IIFT Mock Test -7


123 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | IIFT Mock Test -7


Description
This mock test of IIFT Mock Test -7 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 123 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT IIFT Mock Test -7 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IIFT Mock Test -7 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this IIFT Mock Test -7 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IIFT Mock Test -7 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best possible option.

Mr. Balram has 30 currency notes consisting of 1 dollar and 1 rupee notes. If the rupees were dollars and dollars were rupees, he would have 78 rupees more than he has now. If one dollar is equal to 40 rupees, the number of dollars he has, is

Solution:

Let he has x dollars and y rupees notes => x + y = 30. According to the question, 40y + x – 40x – y = 78 => y – x = 2. So we get x = 14 and y = 16. Hence number of dollars = 14.

QUESTION: 2

The value  is 

Solution:

If x = 0.136136136........

Multiplying both sides by 1000, we get

1000x = 136.136136136........

Subtracting equation (1) from (2), we get

999x = 136

or, x = 136/999

QUESTION: 3

A Pair of rational numbers lying between 1/4 and 3/4 is

Solution:

Going by options, we can see that {63/250,187/250} is lying between the given values 1/4 and 3/4.

QUESTION: 4

{(0.013)+0.000000343} / {(0.013) -0.000091 + 0.000049} =

Solution:

Using the formula a+ b= (a + b)(a2 – ab + b2), we get the answer as 0.013 + 0.007 = 0.020

QUESTION: 5

In a number system, the product of 122 and 41 is 5442. The number 4434 of this system when converted to decimal system becomes:

Solution:

We can write (122)n X (41)n = (5442)n

or, (n2 + 2n + 2) x (4n + 1) = (5n3 + 4n2 + 4n + 2).

Solving the above equation, we get n = 6.

So (4434)6 = (1030)10.

QUESTION: 6

Given z = x2 / y, if x and y are both increased by 10% then z is 

Solution:

z = x2/y. As values of x and y are increased by 10%, therefore new z becomes (1.1x × 1.1 y) / 1.1 y => z increased by 10%.

QUESTION: 7

A milkman saves milk in two vessels, a cuboidal and the other a cylindrical. The capacity of the cuboidal vessel is 20 litres more than the cylindrical one. When 30 litres of milk is drawn from each of the two full vessels, the amount left in the cuboidal vessel is twice that left in the cylindrical vessel. The capacity (in litres) of the cuboidal vessel is

Solution:

If capacity of cuboidal vessel is x litres, then capacity of cylindrical vessel is x – 20 litres. Also (x – 30) = 2(x – 20 – 30)

=>x = 70 litres.

QUESTION: 8

If a/3 = b/4 = c/7 ,than  is equal to :

Solution:

QUESTION: 9

Consider the tangent table given below 

Based on the above exract from the tangent table and the fact that tan θ = 2.340, then θ =

Solution:

QUESTION: 10

If n is an even integer, then find f(n) = 

Solution:

QUESTION: 11

At what percentage above the cost price, must an article be marked, so as to gain 33% after allowing a customer a discount of 5%.

Solution:

QUESTION: 12

A student took five papers in an examination, where full marks were same for each paper. Her marks in these papers were in the proportion of 6:7:8:9:10. In all these papers together, the candidate obtained 60 % of the total marks. Then the number of papers in which she got more than 50% marks is

Solution:

Let full marks in each paper = 100. Therefore total marks = 500. Her score = 300. 

Ratio = 6 : 7 : 8 :  9 : 10. Hence her scores are 45, 52.5, 60, 67.5 and 75. So she got more than 50% in 4 subjects.

QUESTION: 13

A larger cube is formed from the material obtained by melting three smaller cubes of 3, 4 and 5 cm side. The ratio of the total surface areas of the smaller cubes and the larger cube is

Solution:

QUESTION: 14

A person can row 71/2 km an hour in still water and he finds that it takes him twice as long to row up as compared to row down the river. The rate of the stream is

Solution:

QUESTION: 15

Solution:

QUESTION: 16

The GCD of two numbers is 13 and their product is 4732. The possible number of pairs is/are

Solution:

QUESTION: 17

There are 7 oranges, 5 apples and 8 mangoes in a basket. A person wants to eat fruits from the basket, but he is not sure about the number of fruits or types of fruits he will eat. In how many ways can he make a selection of fruits from among those in the basket (He will eat at least one fruit)?

Solution:

QUESTION: 18

The number of common terms of the two sequences 17, 21, 25, ……… 417 and 16, 21, 26,……..., 466 is

Solution:

QUESTION: 19

A hare pursued by hound is 30 m before the hound at starting. Whilst the hare takes 4 leaps the hound takes 3. In one leap the hare goes  m and the hound m. How far will the hare have gone when the hound will catch the hare?

Solution:

QUESTION: 20

If x = 3+2√2, then the value of 

Solution:

QUESTION: 21

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

A. On this matter, historian Jules Michelet remarked, “England is an empire, Germany is a nation, a race, France is a person” quite like statesman Charles de Gaulle, who, too, famously complained, “Only peril can bring the French together as one can’t impose unity on a country with 265 kinds of cheese.”

B. Even so, this centralist tendency is often at odds with another long-standing theme of the French nation: the insistence on the supremacy of the individual.

C. The French people look to the state as the primary guardian of liberty, and the state, in turn, provides generous amenities for its citizens, from free education to health care and pension plans.

D. Today, as in that era, central authority is vested in the state, even though a measure of autonomy has been granted to the country’s 21 régions in recent decades.

E. France is among the globe’s oldest nations, the product of an alliance of duchies and principalities under a single ruler in the Middle Ages.

Solution:

The passage should open with a general, introductory remark, which is easily found here in line E. Note carefully the words a single ruler, which go very well with the words central authority in line D (E-D).

Notice the contrasting thoughts in given lines C and B, which talk of extreme views in turn, thereby giving us another logical pairing C-B. Also notice this centralist tendency in line B. Hence E-D-C-B.

On this matter in line A refers to the precise point raised by line B only (EDCBA).

QUESTION: 22

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

A. Chronic disorganization is NOT a disease, rather, it is a behavioral pattern found in all kinds of people, at every income level.

B. They are often sociable, likable, compassionate, humorous, inventive, accomplished, energetic, enthusiastic and fun to be around when they are in supportive contexts and do not feel threatened or anxious.

C. When stressed and feeling unsupported, they may exhibit impatient, controlling, perfectionistic behaviors as well as anxiety, angry outbursts, depression, grief and other expressions of deep disappointment, existential agony, and/or insecurity.

D. Chronically disorganized people usually have some kind of neurodiverse personality traits as they are often highly functional, exceptionally creative, non-linear thinkers and /or exceptionally technical, intelligent, empathic, emotionally intense, or sensitive.  

E. Other traits that seem to be related include: being ambidextrous, unusually open-minded, having many interests.

Solution:

Line A is an excellent opener, which introduces the topic of chronic disorganization to the reader. Line D picks this thread of thought and describes in detail the features of people having chronically disorganized personalities, thereby giving us the pairing A-D.

Line B talks of the many positive traits such people have while line E gives us a supporting line of thought with other traits, thus making the pair B-E (ADBE). Finally, line C supplies a contrasting thought to make the scenario complete (ADBEC).

QUESTION: 23

Which of the following words is spelled correctly?

Solution:

Perceive is the correct spelling.

QUESTION: 24

DIRECTIONS for the question: In each of the following question, out of the given group of wordings, choose one appropriately spelled.

Which of the following options has both the words spelled correctly?

Solution:

Vicious, Viscous is the pair of words with correct spelling.

QUESTION: 25

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

Nobody will really know if you're___________ huge quantities of leadership and motivation or if you're just walking around bothering people.

Solution:

Exuding means: (of a person) display (an emotion or quality) strongly and openly.

In this case, the 'or' indicates that the two parts of the sentence contain words that contradict each other. Considering that, the first part needs to be positive and the word that helps us ensure a positive sentiment is exuding. The meanings of the other words are:

Debasing: Used of conduct; characterized by dishonour.

Ensconcing: Fix firmly.

Shielding: Protect, hide, or conceal from danger or harm.

None of the other words fit in the given case.

QUESTION: 26

Jim’s under-explained transition through hazy stages labeled Incarnation, Examination and Debut leave the __________ portions of this science fiction more to imagination than desired.

Solution:

The key to this question is the phrase 'more to imagination that desired'. This helps us identify speculative as the correct answer in this case. Speculative means: not based on fact or investigation/engaged in, expressing, or based on conjecture rather than knowledge. Effectively, this means there is a lot of guesswork involved when we use speculative to describe something. Keeping this in mind, we see that it fits our context perfectly.

QUESTION: 27

DIRECTIONS for the question: In the sentence provided a part of the sentence is underlined. Beneath the sentence, four/five different ways of paraphrasing the underlined part are indicated. Choose the best alternative amongst the four/five.

The Courage Magazine, a firm supporter of the social equality and significant as a publication in social science as well, represent the workmanship of diverse writers.

Solution:

The subject of the verb 'represents' is 'The Courage Magazine'. Clearly, this is a singular subject and therefore, a singular verb is required in this case. Remember, the phrase (a firm supporter of the social equality as well as a significant publication in social science) simply defines a quality of the subject and is not a subject in itself.

QUESTION: 28

DIRECTIONS for the question: In the sentence provided a part of the sentence is underlined. Beneath the sentence, four/five different ways of paraphrasing the underlined part are indicated. Choose the best alternative amongst the four/five.

Each of Singh’s works-Train to Pakistan, The Sikhs and The Company of Women- were licentious and stimulating novels, very different from the mild and diplomatically correct Indian literature.

Solution:

Option 1:  Each does not agree with the plural verb were.

Option 2: ‘Each of them Singh's works’ is illogical.

Option 3: This is the correct answer. In this sentence, the plural subject “works” matches the plural verb “were”.

