IIFT Mock Test - 6


122 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | IIFT Mock Test - 6


Description
This mock test of IIFT Mock Test - 6 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 122 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT IIFT Mock Test - 6 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IIFT Mock Test - 6 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this IIFT Mock Test - 6 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IIFT Mock Test - 6 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A drug manufacturing company presents the data on manufacturing of four new types of drugs that it started manufacturing in 2015. The first table shows the breakup of the manufacturing in each month (in thousand units) and the second table shows the share of the types of drugs being manufactured in each quarter as a percentage of the total manufactured drugs for that quarter.

Some parameters have been defined as under:

Quarter production efficiency = (Average monthly production of the drug in the quarter - Total average monthly production)/ Total average monthly production

Quarter comparison ratio = (Average monthly production of the drug in a quarter) / (Average monthly production of the drug in other quarter)

Quarter percent = (The total production in a quarter / Total production) x 100

Which of the following drug types has the lowest per month average production?

 

Solution:

Consider the total drug production (in thousands) for each quarter.

Jan-Feb-Mar = 18 + 20 + 15 = 53; Apr-May-Jun = 17 + 19 + 15 = 51; Jul-Aug-Sep = 13 + 15 + 16 = 44; Oct-Nov-Dec = 19 + 18 + 15 = 52

The average monthly production for any drug type will be the weighted average of the total drug production.

For Pain Killers, total production = (27% of 53) + (45% of 51) + (34% of 44) + (31 % of 52)

= 14.31 + 22.95 + 14.96 + 16.12 = 68.34

Average monthly production of pain killers (in thousands)

= 68.34/12 = 5.695

Similarly, for Antibiotics, total production = (28% of 53) + (25% of 51) + (14% of 44) + (21 % of 52)

= 14.84 + 12.75 + 6.16 + 10.92 = 44.67

Average monthly production of antibiotics (in thousands) = 44.67/12 = 3.7225

For Vitamins, total production = (23% of 53) + (16% of 51) + (25% of 44) + (23% of 52)

= 12.19 + 8.16+ 11 + 11.96 = 43.31

Average monthly production of vitamins (in thousands) = 43.31/12 = 3.609

For Probiotic Capsules, total production = (22% of 53) + (14% of 51) + (27% of 44) + (25% of 52)

= 11.66 + 7.14 + 11.88 + 13 = 43.68

Average monthly production of probiotic capsules (in thousands) = 43.68/12 = 3.64

Thus, the least per month average production is for vitamins.

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 2

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A drug manufacturing company presents the data on manufacturing of four new types of drugs that it started manufacturing in 2015. The first table shows the breakup of the manufacturing in each month (in thousand units) and the second table shows the share of the types of drugs being manufactured in each quarter as a percentage of the total manufactured drugs for that quarter.

Some parameters have been defined as under:

Quarter production efficiency = (Average monthly production of the drug in the quarter - Total average monthly production)/ Total average monthly production

Quarter comparison ratio = (Average monthly production of the drug in a quarter) / (Average monthly production of the drug in other quarter)

Quarter percent = (The total production in a quarter / Total production) x 100

Q.

Which drug shows the highest change in production from any one quarter to the next?

Solution:

Consider the total drug production (in thousands) for each quarter.

Jan-Feb-Mar = 18 + 20 + 15 = 53; Apr-May-Jun = 17 + 19 + 15 = 51; Jul-Aug-Sep = 13 + 15 + 16 = 44; Oct-Nov-Dec = 19 + 18 + 15 = 52

The average monthly production for any drug type will be the weighted average of the total drug production.

For Pain Killers, total production = (27% of 53) + (45% of 51) + (34% of 44) + (31 % of 52)

= 14.31 + 22.95 + 14.96 + 16.12 = 68.34

Average monthly production of pain killers (in thousands)

= 68.34/12 = 5.695

Similarly, for Antibiotics, total production = (28% of 53) + (25% of 51) + (14% of 44) + (21 % of 52)

= 14.84 + 12.75 + 6.16 + 10.92 = 44.67

Average monthly production of antibiotics (in thousands) = 44.67/12 = 3.7225

For Vitamins, total production = (23% of 53) + (16% of 51) + (25% of 44) + (23% of 52)

= 12.19 + 8.16+ 11 + 11.96 = 43.31

Average monthly production of vitamins (in thousands) = 43.31/12 = 3.609

For Probiotic Capsules, total production = (22% of 53) + (14% of 51) + (27% of 44) + (25% of 52)

= 11.66 + 7.14 + 11.88 + 13 = 43.68

Average monthly production of probiotic capsules (in thousands) = 43.68/12 = 3.64

Thus, the least per month average production is for vitamins.

Consider each type of medicine at a time and try to identify the highest percentage change by observation (as far as possible).

Pain Killer:

Consider the actual change in each quarter: Apr-Jun = 22.95 - 14.31 = 8.64, Jul-Sep = 7.99 and Oct-Dec =1.16

Observe that the actual change in Apr-Jun and Jul-Sep is nearly the same, but the base is smaller for Apr-Jun (14.31) compared to Jul-Sep (22.95).

Hence, the % change in Apr-Jun > % change in Jul-Sep

Similarly, observe that the base value in Jan-Mar and Jul- Sep is nearly same but the actual change is much higher in Apr-Jun (8.64) compared to Oct-Dec (1.16)

Hence, the % change in Apr-Jun > % change in Oct-Dec

Hence, just calculate the % change for Apr-Jun

% change = (8.64/14.31) * 100 = 60.38% (This is the highest quarter-on-quarter % change for pain killer).

Use this 60% as a reference for the next type of medicine.

Antibiotics:

Actual change in each quarter: Apr-Jun = 2.09, Jul-Sep =

6.59 and Oct-Dec = 4.76

Apr-Jun for Antibiotics has similar figures as Oct-Dec for

Pain Killers. Hence, it is definitely less than 60%.

The figures for Jul-Sep for painkillers become nearly half of figures in Apr-Jun. Hence, this is approximately a 50% change.

Hence, just check for Oct-Dec

% change = (4.76/6.16) x 100 = 77.27%

Now you can verify that no other drug in any quarter has such a high growth.

Hence, option 2.

Note: One way to verify this is to apply a 78% growth to each quarter i.e. where there is an increase, multiply by 1.78 and where there is a decrease, multiple by 0.22.

e.g. For Vitamins, Apr-Jun = 8.16. Now, 8.16 x 1.78 = 14.52. Since July-Sep value (i.e. 11) < 14.52, the growth is less than 78%

Similarly, for For Vitamins, Jan-Mar = 12.19. Now, 12.19 x 0.22 = 2.68. Since Apr-Jun value (8.16) > 2.68, the decrease is less than 78%.

QUESTION: 3

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A drug manufacturing company presents the data on manufacturing of four new types of drugs that it started manufacturing in 2015. The first table shows the breakup of the manufacturing in each month (in thousand units) and the second table shows the share of the types of drugs being manufactured in each quarter as a percentage of the total manufactured drugs for that quarter.

Some parameters have been defined as under:

Quarter production efficiency = (Average monthly production of the drug in the quarter - Total average monthly production)/ Total average monthly production

Quarter comparison ratio = (Average monthly production of the drug in a quarter) / (Average monthly production of the drug in other quarter)

Quarter percent = (The total production in a quarter / Total production) x 100

Q.

Which drug has the highest quarter production efficiency, in any given quarter?

 

Solution:

Quarter production efficiency = (Average monthly production in that quarter - Total average monthly production)/Total average monthly production

Total average monthly production for each type of drug has been found in one of the earlier solutions:

Pain Killers = 5.69, Antibiotics = 3.72, Vitamins = 3.61 and Probiotic Capsules = 3.64

Hence, for any given drug, quarter production efficiency will be the highest when its quarterly manfacturing is highest. Hence, instead of finding quarterly efficiency of each drug for each quarter, find it for each drug only for its highest manufacturing quarter.

Pain Killers (Apr-Jun) = 22.95/3 = 7.65

Quarter efficiency = [(7.65 - 5.69)/5.69] x 100 =

(1.96/5.69) x 100 = 34.45%

Antibiotics (Jan-Mar) = 14.84/3 = 4.95

Quarter efficiency = [(4.95 - 3.72)/3.72] x 100 =

(1.23/3.72) x 100 = 33.06%

Vitamins (Jan-Mar) = 12.19/3 = 4.06

Quarter efficiency = [(4.06 - 3.61 )/3.61 ] x 100 = (0.45/3.61) x 100 = 12.47%

Probiotic Capsules (Oct-Dec) = 13/3 = 4.33

Quarter efficiency = [(4.33 - 3.64)/3.64] x 100 = (0.69/3.64) x 100 = 18.97%

Hence, the highest quarter production efficiency is for Pain Killers in Apr-Jun

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 4

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A drug manufacturing company presents the data on manufacturing of four new types of drugs that it started manufacturing in 2015. The first table shows the breakup of the manufacturing in each month (in thousand units) and the second table shows the share of the types of drugs being manufactured in each quarter as a percentage of the total manufactured drugs for that quarter.

Some parameters have been defined as under:

Quarter production efficiency = (Average monthly production of the drug in the quarter - Total average monthly production)/ Total average monthly production

Quarter comparison ratio = (Average monthly production of the drug in a quarter) / (Average monthly production of the drug in other quarter)

Quarter percent = (The total production in a quarter / Total production) x 100

Q.

Which quarter has the second highest quarter percent?

Solution:

Quarter percent = total production for a quarter/total production for the year.

Total production for each quarter is independent of medicine type and has been found for each quarter:

Jan-Mar = 53; Apr-Jun = 51; Jul-Sep = 44; Oct-Dec = 52

Since the total annual production is same in all four calculations, the quarter with the highest production (i.e. 53) will have the highest quarter percent.

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 5

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A drug manufacturing company presents the data on manufacturing of four new types of drugs that it started manufacturing in 2015. The first table shows the breakup of the manufacturing in each month (in thousand units) and the second table shows the share of the types of drugs being manufactured in each quarter as a percentage of the total manufactured drugs for that quarter.

Some parameters have been defined as under:

Quarter production efficiency = (Average monthly production of the drug in the quarter - Total average monthly production)/ Total average monthly production

Quarter comparison ratio = (Average monthly production of the drug in a quarter) / (Average monthly production of the drug in other quarter)

Quarter percent = (The total production in a quarter / Total production) x 100

Q.

The quarter comparison ratio for Vitamins is the least for which of the following two quarters?

Solution:

Solve this option by option.

Since each quarter has the same number of months, ratio of average monthly production per quarter is the same as ratio of total production of that type per quarter.

Option 1: Jan-Mar & Jul-Sep = 12.19/11 >1

Option 2: Apr-Jun & Jan-Mar = 8.16/12.19 < 1

Option 3: Jul-Sep & Apr-Jun = 11/8.16 > 1

Opion 4: Jul-Sep & Jan-Mar = 11/12.19 < 1

Since the least value is required, options 1 and 3 are eliminated.

In options 2 and 4, the denominator is the same while option has the smaller numerator.

Hence, the value in option 2 is the smallest.

Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 6

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The chart below shows the break-up of the total salary expenditure of a company in 2011-12 in its five departments. There are no other departments in this company. The total salary paid out is Rs. 1,200 lakh.

The chart below shows the highest salary for any employee and average salary per employee for each department in 2011-12. All figures in the chart are in Rs. lakhs.


The chart below shows the contribution of salary expenditure to total expenditure for some fiscal years.

Q.

What could be the maximum number of people in the M&A department that earn the highest possible salary package for that department?

Solution:

Total salary paid out in M&A department = (60/360) * 1200 = Rs. 200 lakhs.

The maximum possible salary that a person can get in M7A = Rs. 35 lakhs.

200 = 35(5) + 25

Hence, a maximum of 5 people can get the maximum possible salary in M&A.

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 7

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The chart below shows the break-up of the total salary expenditure of a company in 2011-12 in its five departments. There are no other departments in this company. The total salary paid out is Rs. 1,200 lakh.

The chart below shows the highest salary for any employee and average salary per employee for each department in 2011-12. All figures in the chart are in Rs. lakhs.


The chart below shows the contribution of salary expenditure to total expenditure for some fiscal years.

Q.

The expenditure on salaries for the HR department is the same in 2010-11 and 2011-12. The salary expenditure on HR in 2010-11 forms what percentage of the total expenditure of the company in that fiscal?

Solution:

The salary expenditure on HR can be found for 2010-11. However, the total expenditure of the company is not known for 2010-11.

Hence, the required percentage cannot be found.

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 8

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The chart below shows the break-up of the total salary expenditure of a company in 2011-12 in its five departments. There are no other departments in this company. The total salary paid out is Rs. 1,200 lakh.

The chart below shows the highest salary for any employee and average salary per employee for each department in 2011-12. All figures in the chart are in Rs. lakhs.


The chart below shows the contribution of salary expenditure to total expenditure for some fiscal years.

Q.

What is the total expenditure of the company per employee for the year 2011-12 (in Rs. lakhs)?

Solution:

Total salary expenditure in 2011-12 (Rs. 1,200 lakhs) is 25% of the total expenditure of the company for that fiscal.

Total expenditure of the company in 2011-12 = 1200/0.25 = Rs. 4,800 lakhs.

Total salary expenditure on HR = (90/360) * 1200 = Rs. 300 lakhs

Average salary expenditure per employee in HR = Rs. 1 lakh

Number of employees in HR = 300/1 = 300

Similarly, find for each department.

Finance: Total = (60/360) * 1200 = Rs. 200 lakhs and average = Rs. 0.8 lakhs

Number of employees = 200/0.8 = 250

M & A: Total = (60/360) * 1200 = Rs. 200 lakhs and average = Rs. 1.6 lakhs

Number of employees = 200/1.6 = 125

IT: Total = (30/360) * 1200 = Rs. 100 lakhs and average = Rs. 0.5 lakhs

Number of employees = 100/0.5 = 200

Marketing: Total = (120/360) x 1200 = Rs. 400 lakhs and average = Rs. 2 lakhs

Number of employees = 400/2 = 200

Total employees = 300 + 250 + 125 + 200 + 200 = 1075

Average expenses per employee = 4800/1075 = Rs. 4.465 lakhs

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 9

Answer the following question based on the information given below.
The chart below shows the break-up of the total salary expenditure of a company in 2011-12 in its five departments. There are no other departments in this company. The total salary paid out is Rs. 1,200 lakh.

The chart below shows the highest salary for any employee and average salary per employee for each department in 2011-12. All figures in the chart are in Rs. lakhs.


The chart below shows the contribution of salary expenditure to total expenditure for some fiscal years.

Q.

If the income has constant income as well as constant expenditure on salary each year, which year is the most profitable?

Solution:

Since the income is constant, the year with least total expenditure will be most profitable.

Since salary expenditure is constant, the year in which it contributes the most (in %) to total expenditure, will have least total expenditure.

Since the percentage contribution of salary to total expenditure is most in 2010-11 (40%), this year has the least total expenditure, and hence, the highest profitability.

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 10

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A telecom company - XYZ - recently conducted a market survey over three years which asked people to rate their company on different parameters. The data obtained was then put in a chart as shown below:

Q.

 If the final rating of a parameter is given by (0.714 x Rating of 2015) + (0.571 x Rating of 2014) + (0.362 x Rating of 2013), which of these parameters will have the best final rating?

Solution:

Connectivity: (0.714)(3.8) + (0.571 )(3.2) + (0.362)(4.7) = 2.698 + 1.8272 + 1.7014 = 6.2266

Call-drop: (0.714)(3) + (0.571 )(4.2) + (0.362)(5) = 2.142 + 2.3982 + 1.81 =6.3502

Tariffs: (0.714)(5) + (0.571 )(4.5) + (0.362)(3.8) = 3.57 + 2.5695 + 1.3756 = 7.5151

Offers: (0.714)(3.1) + (0.571 )(4.8) + (0.362)(5.2) = 2.2134 + 2.7408 + 1.8824 = 6.8336

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 11

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A telecom company - XYZ - recently conducted a market survey over three years which asked people to rate their company on different parameters. The data obtained was then put in a chart as shown below:

Q.

Rating Performance is measured as

Which of these parameters has the highest rating performance?

Solution:

Some options can be eliminated by observation.

Tariffs and SMS delivery will have negative rating performances since their 2014 value is greater than their 2015 value.

Call-drop: (5 - 3)/4.2 = 2/4.2 = 0.48 Internet: (5.4 - 3.2)/3.8 = 2.2/3.8 = 0.58 Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 12

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A telecom company - XYZ - recently conducted a market survey over three years which asked people to rate their company on different parameters. The data obtained was then put in a chart as shown below:

Q.

Which of these has the highest growth in rating from 2013 to 2015?

Solution:

SMS Delivery has grown by 0% while Tariffs has negative growth.

Hence, options 1 and 2 can be eliminated.

By observation, Emerging Tech has higher growth than Connectivity.

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 13

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

A telecom company - XYZ - recently conducted a market survey over three years which asked people to rate their company on different parameters. The data obtained was then put in a chart as shown below:

Q.

 

Which of these parameters has the highest average yearly rating?

Solution:

Add-On Services: 4.1 + 3.4 + 4.8 = 12.3 Tariffs: 5+ 4.4+ 3.8 =13.2 SMS Delivery: 4 + 4.5 + 4 = 12.5 Internet: 3.2 + 3.9 + 5.4 = 12.5 Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 14

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

To assess the quality of education that was being imparted by the local schools in the state, the education ministry had assigned the project to an external research agency to find out the details of the students who had passed in the recently held state wide examinations.

The survey was carried out across Class VIII, Class IX and Class X students of the state. To speed up the survey, the areas from where these students came were categorized into three zones: Zone A, Zone B and Zone C. The number of students sampled in each zone was 1000. The survey form was a simple four question paper in which the participant had to fill in the answer applicable to him.

The questions asked were:

Did you pass in Class VIII?

Did you pass in Class IX?

Did you pass in Class X?

Have you failed in your examination?

The answers to all the questions were to be in either YES or NO. There was no other answer possible.

The survey report was presented in the following format. The percentages as shown mean the percentage of students who answered YES to that particular question.

In the above charts, only the creator of the questionnaire knew what the options A, B, C and D meant.

In Zone C, he knew from looking at the above charts that 220 students of all the participants in the survey had failed in the examination. And further more, in all the three zones put together, the difference between the number of students who had passed in Class IX and those who had passed in Class X was 100.

Q.

If in Zone A where the number of students who had passed in  Class VIII was minimum possible, then which of the following statements can be definitely concluded?

a.    The maximum number of students had passed in Class IX in Zone B.

b.     The minimum number of students had passed in Class X in Zone B.

c.     The minimum number of students had passed in Class X in Zone C.

d.    The maximum number of students had passed in Class IX in Zone A.

e.    The minimum number of students had failed in all classes put together in Zone A.

Solution:

Tabulating the data from the chart we have the following data table:

Now since we have that 220 students of all the participants in the survey had failed in the examination. And further more, in all the three zones put together, the difference between the
number of students who had passed in Class IX and that in Class X was 100.

This would hold good only for the following cases:

Since in Zone A where the number of students who had passed in Class VIII was minimum possible, then selection of Option A in the survey form would have indicated that the participant had passed in Class VIII since this is the least number. According to either of the case 3 or 4, this could be true and the two classes i.e. IX and X should be indicated by either B or C but their exact order cannot be concluded. Further selection of option C in the survey form indicated that the students have failed in all the three classes in that zone. Hence none of the statements except e can be concluded.

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 15

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

To assess the quality of education that was being imparted by the local schools in the state, the education ministry had assigned the project to an external research agency to find out the details of the students who had passed in the recently held state wide examinations.

The survey was carried out across Class VIII, Class IX and Class X students of the state. To speed up the survey, the areas from where these students came were categorized into three zones: Zone A, Zone B and Zone C. The number of students sampled in each zone was 1000. The survey form was a simple four question paper in which the participant had to fill in the answer applicable to him.

