures in percentage). Answer the questions on the basis of following data.

Q. Identify the FALSE Statement from the following sentences

Solution:

It can be verified from the table that options a, b and 3 are true.
Option: d is false. The percentage share of FDI inflow from 2007 to 2010 in Chemicals (other than Fertilizers) does not show a continuous increase.
It shows (a) decline in 2009.

QUESTION: 87

Given below are the shares of sectoral FDI inflow to India in different years (figures in percentage). Answer the questions on the basis of following data.

Q. Identify the TRUE alternative from the given options based on the following statements

(i) In 2011, the construction development sector was ranked fifth in terms of percentage share of FDI inflow in the country
(ii) In 2009, the Computer Software and Hardware sector was ranked sixth in terms of percentage share of FDI inflow in the country
(iii) In 2012, the drugs and pharmaceuticals sector was ranked fourth lowest from the bottom in terms of percentage share of FDI inflow in the country

Solution:

Statements (ii) is true.

In 2011, the construction development sector was ranked fourth not fifth in terms of percentage share of
FDI inflow. Hence statement (i) is false.
In 2012, the Drugs and Pharmaceuticals sector was ranked 3rd lowest from the bottom in terms of percentage of FDI inflow in the country.
Hence, statement (iii) is false

QUESTION: 88

Given below are the shares of sectoral FDI inflow to India in different years (figures in percentage). Answer the questions on the basis of following data.

Q. Mark the HIGHEST figure among the following options

Solution:

Increase in FDI inflow percentage share for different sectors is as follows:
Telecommunications between 2007 and 2008: 2.8.
Computer Software and Hardware between 2009 and 2010: 2.2
Automobile between 2011 and 2012: 2.4
Power between 2007 and 2008: 2.6
The highest figure is 2.8.

QUESTION: 89

Answer the questions on the basis of the information given below.

Each of the six siblings namely Aashu, Debu, Priya, Sonia, Anjana and Divya are asked to choose three sports out of six different sports namely Curling, Fencing, Judo, Boxing, Wrestling and Volleyball. The number of siblings who chose Curling, Fencing, Judo, Boxing, Wrestling and Volleyball are denoted by C, F, J, B, W and V respectively. The following bar – graph gives the values of C, F, J, B and V.
Additional Information Given 
 
I. Debu has chosen exactly one sport, which Anjana did not choose. 
II. There are exactly two sports that have been chosen by Aashu as well as Priya and there are exactly three sports that have not been chosen by Priya as well as Divya. 
III. Divya chose Curling and Wrestling and Anjana did not choose Boxing.

Q. What is the value of (6 – W)?

Solution:

It is clear that C + F + J + B + W + V = 18 Also, from the bar – graph, the value of C, F, B, J and V is 3, 2, 5, 2 and 4 respectively. Therefore, W = 18 – (3 + 2 + 5 + 2 + 4) = 2.

Since, the number of siblings who chose Boxing is 5 and there are exactly three sports that have not been chosen by Priya as well as Divya (Additional information II), therefore, Priya as well as Divya chose Boxing. Also, form additional information II, Priya and Aashu chose Curling and Wrestling.

Since, the number of siblings who chose Volleyball is 4, therefore except for Divya and Aashu, every other sibling chose Volleyball. Since, Anjana did not choose Boxing and there is one sport that has not been chosen by Anjana but is chosen by Debu, therefore that sport is Boxing.

Also, the three sports chosen by Anjana are Fencing, Judo and Volleyball.

The value of 6 –W = 6 – 2 = 4.

QUESTION: 90

Answer the questions on the basis of the information given below.

Each of the six siblings namely Aashu, Debu, Priya, Sonia, Anjana and Divya are asked to choose three sports out of six different sports namely Curling, Fencing, Judo, Boxing, Wrestling and Volleyball. The number of siblings who chose Curling, Fencing, Judo, Boxing, Wrestling and Volleyball are denoted by C, F, J, B, W and V respectively. The following bar – graph gives the values of C, F, J, B and V.
Additional Information Given 
 
I. Debu has chosen exactly one sport, which Anjana did not choose. 
II. There are exactly two sports that have been chosen by Aashu as well as Priya and there are exactly three sports that have not been chosen by Priya as well as Divya. 
III. Divya chose Curling and Wrestling and Anjana did not choose Boxing.

Q. Which of the following siblings did not play Volleyball? 

Solution:

It is clear that C + F + J + B + W + V = 18 Also, from the bar – graph, the value of C, F, B, J and V is 3, 2, 5, 2 and 4 respectively.

Therefore, W = 18 – (3 + 2 + 5 + 2 + 4) = 2.

Since, the number of siblings who chose Boxing is 5 and there are exactly three sports that have not been chosen by Priya as well as Divya (Additional information II), therefore, Priya as well as Divya chose Boxing.

Also, form additional information II, Priya and Aashu chose Curling and Wrestling.

Since, the number of siblings who chose Volleyball is 4, therefore except for Divya and Aashu, every other sibling chose Volleyball.

Since, Anjana did not choose Boxing and there is one sport that has not been chosen by Anjana but is chosen by Debu, therefore that sport is Boxing.

Also, the three sports chosen by Anjana are Fencing, Judo and Volleyball.

Hence , Priya did not play Volleyball.

QUESTION: 91

Driven by Passion is the punchline of which company ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

Name the first state in India which passed a resolution to scrap CAA ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

Lai Haroaba festival is celebrated in which state ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

Name the first country which ban sun cream which is harmful to corals ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

Name the fastest Indian cricketer to take 100 wickets in One day international ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

Who is the CEO of IBM ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

First confirmed case of Corona was reported by which state ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

The Head Quarter of International Criminal Court  is located in which City?

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

Who won the Australian open Tennis tournament in the year 2020?

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

Vat Phou is the UNESCO world heritage site located in which country?

Solution:
QUESTION: 101

What is the name given by WHO to corona virus?

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

Harike wetland is located in which state?

Solution:
QUESTION: 103

What is the capital and currency of Malawi?

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

Who becomes the 1st ever women to reach deepest point of ocean, the Challenger deep?

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

Find the PSU which is 1st in construction sector to become fully digital?

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

Which is the 3rd largest speaking language of world?

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

Lonar Lake which is in news recently is located in which state?

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

May 28th is observed as ?

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QUESTION: 109

Ghumura is folk dance in which state?

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QUESTION: 110

Toman is the new currency of ?

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