Option 4: Everyone is singular and does not agree with “works” or “were”.

QUESTION: 29

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

BOOMING : STENTORIAN

Solution:

Stentorian is a word used for voice and it means loud, resonant and powerful. Booming and stentorian are synonymous. We find a similar relationship in sparkly and glittering.

QUESTION: 30

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

APT : PERTINENT

Solution:

Apt and pertinent are synonymous in nature. We need another pair of synonyms and we find that in option 4.

QUESTION: 31

DIRECTIONS for the question: The first and the last sentences are placed correctly, arrange the remaining sentences to form a logical sequence and then choose the correct option.

1. For Israel, a country whose image has, in recent years,

i. of the Palestinian question,

ii. been marred by political controversy centered on

iii. particularly in the Gaza strip on its southern frontier,

iv. its perceived rough and ready handling

6. this alternative projection of the country, is important.

Solution:

In this case, you can use simple clues to identify the correct answer. The verb 'has' is completed by 'been' in part ii. Part iv follows part ii as it illustrates on what is Israel's image centered. This is then linked to parts i and iii which bring Palestine into focus.

QUESTION: 32

DIRECTIONS for the question: The first and the last sentences are placed correctly, arrange the remaining sentences to form a logical sequence and then choose the correct option.

1. The first conclusion is

i. the settlement worked out

ii. after the defeat of the Ottoman Empire in 1918

iii. a realization that, having endured for nearly 100 years,

iv. by the European powers

6. is now on its last legs.

Solution:

This is a tricky problem and you need to be careful with the answer choices. Part-iii comes first as 'the realization' referred in it is the conclusion. Then, this is followed by part i which highlights the primary subject in this case, the settlement. Parts ii and iv only make sense if the mention of the settlement comes first. This leaves us with two options, 1 and 2. Option 2 is ruled out as the settlement was worked out by European powers (we give primary importance to the doer here) and part ii simply acts the modifying phrase informing us when did the even occur.

QUESTION: 33

DIRECTIONS for the question: The question consists of four/five sentences on a topic. Select the option that indicates grammatically correct or appropriate sentence/s.

Solution:

Sentence 1: Ham and eggs ‘is’ instead of ‘are’, as it is taken as a collective entity (name of a dish or item and not individual items).

Sentence 2: ‘Currents’ should be replaced by ‘currants.’

Sentence 3: Six tins of hot chocolate ‘were’ instead of ‘was’.

Sentence 4 is correct.

QUESTION: 34

DIRECTIONS for the question: The question consists of four/five sentences on a topic. Select the option that indicates grammatically correct or appropriate sentence/s.

Solution:

Sentence 1: ‘Require enormous strength, confidence and ability’ instead of ‘requires’. This is because the subject consists of two infinitives, ‘to illustrate’ and ‘to express’, which effectively act as two subjects in the sentence. Thus, we need a plural verb.

Sentence 2: ‘The couple are separating’ instead of ‘is separating’. The collective noun is not acting collectively here.

Sentence 4: Instead of ‘hoard (a secret store of valuables or money)’, the correct word will be ‘horde (a vast multitude)’.

QUESTION: 35

DIRECTIONS for the question:  A set of four words is given. Three of the words are related in some way, the remaining word is not related to the rest. Pick the word which does not fit in the relation.

Solution:

Options 1, 2 and 3 are synonyms of each other whereas option 4 is antonym of remaining options.

QUESTION: 36

DIRECTIONS for the question:  A set of four words is given. Three of the words are related in some way, the remaining word is not related to the rest. Pick the word which does not fit in the relation.

Solution:

Options 2, 3 & 4are synonyms of each other whereas option 1 is antonym of remaining options.

QUESTION: 37

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

One never gets a good feeling when one sees one's friend go down like a ____ balloon.

Solution:

The correct idiom is: go down like a lead balloon, which means to be received badly by an audience.

QUESTION: 38

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

The Army Chief’s credibility is ______ stake.

Solution:

At is used to show engaged in; in a state of (being) and is also used to indicate the object of an emotion. So, ‘at’ is the correct option here.

QUESTION: 39

How many words of 4 or more letters can be made with the following, with a condition that I appears in all of them?

I, A, L, S, O, P, N

Solution:

The following six words can be formed to show that at least 4 words can be made from these letters:

Slip
Lips
Spain
Piano
Pianos

Nails

QUESTION: 40

How many words of 5 or more letters can be made with the following set of letters (each letter can be used only once)?

T, I, H, S, E, M, G

Solution:

Go through the following list of words: eight, emits, heist,  items, might,  and so on.

The list only gives some words that contain 5 words. This proves there are at least 4 words that can be formed using these letters.

QUESTION: 41

DIRECTIONS for the questionRead the passage and answer the question based on it. 

In 1893, Theodore Roosevelt published an article in defense of college football. As player injuries mounted, some critics had called for a ban on the game. Nonsense, the future president wrote. "It is mere unmanly folly to try to do away with the sport because the risk exists." Instead, he argued, reform football to "minimize" its dangers.

Sound familiar? As millions of American boys and young men take to our football fields this fall, there's lots of talk about making the game safer. We've seen new rules on tackling, stronger penalties for infractions and time limits on practices. But it's unlikely that these changes will significantly reduce injuries. For the last century, schools and colleges have tried to modify the game so fewer people get hurt. And it hasn't worked.

The first changes took place in the early 1900s. Before that time the game resembled rugby, with players piling on top of one another to control the ball. They could pass it sideways or backward but not forward.

The results were predictable: smashed noses, dislocated shoulders, broken necks and fractured skulls. Dozens of young men died, mostly from cerebral hemorrhage. "The sight of a confused mass of educated young men making batter-rams of their bodies, plunging their heads into each other's stomachs, piling upon each other or maiming each other for life — sometimes indeed … killing each other … is to me a brutal monstrosity," declared Cornell President Andrew D. White in 1891.

Fourteen years later, having ascended to the White House, Roosevelt convened a meeting of coaches from Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Amid newspaper reports of 18 football deaths that fall, the 1905 meeting set in motion a series of reforms to protect players from injury — and to guard the sport from critics who wanted to end it altogether.

The most controversial innovation was the forward pass, which would spread players more widely and decrease the amount of contact between them. But the leading opponent of the reform, Yale coach Walter Camp, warned that players streaking downfield would face even greater danger than the ones clumped together near the line of scrimmage. Camp turned out to be correct.

The recent increase of concussions — at every level of the sport — is partly due to "pass-first" offenses, which have led to more high-speed collisions. By stopping the game clock for incompletions, passing has also increased the total number of plays and, with it, the opportunities for injury.

Ditto for helmets, another reform designed to reduce harm on the field. In the early years of the game, some players grew their hair long to provide a modicum of head protection. Others began to wear leather helmets, which were developed by an Annapolis shoemaker to protect a Navy midshipman after the player's doctor told him that he might die from another hit to his head.

Enter the plastic helmet, which provided more cushioning. But it also became a weapon in its own right, allowing players to "lead with their heads" as they tackled. Despite new restrictions on that practice, helmet-to-helmet hits remain one of the key causes of concussions and other injuries.

And the most common victims are kids, who are starting football at ever-younger ages. Their necks aren't fully developed, so they can't brace for a hit the way adults can. And their braincases haven't finished hardening, which makes their skulls more vulnerable to impact.

By the time they get to high school, kids have a 5% chance of sustaining a concussion for each season they play. And as a 2011 study showed, former football players who sustained two or more concussions in their youth have a significantly higher rate of cognitive impairment as adults.

The issue made its way back to the White House in May, when President Obama convened a meeting of coaches, doctors and scientists to discuss sports-related concussions. But the most powerful voice in the room was one that didn't exist back in Roosevelt's time: the National Football League.

A judge recently approved a settlement to compensate retired NFL players suffering the effects of head injuries that is likely to cost the league several hundred million dollars. It also announced this year that it would donate $45 million to the youth organization it founded, USA Football, in part to expand safety training for coaches.

As the richest sports enterprise in America, the NFL can absorb almost any legal hit that comes its way. But our high schools can't. And the league needs them to continue sponsoring football teams, which — alongside college squads — are the main training system for the pros.

If he had a son, the president said last year, he'd "have to think long and hard" before letting him play football. But the rest of us need to think long and hard too about why we're putting so many kids at risk to subsidize a league that's already awash in money. And if we think we can wash away the risk, we're kidding ourselves.

Identify the correct statement.

Solution:

Option 1 is incorrect. Refer to the lines: The first changes took place in the early 1900s.

Option 2 is the correct answer. It represents the general idea of the passage. The author has quoted multiple exams for the same in the passage.

Option 3 is incorrect. Even though is a tempting option, there is no conclusive evidence for the sentiment of apathy on behalf of the administrators.

Option 4 is incorrect as the passage states that the NFL is the richest sports body in America, not globally. 

QUESTION: 42

In 1893, Theodore Roosevelt published an article in defense of college football. As player injuries mounted, some critics had called for a ban on the game. Nonsense, the future president wrote. "It is mere unmanly folly to try to do away with the sport because the risk exists." Instead, he argued, reform football to "minimize" its dangers.

Sound familiar? As millions of American boys and young men take to our football fields this fall, there's lots of talk about making the game safer. We've seen new rules on tackling, stronger penalties for infractions and time limits on practices. But it's unlikely that these changes will significantly reduce injuries. For the last century, schools and colleges have tried to modify the game so fewer people get hurt. And it hasn't worked.

The first changes took place in the early 1900s. Before that time the game resembled rugby, with players piling on top of one another to control the ball. They could pass it sideways or backward but not forward.

The results were predictable: smashed noses, dislocated shoulders, broken necks and fractured skulls. Dozens of young men died, mostly from cerebral hemorrhage. "The sight of a confused mass of educated young men making batter-rams of their bodies, plunging their heads into each other's stomachs, piling upon each other or maiming each other for life — sometimes indeed … killing each other … is to me a brutal monstrosity," declared Cornell President Andrew D. White in 1891.