The questions asked were:

Did you pass in Class VIII?

Did you pass in Class IX?

Did you pass in Class X?

Have you failed in your examination?

The answers to all the questions were to be in either YES or NO. There was no other answer possible.

The survey report was presented in the following format. The percentages as shown mean the percentage of students who answered YES to that particular question.

In the above charts, only the creator of the questionnaire knew what the options A, B, C and D meant.

In Zone C, he knew from looking at the above charts that 220 students of all the participants in the survey had failed in the examination. And further more, in all the three zones put together, the difference between the number of students who had passed in Class IX and those who had passed in Class X was 100.

Q.

If the number of students who had passed in Class X in all zones put together is minimum possible, then which of the given statements is definitely false?

a. Of all the students who had passed in Class IX in all the zones put together, the minimum were from Zone A.

b. Of all the students who had passed in Class VIII in all the zones put together, the minimum were from Zone B.

c. Of all the students who had failed in all classes put together, the minimum were from Zone A.

d. Of all the students who had failed in all classes put together, the maximum were from Zone B.

Solution:

Going by the statement when the number of students who had passed in all Class X in all zones put together is minimum possible, then option A in the survey form must indicate the number of students who had passed in Class X. Accordingly, only Case 1 would remain valid.

Hence statement c is definitely false.

Hence option 2.

QUESTION: 16

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

To assess the quality of education that was being imparted by the local schools in the state, the education ministry had assigned the project to an external research agency to find out the details of the students who had passed in the recently held state wide examinations.

The survey was carried out across Class VIII, Class IX and Class X students of the state. To speed up the survey, the areas from where these students came were categorized into three zones: Zone A, Zone B and Zone C. The number of students sampled in each zone was 1000. The survey form was a simple four question paper in which the participant had to fill in the answer applicable to him.

The questions asked were:

Did you pass in Class VIII?

Did you pass in Class IX?

Did you pass in Class X?

Have you failed in your examination?

The answers to all the questions were to be in either YES or NO. There was no other answer possible.

The survey report was presented in the following format. The percentages as shown mean the percentage of students who answered YES to that particular question.

In the above charts, only the creator of the questionnaire knew what the options A, B, C and D meant.

In Zone C, he knew from looking at the above charts that 220 students of all the participants in the survey had failed in the examination. And further more, in all the three zones put together, the difference between the number of students who had passed in Class IX and those who had passed in Class X was 100.

Q.

If in Zone B, the number of students who had passed in Class VIII was minimum possible, then which of the following statements is definitely true?

a. In Zone A, the number of students who failed in either Class IX or Class X was 9.33% of total surveyed students.

b. In Zone C, the number of students who failed in either Class VIII or Class X was 19% of total surveyed students.

c. In Zone B, the number of students who failed in Class IX or Class VIII was 63.5% of students surveyed from that zone.

d. In Zone C, the number of students who failed in either Class IX or Class X was 43% of students surveyed from that zone.

Solution:

If in Zone B, the number of students who had passed in Class VIII was minimum possible, then it can be concluded that option A in the survey form must indicate the number of students who had passed in class VIII. Hence options B and D should then indicate the number of students who had passed in Class IX and Class X.

Now, the sum of number of students in options B and D would be same as the number of students who were placed in neither option A nor C and same would also hold good for any other combination as well.

Looking into various options and verifying each option it can be concluded that statement d is true.

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 17

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

To assess the quality of education that was being imparted by the local schools in the state, the education ministry had assigned the project to an external research agency to find out the details of the students who had passed in the recently held state wide examinations.

The survey was carried out across Class VIII, Class IX and Class X students of the state. To speed up the survey, the areas from where these students came were categorized into three zones: Zone A, Zone B and Zone C. The number of students sampled in each zone was 1000. The survey form was a simple four question paper in which the participant had to fill in the answer applicable to him.

The questions asked were:

Did you pass in Class VIII?

Did you pass in Class IX?

Did you pass in Class X?

Have you failed in your examination?

The answers to all the questions were to be in either YES or NO. There was no other answer possible.

The survey report was presented in the following format. The percentages as shown mean the percentage of students who answered YES to that particular question.

In the above charts, only the creator of the questionnaire knew what the options A, B, C and D meant.

In Zone C, he knew from looking at the above charts that 220 students of all the participants in the survey had failed in the examination. And further more, in all the three zones put together, the difference between the number of students who had passed in Class IX and those who had passed in Class X was 100.

Q.

A maximum of how many statements can be simultaneously true?

a.    In Zone A, 13.5% students had failed in all the classes put together.

b.    In Zone C, 7% of the students of all zones put together had passed in Class X.

c.    In Zone B, 185 students had passed in Class IX.

d.    In Zone C, 220 students had passed in Class X.

e.    In Zone B, 180 students had passed in Class VIII.

Solution:

From each of the given statements, the following conclusion can be derived.    

Hence all the statements except for b can be simultaneously true.

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 18

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

To assess the quality of education that was being imparted by the local schools in the state, the education ministry had assigned the project to an external research agency to find out the details of the students who had passed in the recently held state wide examinations.

The survey was carried out across Class VIII, Class IX and Class X students of the state. To speed up the survey, the areas from where these students came were categorized into three zones: Zone A, Zone B and Zone C. The number of students sampled in each zone was 1000. The survey form was a simple four question paper in which the participant had to fill in the answer applicable to him.

The questions asked were:

Did you pass in Class VIII?

Did you pass in Class IX?

Did you pass in Class X?

Have you failed in your examination?

The answers to all the questions were to be in either YES or NO. There was no other answer possible.

The survey report was presented in the following format. The percentages as shown mean the percentage of students who answered YES to that particular question.

In the above charts, only the creator of the questionnaire knew what the options A, B, C and D meant.

In Zone C, he knew from looking at the above charts that 220 students of all the participants in the survey had failed in the examination. And further more, in all the three zones put together, the difference between the number of students who had passed in Class IX and those who had passed in Class X was 100.

Q.

If 18.5% of students passed in class VIII in Zone B, what is  the total number of students who passed in class X across the three Zones

Solution:

As 18.5% passed in Class VIII in Zone B, it indicates Case 1 or Case 2, either of which will give a different number of students passed in Class X.

Hence, the number cannot be uniquely determined.

Hence, option 4

QUESTION: 19

Three persons A, B, and C together have to finish a task. It takes 75 minutes  for them to finish one-fourth of the task. A and C together take 75% of theMarks time taken by A and B together to finish the task. C takes 300 minutes lessthan B to finish the task. What is the time taken by A alone to finish the task?

Solution:

Since A, B and C take 75 minutes to finish one-fourth of a task, they take 300 minutes i.e. 5 hours, to complete the entire task.

Let the total work be some multiple of 5, say 25 units.

Let a, b and c be the amount of work done by A, B and C per hour.

a + b + c = 25/5 = 5 units/hour ... (i)

A and C together take 75% of the time taken by A and B together to finish the task.

Substituting this value of a in (i),

3c-4b + b + c = 5

4c —3b = 5 ... (ii)

C takes 300 minutes less than B to finish the task i.e. C takes 5 hours less

Substituting the value of c from (ii) in (iii)

156 + 25 - 206 = 362 + 56

362+ 106-25 = 0

6 = 5/3 or-15

b has to be positive as it corresponds to amount of work done by B per hour i.e. b = 5/3

Substituting this value in (iii), c = 5/2

Substituting the value of b and c in (i),

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 20

Find the sum of the series:

Solution:

which can also be written as:


Now, this can also be written as:

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 21

A giraffe, standing at a point, G is watching the top of a tree of height 50 meters, which makes an angle of elevation of 30° with the giraffe’s eye. The giraffe walks a distance of 31V3 meters towards the tree to watch its top and the angle of the elevation becomes 60°. What is the height of the giraffe?

Solution:

Let the height of the giraffe be h m. Hence, the given situation can be represented as shown below:

From the figure:

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 22

Two alloys are required to make a specific alloy used for metal extraction. This alloy is used in the mixture of metal extraction. The ratio of copper and iron in the first and the second alloy is 2 : 3 and 1 : 3 respectively. These alloys are mixed in different ratios everyday depending upon the needs of the metal extractor. On a particular day, an alloy having 90% copper was required. In what ratio the given two alloys be mixed?

Solution:

Since both the alloys have copper content of less than 90%, it is not possible to obtain an alloy having 90% copper content by mixing these alloys in any proportion.

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 23

The area of the shaded region shown in the figure is x. If D is the centre of the circle and ABCDEF is a regular hexagon, what is the area of the circle in terms of x?

 

Solution:

Area of the shaded region is x.

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 24

In a group, there are 2 adults and 3 children. An adult is at least 18 years old.

Two years ago, the age of the eldest person from the group equals the sum of the current ages of the children. The current age of the youngest adult is 6 less than the sum of the current ages of the children. Three years ago, the ratio of the ages of the children was 1:2:4. There are exactly 3 adults in the group after 3 years. What is the sum of the current ages of the members of the group, if all ages are integral?

Solution:

Currently there are 2 adults in the group and 3 years later there are exactly 3 adults in the group.

Thus the eldest child in the initial group could be 15, 16 or 17 years old. Also, 3 years before, the ratio of the ages of the children was 1:2:4.

3 years ago, ages of the children are 3, 6 and 12 (to get the ratio 1:2:4)

Current ages of children are 6, 9 and 15.

Sum of the ages of children = 30

Two years ago,  the age of eldest person from the group equals the sum of the current ages of the children.

30 = £-2 or £ = 32

The current age of the youngest adult is 6 less than the sum of the current ages of the children.

30 = Y+ 6 or Y= 24

​Sum of the current ages of the group = 30 + 32 + 24 = 86

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 25

A gorilla eats an orange, an apple, a mango, a peach and a guava one by one at random. What is the probability that it eats the apple before eating the mango and guava

Solution:

The 5 fruits can be eaten in 5! = 120 ways.

The apple has to be the first, second or third fruit to be eaten.

Case 1: The apple is eaten first.

Since the apple just has to be eaten before the mango and guava (and the relative order of the mango and guava is unimportant), the remaining four fruits can be eaten in 4! = 24 ways.

Case 2: The apple is eaten second.

Now, the mango and guava can be eaten third, fourth or fifth in 3C2 ways ie. 3 ways.

Also, the order of the mango and guava can be interchanged, they can be eaten in 3 x 2 = 6 ways.

The remaining two fruits can be eaten in 2! = 2 ways.

Total ways = 6x2=12 ways

Case 3: The apple is eaten third.

The mango and guava have to be fourth and fifth (in any order). Since their order can be interchanged, they can be eaten in 2 ways.

The remaining two fruits can be eaten in 2! = 2 ways.

otal ways = 2x2 = 4 ways

Total number of ways in which the apple is eaten before the mango and guava = 24 + 12 + 4 = 40

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 26

In a class of 56 students, each student studies at least one out of 3 languages - German, Spanish and French. 24 students study German, 28 students study Spanish and 30 students study French. 4 students study German and Spanish, but not French. 6 students study German and French, but not Spanish. 4 students study all the three languages. How many students study Spanish and French but not German?

 

Solution:

The given data can be represented as shown below:

24 students study German.

4 + 4 + 6 + a = 24

a = 10 (i)

28 students study Spanish.

4 + 4 + b + d— 28

b + d = 20... (ii)

30 students study French.

6 + 4 + c + d = 30

c + d = 20... (iii)

From (ii) and (iii), b = c........ (iv)

The total number of students in the class = 56

24 + b + d + c = 56

b + d + c = 32 (v)

From (iii) and (v), b = 12 and then from (ii), d = 8

Thus, the number of students who study Spanish and French, but not German = 8

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 27

There are three types of fruits at a fruit shop - apples, bananas and oranges. All apples cost the same, all bananas cost the same and all oranges cost the same. The total cost of apples, bananas and oranges is Rs. 2160. The average cost of each fruit is Rs. 36. The average cost of apples and bananas is Rs. 39, of bananas and oranges is Rs. 360/11 and of apples and oranges is 110/3. Were apples Rs. 1 costlier, bananas Rs. 6 costlier and oranges Rs. 7 costlier, the total average would be Rs. 41. What is the number of apples, bananas and oranges and the cost of each unit of these respective fruits?

Solution:

The data in the question gives us six equations in six unknowns, which are difficult to solve. So we evaluate options instead.We can see that only option 1 satisfies the fact that the total cost is Rs. 2160. Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 28

Ajinkya starts walking in the north for 16 m. Then, he turns back and walks south for 8 m. Again he turns and walks north for 4 m. He continues this process of walking half the previous distance after turning. What will be his approximate distance from the starting point after he has turned around for 4242 times?

Solution:

The distances travlled by Ajinkya will form a G.P. with a = 16 and r = -1/2. For the total distance, the direction of the travel will not matter.Since he takes 4242 turns, this can be considered as an approximate infinite seriesThus, the distance will be 16/(l+l/2) = 10.66 m Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 29

A rectangular shed ABCD of length 10^3 m and breadth 5 m exists on a field as shown in the figure below. A cow is πthered to the point O with a rope of length 28 m. Points O, A and B are collinear. l(OB) =10 m. Find the total area of the field (in sq.m) that the cow can graze, given that, it cannot enπr the shed.

 

Solution:

The path used to graze by the cow is as shown below:

As shown in the figure, the total area of the field that the cow can graze

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 30

Let A 1 be a circle of radius r1. An equilateral triangle B1 is inscribed in this circle A1 such that all the vertices of B1 lie on the circumference of A1. Another circle A2 is inscribed in the triangle By such that touches all three sides of B1. Another equilateral triangle B^ is inscribed in the circle A2. Another circle A3 is inscribed in the triangle B2 and so on. What is the ratio of the perimeter of A16  to the perimeter of B13 ?

Solution:

Radius of circle A 1 is r1

It can be observed from the figure that, radius of A2 is rl2 and length of side of B1 is V3r1

Thus, the radii of circles A1, A2, A3 and so on, form a GP with common ratio 1/2.

Also, the length of each side of triangles B, B2, #3 and so on, form a GP with common ratio 1/2.

The ratio of the perimeter of A16 to the perimeter of 513



Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 31

Tata Motors manufactures cars in two batches. l/9th of the cars in batch Aand 2/7th of the cars in batch B are defective. If two cars are selected, one each from each batch, what is the probability that exactly one of the cars is non-defective?

Solution:

Exactly one of the cars is non-defective.Required probability = (Batch A is non-defective and B is defective) or (Batch A is defective and B is non-defective)= (8/9) x (2/7) + (1/9) x (5/7)= 21/63= 1/3Hence, option 3

QUESTION: 32

The efficiency of tap A is 80% less than that of tap B. If both the taps are simultaneously opened, the tank gets filled in 60 hours. What is the time taken to fill the tank if only tap A is opened?

Solution:

The efficiency of tap A is 80% less than that of tap B i.e. it is 20% of tap B’ efficiency.

Let the efficiency of tap B be 1 unit/hour.

Efficiency of tap A = 0.2 units/hour

When both taps are opened simultaneously, they fill 0.2 + 1 i.e. 1.2 units/hour.

Since the tank gets filled in 60 hours, capacity of tank = 60 x 1.2 = 72 units

Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 33

Iff{x} denotes the smallest integer greater than or equal to x, what is the positive difference between the maximum and minimum value ofy x f{x] such that:-3.2 < x < 3.2 andy = {y, y E integers, |y| < 15}

Solution:

The maximum value off{x) as well as y is positive.

So, y x f{x) takes its maximum value when both f{x) and y are maximum.

Maximum value ofy x f{x} = 14 x/{3.2} = 14 x 4 = 56

The minimum value off{x] as well as y is negative.

Hence, if both of them are considered for minimum value ofy x f{x], the product becomes positive (which is not minimum).

Hence, consider the minimum value of one and the maximum value of the other variable to get the minimum product (as their signs will be negative).

Minimum value ofy x f{x} = -14 x/{3.2} = -14 x 4 = -56

Hence, option 4.

Note: If you takey = 14 (maximum) and/{-3.2} = -3 (i.e. minimum), the product becomes -42. This is not the minimum value of the product, as seen above.

QUESTION: 34

A solid right circular cone is inscribed inside a hollow sphere of radius 10 cm. The height of the cone is two times its radius (i.e., radius of base of the cone). Find the ratio of volume of the cone to the volume of the sphere.

Solution:

Let the height of the cone be 2r, where r is the radius of base of the cone.

102 = (2r-10)2 + r2

5 r2 = 40r r = 8 cm

h = 2r=16 cm 

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 35

Solution:

Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 36

A watch is set correctly at 6 p.m. on Monday, 5th Jan 2014. On the next day at 9 a.m., the watch showed 5:30 a.m. What time would the watch have shown at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, 6th Jan 2014?

Solution:

Actual time elapsed between 6 p.m. on Monday and 9 a.m. on the next day = 15 hours.

Since the watch showed 5:30 a.m. at 9 a.m., it lost 3 hours and 30 minutes in 15 hours.

i.e. 210 minutes in 15 hours.

Now, actual time elapsed between 6 p.m. on Monday and 6 a.m. on the next day =12 hours.

Thus, the watch will show a time 2 hours and 48 minutes before 6 a.m. i.e. 3:12 a.m.

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 37

A string of length 45/π cm is attached to a ball at its centre. The other end of the string is tied to ceiling of the physics lab. Manoj, the lab assistant taps the ball such that the string makes an angle of 60° with the vertical axis. The professor observes that the angle subtended with the vertical axis decreases by 12.5 % each time the ball travels from one extreme end to the other. Find the distance travelled by the centre of the ball until it comes to rest?

Solution:

Length of the arc = /θ

(Where / is the length of the string and θ is angle subtended by the arc at the centre in radians)

/ = 45/71 cm

θ1 = 60° = 7r/3 radians

θ2 = (π/3) x 87.5/100 = (π/3) x (7/8) radians

θ3 = (π/3) x (7/8)2 radians

Total distance travelled by the centre of the ball

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 38

In how many ways can you select an ace or a diamond from a well shuffled pack of cards?

Solution:

There are 4 aces in a pack of cards.

Number of ways to select one ace = 4Cj = 4 ways Number of diamonds in a pack of cards =13 Number of ways to select one diamond = 13Cj = 13 ways

But there is one card which is an ace of diamond.

We can select that in 1 way.

Total number of ways to select an ace or a diamond =13 + 4-1 = 16 ways Hence, option 1

QUESTION: 39

Chronologically, which of the following arrangements is correct?

Solution:

Chronological order of the battles given in the options is:Second Battle of Panipat -1556Battle of Talikota -1565Battle of Haldighati -1576Battle of Plassey -1757Third Battle of Panipat -1761Battle of Buxar -1764Hence, option 1.
 

QUESTION: 40

On the recommendations of which committee did RBI release a report on "Capacity Building in Banks and non Banks"?

Solution:
QUESTION: 41

While attending the University of Texas in 1984, Michael founded a company called PCs Limited. By 1985 PCs produced its first computer of its own design, and by 1988 it had an initial public offering that valued the company at nearly $80 million. In 2016, it has dropped out of the Fortune 500. What is the name of the company?

Solution:
QUESTION: 42

Which of the following countries did not pull out of the 19th SAARC Summit scheduled to be held in Pakistan?

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

Which of the following teams won the Premier Badminton League 2016?

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

SoftBank completed the $31 billion acquisition of which of the following companies?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

Which of the following half-Indian personalities was crowned Miss World Japan 2016? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

During which year was the National Defence academy (NDA) formally inaugurated?

Solution:

The NDA was formally inaugurated on January 16, 1955. Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 47

Who is the Minister of External Affairs of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

Which among the following is the meaning of the phrase " A Dime a  Dozen " 

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

Match the Chairman with their banks

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

Match the authors to their literary work:

Solution:
QUESTION: 51

Pick the odd one out in context to Football?