Fourteen years later, having ascended to the White House, Roosevelt convened a meeting of coaches from Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Amid newspaper reports of 18 football deaths that fall, the 1905 meeting set in motion a series of reforms to protect players from injury — and to guard the sport from critics who wanted to end it altogether.

The most controversial innovation was the forward pass, which would spread players more widely and decrease the amount of contact between them. But the leading opponent of the reform, Yale coach Walter Camp, warned that players streaking downfield would face even greater danger than the ones clumped together near the line of scrimmage. Camp turned out to be correct.

The recent increase of concussions — at every level of the sport — is partly due to "pass-first" offenses, which have led to more high-speed collisions. By stopping the game clock for incompletions, passing has also increased the total number of plays and, with it, the opportunities for injury.

Ditto for helmets, another reform designed to reduce harm on the field. In the early years of the game, some players grew their hair long to provide a modicum of head protection. Others began to wear leather helmets, which were developed by an Annapolis shoemaker to protect a Navy midshipman after the player's doctor told him that he might die from another hit to his head.

Enter the plastic helmet, which provided more cushioning. But it also became a weapon in its own right, allowing players to "lead with their heads" as they tackled. Despite new restrictions on that practice, helmet-to-helmet hits remain one of the key causes of concussions and other injuries.

And the most common victims are kids, who are starting football at ever-younger ages. Their necks aren't fully developed, so they can't brace for a hit the way adults can. And their braincases haven't finished hardening, which makes their skulls more vulnerable to impact.

By the time they get to high school, kids have a 5% chance of sustaining a concussion for each season they play. And as a 2011 study showed, former football players who sustained two or more concussions in their youth have a significantly higher rate of cognitive impairment as adults.

The issue made its way back to the White House in May, when President Obama convened a meeting of coaches, doctors and scientists to discuss sports-related concussions. But the most powerful voice in the room was one that didn't exist back in Roosevelt's time: the National Football League.

A judge recently approved a settlement to compensate retired NFL players suffering the effects of head injuries that is likely to cost the league several hundred million dollars. It also announced this year that it would donate $45 million to the youth organization it founded, USA Football, in part to expand safety training for coaches.

As the richest sports enterprise in America, the NFL can absorb almost any legal hit that comes its way. But our high schools can't. And the league needs them to continue sponsoring football teams, which — alongside college squads — are the main training system for the pros.

If he had a son, the president said last year, he'd "have to think long and hard" before letting him play football. But the rest of us need to think long and hard too about why we're putting so many kids at risk to subsidize a league that's already awash in money. And if we think we can wash away the risk, we're kidding ourselves.

Match the following:

Solution:

This is a fact based question and option 3 is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 43

In 1893, Theodore Roosevelt published an article in defense of college football. As player injuries mounted, some critics had called for a ban on the game. Nonsense, the future president wrote. "It is mere unmanly folly to try to do away with the sport because the risk exists." Instead, he argued, reform football to "minimize" its dangers.

Sound familiar? As millions of American boys and young men take to our football fields this fall, there's lots of talk about making the game safer. We've seen new rules on tackling, stronger penalties for infractions and time limits on practices. But it's unlikely that these changes will significantly reduce injuries. For the last century, schools and colleges have tried to modify the game so fewer people get hurt. And it hasn't worked.

The first changes took place in the early 1900s. Before that time the game resembled rugby, with players piling on top of one another to control the ball. They could pass it sideways or backward but not forward.

The results were predictable: smashed noses, dislocated shoulders, broken necks and fractured skulls. Dozens of young men died, mostly from cerebral hemorrhage. "The sight of a confused mass of educated young men making batter-rams of their bodies, plunging their heads into each other's stomachs, piling upon each other or maiming each other for life — sometimes indeed … killing each other … is to me a brutal monstrosity," declared Cornell President Andrew D. White in 1891.

Fourteen years later, having ascended to the White House, Roosevelt convened a meeting of coaches from Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Amid newspaper reports of 18 football deaths that fall, the 1905 meeting set in motion a series of reforms to protect players from injury — and to guard the sport from critics who wanted to end it altogether.

The most controversial innovation was the forward pass, which would spread players more widely and decrease the amount of contact between them. But the leading opponent of the reform, Yale coach Walter Camp, warned that players streaking downfield would face even greater danger than the ones clumped together near the line of scrimmage. Camp turned out to be correct.

The recent increase of concussions — at every level of the sport — is partly due to "pass-first" offenses, which have led to more high-speed collisions. By stopping the game clock for incompletions, passing has also increased the total number of plays and, with it, the opportunities for injury.

Ditto for helmets, another reform designed to reduce harm on the field. In the early years of the game, some players grew their hair long to provide a modicum of head protection. Others began to wear leather helmets, which were developed by an Annapolis shoemaker to protect a Navy midshipman after the player's doctor told him that he might die from another hit to his head.

Enter the plastic helmet, which provided more cushioning. But it also became a weapon in its own right, allowing players to "lead with their heads" as they tackled. Despite new restrictions on that practice, helmet-to-helmet hits remain one of the key causes of concussions and other injuries.

And the most common victims are kids, who are starting football at ever-younger ages. Their necks aren't fully developed, so they can't brace for a hit the way adults can. And their braincases haven't finished hardening, which makes their skulls more vulnerable to impact.

By the time they get to high school, kids have a 5% chance of sustaining a concussion for each season they play. And as a 2011 study showed, former football players who sustained two or more concussions in their youth have a significantly higher rate of cognitive impairment as adults.

The issue made its way back to the White House in May, when President Obama convened a meeting of coaches, doctors and scientists to discuss sports-related concussions. But the most powerful voice in the room was one that didn't exist back in Roosevelt's time: the National Football League.

A judge recently approved a settlement to compensate retired NFL players suffering the effects of head injuries that is likely to cost the league several hundred million dollars. It also announced this year that it would donate $45 million to the youth organization it founded, USA Football, in part to expand safety training for coaches.

As the richest sports enterprise in America, the NFL can absorb almost any legal hit that comes its way. But our high schools can't. And the league needs them to continue sponsoring football teams, which — alongside college squads — are the main training system for the pros.

If he had a son, the president said last year, he'd "have to think long and hard" before letting him play football. But the rest of us need to think long and hard too about why we're putting so many kids at risk to subsidize a league that's already awash in money. And if we think we can wash away the risk, we're kidding ourselves.

According to the passage, the chance of a kid suffering a concussion by the time they get to high school is:

Solution:

Remember, the passage quotes that 5% is the chance of a kid who plays football suffering a concussion by the time they get to high school is. The passage does not provide the general figure all kids (as asked in the question).

QUESTION: 44

In 1893, Theodore Roosevelt published an article in defense of college football. As player injuries mounted, some critics had called for a ban on the game. Nonsense, the future president wrote. "It is mere unmanly folly to try to do away with the sport because the risk exists." Instead, he argued, reform football to "minimize" its dangers.

Sound familiar? As millions of American boys and young men take to our football fields this fall, there's lots of talk about making the game safer. We've seen new rules on tackling, stronger penalties for infractions and time limits on practices. But it's unlikely that these changes will significantly reduce injuries. For the last century, schools and colleges have tried to modify the game so fewer people get hurt. And it hasn't worked.

The first changes took place in the early 1900s. Before that time the game resembled rugby, with players piling on top of one another to control the ball. They could pass it sideways or backward but not forward.

The results were predictable: smashed noses, dislocated shoulders, broken necks and fractured skulls. Dozens of young men died, mostly from cerebral hemorrhage. "The sight of a confused mass of educated young men making batter-rams of their bodies, plunging their heads into each other's stomachs, piling upon each other or maiming each other for life — sometimes indeed … killing each other … is to me a brutal monstrosity," declared Cornell President Andrew D. White in 1891.

Fourteen years later, having ascended to the White House, Roosevelt convened a meeting of coaches from Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Amid newspaper reports of 18 football deaths that fall, the 1905 meeting set in motion a series of reforms to protect players from injury — and to guard the sport from critics who wanted to end it altogether.

The most controversial innovation was the forward pass, which would spread players more widely and decrease the amount of contact between them. But the leading opponent of the reform, Yale coach Walter Camp, warned that players streaking downfield would face even greater danger than the ones clumped together near the line of scrimmage. Camp turned out to be correct.

The recent increase of concussions — at every level of the sport — is partly due to "pass-first" offenses, which have led to more high-speed collisions. By stopping the game clock for incompletions, passing has also increased the total number of plays and, with it, the opportunities for injury.

Ditto for helmets, another reform designed to reduce harm on the field. In the early years of the game, some players grew their hair long to provide a modicum of head protection. Others began to wear leather helmets, which were developed by an Annapolis shoemaker to protect a Navy midshipman after the player's doctor told him that he might die from another hit to his head.

Enter the plastic helmet, which provided more cushioning. But it also became a weapon in its own right, allowing players to "lead with their heads" as they tackled. Despite new restrictions on that practice, helmet-to-helmet hits remain one of the key causes of concussions and other injuries.

And the most common victims are kids, who are starting football at ever-younger ages. Their necks aren't fully developed, so they can't brace for a hit the way adults can. And their braincases haven't finished hardening, which makes their skulls more vulnerable to impact.

By the time they get to high school, kids have a 5% chance of sustaining a concussion for each season they play. And as a 2011 study showed, former football players who sustained two or more concussions in their youth have a significantly higher rate of cognitive impairment as adults.

The issue made its way back to the White House in May, when President Obama convened a meeting of coaches, doctors and scientists to discuss sports-related concussions. But the most powerful voice in the room was one that didn't exist back in Roosevelt's time: the National Football League.

A judge recently approved a settlement to compensate retired NFL players suffering the effects of head injuries that is likely to cost the league several hundred million dollars. It also announced this year that it would donate $45 million to the youth organization it founded, USA Football, in part to expand safety training for coaches.

As the richest sports enterprise in America, the NFL can absorb almost any legal hit that comes its way. But our high schools can't. And the league needs them to continue sponsoring football teams, which — alongside college squads — are the main training system for the pros.

If he had a son, the president said last year, he'd "have to think long and hard" before letting him play football. But the rest of us need to think long and hard too about why we're putting so many kids at risk to subsidize a league that's already awash in money. And if we think we can wash away the risk, we're kidding ourselves.

Identify the incorrect statement.

Solution:

Option 1 is a correct statement. Refer to the lines: We've seen new rules on tackling, stronger penalties for infractions and time limits on practices. But it's unlikely that these changes will significantly reduce injuries. For the last century, schools and colleges have tried to modify the game so fewer people get hurt. And it hasn't worked.

Option 2 can be derived from the lines:  By stopping the game clock for incompletions, passing has also increased the total number of plays and, with it, the opportunities for injury.

Option 3 can be derived from the lines: Enter the plastic helmet, which provided more cushioning. But it also became a weapon in its own right, allowing players to "lead with their heads" as they tackled. Despite new restrictions on that practice, helmet-to-helmet hits remain one of the key causes of concussions and other injuries.

Option 4 is the incorrect statement. This comparison is not made in the passage.

QUESTION: 45

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

The characteristic features of Indian culture have long been a search for ultimate verities and the concomitant disciple-guru relationship. My own path led me to a Christlike sage whose beautiful life was chiseled for the ages. He was one of the great masters who are India's sole remaining wealth. Emerging in every generation, they have bulwarked their land against the fate of Babylon and Egypt.

I find my earliest memories covering the anachronistic features of a previous incarnation. Clear recollections came to me of a distant life, a yogi amidst the Himalayan snows. These glimpses of the past, by some dimensionless link, also afforded me a glimpse of the future.

The helpless humiliations of infancy are not banished from my mind. I was resentfully conscious of not being able to walk or express myself freely. Prayerful surges arose within me as I realized my bodily impotence. My strong emotional life took silent form as words in many languages. Among the inward confusion of tongues, my ear gradually accustomed itself to the circumambient Bengali syllables of my people. The beguiling scope of an infant's mind!

Psychological ferment and my unresponsive body brought me to many obstinate crying-spells. I recall the general family bewilderment at my distress. Happier memories, too, crowd in on me: my mother's caresses, and my first attempts at lisping phrase and toddling step. These early triumphs, usually forgotten quickly, are yet a natural basis of self-confidence.

My far-reaching memories are not unique. Many yogis are known to have retained their self-consciousness without interruption by the dramatic transition to and from "life" and "death." If man be solely a body, its loss indeed places the final period to identity. But if prophets down the millenniums spake with truth, man is essentially of incorporeal nature. The persistent core of human egoity is only temporarily allied with sense perception.

Although odd, clear memories of infancy are not extremely rare. During travels in numerous lands, I have listened to early recollections from the lips of veracious men and women.

I was born in the last decade of the nineteenth century, and passed my first eight years at Gorakhpur. This was my birthplace in the United Provinces of northeastern India. We were eight children: four boys and four girls. I, Mukunda Lal Ghosh, was the second son and the fourth child.

Father and Mother were Bengalis, of the kshatriya caste. Both were blessed with saintly nature. Their mutual love, tranquil and dignified, never expressed itself frivolously. A perfect parental harmony was the calm center for the revolving tumult of eight young lives.

Father, Bhagabati Charan Ghosh, was kind, grave, at times stern. Loving him dearly, we children yet observed a certain reverential distance. An outstanding mathematician and logician, he was guided principally by his intellect. But Mother was a queen of hearts, and taught us only through love. After her death, Father displayed more of his inner tenderness. I noticed then that his gaze often metamorphosed into my mother's.

In Mother's presence we tasted our earliest bitter-sweet acquaintance with the scriptures. Tales from the mahabharata and ramayana were resourcefully summoned to meet the exigencies of discipline. Instruction and chastisement went hand in hand.

A daily gesture of respect to Father was given by Mother's dressing us carefully in the afternoons to welcome him home from the office. His position was similar to that of a vice-president, in the Bengal-Nagpur Railway, one of India's large companies. His work involved traveling, and our family lived in several cities during my childhood.

Mother held an open hand toward the needy. Father was also kindly disposed, but his respect for law and order extended to the budget. One fortnight Mother spent, in feeding the poor, more than Father's monthly income.

"All I ask, please, is to keep your charities within a reasonable limit." Even a gentle rebuke from her husband was grievous to Mother. She ordered a hackney carriage, not hinting to the children at any disagreement.

"Good-by; I am going away to my mother's home." Ancient ultimatum!

We broke into astounded lamentations. Our maternal uncle arrived opportunely; he whispered to Father some sage counsel, garnered no doubt from the ages. After Father had made a few conciliatory remarks, Mother happily dismissed the cab. Thus ended the only trouble I ever noticed between my parents. But I recall a characteristic discussion.

"Please give me ten rupees for a hapless woman who has just arrived at the house." Mother's smile had its own persuasion.

"Why ten rupees? One is enough." Father added a justification: "When my father and grandparents died suddenly, I had my first taste of poverty. My only breakfast, before walking miles to my school, was a small banana. Later, at the university, I was in such need that I applied to a wealthy judge for aid of one rupee per month. He declined, remarking that even a rupee is important."

"How bitterly you recall the denial of that rupee!" Mother's heart had an instant logic. "Do you want this woman also to remember painfully your refusal of ten rupees which she needs urgently?"

"You win!" With the immemorial gesture of vanquished husbands, he opened his wallet. "Here is a ten-rupee note. Give it to her with my good will."

Father tended to first say "No" to any new proposal. His attitude toward the strange woman who so readily enlisted Mother's sympathy was an example of his customary caution. Aversion to instant acceptance- typical of the French mind in the West-is really only honoring the principle of "due reflection." I always found Father reasonable and evenly balanced in his judgments. If I could bolster up my numerous requests with one or two good arguments, he invariably put the coveted goal within my reach, whether it were a vacation trip or a new motorcycle.

Father was a strict disciplinarian to his children in their early years, but his attitude toward himself was truly Spartan. He never visited the theater, for instance, but sought his recreation in various spiritual practices and in reading the bhagavad gita. Shunning all luxuries, he would cling to one old pair of shoes until they were useless. His sons bought automobiles after they came into popular use, but Father was always content with the trolley car for his daily ride to the office. The accumulation of money for the sake of power was alien to his nature. Once, after organizing the Calcutta Urban Bank, he refused to benefit himself by holding any of its shares. He had simply wished to perform a civic duty in his spare time.

Several years after Father had retired on a pension, an English accountant arrived to examine the books of the Bengal-Nagpur Railway Company. The amazed investigator discovered that Father had never applied for overdue bonuses.

"He did the work of three men!" the accountant told the company. "He has rupees 125,000 (about $41,250.) owing to him as back compensation." The officials presented Father with a check for this amount. He thought so little about it that he overlooked any mention to the family. Much later he was questioned by my youngest brother Bishnu, who noticed the large deposit on a bank statement.

"Why be elated by material profit?" Father replied. "The one who pursues a goal of even-mindedness is neither jubilant with gain nor depressed by loss. He knows that man arrives penniless in this world, and departs without a single rupee."

Q. What does the phrase 'exigencies of discipline' mean?

Solution:

Exigency means 'a pressing or urgent situation'.  Considering the given context, we find option 1 the apt answer in the given case.

QUESTION: 46

The characteristic features of Indian culture have long been a search for ultimate verities and the concomitant disciple-guru relationship. My own path led me to a Christlike sage whose beautiful life was chiseled for the ages. He was one of the great masters who are India's sole remaining wealth. Emerging in every generation, they have bulwarked their land against the fate of Babylon and Egypt.

I find my earliest memories covering the anachronistic features of a previous incarnation. Clear recollections came to me of a distant life, a yogi amidst the Himalayan snows. These glimpses of the past, by some dimensionless link, also afforded me a glimpse of the future.

The helpless humiliations of infancy are not banished from my mind. I was resentfully conscious of not being able to walk or express myself freely. Prayerful surges arose within me as I realized my bodily impotence. My strong emotional life took silent form as words in many languages. Among the inward confusion of tongues, my ear gradually accustomed itself to the circumambient Bengali syllables of my people. The beguiling scope of an infant's mind!

Psychological ferment and my unresponsive body brought me to many obstinate crying-spells. I recall the general family bewilderment at my distress. Happier memories, too, crowd in on me: my mother's caresses, and my first attempts at lisping phrase and toddling step. These early triumphs, usually forgotten quickly, are yet a natural basis of self-confidence.

My far-reaching memories are not unique. Many yogis are known to have retained their self-consciousness without interruption by the dramatic transition to and from "life" and "death." If man be solely a body, its loss indeed places the final period to identity. But if prophets down the millenniums spake with truth, man is essentially of incorporeal nature. The persistent core of human egoity is only temporarily allied with sense perception.

Although odd, clear memories of infancy are not extremely rare. During travels in numerous lands, I have listened to early recollections from the lips of veracious men and women.

I was born in the last decade of the nineteenth century, and passed my first eight years at Gorakhpur. This was my birthplace in the United Provinces of northeastern India. We were eight children: four boys and four girls. I, Mukunda Lal Ghosh, was the second son and the fourth child.

Father and Mother were Bengalis, of the kshatriya caste. Both were blessed with saintly nature. Their mutual love, tranquil and dignified, never expressed itself frivolously. A perfect parental harmony was the calm center for the revolving tumult of eight young lives.