Solution:

Netherland has neither been a host country nor winner in FIFA World Cup. The rest three have been both.Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 52

In descending order, which of the following groups of world countries are correct about the land area? 

Solution:

The correct arrangement of the given countries in the descending order of their area is,SudanMexicoIndonesiaSouth Africa Hence, option 4 

QUESTION: 53

What is the national tree of India? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

Select the correct Sobriquet - City match: 

Solution:

The correct match is

QUESTION: 55

According to Fitch Ratings Agency, India’s GDP will likely grow by what percentage in 2016-2017?

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

Select the correct International Organization - Location of Headquarter - Year of Formation match:

 

Solution:

The International Court of Justice, the primary judicial organ of the United Nations is based in the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands and was established in 1945.

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 57

Where is India's First Coral Garden to be set by Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) and Tata Chemicals Limited (TCL)? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

Who is the MD & CEO of Tata Technologies? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

In 1798, Tipu Sultan signed a secret agreement with which French leader? 

Solution:

The agreement was that the French would provide military assistance to Tipu against the British. Tipu also sent SOS calls to the Sultan of Turkey and the King of Afghanistan. However, Napoleon, who wanted revolutions all around the world against corruption, feudalism and heirarchy that used to dominate French society before the French Revolution and the British were promoting to serve their interests in the world, was the only one who paid any attention to him.Option 2. 

QUESTION: 60

When is the US Presidential elections of 2016 scheduled?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

Union Minister Nitin Gadkari launched which of the following schemes for rural development? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

Who was awarded the coveted Nobel Prize in Literature 2016? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

M S Dhoni is the co-owner of which of the following ISL teams? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

Which organization is responsible for developing policies to protect patents throughout the world? 

Solution:

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is one of the 17 specialized agencies of the United Nations. WIPO was created in 1967 "to encourage creative activity, to promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world.". Option 4. 

QUESTION: 65

Which is the longest National Highway, connecting Varanasi to Kanyakumari? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

Just at that turning between Market Road and the lane leading to the chemist’s shop he had his establishment. If anyone doesn’t like the word ‘establishment’, he is welcome to say so, because it was actually something of a vision spun out of air. At eight you would not see him, and again at ten you would see nothing, but between eight and ten he arrived, sold his goods and departed. Those who saw him remarked thus, ‘Lucky fellow! He has hardly an hour’s work a day and he pockets ten rupees—what graduates are unable to earn! Three hundred rupees a month!’ He felt irritated when he heard such glib remarks and said, ‘What these folk do not see is that I sit before the oven practically all day frying all this stuff...’

He got up when the cock in the next house crowed; sometimes it had a habit of waking up at three in the morning and letting out a shriek. ‘Why has the cock lost its normal sleep?’ Rama wondered as he awoke, but it was a signal he could not miss. Whether it was three o’clock or four, it was all the same to him. He had to get up and start his day.

At about 8:15 in the evening he arrived with a load of stuff. He looked as if he had four arms, so many things he carried about him. His equipment was the big tray balanced on his head, with its assortment of edibles, a stool stuck in the crook of his arm, a lamp in another hand, a couple of portable legs for mounting his tray. He lit the lamp, a lantern which consumed six pies’ worth of kerosene every day, and kept it near at hand, since he did not like to depend only upon electricity, having to guard a lot of loose cash and a variety of miscellaneous articles.

When he set up his tray with the little lamp illuminating his display, even a confirmed dyspeptic could not pass by without throwing a look at it. A heap of bondas, which seemed puffed and big but melted in one’s mouth; dosais, white, round and limp, looking like layers of muslin; chappatis so thin that you could lift fifty of them on a little finger; duck’s eggs, hard-boiled, resembling a heap of ivory balls; and perpetually boiling coffee on a stove. He had a separate aluminium pot in which he kept chutney, which went gratis with almost every item.

He always arrived in time to catch the cinema crowd coming out after the evening show. A pretender to the throne, a young scraggy fellow, sat on his spot until he arrived and did business, but our friend did not let that bother him unduly. In fact, he felt generous enough to say, ‘Let the poor rat do his business when I am not there.’This sentiment was amply respected, and the pretender moved off a minute before the arrival of the prince among caterers. His customers liked him. They said in admiration,‘Is there another place where you can get coffee for six pies and four chappatis for an anna?’ They sat around his tray, taking what they wanted. A dozen hands hovered about it every minute, because his customers were entitled to pick up, examine and accept their stuff after proper scrutiny.

Though so many hands were probing the lot, he knew exactly who was taking what: he knew by an extraordinary sense which of the jutka-drivers was picking up chappatis at a given moment; he could even mention his license number; he knew that the stained hand nervously coming up was that of the youngster who polished the shoes of passers-by; and he knew exactly at what hour he would see the wrestler’s arm searching for the perfect duck’s egg, which would be knocked against the tray corner before consumption.

His custom was drawn from the population swarming the pavement: the bootpolish boys, for instance, who wandered to and fro with brush and polish in a bag, endlessly soliciting, ‘Polish, sir, polish!’ Rama had a soft corner in his heart for the waifs. When he saw some fat customer haggling over the payment to one of these youngsters he felt like shouting, ‘Give the poor fellow a little more. Don’t grudge it. If you pay an anna more he can have a dosai and a chappati. As it is, the poor fellow is on half-rations and remains half- starved all day.’

It rent his heart to see their hungry, hollow eyes; it pained him to note the rags they wore; and it made him very unhappy to see the tremendous eagerness with which they came to him, laying aside their brown bags. But what could he do? He could not run a charity show; that was impossible. He measured out their half-glass of coffee correct to the fraction of an inch, but they could cling to the glass as long as they liked.

The blind beggar, who whined for alms all day in front of the big hotel, brought him part of his collection at the end of the day and demanded refreshment.. . and the grass-selling women. He disliked serving women; their shrill, loud voices got on his nerves. These came to him after disposing of head-loads of grass satisfactorily. And that sly fellow with a limp who bought a packet of

mixed fare every evening and carried it to a man standing under a tree on the pavement opposite.

All the coppers that men and women of this part of the universe earned through their miscellaneous jobs ultimately came to him at the end of the day. He put all this money into a little cloth bag dangling from his neck under his shirt, and carried it home, soon after the night show had started at the theatre.

He lived in the second lane behind the market. His wife opened the door, throwing into the night air the scent of burnt oil which perpetually hung about their home. She snatched from his hands all his encumbrances, put her hand under his shirt to pull out his cloth bag and counted the cash immediately. They gloated over it. ‘Five rupees invested in the morning has brought us another five ...’

They ruminated on the exquisite mystery of this multiplication. She put back into his cloth bag the capital for further investment on the morrow, and carefully separated the gains and put them away in a little wooden box that she had brought from her parents’ house years before.

After dinner, he tucked a betel leaf and tobacco in his cheek and slept on the pyol of his house, and had dreams of traffic constables bullying him to move on and health inspectors saying that he was spreading all kinds of disease and depopulating the city. But fortunately in actual life no one bothered him very seriously. He gave an occasional packet of his stuff to the traffic constable going off duty or to the health department menial who might pass that way. The health officer no doubt came and said, ‘You must put all this under a glass lid, otherwise I shall destroy it all someday ... Take care!’ But he was a kindly man who did not pursue any matter but wondered in private, ‘How his customers survive his food, I can’t understand! I suppose people build up a sort of immunity to such poisons, with all that dust blowing on it and the gutter behind ...’ Rama no doubt violated all the well-accepted canons of cleanliness and sanitation, but still his customers not only survived his fare but seemed actually to flourish on it, having consumed it for years without showing signs of being any the worse for it.

Q.

Which is the odd one out:

Solution:

The words “scraggy”, “gaunt” and “anorexic” mean 'thin and lean'.

“Burly” means 'heavily built'.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 67

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

Just at that turning between Market Road and the lane leading to the chemist’s shop he had his establishment. If anyone doesn’t like the word ‘establishment’, he is welcome to say so, because it was actually something of a vision spun out of air. At eight you would not see him, and again at ten you would see nothing, but between eight and ten he arrived, sold his goods and departed. Those who saw him remarked thus, ‘Lucky fellow! He has hardly an hour’s work a day and he pockets ten rupees—what graduates are unable to earn! Three hundred rupees a month!’ He felt irritated when he heard such glib remarks and said, ‘What these folk do not see is that I sit before the oven practically all day frying all this stuff...’

He got up when the cock in the next house crowed; sometimes it had a habit of waking up at three in the morning and letting out a shriek. ‘Why has the cock lost its normal sleep?’ Rama wondered as he awoke, but it was a signal he could not miss. Whether it was three o’clock or four, it was all the same to him. He had to get up and start his day.

At about 8:15 in the evening he arrived with a load of stuff. He looked as if he had four arms, so many things he carried about him. His equipment was the big tray balanced on his head, with its assortment of edibles, a stool stuck in the crook of his arm, a lamp in another hand, a couple of portable legs for mounting his tray. He lit the lamp, a lantern which consumed six pies’ worth of kerosene every day, and kept it near at hand, since he did not like to depend only upon electricity, having to guard a lot of loose cash and a variety of miscellaneous articles.

When he set up his tray with the little lamp illuminating his display, even a confirmed dyspeptic could not pass by without throwing a look at it. A heap of bondas, which seemed puffed and big but melted in one’s mouth; dosais, white, round and limp, looking like layers of muslin; chappatis so thin that you could lift fifty of them on a little finger; duck’s eggs, hard-boiled, resembling a heap of ivory balls; and perpetually boiling coffee on a stove. He had a separate aluminium pot in which he kept chutney, which went gratis with almost every item.

He always arrived in time to catch the cinema crowd coming out after the evening show. A pretender to the throne, a young scraggy fellow, sat on his spot until he arrived and did business, but our friend did not let that bother him unduly. In fact, he felt generous enough to say, ‘Let the poor rat do his business when I am not there.’This sentiment was amply respected, and the pretender moved off a minute before the arrival of the prince among caterers. His customers liked him. They said in admiration,‘Is there another place where you can get coffee for six pies and four chappatis for an anna?’ They sat around his tray, taking what they wanted. A dozen hands hovered about it every minute, because his customers were entitled to pick up, examine and accept their stuff after proper scrutiny.

Though so many hands were probing the lot, he knew exactly who was taking what: he knew by an extraordinary sense which of the jutka-drivers was picking up chappatis at a given moment; he could even mention his license number; he knew that the stained hand nervously coming up was that of the youngster who polished the shoes of passers-by; and he knew exactly at what hour he would see the wrestler’s arm searching for the perfect duck’s egg, which would be knocked against the tray corner before consumption.

His custom was drawn from the population swarming the pavement: the bootpolish boys, for instance, who wandered to and fro with brush and polish in a bag, endlessly soliciting, ‘Polish, sir, polish!’ Rama had a soft corner in his heart for the waifs. When he saw some fat customer haggling over the payment to one of these youngsters he felt like shouting, ‘Give the poor fellow a little more. Don’t grudge it. If you pay an anna more he can have a dosai and a chappati. As it is, the poor fellow is on half-rations and remains half- starved all day.’

It rent his heart to see their hungry, hollow eyes; it pained him to note the rags they wore; and it made him very unhappy to see the tremendous eagerness with which they came to him, laying aside their brown bags. But what could he do? He could not run a charity show; that was impossible. He measured out their half-glass of coffee correct to the fraction of an inch, but they could cling to the glass as long as they liked.

The blind beggar, who whined for alms all day in front of the big hotel, brought him part of his collection at the end of the day and demanded refreshment.. . and the grass-selling women. He disliked serving women; their shrill, loud voices got on his nerves. These came to him after disposing of head-loads of grass satisfactorily. And that sly fellow with a limp who bought a packet of

mixed fare every evening and carried it to a man standing under a tree on the pavement opposite.

All the coppers that men and women of this part of the universe earned through their miscellaneous jobs ultimately came to him at the end of the day. He put all this money into a little cloth bag dangling from his neck under his shirt, and carried it home, soon after the night show had started at the theatre.

He lived in the second lane behind the market. His wife opened the door, throwing into the night air the scent of burnt oil which perpetually hung about their home. She snatched from his hands all his encumbrances, put her hand under his shirt to pull out his cloth bag and counted the cash immediately. They gloated over it. ‘Five rupees invested in the morning has brought us another five ...’

They ruminated on the exquisite mystery of this multiplication. She put back into his cloth bag the capital for further investment on the morrow, and carefully separated the gains and put them away in a little wooden box that she had brought from her parents’ house years before.

After dinner, he tucked a betel leaf and tobacco in his cheek and slept on the pyol of his house, and had dreams of traffic constables bullying him to move on and health inspectors saying that he was spreading all kinds of disease and depopulating the city. But fortunately in actual life no one bothered him very seriously. He gave an occasional packet of his stuff to the traffic constable going off duty or to the health department menial who might pass that way. The health officer no doubt came and said, ‘You must put all this under a glass lid, otherwise I shall destroy it all someday ... Take care!’ But he was a kindly man who did not pursue any matter but wondered in private, ‘How his customers survive his food, I can’t understand! I suppose people build up a sort of immunity to such poisons, with all that dust blowing on it and the gutter behind ...’ Rama no doubt violated all the well-accepted canons of cleanliness and sanitation, but still his customers not only survived his fare but seemed actually to flourish on it, having consumed it for years without showing signs of being any the worse for it.

Q.

Which of the following statements is incorrect?

Solution:

Option 1 has been stated in paragraph 3. Rama is apprehensive about the electricity because there might be interruptions in the supply and he cannot afford to risk the safety of his cash.Paragraph 5 says that Rama used to arrive in time to catch the cinema crowd. This indicates their importance to Rama. Eliminate option B.Paragraphs 8 and 9 depicts the soft-hearted nature of Rama. Eliminate option C.Paragraph 9 says “A sly ... opposite.” The man mentioned in the sentence is not Rama. It gives a background picture of the sly fellow with a limp.Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 68

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

Just at that turning between Market Road and the lane leading to the chemist’s shop he had his establishment. If anyone doesn’t like the word ‘establishment’, he is welcome to say so, because it was actually something of a vision spun out of air. At eight you would not see him, and again at ten you would see nothing, but between eight and ten he arrived, sold his goods and departed. Those who saw him remarked thus, ‘Lucky fellow! He has hardly an hour’s work a day and he pockets ten rupees—what graduates are unable to earn! Three hundred rupees a month!’ He felt irritated when he heard such glib remarks and said, ‘What these folk do not see is that I sit before the oven practically all day frying all this stuff...’

He got up when the cock in the next house crowed; sometimes it had a habit of waking up at three in the morning and letting out a shriek. ‘Why has the cock lost its normal sleep?’ Rama wondered as he awoke, but it was a signal he could not miss. Whether it was three o’clock or four, it was all the same to him. He had to get up and start his day.

At about 8:15 in the evening he arrived with a load of stuff. He looked as if he had four arms, so many things he carried about him. His equipment was the big tray balanced on his head, with its assortment of edibles, a stool stuck in the crook of his arm, a lamp in another hand, a couple of portable legs for mounting his tray. He lit the lamp, a lantern which consumed six pies’ worth of kerosene every day, and kept it near at hand, since he did not like to depend only upon electricity, having to guard a lot of loose cash and a variety of miscellaneous articles.

When he set up his tray with the little lamp illuminating his display, even a confirmed dyspeptic could not pass by without throwing a look at it. A heap of bondas, which seemed puffed and big but melted in one’s mouth; dosais, white, round and limp, looking like layers of muslin; chappatis so thin that you could lift fifty of them on a little finger; duck’s eggs, hard-boiled, resembling a heap of ivory balls; and perpetually boiling coffee on a stove. He had a separate aluminium pot in which he kept chutney, which went gratis with almost every item.

He always arrived in time to catch the cinema crowd coming out after the evening show. A pretender to the throne, a young scraggy fellow, sat on his spot until he arrived and did business, but our friend did not let that bother him unduly. In fact, he felt generous enough to say, ‘Let the poor rat do his business when I am not there.’This sentiment was amply respected, and the pretender moved off a minute before the arrival of the prince among caterers. His customers liked him. They said in admiration,‘Is there another place where you can get coffee for six pies and four chappatis for an anna?’ They sat around his tray, taking what they wanted. A dozen hands hovered about it every minute, because his customers were entitled to pick up, examine and accept their stuff after proper scrutiny.

Though so many hands were probing the lot, he knew exactly who was taking what: he knew by an extraordinary sense which of the jutka-drivers was picking up chappatis at a given moment; he could even mention his license number; he knew that the stained hand nervously coming up was that of the youngster who polished the shoes of passers-by; and he knew exactly at what hour he would see the wrestler’s arm searching for the perfect duck’s egg, which would be knocked against the tray corner before consumption.

His custom was drawn from the population swarming the pavement: the bootpolish boys, for instance, who wandered to and fro with brush and polish in a bag, endlessly soliciting, ‘Polish, sir, polish!’ Rama had a soft corner in his heart for the waifs. When he saw some fat customer haggling over the payment to one of these youngsters he felt like shouting, ‘Give the poor fellow a little more. Don’t grudge it. If you pay an anna more he can have a dosai and a chappati. As it is, the poor fellow is on half-rations and remains half- starved all day.’

It rent his heart to see their hungry, hollow eyes; it pained him to note the rags they wore; and it made him very unhappy to see the tremendous eagerness with which they came to him, laying aside their brown bags. But what could he do? He could not run a charity show; that was impossible. He measured out their half-glass of coffee correct to the fraction of an inch, but they could cling to the glass as long as they liked.

The blind beggar, who whined for alms all day in front of the big hotel, brought him part of his collection at the end of the day and demanded refreshment.. . and the grass-selling women. He disliked serving women; their shrill, loud voices got on his nerves. These came to him after disposing of head-loads of grass satisfactorily. And that sly fellow with a limp who bought a packet of

mixed fare every evening and carried it to a man standing under a tree on the pavement opposite.

All the coppers that men and women of this part of the universe earned through their miscellaneous jobs ultimately came to him at the end of the day. He put all this money into a little cloth bag dangling from his neck under his shirt, and carried it home, soon after the night show had started at the theatre.

He lived in the second lane behind the market. His wife opened the door, throwing into the night air the scent of burnt oil which perpetually hung about their home. She snatched from his hands all his encumbrances, put her hand under his shirt to pull out his cloth bag and counted the cash immediately. They gloated over it. ‘Five rupees invested in the morning has brought us another five ...’

They ruminated on the exquisite mystery of this multiplication. She put back into his cloth bag the capital for further investment on the morrow, and carefully separated the gains and put them away in a little wooden box that she had brought from her parents’ house years before.

After dinner, he tucked a betel leaf and tobacco in his cheek and slept on the pyol of his house, and had dreams of traffic constables bullying him to move on and health inspectors saying that he was spreading all kinds of disease and depopulating the city. But fortunately in actual life no one bothered him very seriously. He gave an occasional packet of his stuff to the traffic constable going off duty or to the health department menial who might pass that way. The health officer no doubt came and said, ‘You must put all this under a glass lid, otherwise I shall destroy it all someday ... Take care!’ But he was a kindly man who did not pursue any matter but wondered in private, ‘How his customers survive his food, I can’t understand! I suppose people build up a sort of immunity to such poisons, with all that dust blowing on it and the gutter behind ...’ Rama no doubt violated all the well-accepted canons of cleanliness and sanitation, but still his customers not only survived his fare but seemed actually to flourish on it, having consumed it for years without showing signs of being any the worse for it.

Q.

What was the health officer's take on Rama's food?

Solution:

Paragraph 12 states that the health officer used to threaten Rama of dire consequences if hygiene was not maintained. However, he was a kind man and did not take the matter further. This is implied by option 3. So, eliminate options 1 and 4.Although option 2 is close, it does not take into account the health officer's warnings to Rama.Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 69

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end.