Father, Bhagabati Charan Ghosh, was kind, grave, at times stern. Loving him dearly, we children yet observed a certain reverential distance. An outstanding mathematician and logician, he was guided principally by his intellect. But Mother was a queen of hearts, and taught us only through love. After her death, Father displayed more of his inner tenderness. I noticed then that his gaze often metamorphosed into my mother's.

In Mother's presence we tasted our earliest bitter-sweet acquaintance with the scriptures. Tales from the mahabharata and ramayana were resourcefully summoned to meet the exigencies of discipline. Instruction and chastisement went hand in hand.

A daily gesture of respect to Father was given by Mother's dressing us carefully in the afternoons to welcome him home from the office. His position was similar to that of a vice-president, in the Bengal-Nagpur Railway, one of India's large companies. His work involved traveling, and our family lived in several cities during my childhood.

Mother held an open hand toward the needy. Father was also kindly disposed, but his respect for law and order extended to the budget. One fortnight Mother spent, in feeding the poor, more than Father's monthly income.

"All I ask, please, is to keep your charities within a reasonable limit." Even a gentle rebuke from her husband was grievous to Mother. She ordered a hackney carriage, not hinting to the children at any disagreement.

"Good-by; I am going away to my mother's home." Ancient ultimatum!

We broke into astounded lamentations. Our maternal uncle arrived opportunely; he whispered to Father some sage counsel, garnered no doubt from the ages. After Father had made a few conciliatory remarks, Mother happily dismissed the cab. Thus ended the only trouble I ever noticed between my parents. But I recall a characteristic discussion.

"Please give me ten rupees for a hapless woman who has just arrived at the house." Mother's smile had its own persuasion.

"Why ten rupees? One is enough." Father added a justification: "When my father and grandparents died suddenly, I had my first taste of poverty. My only breakfast, before walking miles to my school, was a small banana. Later, at the university, I was in such need that I applied to a wealthy judge for aid of one rupee per month. He declined, remarking that even a rupee is important."

"How bitterly you recall the denial of that rupee!" Mother's heart had an instant logic. "Do you want this woman also to remember painfully your refusal of ten rupees which she needs urgently?"

"You win!" With the immemorial gesture of vanquished husbands, he opened his wallet. "Here is a ten-rupee note. Give it to her with my good will."

Father tended to first say "No" to any new proposal. His attitude toward the strange woman who so readily enlisted Mother's sympathy was an example of his customary caution. Aversion to instant acceptance- typical of the French mind in the West-is really only honoring the principle of "due reflection." I always found Father reasonable and evenly balanced in his judgments. If I could bolster up my numerous requests with one or two good arguments, he invariably put the coveted goal within my reach, whether it were a vacation trip or a new motorcycle.

Father was a strict disciplinarian to his children in their early years, but his attitude toward himself was truly Spartan. He never visited the theater, for instance, but sought his recreation in various spiritual practices and in reading the bhagavad gita. Shunning all luxuries, he would cling to one old pair of shoes until they were useless. His sons bought automobiles after they came into popular use, but Father was always content with the trolley car for his daily ride to the office. The accumulation of money for the sake of power was alien to his nature. Once, after organizing the Calcutta Urban Bank, he refused to benefit himself by holding any of its shares. He had simply wished to perform a civic duty in his spare time.

Several years after Father had retired on a pension, an English accountant arrived to examine the books of the Bengal-Nagpur Railway Company. The amazed investigator discovered that Father had never applied for overdue bonuses.

"He did the work of three men!" the accountant told the company. "He has rupees 125,000 (about $41,250.) owing to him as back compensation." The officials presented Father with a check for this amount. He thought so little about it that he overlooked any mention to the family. Much later he was questioned by my youngest brother Bishnu, who noticed the large deposit on a bank statement.

"Why be elated by material profit?" Father replied. "The one who pursues a goal of even-mindedness is neither jubilant with gain nor depressed by loss. He knows that man arrives penniless in this world, and departs without a single rupee."

Identify the incorrect statements from the following:

I. The author was not a kshatriya.

II. The father of the author was a mathematician and logician.

III. The mother of author first acquainted him with the scriptures.

IV. The author and his siblings were dressed by their father.

Solution:

Statement I is incorrect. Refer to the lines:  Father and Mother were Bengalis, of the kshatriya caste.

Statement II can be derived from the lines: An outstanding mathematician and logician, he was guided principally by his intellect.

Statement III can be derived from the lines: In Mother's presence we tasted our earliest bitter-sweet acquaintance with the scriptures.

Statement IV is incorrect. Refer to the lines: A daily gesture of respect to Father was given by Mother's dressing us carefully in the afternoons to welcome him home from the office.

QUESTION: 47

The characteristic features of Indian culture have long been a search for ultimate verities and the concomitant disciple-guru relationship. My own path led me to a Christlike sage whose beautiful life was chiseled for the ages. He was one of the great masters who are India's sole remaining wealth. Emerging in every generation, they have bulwarked their land against the fate of Babylon and Egypt.

I find my earliest memories covering the anachronistic features of a previous incarnation. Clear recollections came to me of a distant life, a yogi amidst the Himalayan snows. These glimpses of the past, by some dimensionless link, also afforded me a glimpse of the future.

The helpless humiliations of infancy are not banished from my mind. I was resentfully conscious of not being able to walk or express myself freely. Prayerful surges arose within me as I realized my bodily impotence. My strong emotional life took silent form as words in many languages. Among the inward confusion of tongues, my ear gradually accustomed itself to the circumambient Bengali syllables of my people. The beguiling scope of an infant's mind!

Psychological ferment and my unresponsive body brought me to many obstinate crying-spells. I recall the general family bewilderment at my distress. Happier memories, too, crowd in on me: my mother's caresses, and my first attempts at lisping phrase and toddling step. These early triumphs, usually forgotten quickly, are yet a natural basis of self-confidence.

My far-reaching memories are not unique. Many yogis are known to have retained their self-consciousness without interruption by the dramatic transition to and from "life" and "death." If man be solely a body, its loss indeed places the final period to identity. But if prophets down the millenniums spake with truth, man is essentially of incorporeal nature. The persistent core of human egoity is only temporarily allied with sense perception.

Although odd, clear memories of infancy are not extremely rare. During travels in numerous lands, I have listened to early recollections from the lips of veracious men and women.

I was born in the last decade of the nineteenth century, and passed my first eight years at Gorakhpur. This was my birthplace in the United Provinces of northeastern India. We were eight children: four boys and four girls. I, Mukunda Lal Ghosh, was the second son and the fourth child.

Father and Mother were Bengalis, of the kshatriya caste. Both were blessed with saintly nature. Their mutual love, tranquil and dignified, never expressed itself frivolously. A perfect parental harmony was the calm center for the revolving tumult of eight young lives.

Father, Bhagabati Charan Ghosh, was kind, grave, at times stern. Loving him dearly, we children yet observed a certain reverential distance. An outstanding mathematician and logician, he was guided principally by his intellect. But Mother was a queen of hearts, and taught us only through love. After her death, Father displayed more of his inner tenderness. I noticed then that his gaze often metamorphosed into my mother's.

In Mother's presence we tasted our earliest bitter-sweet acquaintance with the scriptures. Tales from the mahabharata and ramayana were resourcefully summoned to meet the exigencies of discipline. Instruction and chastisement went hand in hand.

A daily gesture of respect to Father was given by Mother's dressing us carefully in the afternoons to welcome him home from the office. His position was similar to that of a vice-president, in the Bengal-Nagpur Railway, one of India's large companies. His work involved traveling, and our family lived in several cities during my childhood.

Mother held an open hand toward the needy. Father was also kindly disposed, but his respect for law and order extended to the budget. One fortnight Mother spent, in feeding the poor, more than Father's monthly income.

"All I ask, please, is to keep your charities within a reasonable limit." Even a gentle rebuke from her husband was grievous to Mother. She ordered a hackney carriage, not hinting to the children at any disagreement.

"Good-by; I am going away to my mother's home." Ancient ultimatum!

We broke into astounded lamentations. Our maternal uncle arrived opportunely; he whispered to Father some sage counsel, garnered no doubt from the ages. After Father had made a few conciliatory remarks, Mother happily dismissed the cab. Thus ended the only trouble I ever noticed between my parents. But I recall a characteristic discussion.

"Please give me ten rupees for a hapless woman who has just arrived at the house." Mother's smile had its own persuasion.

"Why ten rupees? One is enough." Father added a justification: "When my father and grandparents died suddenly, I had my first taste of poverty. My only breakfast, before walking miles to my school, was a small banana. Later, at the university, I was in such need that I applied to a wealthy judge for aid of one rupee per month. He declined, remarking that even a rupee is important."

"How bitterly you recall the denial of that rupee!" Mother's heart had an instant logic. "Do you want this woman also to remember painfully your refusal of ten rupees which she needs urgently?"

"You win!" With the immemorial gesture of vanquished husbands, he opened his wallet. "Here is a ten-rupee note. Give it to her with my good will."

Father tended to first say "No" to any new proposal. His attitude toward the strange woman who so readily enlisted Mother's sympathy was an example of his customary caution. Aversion to instant acceptance- typical of the French mind in the West-is really only honoring the principle of "due reflection." I always found Father reasonable and evenly balanced in his judgments. If I could bolster up my numerous requests with one or two good arguments, he invariably put the coveted goal within my reach, whether it were a vacation trip or a new motorcycle.

Father was a strict disciplinarian to his children in their early years, but his attitude toward himself was truly Spartan. He never visited the theater, for instance, but sought his recreation in various spiritual practices and in reading the bhagavad gita. Shunning all luxuries, he would cling to one old pair of shoes until they were useless. His sons bought automobiles after they came into popular use, but Father was always content with the trolley car for his daily ride to the office. The accumulation of money for the sake of power was alien to his nature. Once, after organizing the Calcutta Urban Bank, he refused to benefit himself by holding any of its shares. He had simply wished to perform a civic duty in his spare time.

Several years after Father had retired on a pension, an English accountant arrived to examine the books of the Bengal-Nagpur Railway Company. The amazed investigator discovered that Father had never applied for overdue bonuses.

"He did the work of three men!" the accountant told the company. "He has rupees 125,000 (about $41,250.) owing to him as back compensation." The officials presented Father with a check for this amount. He thought so little about it that he overlooked any mention to the family. Much later he was questioned by my youngest brother Bishnu, who noticed the large deposit on a bank statement.

"Why be elated by material profit?" Father replied. "The one who pursues a goal of even-mindedness is neither jubilant with gain nor depressed by loss. He knows that man arrives penniless in this world, and departs without a single rupee."

Identify the correct statements:

I. The father of author of passage held a prestigious position at his workplace.

II. The father of author of passage maintained an austere outlook towards his own self.

III. The father of author of passage was never strict with his children.

Solution:

Statement I can be derived from the lines: His position was similar to that of a vice-president, in the Bengal-Nagpur Railway, one of India's large companies.

Statement II can be derived from the lines: Father was a strict disciplinarian to his children in their early years, but his attitude toward himself was truly Spartan.

Statement III is incorrect. Refer to the lines: Father was a strict disciplinarian to his children in their early years.

QUESTION: 48

The characteristic features of Indian culture have long been a search for ultimate verities and the concomitant disciple-guru relationship. My own path led me to a Christlike sage whose beautiful life was chiseled for the ages. He was one of the great masters who are India's sole remaining wealth. Emerging in every generation, they have bulwarked their land against the fate of Babylon and Egypt.

I find my earliest memories covering the anachronistic features of a previous incarnation. Clear recollections came to me of a distant life, a yogi amidst the Himalayan snows. These glimpses of the past, by some dimensionless link, also afforded me a glimpse of the future.

The helpless humiliations of infancy are not banished from my mind. I was resentfully conscious of not being able to walk or express myself freely. Prayerful surges arose within me as I realized my bodily impotence. My strong emotional life took silent form as words in many languages. Among the inward confusion of tongues, my ear gradually accustomed itself to the circumambient Bengali syllables of my people. The beguiling scope of an infant's mind!

Psychological ferment and my unresponsive body brought me to many obstinate crying-spells. I recall the general family bewilderment at my distress. Happier memories, too, crowd in on me: my mother's caresses, and my first attempts at lisping phrase and toddling step. These early triumphs, usually forgotten quickly, are yet a natural basis of self-confidence.

My far-reaching memories are not unique. Many yogis are known to have retained their self-consciousness without interruption by the dramatic transition to and from "life" and "death." If man be solely a body, its loss indeed places the final period to identity. But if prophets down the millenniums spake with truth, man is essentially of incorporeal nature. The persistent core of human egoity is only temporarily allied with sense perception.

Although odd, clear memories of infancy are not extremely rare. During travels in numerous lands, I have listened to early recollections from the lips of veracious men and women.

I was born in the last decade of the nineteenth century, and passed my first eight years at Gorakhpur. This was my birthplace in the United Provinces of northeastern India. We were eight children: four boys and four girls. I, Mukunda Lal Ghosh, was the second son and the fourth child.

Father and Mother were Bengalis, of the kshatriya caste. Both were blessed with saintly nature. Their mutual love, tranquil and dignified, never expressed itself frivolously. A perfect parental harmony was the calm center for the revolving tumult of eight young lives.

Father, Bhagabati Charan Ghosh, was kind, grave, at times stern. Loving him dearly, we children yet observed a certain reverential distance. An outstanding mathematician and logician, he was guided principally by his intellect. But Mother was a queen of hearts, and taught us only through love. After her death, Father displayed more of his inner tenderness. I noticed then that his gaze often metamorphosed into my mother's.

In Mother's presence we tasted our earliest bitter-sweet acquaintance with the scriptures. Tales from the mahabharata and ramayana were resourcefully summoned to meet the exigencies of discipline. Instruction and chastisement went hand in hand.

A daily gesture of respect to Father was given by Mother's dressing us carefully in the afternoons to welcome him home from the office. His position was similar to that of a vice-president, in the Bengal-Nagpur Railway, one of India's large companies. His work involved traveling, and our family lived in several cities during my childhood.

Mother held an open hand toward the needy. Father was also kindly disposed, but his respect for law and order extended to the budget. One fortnight Mother spent, in feeding the poor, more than Father's monthly income.

"All I ask, please, is to keep your charities within a reasonable limit." Even a gentle rebuke from her husband was grievous to Mother. She ordered a hackney carriage, not hinting to the children at any disagreement.

"Good-by; I am going away to my mother's home." Ancient ultimatum!

We broke into astounded lamentations. Our maternal uncle arrived opportunely; he whispered to Father some sage counsel, garnered no doubt from the ages. After Father had made a few conciliatory remarks, Mother happily dismissed the cab. Thus ended the only trouble I ever noticed between my parents. But I recall a characteristic discussion.

"Please give me ten rupees for a hapless woman who has just arrived at the house." Mother's smile had its own persuasion.

"Why ten rupees? One is enough." Father added a justification: "When my father and grandparents died suddenly, I had my first taste of poverty. My only breakfast, before walking miles to my school, was a small banana. Later, at the university, I was in such need that I applied to a wealthy judge for aid of one rupee per month. He declined, remarking that even a rupee is important."

"How bitterly you recall the denial of that rupee!" Mother's heart had an instant logic. "Do you want this woman also to remember painfully your refusal of ten rupees which she needs urgently?"

"You win!" With the immemorial gesture of vanquished husbands, he opened his wallet. "Here is a ten-rupee note. Give it to her with my good will."

Father tended to first say "No" to any new proposal. His attitude toward the strange woman who so readily enlisted Mother's sympathy was an example of his customary caution. Aversion to instant acceptance- typical of the French mind in the West-is really only honoring the principle of "due reflection." I always found Father reasonable and evenly balanced in his judgments. If I could bolster up my numerous requests with one or two good arguments, he invariably put the coveted goal within my reach, whether it were a vacation trip or a new motorcycle.

Father was a strict disciplinarian to his children in their early years, but his attitude toward himself was truly Spartan. He never visited the theater, for instance, but sought his recreation in various spiritual practices and in reading the bhagavad gita. Shunning all luxuries, he would cling to one old pair of shoes until they were useless. His sons bought automobiles after they came into popular use, but Father was always content with the trolley car for his daily ride to the office. The accumulation of money for the sake of power was alien to his nature. Once, after organizing the Calcutta Urban Bank, he refused to benefit himself by holding any of its shares. He had simply wished to perform a civic duty in his spare time.

Several years after Father had retired on a pension, an English accountant arrived to examine the books of the Bengal-Nagpur Railway Company. The amazed investigator discovered that Father had never applied for overdue bonuses.

"He did the work of three men!" the accountant told the company. "He has rupees 125,000 (about $41,250.) owing to him as back compensation." The officials presented Father with a check for this amount. He thought so little about it that he overlooked any mention to the family. Much later he was questioned by my youngest brother Bishnu, who noticed the large deposit on a bank statement.

"Why be elated by material profit?" Father replied. "The one who pursues a goal of even-mindedness is neither jubilant with gain nor depressed by loss. He knows that man arrives penniless in this world, and departs without a single rupee."

Q. The French mind in the West has been typified by the author to represent:

Solution:

The answer can be derived from the lines: Aversion to instant acceptance- typical of the French mind in the West-is really only honoring the principle of "due reflection."

The dictionary definition of aversion is a feeling of intense dislike. In the given case, it represents an avoidance where one does not instantly approve of something. The option closest to this sentiment is option 4. 

QUESTION: 49

The characteristic features of Indian culture have long been a search for ultimate verities and the concomitant disciple-guru relationship. My own path led me to a Christlike sage whose beautiful life was chiseled for the ages. He was one of the great masters who are India's sole remaining wealth. Emerging in every generation, they have bulwarked their land against the fate of Babylon and Egypt.

I find my earliest memories covering the anachronistic features of a previous incarnation. Clear recollections came to me of a distant life, a yogi amidst the Himalayan snows. These glimpses of the past, by some dimensionless link, also afforded me a glimpse of the future.

The helpless humiliations of infancy are not banished from my mind. I was resentfully conscious of not being able to walk or express myself freely. Prayerful surges arose within me as I realized my bodily impotence. My strong emotional life took silent form as words in many languages. Among the inward confusion of tongues, my ear gradually accustomed itself to the circumambient Bengali syllables of my people. The beguiling scope of an infant's mind!

Psychological ferment and my unresponsive body brought me to many obstinate crying-spells. I recall the general family bewilderment at my distress. Happier memories, too, crowd in on me: my mother's caresses, and my first attempts at lisping phrase and toddling step. These early triumphs, usually forgotten quickly, are yet a natural basis of self-confidence.

My far-reaching memories are not unique. Many yogis are known to have retained their self-consciousness without interruption by the dramatic transition to and from "life" and "death." If man be solely a body, its loss indeed places the final period to identity. But if prophets down the millenniums spake with truth, man is essentially of incorporeal nature. The persistent core of human egoity is only temporarily allied with sense perception.

Although odd, clear memories of infancy are not extremely rare. During travels in numerous lands, I have listened to early recollections from the lips of veracious men and women.

I was born in the last decade of the nineteenth century, and passed my first eight years at Gorakhpur. This was my birthplace in the United Provinces of northeastern India. We were eight children: four boys and four girls. I, Mukunda Lal Ghosh, was the second son and the fourth child.

Father and Mother were Bengalis, of the kshatriya caste. Both were blessed with saintly nature. Their mutual love, tranquil and dignified, never expressed itself frivolously. A perfect parental harmony was the calm center for the revolving tumult of eight young lives.