Just at that turning between Market Road and the lane leading to the chemist’s shop he had his establishment. If anyone doesn’t like the word ‘establishment’, he is welcome to say so, because it was actually something of a vision spun out of air. At eight you would not see him, and again at ten you would see nothing, but between eight and ten he arrived, sold his goods and departed. Those who saw him remarked thus, ‘Lucky fellow! He has hardly an hour’s work a day and he pockets ten rupees—what graduates are unable to earn! Three hundred rupees a month!’ He felt irritated when he heard such glib remarks and said, ‘What these folk do not see is that I sit before the oven practically all day frying all this stuff...’

He got up when the cock in the next house crowed; sometimes it had a habit of waking up at three in the morning and letting out a shriek. ‘Why has the cock lost its normal sleep?’ Rama wondered as he awoke, but it was a signal he could not miss. Whether it was three o’clock or four, it was all the same to him. He had to get up and start his day.

At about 8:15 in the evening he arrived with a load of stuff. He looked as if he had four arms, so many things he carried about him. His equipment was the big tray balanced on his head, with its assortment of edibles, a stool stuck in the crook of his arm, a lamp in another hand, a couple of portable legs for mounting his tray. He lit the lamp, a lantern which consumed six pies’ worth of kerosene every day, and kept it near at hand, since he did not like to depend only upon electricity, having to guard a lot of loose cash and a variety of miscellaneous articles.

When he set up his tray with the little lamp illuminating his display, even a confirmed dyspeptic could not pass by without throwing a look at it. A heap of bondas, which seemed puffed and big but melted in one’s mouth; dosais, white, round and limp, looking like layers of muslin; chappatis so thin that you could lift fifty of them on a little finger; duck’s eggs, hard-boiled, resembling a heap of ivory balls; and perpetually boiling coffee on a stove. He had a separate aluminium pot in which he kept chutney, which went gratis with almost every item.

He always arrived in time to catch the cinema crowd coming out after the evening show. A pretender to the throne, a young scraggy fellow, sat on his spot until he arrived and did business, but our friend did not let that bother him unduly. In fact, he felt generous enough to say, ‘Let the poor rat do his business when I am not there.’This sentiment was amply respected, and the pretender moved off a minute before the arrival of the prince among caterers. His customers liked him. They said in admiration,‘Is there another place where you can get coffee for six pies and four chappatis for an anna?’ They sat around his tray, taking what they wanted. A dozen hands hovered about it every minute, because his customers were entitled to pick up, examine and accept their stuff after proper scrutiny.

Though so many hands were probing the lot, he knew exactly who was taking what: he knew by an extraordinary sense which of the jutka-drivers was picking up chappatis at a given moment; he could even mention his license number; he knew that the stained hand nervously coming up was that of the youngster who polished the shoes of passers-by; and he knew exactly at what hour he would see the wrestler’s arm searching for the perfect duck’s egg, which would be knocked against the tray corner before consumption.

His custom was drawn from the population swarming the pavement: the bootpolish boys, for instance, who wandered to and fro with brush and polish in a bag, endlessly soliciting, ‘Polish, sir, polish!’ Rama had a soft corner in his heart for the waifs. When he saw some fat customer haggling over the payment to one of these youngsters he felt like shouting, ‘Give the poor fellow a little more. Don’t grudge it. If you pay an anna more he can have a dosai and a chappati. As it is, the poor fellow is on half-rations and remains half- starved all day.’

It rent his heart to see their hungry, hollow eyes; it pained him to note the rags they wore; and it made him very unhappy to see the tremendous eagerness with which they came to him, laying aside their brown bags. But what could he do? He could not run a charity show; that was impossible. He measured out their half-glass of coffee correct to the fraction of an inch, but they could cling to the glass as long as they liked.

The blind beggar, who whined for alms all day in front of the big hotel, brought him part of his collection at the end of the day and demanded refreshment.. . and the grass-selling women. He disliked serving women; their shrill, loud voices got on his nerves. These came to him after disposing of head-loads of grass satisfactorily. And that sly fellow with a limp who bought a packet of

mixed fare every evening and carried it to a man standing under a tree on the pavement opposite.

All the coppers that men and women of this part of the universe earned through their miscellaneous jobs ultimately came to him at the end of the day. He put all this money into a little cloth bag dangling from his neck under his shirt, and carried it home, soon after the night show had started at the theatre.

He lived in the second lane behind the market. His wife opened the door, throwing into the night air the scent of burnt oil which perpetually hung about their home. She snatched from his hands all his encumbrances, put her hand under his shirt to pull out his cloth bag and counted the cash immediately. They gloated over it. ‘Five rupees invested in the morning has brought us another five ...’

They ruminated on the exquisite mystery of this multiplication. She put back into his cloth bag the capital for further investment on the morrow, and carefully separated the gains and put them away in a little wooden box that she had brought from her parents’ house years before.

After dinner, he tucked a betel leaf and tobacco in his cheek and slept on the pyol of his house, and had dreams of traffic constables bullying him to move on and health inspectors saying that he was spreading all kinds of disease and depopulating the city. But fortunately in actual life no one bothered him very seriously. He gave an occasional packet of his stuff to the traffic constable going off duty or to the health department menial who might pass that way. The health officer no doubt came and said, ‘You must put all this under a glass lid, otherwise I shall destroy it all someday ... Take care!’ But he was a kindly man who did not pursue any matter but wondered in private, ‘How his customers survive his food, I can’t understand! I suppose people build up a sort of immunity to such poisons, with all that dust blowing on it and the gutter behind ...’ Rama no doubt violated all the well-accepted canons of cleanliness and sanitation, but still his customers not only survived his fare but seemed actually to flourish on it, having consumed it for years without showing signs of being any the worse for it.

Q.

Rama's shop cannot be associated with the word “establishment” because

Solution:

Paragraph 3 states the equipments that he used to carry with him everyday and set up an outlet. He used to bring them everyday to the spot and assemble them to form a stall. This is implied by option 4.Option 1 is not correct because it was not a full fledged shop. It was a temporary set up. Eliminate 1.Option 2 has not been mentioned in the passage. Eliminate option 2.Option 3 is incorrect as he used to run his stall for an hour only. Eliminate option 3.Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 70

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Google shook up the tech world recently by announcing that it is developing a PC operating system based on its Chrome Web browser. The Chrome operating system (OS) will at first be available only on low-power netbook machines, but eventually, Google says, you’ll see Chrome on all kinds of laptops and desktops.

The operating-system market could certainly use more competition, and as we’ve seen with the Web browser war when big tech companies go head to head, great new features often trickle down to us users. But I’m sceptical about Google’s project. More than sceptical, actually: I think the Google OS is doomed. Here are five reasons why:

1.  Linux is hard to love. Chrome OS will be based on Linux, the open-source operating system that many techies have long held up as the white knight that will one day slay Microsoft. Scores of engineers and eager entrepreneurs have tried to turn Linux into an operating system that appeals not just to server ninjas but to regular people. They’ve had limited success. Even the advent of Ubuntu, a user-friendly flavour of Linux that comes pre-installed on a variety of brand-name computers, didn’t move the mark; Linux still holds an infinitesimal share of the operating-system market, and not even its biggest boosters expect that to change anytime soon.

Why can’t Linux catch on? A dearth of software and hardware. Many of the programs and peripherals that people want to use are either incompatible with the OS or require so much work to rejigger that it’s not worth the trouble.

Sure, it’s possible that Google’s imprimatur will prompt third-party companies to create more software and hardware that works with Linux. But this will be a long struggle, and Google will have to work hard to convince others to play along. Some firms notably Apple and Microsoft might be especially resistant to change. Don’t expect to see a Chrome OS version of Excel anytime soon.

2.  We aren’t ready to run everything on the Web. Google would contend that software and hardware incompatibilities won’t limit Chrome OS. In the very near future, the argument goes, we’ll run all of our programs in the browser. Since Google’s OS will be optimized to work seamlessly with the Web, then Chrome is the way of the future.

This notion makes explicit what many observers have pointed out before: The Web is already a kind of operating system. I’ve myself praised this vision of a stripped-down, Webby OS in the past. But it’s important to remember the limits of these machines. Many people buy netbooks as second computers devices for surfing the Web while watching TV or shooting off e-mails on a long cab ride but not for the kind of deep, sustained interaction that most of us would call work. Most Web apps just aren’t good enough right now to replace the desktop programs we rely on. I’ll create a Google Doc when I want to share info with friends or colleagues, but I’m writing this article in Word. It’s no wonder Google Docs despite being free is an order of magnitude less popular than Word.

Web apps will keep getting better, of course, and perhaps soon we’ll run the vast majority of our programs online. But here’s the crucial sticking point for Chrome: Because it’s based on a Web browser, every app developed for Chrome will also run perfectly on Windows or the Mac. By definition, then, Microsoft and Apple machines will always be able to do more than Chrome machines they’ll be able to run Web apps and the processor-intensive desktop programs that we’ll still need in our glorious Webby future: movie-editing software and CAD programs, for instance.

3.  Microsoft is a formidable opponent. Windows’ total market share counting all versions is now at just under 88 percent. This, to be sure, is lower than it has been in the past; just before Vista’s release, Windows commanded 93 percent of the market. But with the launch Windows 7, a terrific OS, Microsoft is certain to make up for lost ground.

So what will be the Chrome OS’s selling point as opposed to Windows? Because the search company plans to give Chrome away for free, the stripped-down machines that come with the OS pre-loaded may be cheaper than comparable Windows computers. But the difference will be slight probably about $50 at the most. That would be a small price to pay for all the extra functionality you’ll get from the Windows computer.

4.  Google fails often. It’s hard to discount Google; engineers there

have a history of shaking up entrenched industries with truly revolutionary software. Look at Gmail, Google Maps, and, obviously, the Google search engine. At the same time, the company often seems to launch products for no clear reason other than because other people are doing it and these efforts flail. Knol, Google’s take on Wikipedia, is useless. So was Lively, Google’s now-shuttered virtual world. And to say that Orkut, its social network, is very popular in Brazil and India is to damn it with faint praise.

Even when Google does make very good products, it has had trouble leveraging its search-engine dominance into other ventures. Google Video was great but the company had to buy YouTube to get anywhere in the online-video market. Google Checkout is wonderful, but its presence hasn’t hurt PayPal. Chrome is just about the best browser you can download, and it’s the only product that Google has ever advertised on TV. Fewer than 2 percent of Web surfers use it.

5. The Chrome OS makes no business sense. It’s no surprise that Google plans to give away its new OS for free; Google gives away nearly everything for free. That’s because it makes huge amounts of money from a single product, Web ads, and can afford to dally in any other business venture it chooses, whether or not those efforts hold out any promise of profits.

Sometimes there’s a logic to this. It made sense for Google to create its own mobile phone OS, for instance, because there were few great operating systems that would deliver the Web to phones and Google’s future depends on the Internet being available everywhere, all the time. Thus you can think of Google’s investment in Android as a kind of loss leader it gives away the OS for free in the hope that billions of people around the world will one day use Android-like phones to click on ads at the gym.

But the Chrome OS project is unencumbered by any such rationale. If 20 percent of the world’s computer users switched from Windows to Chrome OS, would that help Google’s bottom line? Sure, all those people would now be using Gmail and Google Docs but they could have been doing that in Windows, too! An MBA might describe the Chrome OS as a wasteful customer acquisition expense; Google would be wiser to use all the cash that it’s pouring into developing the new program for advertising instead. But the real point of Chrome OS the only point of Chrome OS is to annoy Microsoft.

And that’s fine. When you’ve got money to burn, why not? Microsoft often does things for no reason other than to frustrate its rivals its new search engine Bing being a prime example. But by focusing so much attention on a venture that’s unlikely to do the company any good, Google will only hurt itself.

Q.

Which of the following statements truly reflects the theme of this passage?

 

Solution:

Option 2 is only one of the points made by the author (point 4, to be precise), so it cannot be the whole theme.

Option 3, besides relating to only a single point (number 3), is also factually incorrect, as the author thinks the Google OS is “doomed” not “promising”.

Option 4 is merely the opening sentence of the passage - it completely ignores the rest of the passage, in which the author states his opinions and predictions about this announcement.

Only option 1 accurately summarizes the theme of the passage, i.e. that the author thinks that the Google OS is unlikely to succeed, which he proceeds to qualify with five different reasons.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 71

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Google shook up the tech world recently by announcing that it is developing a PC operating system based on its Chrome Web browser. The Chrome operating system (OS) will at first be available only on low-power netbook machines, but eventually, Google says, you’ll see Chrome on all kinds of laptops and desktops.

The operating-system market could certainly use more competition, and as we’ve seen with the Web browser war when big tech companies go head to head, great new features often trickle down to us users. But I’m sceptical about Google’s project. More than sceptical, actually: I think the Google OS is doomed. Here are five reasons why:

1.  Linux is hard to love. Chrome OS will be based on Linux, the open-source operating system that many techies have long held up as the white knight that will one day slay Microsoft. Scores of engineers and eager entrepreneurs have tried to turn Linux into an operating system that appeals not just to server ninjas but to regular people. They’ve had limited success. Even the advent of Ubuntu, a user-friendly flavour of Linux that comes pre-installed on a variety of brand-name computers, didn’t move the mark; Linux still holds an infinitesimal share of the operating-system market, and not even its biggest boosters expect that to change anytime soon.

Why can’t Linux catch on? A dearth of software and hardware. Many of the programs and peripherals that people want to use are either incompatible with the OS or require so much work to rejigger that it’s not worth the trouble.

Sure, it’s possible that Google’s imprimatur will prompt third-party companies to create more software and hardware that works with Linux. But this will be a long struggle, and Google will have to work hard to convince others to play along. Some firms notably Apple and Microsoft might be especially resistant to change. Don’t expect to see a Chrome OS version of Excel anytime soon.

2.  We aren’t ready to run everything on the Web. Google would contend that software and hardware incompatibilities won’t limit Chrome OS. In the very near future, the argument goes, we’ll run all of our programs in the browser. Since Google’s OS will be optimized to work seamlessly with the Web, then Chrome is the way of the future.

This notion makes explicit what many observers have pointed out before: The Web is already a kind of operating system. I’ve myself praised this vision of a stripped-down, Webby OS in the past. But it’s important to remember the limits of these machines. Many people buy netbooks as second computers devices for surfing the Web while watching TV or shooting off e-mails on a long cab ride but not for the kind of deep, sustained interaction that most of us would call work. Most Web apps just aren’t good enough right now to replace the desktop programs we rely on. I’ll create a Google Doc when I want to share info with friends or colleagues, but I’m writing this article in Word. It’s no wonder Google Docs despite being free is an order of magnitude less popular than Word.

Web apps will keep getting better, of course, and perhaps soon we’ll run the vast majority of our programs online. But here’s the crucial sticking point for Chrome: Because it’s based on a Web browser, every app developed for Chrome will also run perfectly on Windows or the Mac. By definition, then, Microsoft and Apple machines will always be able to do more than Chrome machines they’ll be able to run Web apps and the processor-intensive desktop programs that we’ll still need in our glorious Webby future: movie-editing software and CAD programs, for instance.

3.  Microsoft is a formidable opponent. Windows’ total market share counting all versions is now at just under 88 percent. This, to be sure, is lower than it has been in the past; just before Vista’s release, Windows commanded 93 percent of the market. But with the launch Windows 7, a terrific OS, Microsoft is certain to make up for lost ground.

So what will be the Chrome OS’s selling point as opposed to Windows? Because the search company plans to give Chrome away for free, the stripped-down machines that come with the OS pre-loaded may be cheaper than comparable Windows computers. But the difference will be slight probably about $50 at the most. That would be a small price to pay for all the extra functionality you’ll get from the Windows computer.

4.  Google fails often. It’s hard to discount Google; engineers there

have a history of shaking up entrenched industries with truly revolutionary software. Look at Gmail, Google Maps, and, obviously, the Google search engine. At the same time, the company often seems to launch products for no clear reason other than because other people are doing it and these efforts flail. Knol, Google’s take on Wikipedia, is useless. So was Lively, Google’s now-shuttered virtual world. And to say that Orkut, its social network, is very popular in Brazil and India is to damn it with faint praise.

Even when Google does make very good products, it has had trouble leveraging its search-engine dominance into other ventures. Google Video was great but the company had to buy YouTube to get anywhere in the online-video market. Google Checkout is wonderful, but its presence hasn’t hurt PayPal. Chrome is just about the best browser you can download, and it’s the only product that Google has ever advertised on TV. Fewer than 2 percent of Web surfers use it.

5. The Chrome OS makes no business sense. It’s no surprise that Google plans to give away its new OS for free; Google gives away nearly everything for free. That’s because it makes huge amounts of money from a single product, Web ads, and can afford to dally in any other business venture it chooses, whether or not those efforts hold out any promise of profits.

Sometimes there’s a logic to this. It made sense for Google to create its own mobile phone OS, for instance, because there were few great operating systems that would deliver the Web to phones and Google’s future depends on the Internet being available everywhere, all the time. Thus you can think of Google’s investment in Android as a kind of loss leader it gives away the OS for free in the hope that billions of people around the world will one day use Android-like phones to click on ads at the gym.

But the Chrome OS project is unencumbered by any such rationale. If 20 percent of the world’s computer users switched from Windows to Chrome OS, would that help Google’s bottom line? Sure, all those people would now be using Gmail and Google Docs but they could have been doing that in Windows, too! An MBA might describe the Chrome OS as a wasteful customer acquisition expense; Google would be wiser to use all the cash that it’s pouring into developing the new program for advertising instead. But the real point of Chrome OS the only point of Chrome OS is to annoy Microsoft.

And that’s fine. When you’ve got money to burn, why not? Microsoft often does things for no reason other than to frustrate its rivals its new search engine Bing being a prime example. But by focusing so much attention on a venture that’s unlikely to do the company any good, Google will only hurt itself.

Q.

Which of the following statements are not true, as per this  passage?

I.   Google tends to give away most of its products for free.

II.  Google Docs is much more popular than Word, because it is free.

III. Linux is not very popular because Microsoft and Apple refuse to allow their software to be compatible with it.

IV. Computers that will come with the Chrome OS installed will be cheaper than computers with Windows

 

Solution:

Statement I is true - it is stated in the first paragraph of point 5.

Statement II is not true - according to the second paragraph of point 2, Google Docs is far less popular than Word, in spite of being free.

Statement III is not a valid inference - according to the third paragraph of point 1, Microsoft and Apple may refuse to allow their software to be used with the Google OS (which is based on Linux), but there is nothing to suggest they do so with Linux in general. Moreover, the previous paragraph gives the reason for the lack of popularity as: “A dearth of software and hardware. Many of the programs and peripherals that people want to use are either incompatible with the OS or require so much work to rejigger that it’s not worth the trouble” - thus the problem is not restricted to only Microsoft and Apple. Therefore, statement III is not true. Statement IV is true, as it is stated in the second paragraph of point 3.

So only statements II and III are not true.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 72

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Google shook up the tech world recently by announcing that it is developing a PC operating system based on its Chrome Web browser. The Chrome operating system (OS) will at first be available only on low-power netbook machines, but eventually, Google says, you’ll see Chrome on all kinds of laptops and desktops.

The operating-system market could certainly use more competition, and as we’ve seen with the Web browser war when big tech companies go head to head, great new features often trickle down to us users. But I’m sceptical about Google’s project. More than sceptical, actually: I think the Google OS is doomed. Here are five reasons why:

1.  Linux is hard to love. Chrome OS will be based on Linux, the open-source operating system that many techies have long held up as the white knight that will one day slay Microsoft. Scores of engineers and eager entrepreneurs have tried to turn Linux into an operating system that appeals not just to server ninjas but to regular people. They’ve had limited success. Even the advent of Ubuntu, a user-friendly flavour of Linux that comes pre-installed on a variety of brand-name computers, didn’t move the mark; Linux still holds an infinitesimal share of the operating-system market, and not even its biggest boosters expect that to change anytime soon.

Why can’t Linux catch on? A dearth of software and hardware. Many of the programs and peripherals that people want to use are either incompatible with the OS or require so much work to rejigger that it’s not worth the trouble.