Father, Bhagabati Charan Ghosh, was kind, grave, at times stern. Loving him dearly, we children yet observed a certain reverential distance. An outstanding mathematician and logician, he was guided principally by his intellect. But Mother was a queen of hearts, and taught us only through love. After her death, Father displayed more of his inner tenderness. I noticed then that his gaze often metamorphosed into my mother's.

In Mother's presence we tasted our earliest bitter-sweet acquaintance with the scriptures. Tales from the mahabharata and ramayana were resourcefully summoned to meet the exigencies of discipline. Instruction and chastisement went hand in hand.

A daily gesture of respect to Father was given by Mother's dressing us carefully in the afternoons to welcome him home from the office. His position was similar to that of a vice-president, in the Bengal-Nagpur Railway, one of India's large companies. His work involved traveling, and our family lived in several cities during my childhood.

Mother held an open hand toward the needy. Father was also kindly disposed, but his respect for law and order extended to the budget. One fortnight Mother spent, in feeding the poor, more than Father's monthly income.

"All I ask, please, is to keep your charities within a reasonable limit." Even a gentle rebuke from her husband was grievous to Mother. She ordered a hackney carriage, not hinting to the children at any disagreement.

"Good-by; I am going away to my mother's home." Ancient ultimatum!

We broke into astounded lamentations. Our maternal uncle arrived opportunely; he whispered to Father some sage counsel, garnered no doubt from the ages. After Father had made a few conciliatory remarks, Mother happily dismissed the cab. Thus ended the only trouble I ever noticed between my parents. But I recall a characteristic discussion.

"Please give me ten rupees for a hapless woman who has just arrived at the house." Mother's smile had its own persuasion.

"Why ten rupees? One is enough." Father added a justification: "When my father and grandparents died suddenly, I had my first taste of poverty. My only breakfast, before walking miles to my school, was a small banana. Later, at the university, I was in such need that I applied to a wealthy judge for aid of one rupee per month. He declined, remarking that even a rupee is important."

"How bitterly you recall the denial of that rupee!" Mother's heart had an instant logic. "Do you want this woman also to remember painfully your refusal of ten rupees which she needs urgently?"

"You win!" With the immemorial gesture of vanquished husbands, he opened his wallet. "Here is a ten-rupee note. Give it to her with my good will."

Father tended to first say "No" to any new proposal. His attitude toward the strange woman who so readily enlisted Mother's sympathy was an example of his customary caution. Aversion to instant acceptance- typical of the French mind in the West-is really only honoring the principle of "due reflection." I always found Father reasonable and evenly balanced in his judgments. If I could bolster up my numerous requests with one or two good arguments, he invariably put the coveted goal within my reach, whether it were a vacation trip or a new motorcycle.

Father was a strict disciplinarian to his children in their early years, but his attitude toward himself was truly Spartan. He never visited the theater, for instance, but sought his recreation in various spiritual practices and in reading the bhagavad gita. Shunning all luxuries, he would cling to one old pair of shoes until they were useless. His sons bought automobiles after they came into popular use, but Father was always content with the trolley car for his daily ride to the office. The accumulation of money for the sake of power was alien to his nature. Once, after organizing the Calcutta Urban Bank, he refused to benefit himself by holding any of its shares. He had simply wished to perform a civic duty in his spare time.

Several years after Father had retired on a pension, an English accountant arrived to examine the books of the Bengal-Nagpur Railway Company. The amazed investigator discovered that Father had never applied for overdue bonuses.

"He did the work of three men!" the accountant told the company. "He has rupees 125,000 (about $41,250.) owing to him as back compensation." The officials presented Father with a check for this amount. He thought so little about it that he overlooked any mention to the family. Much later he was questioned by my youngest brother Bishnu, who noticed the large deposit on a bank statement.

"Why be elated by material profit?" Father replied. "The one who pursues a goal of even-mindedness is neither jubilant with gain nor depressed by loss. He knows that man arrives penniless in this world, and departs without a single rupee."

Q. Which, out of the following, represent the key ideas the father of the author prescribed to?

I. Self-discipline and austerity

II. Non-attachment to material benefits.

II. Disassociation with power and wealth.

Solution:

The answer can be derived from the following lines: The accumulation of money for the sake of power was alien to his nature…"Why be elated by material profit?" Father replied. "The one who pursues a goal of even-mindedness is neither jubilant with gain nor depressed by loss. He knows that man arrives penniless in this world, and departs without a single rupee."Each of the given statements is correct in the given case.

QUESTION: 50

Some years before St. Louis led his last Crusade there was born in Venice a boy named Marco Polo. His father was a wealthy merchant who often went on trading journeys to distant lands.

In 1271, when Marco was seventeen years old, he accompanied his father and uncle on a journey through the Holy Land, Persia and Tartary, and at length to the Empire of China—then called Ca-thay'. It took the travelers three years to reach Cathay.

The emperor of Cathay was a monarch named Kublai Khan (koo' bli-kän'), who lived in Peking.

Marco's father and uncle had been in Cathay once before and had entertained Kublai Khan by telling him about the manners and customs of Europe.

So when the two Venetian merchants again appeared in Peking, Kublai Khan was glad to see them. He was also greatly pleased with the young Marco, whom he invited to the palace.

Important positions at the Chinese court were given to Marco's father and uncle, and so they and Marco lived in the country for some years. Marco studied the Chinese language, and it was not very long before he could speak it.

When he was about twenty-one Kublai Khan sent him on very important business to a distant part of China. He did the work well and from that time was often employed as an envoy of the Chinese monarch. His travels were sometimes in lands never before visited by Europeans and he had many strange adventures among the almost unknown tribes of Asia. Step by step he was promoted. For several years he was governor of a great Chinese city.

Finally he and his father and uncle desired to return to Venice. They had all served Kublai Khan faithfully and he had appreciated it and given them rich rewards; but he did not wish to let them go.

While the matter was being talked over an embassy arrived in Peking from the king of Persia. This monarch desired to marry the daughter of Kublai Khan, the Princess Cocachin, and he had sent to ask her father for her hand. Consent was given, and Kublai Khan fitted out a fleet of fourteen ships to carry the wedding party to Persia.

The Princess Cocachin was a great friend of Marco Polo, and urged her father to allow him to go with the party. Finally Kublai Khan gave his consent. Marco's father and uncle were also allowed to go, and the three Venetians left China.

The fleet with the wedding party on board sailed southward on the China Sea. It was a long and perilous voyage. Stops were made at Borneo, Sumatra, Ceylon and other places, until the ships entered the Persian Gulf and the princess was safely landed. After they reached the capital of Persia the party, including the three Venetians, was entertained by the Persians for weeks in a magnificent manner and costly presents were given to all.

At last the Venetians left their friends, went to the Black Sea and took ship for Venice.

They had been away so long and were so much changed in appearance that none of their relations and old friends knew them when they arrived in Venice. As they were dressed in Tatar costume and sometimes spoke the Chinese language to one another, they found it hard to convince people that they were members of the Polo family.

At length, on order to show that they were the men that they declared themselves to be, they gave a dinner to all their relations and old friends. When the guests arrived they were greeted by the travelers, arrayed in gorgeous Chinese robes of crimson satin. After the first course they appeared in crimson damask; after the second, they changed their costumes to crimson velvet; while at the end of the dinner they appeared in the usual garb of wealthy Venetians.

"Now, my friends," said Marco, "I will show you something that will please you." He then brought into the room the rough Tatar coats which he and his father and uncle had worn when they reached Venice. Cutting open the seams, he took from inside the lining packets filled with rubies, emeralds and diamonds. It was the finest collection of jewels ever seen in Venice.

The guests were now persuaded that their hosts were indeed what they claimed to be.

Eight hundred years before Marco Polo's birth, some of the people of North Italy had fled before the Attila to the muddy islands of the Adriatic and founded Venice upon them. Since then the little settlement had become the most wealthy and powerful city of Europe. Venice was the queen of the Adriatic and her merchants were princes. They had vessels to bring the costly wares of the East to their wharves; they had warships to protect their rich cargoes from the pirates of the Mediterranean; they carried on wars. At the time when Marco Polo returned from Cathay they were at war with Gen'o-a.

The two cities were fighting for the trade of the world. In a great naval battle the Venetians were completely defeated. Marco Polo was in the battle and with many of his countrymen was captured by the enemy. For a year he was confined in a Genoese prison. One of his fellow-prisoners was a skillful penman and Marco dictated to him an account of his experiences in China, Japan, and other Eastern countries. This account was carefully written out. Copies of the manuscript exist to this day. One of these is in a library in Paris. It was carried into France in the year 1307. Another copy is preserved in the city of Berne. It is said that the book was translated into many languages, so that people in all parts of Europe learned about Marco's adventures.

About a hundred and seventy-five years after the book was written, the famous Genoese, Christopher Columbus, planned his voyage across the Atlantic. It is believed that he had read Marco's description of Java, Sumatra and other East India Islands, which he thought he had reached when he discovered Hai'ti and Cuba. So Marco Polo may have suggested to Columbus the voyage which led to the discovery of America.

Q. Identify the incorrect statement.

Solution:

Option 3 is incorrect. Refer to the lines: In 1271, when Marco was seventeen years old, he accompanied his father and uncle on a journey through the Holy Land, Persia and Tartary, and at length to the Empire of China—then called Ca-thay'. It took the travelers three years to reach Cathay.

Option 1 can be derived from the lines: When he was about twenty-one Kublai Khan sent him on very important business to a distant part of China. He did the work well and from that time was often employed as an envoy of the Chinese monarch.

Option 2 can be derived from the lines: Consent was given, and Kublai Khan fitted out a fleet of fourteen ships to carry the wedding party to Persia.