Sure, it’s possible that Google’s imprimatur will prompt third-party companies to create more software and hardware that works with Linux. But this will be a long struggle, and Google will have to work hard to convince others to play along. Some firms notably Apple and Microsoft might be especially resistant to change. Don’t expect to see a Chrome OS version of Excel anytime soon.

2.  We aren’t ready to run everything on the Web. Google would contend that software and hardware incompatibilities won’t limit Chrome OS. In the very near future, the argument goes, we’ll run all of our programs in the browser. Since Google’s OS will be optimized to work seamlessly with the Web, then Chrome is the way of the future.

This notion makes explicit what many observers have pointed out before: The Web is already a kind of operating system. I’ve myself praised this vision of a stripped-down, Webby OS in the past. But it’s important to remember the limits of these machines. Many people buy netbooks as second computers devices for surfing the Web while watching TV or shooting off e-mails on a long cab ride but not for the kind of deep, sustained interaction that most of us would call work. Most Web apps just aren’t good enough right now to replace the desktop programs we rely on. I’ll create a Google Doc when I want to share info with friends or colleagues, but I’m writing this article in Word. It’s no wonder Google Docs despite being free is an order of magnitude less popular than Word.

Web apps will keep getting better, of course, and perhaps soon we’ll run the vast majority of our programs online. But here’s the crucial sticking point for Chrome: Because it’s based on a Web browser, every app developed for Chrome will also run perfectly on Windows or the Mac. By definition, then, Microsoft and Apple machines will always be able to do more than Chrome machines they’ll be able to run Web apps and the processor-intensive desktop programs that we’ll still need in our glorious Webby future: movie-editing software and CAD programs, for instance.

3.  Microsoft is a formidable opponent. Windows’ total market share counting all versions is now at just under 88 percent. This, to be sure, is lower than it has been in the past; just before Vista’s release, Windows commanded 93 percent of the market. But with the launch Windows 7, a terrific OS, Microsoft is certain to make up for lost ground.

So what will be the Chrome OS’s selling point as opposed to Windows? Because the search company plans to give Chrome away for free, the stripped-down machines that come with the OS pre-loaded may be cheaper than comparable Windows computers. But the difference will be slight probably about $50 at the most. That would be a small price to pay for all the extra functionality you’ll get from the Windows computer.

4.  Google fails often. It’s hard to discount Google; engineers there

have a history of shaking up entrenched industries with truly revolutionary software. Look at Gmail, Google Maps, and, obviously, the Google search engine. At the same time, the company often seems to launch products for no clear reason other than because other people are doing it and these efforts flail. Knol, Google’s take on Wikipedia, is useless. So was Lively, Google’s now-shuttered virtual world. And to say that Orkut, its social network, is very popular in Brazil and India is to damn it with faint praise.

Even when Google does make very good products, it has had trouble leveraging its search-engine dominance into other ventures. Google Video was great but the company had to buy YouTube to get anywhere in the online-video market. Google Checkout is wonderful, but its presence hasn’t hurt PayPal. Chrome is just about the best browser you can download, and it’s the only product that Google has ever advertised on TV. Fewer than 2 percent of Web surfers use it.

5. The Chrome OS makes no business sense. It’s no surprise that Google plans to give away its new OS for free; Google gives away nearly everything for free. That’s because it makes huge amounts of money from a single product, Web ads, and can afford to dally in any other business venture it chooses, whether or not those efforts hold out any promise of profits.

Sometimes there’s a logic to this. It made sense for Google to create its own mobile phone OS, for instance, because there were few great operating systems that would deliver the Web to phones and Google’s future depends on the Internet being available everywhere, all the time. Thus you can think of Google’s investment in Android as a kind of loss leader it gives away the OS for free in the hope that billions of people around the world will one day use Android-like phones to click on ads at the gym.

But the Chrome OS project is unencumbered by any such rationale. If 20 percent of the world’s computer users switched from Windows to Chrome OS, would that help Google’s bottom line? Sure, all those people would now be using Gmail and Google Docs but they could have been doing that in Windows, too! An MBA might describe the Chrome OS as a wasteful customer acquisition expense; Google would be wiser to use all the cash that it’s pouring into developing the new program for advertising instead. But the real point of Chrome OS the only point of Chrome OS is to annoy Microsoft.

And that’s fine. When you’ve got money to burn, why not? Microsoft often does things for no reason other than to frustrate its rivals its new search engine Bing being a prime example. But by focusing so much attention on a venture that’s unlikely to do the company any good, Google will only hurt itself.

Q.

Arrange the given statements in the correct sequence as they appear in the passage.

I.  In the future, we will still need processor-intensive desktop programs.

II.  People buy netbooks for casual Web-surfing, not for deep, sustained work.

III. Google Video alone was not enough for Google to get anywhere in the online-video market.

IV. Microsoft will make up for lost ground with the launch of Windows 7.

 

Solution:

Statement I is mentioned in the third paragraph of the second point.

Statement II is mentioned in the second paragraph of the second point.

Statement III is mentioned in the second paragraph of the fourth point.

Statement IV is mentioned in the first paragraph of the third point.

Therefore, the correct sequence is: II, I, IV, III.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 73

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Google shook up the tech world recently by announcing that it is developing a PC operating system based on its Chrome Web browser. The Chrome operating system (OS) will at first be available only on low-power netbook machines, but eventually, Google says, you’ll see Chrome on all kinds of laptops and desktops.

The operating-system market could certainly use more competition, and as we’ve seen with the Web browser war when big tech companies go head to head, great new features often trickle down to us users. But I’m sceptical about Google’s project. More than sceptical, actually: I think the Google OS is doomed. Here are five reasons why:

1.  Linux is hard to love. Chrome OS will be based on Linux, the open-source operating system that many techies have long held up as the white knight that will one day slay Microsoft. Scores of engineers and eager entrepreneurs have tried to turn Linux into an operating system that appeals not just to server ninjas but to regular people. They’ve had limited success. Even the advent of Ubuntu, a user-friendly flavour of Linux that comes pre-installed on a variety of brand-name computers, didn’t move the mark; Linux still holds an infinitesimal share of the operating-system market, and not even its biggest boosters expect that to change anytime soon.

Why can’t Linux catch on? A dearth of software and hardware. Many of the programs and peripherals that people want to use are either incompatible with the OS or require so much work to rejigger that it’s not worth the trouble.

Sure, it’s possible that Google’s imprimatur will prompt third-party companies to create more software and hardware that works with Linux. But this will be a long struggle, and Google will have to work hard to convince others to play along. Some firms notably Apple and Microsoft might be especially resistant to change. Don’t expect to see a Chrome OS version of Excel anytime soon.

2.  We aren’t ready to run everything on the Web. Google would contend that software and hardware incompatibilities won’t limit Chrome OS. In the very near future, the argument goes, we’ll run all of our programs in the browser. Since Google’s OS will be optimized to work seamlessly with the Web, then Chrome is the way of the future.

This notion makes explicit what many observers have pointed out before: The Web is already a kind of operating system. I’ve myself praised this vision of a stripped-down, Webby OS in the past. But it’s important to remember the limits of these machines. Many people buy netbooks as second computers devices for surfing the Web while watching TV or shooting off e-mails on a long cab ride but not for the kind of deep, sustained interaction that most of us would call work. Most Web apps just aren’t good enough right now to replace the desktop programs we rely on. I’ll create a Google Doc when I want to share info with friends or colleagues, but I’m writing this article in Word. It’s no wonder Google Docs despite being free is an order of magnitude less popular than Word.

Web apps will keep getting better, of course, and perhaps soon we’ll run the vast majority of our programs online. But here’s the crucial sticking point for Chrome: Because it’s based on a Web browser, every app developed for Chrome will also run perfectly on Windows or the Mac. By definition, then, Microsoft and Apple machines will always be able to do more than Chrome machines they’ll be able to run Web apps and the processor-intensive desktop programs that we’ll still need in our glorious Webby future: movie-editing software and CAD programs, for instance.

3.  Microsoft is a formidable opponent. Windows’ total market share counting all versions is now at just under 88 percent. This, to be sure, is lower than it has been in the past; just before Vista’s release, Windows commanded 93 percent of the market. But with the launch Windows 7, a terrific OS, Microsoft is certain to make up for lost ground.

So what will be the Chrome OS’s selling point as opposed to Windows? Because the search company plans to give Chrome away for free, the stripped-down machines that come with the OS pre-loaded may be cheaper than comparable Windows computers. But the difference will be slight probably about $50 at the most. That would be a small price to pay for all the extra functionality you’ll get from the Windows computer.

4.  Google fails often. It’s hard to discount Google; engineers there

have a history of shaking up entrenched industries with truly revolutionary software. Look at Gmail, Google Maps, and, obviously, the Google search engine. At the same time, the company often seems to launch products for no clear reason other than because other people are doing it and these efforts flail. Knol, Google’s take on Wikipedia, is useless. So was Lively, Google’s now-shuttered virtual world. And to say that Orkut, its social network, is very popular in Brazil and India is to damn it with faint praise.

Even when Google does make very good products, it has had trouble leveraging its search-engine dominance into other ventures. Google Video was great but the company had to buy YouTube to get anywhere in the online-video market. Google Checkout is wonderful, but its presence hasn’t hurt PayPal. Chrome is just about the best browser you can download, and it’s the only product that Google has ever advertised on TV. Fewer than 2 percent of Web surfers use it.

5. The Chrome OS makes no business sense. It’s no surprise that Google plans to give away its new OS for free; Google gives away nearly everything for free. That’s because it makes huge amounts of money from a single product, Web ads, and can afford to dally in any other business venture it chooses, whether or not those efforts hold out any promise of profits.

Sometimes there’s a logic to this. It made sense for Google to create its own mobile phone OS, for instance, because there were few great operating systems that would deliver the Web to phones and Google’s future depends on the Internet being available everywhere, all the time. Thus you can think of Google’s investment in Android as a kind of loss leader it gives away the OS for free in the hope that billions of people around the world will one day use Android-like phones to click on ads at the gym.

But the Chrome OS project is unencumbered by any such rationale. If 20 percent of the world’s computer users switched from Windows to Chrome OS, would that help Google’s bottom line? Sure, all those people would now be using Gmail and Google Docs but they could have been doing that in Windows, too! An MBA might describe the Chrome OS as a wasteful customer acquisition expense; Google would be wiser to use all the cash that it’s pouring into developing the new program for advertising instead. But the real point of Chrome OS the only point of Chrome OS is to annoy Microsoft.

And that’s fine. When you’ve got money to burn, why not? Microsoft often does things for no reason other than to frustrate its rivals its new search engine Bing being a prime example. But by focusing so much attention on a venture that’s unlikely to do the company any good, Google will only hurt itself.

Q.

Which of the following ideas does the author put forth to support his main argument?

I. Web apps are currently not good enough to replace regularly used desktop programs.

II. Even the biggest supporters of Linux don’t expect its market share to increase in the near future.

III. Google should stop giving away its products for free, even if it does make its money from other sources.

IV. Google’s OS will be directly competing against Microsoft’s Windows, which nearly monopolizes the market

 

Solution:

Statement I is clearly stated in the second paragraph of the second point. Eliminate options 2 and 3.

Statement II is stated in the first paragraph of the first point. Statement III is incorrect - in the fifth point, the author states that it does make sense for Google to give away some of its products for free (like the Android OS) - just not its new Chrome OS.

Statement IV can be inferred from the data given in the first paragraph of the third point. Eliminate option 1.

Therefore only statements I, II, and IV are correct.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 74

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer-excellent for drawing the veil from men's motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high- power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory.

I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home- centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the

Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland. Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.

One night--it was on the twentieth of March, 1888--I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street. As I passed the well- remembered door, which must always be associated in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers. His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his headsunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again. He had risen out of his drug-created dreams and was hot upon the scent of some new problem. I rang the bell and was shown up to the chamber which had formerly been in part my own.

His manner was not effusive. It seldom was; but he was glad, I think, to see me. With hardly a word spoken, but with a kindly eye, he waved me to an armchair, threw across his case of cigars, and indicated a spirit case and a gasogene in the corner. Then he stood before the fire and looked me over in his singular introspective fashion.

"Wedlock suits you," he remarked. "I think, Watson, that you have put on seven and a half pounds since I saw you"."Seven!" I answered. "Indeed, I should have thought a little more. Just a trifle more, I fancy, Watson. And in practice again, I observe. You did not tell me that you intended to go into harness". "Then, how do you know?" "I see it, I deduce it. How do I know that you have been getting yourself very wet lately, and that you have a most clumsy and careless servant girl?" "My dear Holmes," said I, "this is too much. You would certainly have been burned, had you lived a few centuries ago. It is true that I had a country walk on Thursday and came home in a dreadful mess, but as I have changed my clothes I can't imagine how you deduce it. As to Mary Jane, she is

incorrigible, and my wife has given her notice, but there, again, I fail to see how you work it out."

He chuckled to himself and rubbed his long, nervous hands together. "It is simplicity itself," said he; "my eyes tell me that on the inside of your left shoe, just where the firelight strikes it, the leather is scored by six almost parallel cuts. Obviously they have been caused by someone who has very carelessly scraped round the edges of the sole in order to remove crusted mud from it. Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot- slitting specimen of the London slavey. As to your practice, if a gentleman walks into my rooms smelling of iodoform, with a black mark of nitrate of silver upon his right forefinger, and a bulge on the right side of his top-hat to show where he has secreted his stethoscope, I must be dull, indeed, if I do not pronounce him to be an active member of the medical profession."

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. "When I hear you give your reasons,"

I remarked, "the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours". "Quite so," he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an armchair. "You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room". "Frequently."

"How often?"

"Well, some hundreds of times."

"Then how many are there?"

"How many? I don't know."

"Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there are seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed. By-the-way, since you are interested in these little problems, and since you are good enough to chronicle one or two of my trifling experiences, you may be interested in this." He threw over a sheet of thick, pink- tinted note-paper which had been lying open upon the table. "It came by the last post," said he. "Read it aloud".

Q.

The synonym for the term “Bohemian” is:

Solution:

The following extract,"... while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street...” shows that the word “Bohemian” refers to someone who loathes society or is “unconventional” in outlook since most people do not loathe society but want very much to be a part of it.

“Orthodox” and “traditional” are opposite in meaning to “Bohemian”, while “misogynist” is someone who hates women - the extract mentions Holmes hated society.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 75

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer-excellent for drawing the veil from men's motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high- power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory.

I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home- centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the

Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland. Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.

One night--it was on the twentieth of March, 1888--I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street. As I passed the well- remembered door, which must always be associated in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers. His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his headsunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again. He had risen out of his drug-created dreams and was hot upon the scent of some new problem. I rang the bell and was shown up to the chamber which had formerly been in part my own.

His manner was not effusive. It seldom was; but he was glad, I think, to see me. With hardly a word spoken, but with a kindly eye, he waved me to an armchair, threw across his case of cigars, and indicated a spirit case and a gasogene in the corner. Then he stood before the fire and looked me over in his singular introspective fashion.

"Wedlock suits you," he remarked. "I think, Watson, that you have put on seven and a half pounds since I saw you"."Seven!" I answered. "Indeed, I should have thought a little more. Just a trifle more, I fancy, Watson. And in practice again, I observe. You did not tell me that you intended to go into harness". "Then, how do you know?" "I see it, I deduce it. How do I know that you have been getting yourself very wet lately, and that you have a most clumsy and careless servant girl?" "My dear Holmes," said I, "this is too much. You would certainly have been burned, had you lived a few centuries ago. It is true that I had a country walk on Thursday and came home in a dreadful mess, but as I have changed my clothes I can't imagine how you deduce it. As to Mary Jane, she is

incorrigible, and my wife has given her notice, but there, again, I fail to see how you work it out."

He chuckled to himself and rubbed his long, nervous hands together. "It is simplicity itself," said he; "my eyes tell me that on the inside of your left shoe, just where the firelight strikes it, the leather is scored by six almost parallel cuts. Obviously they have been caused by someone who has very carelessly scraped round the edges of the sole in order to remove crusted mud from it. Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot- slitting specimen of the London slavey. As to your practice, if a gentleman walks into my rooms smelling of iodoform, with a black mark of nitrate of silver upon his right forefinger, and a bulge on the right side of his top-hat to show where he has secreted his stethoscope, I must be dull, indeed, if I do not pronounce him to be an active member of the medical profession."

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. "When I hear you give your reasons,"

I remarked, "the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours". "Quite so," he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an armchair. "You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room". "Frequently."

"How often?"

"Well, some hundreds of times."

"Then how many are there?"

"How many? I don't know."

"Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there are seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed. By-the-way, since you are interested in these little problems, and since you are good enough to chronicle one or two of my trifling experiences, you may be interested in this." He threw over a sheet of thick, pink- tinted note-paper which had been lying open upon the table. "It came by the last post," said he. "Read it aloud".

Q.

What is the other profession of the author apart from being a doctor?

Solution:

The following extract, “By-the-way, since you are interested in these little problems, and since you are good enough to chronicle one or two of my trifling experiences, you may be interested in this.” validates option 2.

There is no basis on which we can assume the other options to be correct.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 76

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer-excellent for drawing the veil from men's motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high- power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory.

I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home- centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the

Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland. Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.

One night--it was on the twentieth of March, 1888--I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street. As I passed the well- remembered door, which must always be associated in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers. His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his headsunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again. He had risen out of his drug-created dreams and was hot upon the scent of some new problem. I rang the bell and was shown up to the chamber which had formerly been in part my own.

His manner was not effusive. It seldom was; but he was glad, I think, to see me. With hardly a word spoken, but with a kindly eye, he waved me to an armchair, threw across his case of cigars, and indicated a spirit case and a gasogene in the corner. Then he stood before the fire and looked me over in his singular introspective fashion.

"Wedlock suits you," he remarked. "I think, Watson, that you have put on seven and a half pounds since I saw you"."Seven!" I answered. "Indeed, I should have thought a little more. Just a trifle more, I fancy, Watson. And in practice again, I observe. You did not tell me that you intended to go into harness". "Then, how do you know?" "I see it, I deduce it. How do I know that you have been getting yourself very wet lately, and that you have a most clumsy and careless servant girl?" "My dear Holmes," said I, "this is too much. You would certainly have been burned, had you lived a few centuries ago. It is true that I had a country walk on Thursday and came home in a dreadful mess, but as I have changed my clothes I can't imagine how you deduce it. As to Mary Jane, she is

incorrigible, and my wife has given her notice, but there, again, I fail to see how you work it out."

He chuckled to himself and rubbed his long, nervous hands together. "It is simplicity itself," said he; "my eyes tell me that on the inside of your left shoe, just where the firelight strikes it, the leather is scored by six almost parallel cuts. Obviously they have been caused by someone who has very carelessly scraped round the edges of the sole in order to remove crusted mud from it. Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot- slitting specimen of the London slavey. As to your practice, if a gentleman walks into my rooms smelling of iodoform, with a black mark of nitrate of silver upon his right forefinger, and a bulge on the right side of his top-hat to show where he has secreted his stethoscope, I must be dull, indeed, if I do not pronounce him to be an active member of the medical profession."

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. "When I hear you give your reasons,"

I remarked, "the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours". "Quite so," he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an armchair. "You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room". "Frequently."

"How often?"

"Well, some hundreds of times."

"Then how many are there?"

"How many? I don't know."

"Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there are seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed. By-the-way, since you are interested in these little problems, and since you are good enough to chronicle one or two of my trifling experiences, you may be interested in this." He threw over a sheet of thick, pink- tinted note-paper which had been lying open upon the table. "It came by the last post," said he. "Read it aloud".

Q.

Which among the following cannot be concluded from the passage?

Solution:

Option 1 is incorrect and contradicts the first paragraph wherein it is mentioned that Holmes did not have any feelings of the heart as far as Irene Adler was concerned. Option 2 can be concluded from the way Holmes deduces that the author has a very bad maid and has resumed medical practice.

Option 3 can be concluded from the various cases that he was involved in and which appeared in the daily press. Option 4 can be concluded from the following extract, “He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police.”

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 77

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer-excellent for drawing the veil from men's motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high- power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory.

I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home- centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the

Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland. Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.

One night--it was on the twentieth of March, 1888--I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street. As I passed the well- remembered door, which must always be associated in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers. His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his headsunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again. He had risen out of his drug-created dreams and was hot upon the scent of some new problem. I rang the bell and was shown up to the chamber which had formerly been in part my own.

His manner was not effusive. It seldom was; but he was glad, I think, to see me. With hardly a word spoken, but with a kindly eye, he waved me to an armchair, threw across his case of cigars, and indicated a spirit case and a gasogene in the corner. Then he stood before the fire and looked me over in his singular introspective fashion.

"Wedlock suits you," he remarked. "I think, Watson, that you have put on seven and a half pounds since I saw you"."Seven!" I answered. "Indeed, I should have thought a little more. Just a trifle more, I fancy, Watson. And in practice again, I observe. You did not tell me that you intended to go into harness". "Then, how do you know?" "I see it, I deduce it. How do I know that you have been getting yourself very wet lately, and that you have a most clumsy and careless servant girl?" "My dear Holmes," said I, "this is too much. You would certainly have been burned, had you lived a few centuries ago. It is true that I had a country walk on Thursday and came home in a dreadful mess, but as I have changed my clothes I can't imagine how you deduce it. As to Mary Jane, she is

incorrigible, and my wife has given her notice, but there, again, I fail to see how you work it out."

He chuckled to himself and rubbed his long, nervous hands together. "It is simplicity itself," said he; "my eyes tell me that on the inside of your left shoe, just where the firelight strikes it, the leather is scored by six almost parallel cuts. Obviously they have been caused by someone who has very carelessly scraped round the edges of the sole in order to remove crusted mud from it. Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot- slitting specimen of the London slavey. As to your practice, if a gentleman walks into my rooms smelling of iodoform, with a black mark of nitrate of silver upon his right forefinger, and a bulge on the right side of his top-hat to show where he has secreted his stethoscope, I must be dull, indeed, if I do not pronounce him to be an active member of the medical profession."

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. "When I hear you give your reasons,"

I remarked, "the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours". "Quite so," he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an armchair. "You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room". "Frequently."

"How often?"

"Well, some hundreds of times."

"Then how many are there?"

"How many? I don't know."

"Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there are seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed. By-the-way, since you are interested in these little problems, and since you are good enough to chronicle one or two of my trifling experiences, you may be interested in this." He threw over a sheet of thick, pink- tinted note-paper which had been lying open upon the table. "It came by the last post," said he. "Read it aloud".

Q.

What did Holmes do when he was at work?

 

Solution:

The following extract, “I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his head sunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again” indicates option 2.

 

Options 1 and 3 are true of Holmes but do not indicate that he was back at work.

Option 4 is not related to the question being asked.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 78

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Unfortunately, the end of the euro crisis is far in the distance. The worst could even lie ahead. This is primarily a crisis of competitiveness - the eurozone’s periphery has not been able to keep up with Germany, Europe’s economic powerhouse. The fiscal crisis and the banking crisis are in large part reflections of the competitiveness gap, even though other factors are also at play.

Before the euro, it was relatively easy for countries to deal with the divergence of competitiveness, as they could devalue their currency. Naturally, with everyone in the eurozone using the same currency, that is no longer an option. The result is that the periphery is structurally incapable of growing, which has severe budgetary, banking, and employment consequences and is the cause of acute social and political tensions. While there are positive signs in Ireland, there is a long way to go before the competitiveness problem is fixed. Other economies, particularly Italy, are well behind. The eurozone faces an extended period of stagnation. That is depressingly the best scenario that can be hoped for at this stage. It is difficult to see sources of growth when many of these countries are uncompetitive. The countries of the periphery are still struggling to borrow money and remain under enormous pressure from the markets to cut back their deficits. Consumption is low and investors are scared.

The only way to reestablish growth is to improve the competitiveness of Europe over time and to reduce the debt burden of the periphery. Both of these things are going to take a long time. For now, Europe’s crisis is a major drag on global growth. The financial crisis is largely contained within Europe, so it isn’t a disaster for the world, but it could easily explode into a bigger issue. The odds are that the euro will survive, but this is far from guaranteed. The eurozone could indeed break apart. If a country did move to exit the eurozone, the trigger would be a political crisis, not one based on a rational economic calculus. The fundamental driver of an eventual breakup would be either a reaction to endless austerity in the periphery or the bubbling-over of resentment in one of the core countries about the amount of money being used to keep the periphery afloat and the share of the burden the core is carrying. Germany is not likely to make the first move. There are strong political, historic, and economic factor - Germany is the biggest creditor and exporter to the periphery - that make it one of the last countries that will want to pull out. Greece is obviously the most at risk. The country cannot repay its debt and will require more debt forgiveness. Its government is in a terrible mess. It is the least competitive economy in the eurozone. And it lacks a good export structure that could prop up the country.

Portugal is also in bad shape, and Spain and Italy are in deep trouble. Spain’s

economy must undergo an enormous adjustment following the burst of its housing bubble, so, taking that risk into account, investors are probably correctly demanding larger yields on their loans to Spain than to Italy. But Italy is also in serious danger.

Italy’s GDP is down from where it was when the country joined the eurozone in 1999. Though Italy did not experience a housing bubble similar to Spain’s and its unemployment is not as high as other economies, the fact that the economy hasn’t grown in fourteen years coupled with a declining GDP is an indicator that things could go very wrong. The tendency is always to say that every election is crucial. And this is correct in Italy’s case. The same would hold true for any election in Europe’s periphery today because voting points to the significant policy choices that need to be made and creates enormous political tensions - and that’s where the risks ultimately lie. This election is especially important because Italy is so big. The country is trillions of euros in debt, and it’s one of the world’s largest economies. Unless Italy gets its act together, the euro is doomed and there will be a major financial crisis in Europe that could easily lead to a global financial crisis.

Italy is transitioning away from a technocratic government that made progress on the fiscal balance and on pensions but didn’t do great things to address the structural reforms needed, beginning in the labor market. It did, however, have more success than previous governments in reestablishing the country’s credibility. The question is how the new leaders will conduct economic reforms. In my view, Italy will end up with a coalition government that has little choice in practice but to persist in the economic policies already under way. Even if former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi gains the upper hand on Democratic Party leader Pier Luigi Bersani and Prime Minister Mario Monti - an unlikely outcome - the markets will quickly force the new government’s hand. There will surely be differences in tone and style, but reforms will need to continue and there will be little room for maneuver. Still, this is a very sensitive time.

The election matters even if the policies pursued are similar because Italy’s new leaders need to have international credibility in order to reassure the markets.

When assessing the performance of Europe’s leaders, it’s good to separate the way in which they’ve dealt with the current crisis from what they are doing to build an architecture that assures - to the degree possible - that the euro will survive in the long term. In terms of fighting the current crisis, politicians across Europe should be doing more. Leaders need to move forward on structural reforms in Greece, Italy,

Spain, and other countries at a faster rate. Germany should be doing more to stimulate its own economy. Building a sustainable architecture is clearly linked to the current crisis because the more progress is made, the more confidence is gained in facing the current conditions. Some of the reforms needed to fix the current crisis, including making labor markets more flexible, can help establish the necessary architecture. For the euro to survive in the long term, the countries of the eurozone need to bolster the EU’s institutional capacity to support member states. They can do so in three main ways.

First, they need to establish a banking union. In the United States, when banks in the state of Florida get into trouble they are not bailed out by the state, they receive federal support. The same is necessary in the eurozone. Some progress has been made on this by adopting a template on common supervision, but European leaders are quite far from making the big reforms that are necessary. This includes a common scheme for insuring deposits and for dealing with banks that fail.

Second, there needs to be greater fiscal unity with a large pool of money at the center. Europe doesn’t need the exact same fiscal structure as the United States, but the center must be more capable of transferring money and intervening when countries and regions are in trouble. Europe has gotten nowhere on this issue. Leaders are responding to this need with as little change as possible and as late as possible because all leaders confront different political pressures.

Third, there needs to be a true lender of last resort in the eurozone. This is where there has been the most movement in the right direction. While the European Central Bank didn’t do enough at the beginning of the crisis, it has assumed a much more positive role since Mario Draghi took over and the inevitability of change became apparent. But a lender of last resort is not the solution in and of itself. All it does is give states time to take the necessary actions, so the other key reforms cannot be overlooked. The economies in the periphery must carry out structural reforms, and the eurozone countries need to move forward on strengthening the banking and fiscal mechanisms at the center.

Q.

Identify the correct statement from the following:

Solution:

The second sentence of the passage contradicts option 1.

Option 2 contradicts paragraph 2.

Option 3 contradicts paragraph 3.

Only option 4 is a correct statement and is contained in paragraph 7.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 79

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Unfortunately, the end of the euro crisis is far in the distance. The worst could even lie ahead. This is primarily a crisis of competitiveness - the eurozone’s periphery has not been able to keep up with Germany, Europe’s economic powerhouse. The fiscal crisis and the banking crisis are in large part reflections of the competitiveness gap, even though other factors are also at play.

Before the euro, it was relatively easy for countries to deal with the divergence of competitiveness, as they could devalue their currency. Naturally, with everyone in the eurozone using the same currency, that is no longer an option. The result is that the periphery is structurally incapable of growing, which has severe budgetary, banking, and employment consequences and is the cause of acute social and political tensions. While there are positive signs in Ireland, there is a long way to go before the competitiveness problem is fixed. Other economies, particularly Italy, are well behind. The eurozone faces an extended period of stagnation. That is depressingly the best scenario that can be hoped for at this stage. It is difficult to see sources of growth when many of these countries are uncompetitive. The countries of the periphery are still struggling to borrow money and remain under enormous pressure from the markets to cut back their deficits. Consumption is low and investors are scared.

The only way to reestablish growth is to improve the competitiveness of Europe over time and to reduce the debt burden of the periphery. Both of these things are going to take a long time. For now, Europe’s crisis is a major drag on global growth. The financial crisis is largely contained within Europe, so it isn’t a disaster for the world, but it could easily explode into a bigger issue. The odds are that the euro will survive, but this is far from guaranteed. The eurozone could indeed break apart. If a country did move to exit the eurozone, the trigger would be a political crisis, not one based on a rational economic calculus. The fundamental driver of an eventual breakup would be either a reaction to endless austerity in the periphery or the bubbling-over of resentment in one of the core countries about the amount of money being used to keep the periphery afloat and the share of the burden the core is carrying. Germany is not likely to make the first move. There are strong political, historic, and economic factor - Germany is the biggest creditor and exporter to the periphery - that make it one of the last countries that will want to pull out. Greece is obviously the most at risk. The country cannot repay its debt and will require more debt forgiveness. Its government is in a terrible mess. It is the least competitive economy in the eurozone. And it lacks a good export structure that could prop up the country.

Portugal is also in bad shape, and Spain and Italy are in deep trouble. Spain’s

economy must undergo an enormous adjustment following the burst of its housing bubble, so, taking that risk into account, investors are probably correctly demanding larger yields on their loans to Spain than to Italy. But Italy is also in serious danger.

Italy’s GDP is down from where it was when the country joined the eurozone in 1999. Though Italy did not experience a housing bubble similar to Spain’s and its unemployment is not as high as other economies, the fact that the economy hasn’t grown in fourteen years coupled with a declining GDP is an indicator that things could go very wrong. The tendency is always to say that every election is crucial. And this is correct in Italy’s case. The same would hold true for any election in Europe’s periphery today because voting points to the significant policy choices that need to be made and creates enormous political tensions - and that’s where the risks ultimately lie. This election is especially important because Italy is so big. The country is trillions of euros in debt, and it’s one of the world’s largest economies. Unless Italy gets its act together, the euro is doomed and there will be a major financial crisis in Europe that could easily lead to a global financial crisis.

Italy is transitioning away from a technocratic government that made progress on the fiscal balance and on pensions but didn’t do great things to address the structural reforms needed, beginning in the labor market. It did, however, have more success than previous governments in reestablishing the country’s credibility. The question is how the new leaders will conduct economic reforms. In my view, Italy will end up with a coalition government that has little choice in practice but to persist in the economic policies already under way. Even if former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi gains the upper hand on Democratic Party leader Pier Luigi Bersani and Prime Minister Mario Monti - an unlikely outcome - the markets will quickly force the new government’s hand. There will surely be differences in tone and style, but reforms will need to continue and there will be little room for maneuver. Still, this is a very sensitive time.

The election matters even if the policies pursued are similar because Italy’s new leaders need to have international credibility in order to reassure the markets.

When assessing the performance of Europe’s leaders, it’s good to separate the way in which they’ve dealt with the current crisis from what they are doing to build an architecture that assures - to the degree possible - that the euro will survive in the long term. In terms of fighting the current crisis, politicians across Europe should be doing more. Leaders need to move forward on structural reforms in Greece, Italy,

Spain, and other countries at a faster rate. Germany should be doing more to stimulate its own economy. Building a sustainable architecture is clearly linked to the current crisis because the more progress is made, the more confidence is gained in facing the current conditions. Some of the reforms needed to fix the current crisis, including making labor markets more flexible, can help establish the necessary architecture. For the euro to survive in the long term, the countries of the eurozone need to bolster the EU’s institutional capacity to support member states. They can do so in three main ways.

First, they need to establish a banking union. In the United States, when banks in the state of Florida get into trouble they are not bailed out by the state, they receive federal support. The same is necessary in the eurozone. Some progress has been made on this by adopting a template on common supervision, but European leaders are quite far from making the big reforms that are necessary. This includes a common scheme for insuring deposits and for dealing with banks that fail.

Second, there needs to be greater fiscal unity with a large pool of money at the center. Europe doesn’t need the exact same fiscal structure as the United States, but the center must be more capable of transferring money and intervening when countries and regions are in trouble. Europe has gotten nowhere on this issue. Leaders are responding to this need with as little change as possible and as late as possible because all leaders confront different political pressures.

Third, there needs to be a true lender of last resort in the eurozone. This is where there has been the most movement in the right direction. While the European Central Bank didn’t do enough at the beginning of the crisis, it has assumed a much more positive role since Mario Draghi took over and the inevitability of change became apparent. But a lender of last resort is not the solution in and of itself. All it does is give states time to take the necessary actions, so the other key reforms cannot be overlooked. The economies in the periphery must carry out structural reforms, and the eurozone countries need to move forward on strengthening the banking and fiscal mechanisms at the center.

Q.

 Identify the wrong statement from the following:

Solution:

Options 2, 3 and 4 have been stated in the passage andhence, can be eliminated.

Option 1 contradicts the following extract, “In terms of fighting the current crisis, politicians across Europe should be doing more. Leaders need to move forward on structural reforms in Greece, Italy, Spain, and other countries at a faster rate. Germany should be doing more to stimulate its own economy.” Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 80

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Unfortunately, the end of the euro crisis is far in the distance. The worst could even lie ahead. This is primarily a crisis of competitiveness - the eurozone’s periphery has not been able to keep up with Germany, Europe’s economic powerhouse. The fiscal crisis and the banking crisis are in large part reflections of the competitiveness gap, even though other factors are also at play.

Before the euro, it was relatively easy for countries to deal with the divergence of competitiveness, as they could devalue their currency. Naturally, with everyone in the eurozone using the same currency, that is no longer an option. The result is that the periphery is structurally incapable of growing, which has severe budgetary, banking, and employment consequences and is the cause of acute social and political tensions. While there are positive signs in Ireland, there is a long way to go before the competitiveness problem is fixed. Other economies, particularly Italy, are well behind. The eurozone faces an extended period of stagnation. That is depressingly the best scenario that can be hoped for at this stage. It is difficult to see sources of growth when many of these countries are uncompetitive. The countries of the periphery are still struggling to borrow money and remain under enormous pressure from the markets to cut back their deficits. Consumption is low and investors are scared.

The only way to reestablish growth is to improve the competitiveness of Europe over time and to reduce the debt burden of the periphery. Both of these things are going to take a long time. For now, Europe’s crisis is a major drag on global growth. The financial crisis is largely contained within Europe, so it isn’t a disaster for the world, but it could easily explode into a bigger issue. The odds are that the euro will survive, but this is far from guaranteed. The eurozone could indeed break apart. If a country did move to exit the eurozone, the trigger would be a political crisis, not one based on a rational economic calculus. The fundamental driver of an eventual breakup would be either a reaction to endless austerity in the periphery or the bubbling-over of resentment in one of the core countries about the amount of money being used to keep the periphery afloat and the share of the burden the core is carrying. Germany is not likely to make the first move. There are strong political, historic, and economic factor - Germany is the biggest creditor and exporter to the periphery - that make it one of the last countries that will want to pull out. Greece is obviously the most at risk. The country cannot repay its debt and will require more debt forgiveness. Its government is in a terrible mess. It is the least competitive economy in the eurozone. And it lacks a good export structure that could prop up the country.

Portugal is also in bad shape, and Spain and Italy are in deep trouble. Spain’s

economy must undergo an enormous adjustment following the burst of its housing bubble, so, taking that risk into account, investors are probably correctly demanding larger yields on their loans to Spain than to Italy. But Italy is also in serious danger.

Italy’s GDP is down from where it was when the country joined the eurozone in 1999. Though Italy did not experience a housing bubble similar to Spain’s and its unemployment is not as high as other economies, the fact that the economy hasn’t grown in fourteen years coupled with a declining GDP is an indicator that things could go very wrong. The tendency is always to say that every election is crucial. And this is correct in Italy’s case. The same would hold true for any election in Europe’s periphery today because voting points to the significant policy choices that need to be made and creates enormous political tensions - and that’s where the risks ultimately lie. This election is especially important because Italy is so big. The country is trillions of euros in debt, and it’s one of the world’s largest economies. Unless Italy gets its act together, the euro is doomed and there will be a major financial crisis in Europe that could easily lead to a global financial crisis.

Italy is transitioning away from a technocratic government that made progress on the fiscal balance and on pensions but didn’t do great things to address the structural reforms needed, beginning in the labor market. It did, however, have more success than previous governments in reestablishing the country’s credibility. The question is how the new leaders will conduct economic reforms. In my view, Italy will end up with a coalition government that has little choice in practice but to persist in the economic policies already under way. Even if former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi gains the upper hand on Democratic Party leader Pier Luigi Bersani and Prime Minister Mario Monti - an unlikely outcome - the markets will quickly force the new government’s hand. There will surely be differences in tone and style, but reforms will need to continue and there will be little room for maneuver. Still, this is a very sensitive time.

The election matters even if the policies pursued are similar because Italy’s new leaders need to have international credibility in order to reassure the markets.

When assessing the performance of Europe’s leaders, it’s good to separate the way in which they’ve dealt with the current crisis from what they are doing to build an architecture that assures - to the degree possible - that the euro will survive in the long term. In terms of fighting the current crisis, politicians across Europe should be doing more. Leaders need to move forward on structural reforms in Greece, Italy,

Spain, and other countries at a faster rate. Germany should be doing more to stimulate its own economy. Building a sustainable architecture is clearly linked to the current crisis because the more progress is made, the more confidence is gained in facing the current conditions. Some of the reforms needed to fix the current crisis, including making labor markets more flexible, can help establish the necessary architecture. For the euro to survive in the long term, the countries of the eurozone need to bolster the EU’s institutional capacity to support member states. They can do so in three main ways.

First, they need to establish a banking union. In the United States, when banks in the state of Florida get into trouble they are not bailed out by the state, they receive federal support. The same is necessary in the eurozone. Some progress has been made on this by adopting a template on common supervision, but European leaders are quite far from making the big reforms that are necessary. This includes a common scheme for insuring deposits and for dealing with banks that fail.

Second, there needs to be greater fiscal unity with a large pool of money at the center. Europe doesn’t need the exact same fiscal structure as the United States, but the center must be more capable of transferring money and intervening when countries and regions are in trouble. Europe has gotten nowhere on this issue. Leaders are responding to this need with as little change as possible and as late as possible because all leaders confront different political pressures.

Third, there needs to be a true lender of last resort in the eurozone. This is where there has been the most movement in the right direction. While the European Central Bank didn’t do enough at the beginning of the crisis, it has assumed a much more positive role since Mario Draghi took over and the inevitability of change became apparent. But a lender of last resort is not the solution in and of itself. All it does is give states time to take the necessary actions, so the other key reforms cannot be overlooked. The economies in the periphery must carry out structural reforms, and the eurozone countries need to move forward on strengthening the banking and fiscal mechanisms at the center.

Q.

Match the following:

Solution:

The passage describes Portugal as being in “bad

shape.” Ireland is showing “positive signs”, while Greece is “most at risk” and Spain is in “deep trouble.”

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 81

The passage given below is followed by a set of questions. Choose the most appropriate answer to each question.

Unfortunately, the end of the euro crisis is far in the distance. The worst could even lie ahead. This is primarily a crisis of competitiveness - the eurozone’s periphery has not been able to keep up with Germany, Europe’s economic powerhouse. The fiscal crisis and the banking crisis are in large part reflections of the competitiveness gap, even though other factors are also at play.

Before the euro, it was relatively easy for countries to deal with the divergence of competitiveness, as they could devalue their currency. Naturally, with everyone in the eurozone using the same currency, that is no longer an option. The result is that the periphery is structurally incapable of growing, which has severe budgetary, banking, and employment consequences and is the cause of acute social and political tensions. While there are positive signs in Ireland, there is a long way to go before the competitiveness problem is fixed. Other economies, particularly Italy, are well behind. The eurozone faces an extended period of stagnation. That is depressingly the best scenario that can be hoped for at this stage. It is difficult to see sources of growth when many of these countries are uncompetitive. The countries of the periphery are still struggling to borrow money and remain under enormous pressure from the markets to cut back their deficits. Consumption is low and investors are scared.

The only way to reestablish growth is to improve the competitiveness of Europe over time and to reduce the debt burden of the periphery. Both of these things are going to take a long time. For now, Europe’s crisis is a major drag on global growth. The financial crisis is largely contained within Europe, so it isn’t a disaster for the world, but it could easily explode into a bigger issue. The odds are that the euro will survive, but this is far from guaranteed. The eurozone could indeed break apart. If a country did move to exit the eurozone, the trigger would be a political crisis, not one based on a rational economic calculus. The fundamental driver of an eventual breakup would be either a reaction to endless austerity in the periphery or the bubbling-over of resentment in one of the core countries about the amount of money being used to keep the periphery afloat and the share of the burden the core is carrying. Germany is not likely to make the first move. There are strong political, historic, and economic factor - Germany is the biggest creditor and exporter to the periphery - that make it one of the last countries that will want to pull out. Greece is obviously the most at risk. The country cannot repay its debt and will require more debt forgiveness. Its government is in a terrible mess. It is the least competitive economy in the eurozone. And it lacks a good export structure that could prop up the country.

Portugal is also in bad shape, and Spain and Italy are in deep trouble. Spain’s

economy must undergo an enormous adjustment following the burst of its housing bubble, so, taking that risk into account, investors are probably correctly demanding larger yields on their loans to Spain than to Italy. But Italy is also in serious danger.

Italy’s GDP is down from where it was when the country joined the eurozone in 1999. Though Italy did not experience a housing bubble similar to Spain’s and its unemployment is not as high as other economies, the fact that the economy hasn’t grown in fourteen years coupled with a declining GDP is an indicator that things could go very wrong. The tendency is always to say that every election is crucial. And this is correct in Italy’s case. The same would hold true for any election in Europe’s periphery today because voting points to the significant policy choices that need to be made and creates enormous political tensions - and that’s where the risks ultimately lie. This election is especially important because Italy is so big. The country is trillions of euros in debt, and it’s one of the world’s largest economies. Unless Italy gets its act together, the euro is doomed and there will be a major financial crisis in Europe that could easily lead to a global financial crisis.

Italy is transitioning away from a technocratic government that made progress on the fiscal balance and on pensions but didn’t do great things to address the structural reforms needed, beginning in the labor market. It did, however, have more success than previous governments in reestablishing the country’s credibility. The question is how the new leaders will conduct economic reforms. In my view, Italy will end up with a coalition government that has little choice in practice but to persist in the economic policies already under way. Even if former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi gains the upper hand on Democratic Party leader Pier Luigi Bersani and Prime Minister Mario Monti - an unlikely outcome - the markets will quickly force the new government’s hand. There will surely be differences in tone and style, but reforms will need to continue and there will be little room for maneuver. Still, this is a very sensitive time.

The election matters even if the policies pursued are similar because Italy’s new leaders need to have international credibility in order to reassure the markets.

When assessing the performance of Europe’s leaders, it’s good to separate the way in which they’ve dealt with the current crisis from what they are doing to build an architecture that assures - to the degree possible - that the euro will survive in the long term. In terms of fighting the current crisis, politicians across Europe should be doing more. Leaders need to move forward on structural reforms in Greece, Italy,

Spain, and other countries at a faster rate. Germany should be doing more to stimulate its own economy. Building a sustainable architecture is clearly linked to the current crisis because the more progress is made, the more confidence is gained in facing the current conditions. Some of the reforms needed to fix the current crisis, including making labor markets more flexible, can help establish the necessary architecture. For the euro to survive in the long term, the countries of the eurozone need to bolster the EU’s institutional capacity to support member states. They can do so in three main ways.

First, they need to establish a banking union. In the United States, when banks in the state of Florida get into trouble they are not bailed out by the state, they receive federal support. The same is necessary in the eurozone. Some progress has been made on this by adopting a template on common supervision, but European leaders are quite far from making the big reforms that are necessary. This includes a common scheme for insuring deposits and for dealing with banks that fail.

Second, there needs to be greater fiscal unity with a large pool of money at the center. Europe doesn’t need the exact same fiscal structure as the United States, but the center must be more capable of transferring money and intervening when countries and regions are in trouble. Europe has gotten nowhere on this issue. Leaders are responding to this need with as little change as possible and as late as possible because all leaders confront different political pressures.

Third, there needs to be a true lender of last resort in the eurozone. This is where there has been the most movement in the right direction. While the European Central Bank didn’t do enough at the beginning of the crisis, it has assumed a much more positive role since Mario Draghi took over and the inevitability of change became apparent. But a lender of last resort is not the solution in and of itself. All it does is give states time to take the necessary actions, so the other key reforms cannot be overlooked. The economies in the periphery must carry out structural reforms, and the eurozone countries need to move forward on strengthening the banking and fiscal mechanisms at the center.

Q.

Why are some countries which are at the periphery of the Eurozone incapable of growing?  

Solution:

The following extract, “Before the euro, it was relatively easy for countries to deal with the divergence of competitiveness, 

as they could devalue their currency. Naturally, with everyone in the eurozone using the same currency, that is no longer an option. The result is that the periphery is

structurally incapable of growing” vindicates option 3.

Option 1 pertains only to Greece.

Option 2 is not given as a reason for not growing.

Option 4 merely mentions the divergence of competitiveness, which is why countries within the eurozone are not able to compete - since they cannot devalue the currency.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 82

Read the following sets of four sentences and arrange them in the most logical sequence to form a meaningful and coherent paragraph.

A.   Princess Bamba loved music, met the young Hungarian lady Marie Antoinette in Europe, and persuaded her to come on a trip to Punjab.

B.    The handsome aristocratic Sardar fell in love with the charming Marie Antoinette and they decided to get married.

C.   They arrived some time in 1911, and in Simla the Princess and her companion met Sardar Umrao Singh Sher-Gil of Majitha.

D.   Amrita Sher-Gil was bom of a Hungarian lady who came to India with the socialite Princess Bamba, the cultured and eccentric granddaughter of Maharaja Ranjit Singh.

Solution:

Both statements A and D seem equally suitable as the opening statement of the sequence. We must examine the sentences further to arrive at the correct sequence.

Statement D briefly mentions Amrita Sher-Gil's Hungarian mother and introduces the Princess Bamba, while A talks about how the two women met and set off on a trip. D is therefore a more suitable opening sentence. Eliminate options 3 and 4.

This is followed by statement C, which introduces Sardar Umrao Singh Sher-

Gil- Amrita's father. Eliminate option 2, which does not contain the AC link. The sequence is closed by statement B, which talks about how the Sardar and Marie Antoinette fell in love.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 83

Read the sentences and choose the option that best arranges them in a logical order.

A.   Curry's paradox, so named after Haskell B. Curry, is a paradox within the family of so-called paradoxes of self-reference.

B.   Contrastingly though, to the liar and Russell paradoxes, Curry's paradox is negation-free; it may be generated irrespective of one's theory of negation.

C.   If one accepts naive truth theory (or naive set theory), then Curry's paradox becomes a direct challenge to one's theory of logical implication or entailment.

D.   Like the liar paradox and Russell's paradox, Curry's paradox challenges familiar naive theories, including naive truth theory and naive set theory, respectively.

 

Solution:

The passage talks about Curry's paradox and compares it with other paradoxes.

Sentence A introduces the paradox by telling us about its discoverer. Eliminate options 3 and 4.

Between sentences B and D, sentence B gets eliminated due to the use of “though” which does not find sufficient context in sentence A. Sentence D follows A by introducing the points of similarity between Curry's paradox and the other paradoxes. Eliminate option 1.

Sentence C follows D by elaborating on “naive truth theory” which is mentioned in sentence D.

Sentence B concludes the paragraph by mentioning a point of contrast between Curry's paradox and the other paradoxes.

Thus, the correct sequence is ADCB.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 84

Pick the word with the correct spelling.

Solution:

The correct spelling is “requiem” which refers to ‘any musical service,

hymn, or dirge for the repose of the dead.’

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 85

Choose the appropriate option from among the ones given below Which of the following options has both words spelled correctly?

Solution:

"Expatriate, Infuriate" have been spelled correctly.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1

QUESTION: 86

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate pair of words from the given options.Hitler may have had a____________ frame, but his____________ supporters madehim feel inordinately tall.

Solution:

The first word is obviously something that is opposite in meaning to the word “tall.” Out of the options, the only word that fits the bill is “diminutive” which means ‘small; little; tiny’. “Obsequious” fills the second blank well, as only ‘servilely compliant or deferential’ supporters would make him feel like something he was not.“Bellicose” means ‘inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile; belligerent; pugnacious’. Since a physical “frame” can be neither bellicose nor “terrifying”, options 2 and 4 can be eliminated. Further, “leonine” means “resembling or suggestive of a lion,” which doesn’t make sense when placed in the second blank.Even if “steadfast” fits in, a frame cannot be “derivative,” which means ‘not original; secondary’. Therefore, option 3 can be eliminated.Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 87

For each of the questions below, select the word that fits well in all the four given sentences.

i.      The hidden costs of corruption are almost always much higher than companies        .

ii.   To capture that spirit,___________ your own journey through an unknown place.

iii. Their education should not be left to those who may mistakenly that training is the same as education.

iv. It gives you an impression, and it's up to you to______________ the rest.

Solution:

The cost of corruption is not something that a company will “visualize” or “perceive”. It is something that a company will ‘envision’ or “imagine”. Therefore, options 1 and 2 do not make sense as far as statement i is concerned and can be eliminated.

To “approximate” means ‘to come near to; approach closely to’. It does not fit well within statements ii and iii. One cannot capture a particular spirit or mistakenly believe that training is the same as education through ‘approximation’. This is more likely to occur through ‘imagination’. Eliminate option 3.

Option 4 fits into all of the statements logically and meaningfully.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 88

A sentence is written in four different ways. Choose the option which gives 0-75 the most effective and grammatically correct sentence. Pay attention to the Marks grammar, word choice and sentence construction.Economic growth does well because of expanding cities because of

Solution:

Option 1 is ruled out as the word “because” is used too often making it redundant. Option 2 starts off in the simple present tense. However, the phrase “would do well” does not adhere to tense parallelism.Option 4 is ruled out as the singular verb “has” is not parallel with the plural subjects of “rapid urbanization” and “economic growth”.The consequence of the need of the poor not being addressed in spite of rapid urbanization, expanding cities and economic growth is put forth in a grammatically correct manner in option 3.Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 89

A sentence is written in four different ways. Choose the option which gives the most effective and grammatically correct sentence. Pay attention to grammar, word choice and sentence construction.Poaching always increases by the sales of animal parts, even if the

Solution:

The passage addresses the conclusions drawn by those who follow the patterns of poaching.The order of sentence construction is distorted in option 1.Option 2 is ruled out as it is unnecessarily wordy.There are several grammatical errors in option 4 such as the verb “increase” within the phrase, “always increase poaching ” and the lack of the definite article ‘the’ before the phrase “poaching trade.”Option 3 is grammatically correct and displays correct punctuation as well as sentence construction.Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 90

Select the option which expresses a relationship similar to the one expressed in the capitalized pair.MOTLEY: VARIEGATED ::

Solution:

“Motley” means 'incongruous variance in appearance'. "Variegated" means'displaying different colours in irregular patches or streaks'.Both the words are adjectives and describe a particular arrangement. “Speckled” means 'marked with a large number of small spots or patches of colour'. "Cheerful" means 'happy and optimistic'. They are both adjectives as well.The other options do not display the same relationship.Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 91

Select the option which expresses a relationship similar to the one expressed in the capitalized pair.THWART: ENDEAVOR::

Solution:

We can “thwart” meaning 'prevent from accomplishing' a person's “endeavor”. Similarly' we can “baffle” meaning 'perplex or confuse' a person's “comprehension” meaning 'understanding'.The other options do not display the same relationship.Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 92

The question below consists of a paragraph in which the first and last 0.75 sentences are identified. Choose the option that has the most logical order of Marks the intermediate sentences.

1. Frida Kahlo's art language

i. as a critical reflex against

ii.she hoped to use it

iii. involved the use of indigenous resource

iv.for the modernising nation;

v. in the context of her nascent sympathy

6. her personal narcissism.     

Solution:

The prepositions and nouns used at the end of each sentence fragment provide valuable links between the fragments.

Fragment i with “reflex against” can only precede fragment 6, since 6 has
the noun “narcissism” which her reflex is against. Eliminate option 4. Fragment v with the noun “sympathy” must be followed by the preposition “for” in fragment iv. Eliminate options 1 and 2.

Option 3 gives the correct sequence of fragments- 1, iii, v, iv, ii, i, 6. The sentence says 'Frida Kahlo's art language involved the use of indigenous resource in the context of her nascent sympathy for the modernising nation; she hoped to use it as a critical reflex against her personal narcissism'. Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 93

The question below consists of a paragraph in which the first and last sentences are identified. Choose the option that has the most logical order of the intermediate sentences.

1. His face beaming at having in his house

i. a junior Jeeves almost,

ii. which he had been dialing all morning

iii. such a certified problem-solver,

iv. in a futile effort to reach

v. he led me without further ado to a telephone,

6. a number in New York.

Solution:

There is a clear link between fragments iii and i - fragment iii has “such a ... problem-solver” and i with “junior Jeeves almost” exemplifies it. Therefore, iii has to precede i. Eliminate options 1 and 4.

There is a link between fragment v with “...a telephone” and fragment ii with “which he had been dialing ...” and another one between fragment iv with “... to reach” and fragment 6 having “a number ...”. Eliminate option 3 for not having these links.

The correct sequence is option 2 with 1, iii, i, v, ii, iv, 6. The sentence says 'His face beaming at having in his house such a certified problem-solver, a junior Jeeves almost, he led me without further ado to a telephone, which he had been dialing all morning in a futile effort to reach a number in New York.'.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 94

Select the correct sentence from the given options.

Solution:

Option 1 is incorrect as the preposition to be used is ‘in’, since it is used in the context of inclusion within something (the ingredients in the dish). “Inside” is incorrect because it refers to the physical space inside the dish. Option 2 is incorrect as the right way to frame the sentence would be ‘reach her office’.Option 3 is constructed correctly.Option 4 is incorrect due to the repetition of “freedom of choice” and “right to choose” - either one would suffice.Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 95

In the question given below, a sentence is written in four different ways. Choose the option which gives the most effective and grammatically correct sentence. Pay attention to grammar, word choice and sentence construction. This tale though “about” a cat, is heartwarmingly and heartbreakingly really about what it means to be human - the hollowing loneliness and

Solution:

The construction of the sentence in option 1 is faulty in the latter half.In option 2, the first part of the sentence does not convey its meaning appropriately. It should read as “though about a cat.. .the tale is really about what it means to be human...”. Moreover, the use of prepositions such as“with” in “hollowing loneliness with profound attachment”, “from” in “boundless affection from paralyzing fear of abandonment” and “within” in “every possibility within love” is incorrect. An oscillation ought to be between two factors and not “from” them.The construction of the latter half of the sentence in option 4 is faulty as well. Option 3 is grammatically correct and conveys the meaning of the sentence appropriately.Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 96

Select the odd man out from the given alternatives.

Solution:

The words “archaic”, “antiquity” and “venerable” refer to something that is prehistoric.“Anachronistic” refers to ‘something that is not in its correct historical or chronological time.’Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 97

Pick the odd word out

Solution:

“Deprecate”, “castigate” and “remonstrate” are synonyms of the word ‘condemn’.“Endorse” means ‘to approve, support, or sustain’. It is antonymous to the other three words.Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 98

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate option that follows:After he robbed the store, Pinocchio’s______________ started to bother him.

Solution:

The sentence implies that after robbing the store, Pinocchio started feeling guilty about it and and his moral senses bothered him. Hence, the word“conscience” meaning 'a person's moral sense of right and wrong' fits correctly.The other words, although related contextually to the sentence, are not appropriate.Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 99

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate option that follows:Michael, who has been working on collaborative songwriting through the internet, thinks that the medium shows great promise, but Norah is not so sure about the quality that such a/an______________________________________ can produce.

Solution:

Michael has embarked upon the path of songwriting through internet. Hence, in the given context “endeavor” meaning 'an attempt to achieve something' fits well.Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 100

How many words of four or more letters can be made with the following, with the condition that at least one “D” and one “T” appear in each word? D, T, I, D, A, T, C, A, O, T

Solution:

:The words that can be formed are:AuditOutdid i.e. past of outdo. Ditto Addict ToadAuto didact meaning “a self-taught person”.The total words that can be formed are 6. Hence, the correct answer is option 3

QUESTION: 101

How many words of four or more letters can be made with the following, with the condition that “U” appears in each word? C, E, T, A, L, U, C, L, A.

Solution:

At least 5 words of four or more letters all containing “U” can be made from these letters.They are:'Calculate''Actual''Cult' meaning 'a system of religious veneration and devotion directed towards a particular figure or object'.'Cull' meaning 'select from a large quantity'.'Lute' meaning 'a plucked stringed instrument with a long neck bearing frets and a rounded body with a flat front, rather like a halved egg in shape'.'Tulle' meaning 'a soft, fine silk, cotton, or nylon material like net, used for making veils and dresses'.Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 102

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

For how many countries can the test ranks be found?

Solution:

In questions with so much data, you can focus on one parameter at a time rather than find all the data together.

First identify the country that each representative comes from.

A is from India, B is from West Indies, G is from New Zealand and H is from South Africa.

Now, the people left are C, D, E and F while the countries left are Australia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and England.

Since C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England, C is from Australia.

Since D is not England or Sri Lanka, D is from Pakistan.

Since F is not from Sri Lanka, E is from Sri Lanka and F is from England.

Thus, the country of each representative is:

A - India, B - West Indies, C - Australia, D - Pakistan, E - Sri Lanka, F - England, G - New Zealand, H - South Africa

Now, identify each country’s rank.

South Africa = 1

India + Australia = Sri Lanka

India + New Zealand = West Indies

Pakistan + New Zealand = West Indies + Sri Lanka Sri Lanka = 2 x England

India, New Zealand, West Indies, England = 2, 3, 5, 7 (in no specific order).

Australia = perfect square

Thus Australia’s rank can be 1 or 4. Since South Africa is ranked 1, Australia is ranked 4.

Since the available ranks are from 1 to 8, England has to be ranked 2 or 3 (to satisfy Sri Lanka = 2 x England).

If England is ranked 2, Sri Lanka is ranked 4 (which is not possible as Australia is ranked 4).

Hence, England is ranked 3 and Sri Lanka is ranked 6.

​India + 4 = 6

India = 2

Now, since India + New Zealand = West Indies and all three countries have prime-numbered ranks, the equation is only satisfied for 2 + 5 = 7

Hence, New Zealand = 5 and West Indies = 7 Hence, Pakistan can take the only available rank i.e. 8 Thus, the ranks are:

South Africa - 1, India - 2, England - 3, Australia - 4, New Zealand - 5, Sri Lanka - 6, West Indies - 7, Pakistan - 8

Now, consider the number of centuries.

India = 100 and New Zealand = 32 (which is the least value)

Since the Australian’s number of centuries is a perfect square as well as a perfect cube, the Australian has scored 1 or 64 centuries.

Since 32 is the least number of centuries, the Australian has scored 64 centuries.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order i.e. 68, 67, 66, 65 and 64.

However, the number of centuries scored by the West Indian cannot be found.

Thus, the number of centuries is:

India - 100, Pakistan - 68, England - 67, South Africa - 66, Sri Lanka - 65, Australia - 64, New Zealand - 32, West Indies - ?

Finally, consider the room numbers.

The rooms are arranged as:

401 402 403 404 408 407 406 405

This is to ensure that 403 and 406 are opposite each other and consecutively numbered rooms are adjacent to each other.

South Africa = 407

The Indian and Pakistani are in room numbers 401 and 408 (in no specific order), but the Indian is not next to the South African.

Hence, the Indian and Pakistani are in rooms 401 and 408 respectively.

The Australian is in the room opposite 404 i.e. he is in room 405.

Since the West Indian and New Zealander stay opposite each other, they are in rooms 403 and 406 (in no specific order).

Hence, the Sri Lankan and the Englishman are in rooms 402 and 404 (in no specific order).

Thus, the room numbers are:

401 - India, 402 - England/Sri Lanka, 403 - West Indies/New

Zealand, 404 - England/Sri Lanka, 405 - Australia, 406 - West Indies/New Zealand, 407 - South Africa, 408 - Pakistan

This provides all the required information.

Thus, the test ranks can be found for all eight countries.

Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 103

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

In which room does the Sri Lankan representative stay?

Solution:

In questions with so much data, you can focus on one parameter at a time rather than find all the data together. First identify the country that each representative comes from. A is from India, B is from West Indies, G is from New Zealand and H is from South Africa. Now, the people left are C, D, E and F while the countries left are Australia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and England. Since C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England, C is from Australia. Since D is not England or Sri Lanka, D is from Pakistan. Since F is not from Sri Lanka, E is from Sri Lanka and F is from England. Thus, the country of each representative is: A - India, B - West Indies, C - Australia, D - Pakistan, E - Sri Lanka, F - England, G - New Zealand, H - South Africa Now, identify each country’s rank. South Africa = 1 India + Australia = Sri Lanka India + New Zealand = West Indies Pakistan + New Zealand = West Indies + Sri Lanka Sri Lanka = 2 x England India, New Zealand, West Indies, England = 2, 3, 5, 7 (in no specific order). Australia = perfect square Thus Australia’s rank can be 1 or 4. Since South Africa is ranked 1, Australia is ranked 4. Since the available ranks are from 1 to 8, England has to be ranked 2 or 3 (to satisfy Sri Lanka = 2 x England). If England is ranked 2, Sri Lanka is ranked 4 (which is not possible as Australia is ranked 4). Hence, England is ranked 3 and Sri Lanka is ranked 6. ​India + 4 = 6 India = 2 Now, since India + New Zealand = West Indies and all three countries have prime-numbered ranks, the equation is only satisfied for 2 + 5 = 7 Hence, New Zealand = 5 and West Indies = 7 Hence, Pakistan can take the only available rank i.e. 8 Thus, the ranks are: South Africa - 1, India - 2, England - 3, Australia - 4, New Zealand - 5, Sri Lanka - 6, West Indies - 7, Pakistan - 8 Now, consider the number of centuries. India = 100 and New Zealand = 32 (which is the least value) Since the Australian’s number of centuries is a perfect square as well as a perfect cube, the Australian has scored 1 or 64 centuries. Since 32 is the least number of centuries, the Australian has scored 64 centuries. The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order i.e. 68, 67, 66, 65 and 64. However, the number of centuries scored by the West Indian cannot be found. Thus, the number of centuries is: India - 100, Pakistan - 68, England - 67, South Africa - 66, Sri Lanka - 65, Australia - 64, New Zealand - 32, West Indies - ? Finally, consider the room numbers. The rooms are arranged as: 401 402 403 404 408 407 406 405 This is to ensure that 403 and 406 are opposite each other and consecutively numbered rooms are adjacent to each other. South Africa = 407 The Indian and Pakistani are in room numbers 401 and 408 (in no specific order), but the Indian is not next to the South African. Hence, the Indian and Pakistani are in rooms 401 and 408 respectively. The Australian is in the room opposite 404 i.e. he is in room 405. Since the West Indian and New Zealander stay opposite each other, they are in rooms 403 and 406 (in no specific order). Hence, the Sri Lankan and the Englishman are in rooms 402 and 404 (in no specific order). Thus, the room numbers are: 401 - India, 402 - England/Sri Lanka, 403 - West Indies/New Zealand, 404 - England/Sri Lanka, 405 - Australia, 406 - West Indies/New Zealand, 407 - South Africa, 408 - Pakistan This provides all the required information.

The Sri Lankan representative stays in room number 402 or 404. Hence, option 4.

QUESTION: 104

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

Which of these can be the total number of centuries scored by all eight representatives?

Solution:

Consider the solution to the first question.

The total number of centuries scored by seven out of eight representatives is:

100 + 68 + 67 + 66 + 65 + 64 + 32 = 462

Since the least and highest number of centuries is 32 and 100 respectively, the West Indian scores atleast 33 centuries and at most 99 centuries.

Now, consider each option and subtract 462 from the value in the option.

Option 1: 490 - 462 = 28 (not possible as it is less than 32) Option 2: 571 - 462 = 109 (not possible as it is more than 100) Option 3: 504 - 462 = 42 (possible)

Option 4: 527 - 462 = 65 (not possible as the Sri Lankan has scored 65 centuries)

Hence, option 3.

QUESTION: 105

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

Who is from England?

Solution:

In questions with so much data, you can focus on one parameter at a time rather than find all the data together. First identify the country that each representative comes from. A is from India, B is from West Indies, G is from New Zealand and H is from South Africa. Now, the people left are C, D, E and F while the countries left are Australia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and England. Since C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England, C is from Australia. Since D is not England or Sri Lanka, D is from Pakistan. Since F is not from Sri Lanka, E is from Sri Lanka and F is from England. Thus, the country of each representative is: A - India, B - West Indies, C - Australia, D - Pakistan, E - Sri Lanka, F - England, G - New Zealand, H - South Africa Now, identify each country’s rank. South Africa = 1 India + Australia = Sri Lanka India + New Zealand = West Indies Pakistan + New Zealand = West Indies + Sri Lanka Sri Lanka = 2 x England India, New Zealand, West Indies, England = 2, 3, 5, 7 (in no specific order). Australia = perfect square Thus Australia’s rank can be 1 or 4. Since South Africa is ranked 1, Australia is ranked 4. Since the available ranks are from 1 to 8, England has to be ranked 2 or 3 (to satisfy Sri Lanka = 2 x England). If England is ranked 2, Sri Lanka is ranked 4 (which is not possible as Australia is ranked 4). Hence, England is ranked 3 and Sri Lanka is ranked 6. ​India + 4 = 6 India = 2 Now, since India + New Zealand = West Indies and all three countries have prime-numbered ranks, the equation is only satisfied for 2 + 5 = 7 Hence, New Zealand = 5 and West Indies = 7 Hence, Pakistan can take the only available rank i.e. 8 Thus, the ranks are: South Africa - 1, India - 2, England - 3, Australia - 4, New Zealand - 5, Sri Lanka - 6, West Indies - 7, Pakistan - 8 Now, consider the number of centuries. India = 100 and New Zealand = 32 (which is the least value) Since the Australian’s number of centuries is a perfect square as well as a perfect cube, the Australian has scored 1 or 64 centuries. Since 32 is the least number of centuries, the Australian has scored 64 centuries. The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order i.e. 68, 67, 66, 65 and 64. However, the number of centuries scored by the West Indian cannot be found. Thus, the number of centuries is: India - 100, Pakistan - 68, England - 67, South Africa - 66, Sri Lanka - 65, Australia - 64, New Zealand - 32, West Indies - ? Finally, consider the room numbers. The rooms are arranged as: 401 402 403 404 408 407 406 405 This is to ensure that 403 and 406 are opposite each other and consecutively numbered rooms are adjacent to each other. South Africa = 407 The Indian and Pakistani are in room numbers 401 and 408 (in no specific order), but the Indian is not next to the South African. Hence, the Indian and Pakistani are in rooms 401 and 408 respectively. The Australian is in the room opposite 404 i.e. he is in room 405. Since the West Indian and New Zealander stay opposite each other, they are in rooms 403 and 406 (in no specific order). Hence, the Sri Lankan and the Englishman are in rooms 402 and 404 (in no specific order). Thus, the room numbers are: 401 - India, 402 - England/Sri Lanka, 403 - West Indies/New Zealand, 404 - England/Sri Lanka, 405 - Australia, 406 - West Indies/New Zealand, 407 - South Africa, 408 - Pakistan This provides all the required information.

F is from England.

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 106

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

If the West Indian representative stays in room number 403, in which room does the representative from New Zealand stay?

Solution:

In questions with so much data, you can focus on one parameter at a time rather than find all the data together. First identify the country that each representative comes from. A is from India, B is from West Indies, G is from New Zealand and H is from South Africa. Now, the people left are C, D, E and F while the countries left are Australia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and England. Since C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England, C is from Australia. Since D is not England or Sri Lanka, D is from Pakistan. Since F is not from Sri Lanka, E is from Sri Lanka and F is from England. Thus, the country of each representative is: A - India, B - West Indies, C - Australia, D - Pakistan, E - Sri Lanka, F - England, G - New Zealand, H - South Africa Now, identify each country’s rank. South Africa = 1 India + Australia = Sri Lanka India + New Zealand = West Indies Pakistan + New Zealand = West Indies + Sri Lanka Sri Lanka = 2 x England India, New Zealand, West Indies, England = 2, 3, 5, 7 (in no specific order). Australia = perfect square Thus Australia’s rank can be 1 or 4. Since South Africa is ranked 1, Australia is ranked 4. Since the available ranks are from 1 to 8, England has to be ranked 2 or 3 (to satisfy Sri Lanka = 2 x England). If England is ranked 2, Sri Lanka is ranked 4 (which is not possible as Australia is ranked 4). Hence, England is ranked 3 and Sri Lanka is ranked 6. ​India + 4 = 6 India = 2 Now, since India + New Zealand = West Indies and all three countries have prime-numbered ranks, the equation is only satisfied for 2 + 5 = 7 Hence, New Zealand = 5 and West Indies = 7 Hence, Pakistan can take the only available rank i.e. 8 Thus, the ranks are: South Africa - 1, India - 2, England - 3, Australia - 4, New Zealand - 5, Sri Lanka - 6, West Indies - 7, Pakistan - 8 Now, consider the number of centuries. India = 100 and New Zealand = 32 (which is the least value) Since the Australian’s number of centuries is a perfect square as well as a perfect cube, the Australian has scored 1 or 64 centuries. Since 32 is the least number of centuries, the Australian has scored 64 centuries. The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order i.e. 68, 67, 66, 65 and 64. However, the number of centuries scored by the West Indian cannot be found. Thus, the number of centuries is: India - 100, Pakistan - 68, England - 67, South Africa - 66, Sri Lanka - 65, Australia - 64, New Zealand - 32, West Indies - ? Finally, consider the room numbers. The rooms are arranged as: 401 402 403 404 408 407 406 405 This is to ensure that 403 and 406 are opposite each other and consecutively numbered rooms are adjacent to each other. South Africa = 407 The Indian and Pakistani are in room numbers 401 and 408 (in no specific order), but the Indian is not next to the South African. Hence, the Indian and Pakistani are in rooms 401 and 408 respectively. The Australian is in the room opposite 404 i.e. he is in room 405. Since the West Indian and New Zealander stay opposite each other, they are in rooms 403 and 406 (in no specific order). Hence, the Sri Lankan and the Englishman are in rooms 402 and 404 (in no specific order). Thus, the room numbers are: 401 - India, 402 - England/Sri Lanka, 403 - West Indies/New Zealand, 404 - England/Sri Lanka, 405 - Australia, 406 - West Indies/New Zealand, 407 - South Africa, 408 - Pakistan This provides all the required information.

The West Indian and New Zealander stay in rooms 403 and 406 (in no specific order).

Since the West Indian stays in room number 403, the New Zealander stays in room number 406.

Hence, option 1.

QUESTION: 107

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

If the Sri Lankan representative stays in room 404, where does the Englishman stay?

Solution:

In questions with so much data, you can focus on one parameter at a time rather than find all the data together. First identify the country that each representative comes from. A is from India, B is from West Indies, G is from New Zealand and H is from South Africa. Now, the people left are C, D, E and F while the countries left are Australia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and England. Since C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England, C is from Australia. Since D is not England or Sri Lanka, D is from Pakistan. Since F is not from Sri Lanka, E is from Sri Lanka and F is from England. Thus, the country of each representative is: A - India, B - West Indies, C - Australia, D - Pakistan, E - Sri Lanka, F - England, G - New Zealand, H - South Africa Now, identify each country’s rank. South Africa = 1 India + Australia = Sri Lanka India + New Zealand = West Indies Pakistan + New Zealand = West Indies + Sri Lanka Sri Lanka = 2 x England India, New Zealand, West Indies, England = 2, 3, 5, 7 (in no specific order). Australia = perfect square Thus Australia’s rank can be 1 or 4. Since South Africa is ranked 1, Australia is ranked 4. Since the available ranks are from 1 to 8, England has to be ranked 2 or 3 (to satisfy Sri Lanka = 2 x England). If England is ranked 2, Sri Lanka is ranked 4 (which is not possible as Australia is ranked 4). Hence, England is ranked 3 and Sri Lanka is ranked 6. ​India + 4 = 6 India = 2 Now, since India + New Zealand = West Indies and all three countries have prime-numbered ranks, the equation is only satisfied for 2 + 5 = 7 Hence, New Zealand = 5 and West Indies = 7 Hence, Pakistan can take the only available rank i.e. 8 Thus, the ranks are: South Africa - 1, India - 2, England - 3, Australia - 4, New Zealand - 5, Sri Lanka - 6, West Indies - 7, Pakistan - 8 Now, consider the number of centuries. India = 100 and New Zealand = 32 (which is the least value) Since the Australian’s number of centuries is a perfect square as well as a perfect cube, the Australian has scored 1 or 64 centuries. Since 32 is the least number of centuries, the Australian has scored 64 centuries. The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order i.e. 68, 67, 66, 65 and 64. However, the number of centuries scored by the West Indian cannot be found. Thus, the number of centuries is: India - 100, Pakistan - 68, England - 67, South Africa - 66, Sri Lanka - 65, Australia - 64, New Zealand - 32, West Indies - ? Finally, consider the room numbers. The rooms are arranged as: 401 402 403 404 408 407 406 405 This is to ensure that 403 and 406 are opposite each other and consecutively numbered rooms are adjacent to each other. South Africa = 407 The Indian and Pakistani are in room numbers 401 and 408 (in no specific order), but the Indian is not next to the South African. Hence, the Indian and Pakistani are in rooms 401 and 408 respectively. The Australian is in the room opposite 404 i.e. he is in room 405. Since the West Indian and New Zealander stay opposite each other, they are in rooms 403 and 406 (in no specific order). Hence, the Sri Lankan and the Englishman are in rooms 402 and 404 (in no specific order). Thus, the room numbers are: 401 - India, 402 - England/Sri Lanka, 403 - West Indies/New Zealand, 404 - England/Sri Lanka, 405 - Australia, 406 - West Indies/New Zealand, 407 - South Africa, 408 - Pakistan This provides all the required information.

The Sri Lankan and English representatives stay in room numbers 402 or 404 (in no specific order).

Since the Sri Lankan stays in room number 404, the Englishman stays in room number 402.

Hence, option 2.

QUESTION: 108

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

A @ B means A > B A # B means A < B

A % B means the remainder when A is divided by B

If P # Q, R @ Q and (P % Q) # (Q % R), which of the following expressions follows?

Solution:

P # Q, R @ Q and (P % Q) # (Q % R)

So, P < Q and R > Q i.e. P < Q < R Let P = 4, Q = 5, R = 6 So, P % Q = 4 and Q % R = 5 Thus, this is a possible set of values.

Consider the expression in option 1.

-P % Q = -4 % 5 i.e. -4 -Q % R = -5 % 6 i.e. -5 -4 > -5

So, the expression in option 1 does not follow. Q % P = 5 % 4 = 1 R % Q = 6 % 5 = 1 So, (Q % P) = (R % Q)

So, the expression in option 2 does not follow. Thus, neither expression follows.

Hence, option 4

QUESTION: 109

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Eight representatives - A to H - one from each of the eight international test playing nations are invited by the ICC for an event where strategies to encourage different countries to take up cricket are to be discussed. All eight nations have a different ICC test ranking from 1 to 8 and every representative has scored a different number of centuries in international cricket. These representatives are staying in a hotel on the same floor but in eight different rooms. There are only eight rooms on the floor. There are four rooms in each row. There is a corridor such that one row is to the left of the corridor and the other is to its right. The Indian and Pakistani representatives stay in room numbers 401 and 408, not necessarily in the same order. Rooms adjacent to each other are numbered consecutively, such that rooms 403 and 406 are opposite each other.

The addition of the test rank of India and Australia is the same as the rank of Sri Lanka. Also, the addition of India’s and New Zealand’s rank is equal to West Indies’ rank. The addition of ranks of Pakistan and New Zealand is the same as that of West Indies and Sri Lanka.

B is from West Indies. C is not from Pakistan, Sri Lanka or England. G is from New Zealand. D is neither from England nor from Sri Lanka.

The ranks of India, New Zealand, West Indies, and England are prime numbers. A, the representative from India, has scored 100 centuries. This is the maximum number of centuries scored by any representative.

Australia’s rank as well as the number of centuries scored by the Australian representative is a perfect square. Sri Lanka’s rank is twice England’s rank. The number of centuries scored by the Australian is a perfect cube.

The Australian is opposite room number 404 and there is only one room adjacent to his room. The South African stays in room number 407 and neither the Indian nor the Australian is his neighbor. The West Indian and the New Zealander stay opposite each other.

The number of centuries scored by the Pakistani, Englishman, South African, Sri Lankan, and Australian are consecutive numbers in decreasing order. With 32 centuries, the New Zealander has scored the least number of centuries.

H represents South Africa, which holds the top most spot in the test rankings. F is not from Sri Lanka

Q.

Each letter below signifies one mathematical operation or relationship. Use these to identify which of the expressions given in the options is correct.

R: Add, S; Subtract, T: Multiply, U: Divide, V: Equal to, X: Less than or equal to.