Option 4 can be derived from the lines: "Now, my friends," said Marco, "I will show you something that will please you." He then brought into the room the rough Tatar coats which he and his father and uncle had worn when they reached Venice. Cutting open the seams, he took from inside the lining packets filled with rubies, emeralds and diamonds. It was the finest collection of jewels ever seen in Venice.

QUESTION: 51

Some years before St. Louis led his last Crusade there was born in Venice a boy named Marco Polo. His father was a wealthy merchant who often went on trading journeys to distant lands.

In 1271, when Marco was seventeen years old, he accompanied his father and uncle on a journey through the Holy Land, Persia and Tartary, and at length to the Empire of China—then called Ca-thay'. It took the travelers three years to reach Cathay.

The emperor of Cathay was a monarch named Kublai Khan (koo' bli-kän'), who lived in Peking.

Marco's father and uncle had been in Cathay once before and had entertained Kublai Khan by telling him about the manners and customs of Europe.

So when the two Venetian merchants again appeared in Peking, Kublai Khan was glad to see them. He was also greatly pleased with the young Marco, whom he invited to the palace.

Important positions at the Chinese court were given to Marco's father and uncle, and so they and Marco lived in the country for some years. Marco studied the Chinese language, and it was not very long before he could speak it.

When he was about twenty-one Kublai Khan sent him on very important business to a distant part of China. He did the work well and from that time was often employed as an envoy of the Chinese monarch. His travels were sometimes in lands never before visited by Europeans and he had many strange adventures among the almost unknown tribes of Asia. Step by step he was promoted. For several years he was governor of a great Chinese city.

Finally he and his father and uncle desired to return to Venice. They had all served Kublai Khan faithfully and he had appreciated it and given them rich rewards; but he did not wish to let them go.

While the matter was being talked over an embassy arrived in Peking from the king of Persia. This monarch desired to marry the daughter of Kublai Khan, the Princess Cocachin, and he had sent to ask her father for her hand. Consent was given, and Kublai Khan fitted out a fleet of fourteen ships to carry the wedding party to Persia.

The Princess Cocachin was a great friend of Marco Polo, and urged her father to allow him to go with the party. Finally Kublai Khan gave his consent. Marco's father and uncle were also allowed to go, and the three Venetians left China.

The fleet with the wedding party on board sailed southward on the China Sea. It was a long and perilous voyage. Stops were made at Borneo, Sumatra, Ceylon and other places, until the ships entered the Persian Gulf and the princess was safely landed. After they reached the capital of Persia the party, including the three Venetians, was entertained by the Persians for weeks in a magnificent manner and costly presents were given to all.

At last the Venetians left their friends, went to the Black Sea and took ship for Venice.

They had been away so long and were so much changed in appearance that none of their relations and old friends knew them when they arrived in Venice. As they were dressed in Tatar costume and sometimes spoke the Chinese language to one another, they found it hard to convince people that they were members of the Polo family.

At length, on order to show that they were the men that they declared themselves to be, they gave a dinner to all their relations and old friends. When the guests arrived they were greeted by the travelers, arrayed in gorgeous Chinese robes of crimson satin. After the first course they appeared in crimson damask; after the second, they changed their costumes to crimson velvet; while at the end of the dinner they appeared in the usual garb of wealthy Venetians.

"Now, my friends," said Marco, "I will show you something that will please you." He then brought into the room the rough Tatar coats which he and his father and uncle had worn when they reached Venice. Cutting open the seams, he took from inside the lining packets filled with rubies, emeralds and diamonds. It was the finest collection of jewels ever seen in Venice.

The guests were now persuaded that their hosts were indeed what they claimed to be.

Eight hundred years before Marco Polo's birth, some of the people of North Italy had fled before the Attila to the muddy islands of the Adriatic and founded Venice upon them. Since then the little settlement had become the most wealthy and powerful city of Europe. Venice was the queen of the Adriatic and her merchants were princes. They had vessels to bring the costly wares of the East to their wharves; they had warships to protect their rich cargoes from the pirates of the Mediterranean; they carried on wars. At the time when Marco Polo returned from Cathay they were at war with Gen'o-a.

The two cities were fighting for the trade of the world. In a great naval battle the Venetians were completely defeated. Marco Polo was in the battle and with many of his countrymen was captured by the enemy. For a year he was confined in a Genoese prison. One of his fellow-prisoners was a skillful penman and Marco dictated to him an account of his experiences in China, Japan, and other Eastern countries. This account was carefully written out. Copies of the manuscript exist to this day. One of these is in a library in Paris. It was carried into France in the year 1307. Another copy is preserved in the city of Berne. It is said that the book was translated into many languages, so that people in all parts of Europe learned about Marco's adventures.

About a hundred and seventy-five years after the book was written, the famous Genoese, Christopher Columbus, planned his voyage across the Atlantic. It is believed that he had read Marco's description of Java, Sumatra and other East India Islands, which he thought he had reached when he discovered Hai'ti and Cuba. So Marco Polo may have suggested to Columbus the voyage which led to the discovery of America.

In the context of the passage, the word perilous means:

Solution:

Perilous means full of danger or risk. In the given case, option 2 is the apt answer.

QUESTION: 52

Some years before St. Louis led his last Crusade there was born in Venice a boy named Marco Polo. His father was a wealthy merchant who often went on trading journeys to distant lands.

In 1271, when Marco was seventeen years old, he accompanied his father and uncle on a journey through the Holy Land, Persia and Tartary, and at length to the Empire of China—then called Ca-thay'. It took the travelers three years to reach Cathay.

The emperor of Cathay was a monarch named Kublai Khan (koo' bli-kän'), who lived in Peking.

Marco's father and uncle had been in Cathay once before and had entertained Kublai Khan by telling him about the manners and customs of Europe.

So when the two Venetian merchants again appeared in Peking, Kublai Khan was glad to see them. He was also greatly pleased with the young Marco, whom he invited to the palace.

Important positions at the Chinese court were given to Marco's father and uncle, and so they and Marco lived in the country for some years. Marco studied the Chinese language, and it was not very long before he could speak it.

When he was about twenty-one Kublai Khan sent him on very important business to a distant part of China. He did the work well and from that time was often employed as an envoy of the Chinese monarch. His travels were sometimes in lands never before visited by Europeans and he had many strange adventures among the almost unknown tribes of Asia. Step by step he was promoted. For several years he was governor of a great Chinese city.

Finally he and his father and uncle desired to return to Venice. They had all served Kublai Khan faithfully and he had appreciated it and given them rich rewards; but he did not wish to let them go.

While the matter was being talked over an embassy arrived in Peking from the king of Persia. This monarch desired to marry the daughter of Kublai Khan, the Princess Cocachin, and he had sent to ask her father for her hand. Consent was given, and Kublai Khan fitted out a fleet of fourteen ships to carry the wedding party to Persia.

The Princess Cocachin was a great friend of Marco Polo, and urged her father to allow him to go with the party. Finally Kublai Khan gave his consent. Marco's father and uncle were also allowed to go, and the three Venetians left China.

The fleet with the wedding party on board sailed southward on the China Sea. It was a long and perilous voyage. Stops were made at Borneo, Sumatra, Ceylon and other places, until the ships entered the Persian Gulf and the princess was safely landed. After they reached the capital of Persia the party, including the three Venetians, was entertained by the Persians for weeks in a magnificent manner and costly presents were given to all.

At last the Venetians left their friends, went to the Black Sea and took ship for Venice.

They had been away so long and were so much changed in appearance that none of their relations and old friends knew them when they arrived in Venice. As they were dressed in Tatar costume and sometimes spoke the Chinese language to one another, they found it hard to convince people that they were members of the Polo family.

At length, on order to show that they were the men that they declared themselves to be, they gave a dinner to all their relations and old friends. When the guests arrived they were greeted by the travelers, arrayed in gorgeous Chinese robes of crimson satin. After the first course they appeared in crimson damask; after the second, they changed their costumes to crimson velvet; while at the end of the dinner they appeared in the usual garb of wealthy Venetians.

"Now, my friends," said Marco, "I will show you something that will please you." He then brought into the room the rough Tatar coats which he and his father and uncle had worn when they reached Venice. Cutting open the seams, he took from inside the lining packets filled with rubies, emeralds and diamonds. It was the finest collection of jewels ever seen in Venice.

The guests were now persuaded that their hosts were indeed what they claimed to be.

Eight hundred years before Marco Polo's birth, some of the people of North Italy had fled before the Attila to the muddy islands of the Adriatic and founded Venice upon them. Since then the little settlement had become the most wealthy and powerful city of Europe. Venice was the queen of the Adriatic and her merchants were princes. They had vessels to bring the costly wares of the East to their wharves; they had warships to protect their rich cargoes from the pirates of the Mediterranean; they carried on wars. At the time when Marco Polo returned from Cathay they were at war with Gen'o-a.

The two cities were fighting for the trade of the world. In a great naval battle the Venetians were completely defeated. Marco Polo was in the battle and with many of his countrymen was captured by the enemy. For a year he was confined in a Genoese prison. One of his fellow-prisoners was a skillful penman and Marco dictated to him an account of his experiences in China, Japan, and other Eastern countries. This account was carefully written out. Copies of the manuscript exist to this day. One of these is in a library in Paris. It was carried into France in the year 1307. Another copy is preserved in the city of Berne. It is said that the book was translated into many languages, so that people in all parts of Europe learned about Marco's adventures.

About a hundred and seventy-five years after the book was written, the famous Genoese, Christopher Columbus, planned his voyage across the Atlantic. It is believed that he had read Marco's description of Java, Sumatra and other East India Islands, which he thought he had reached when he discovered Hai'ti and Cuba. So Marco Polo may have suggested to Columbus the voyage which led to the discovery of America.

Match the following:

Solution:

This is a fact based question and all the facts can be directly found in the passage.

QUESTION: 53

Some years before St. Louis led his last Crusade there was born in Venice a boy named Marco Polo. His father was a wealthy merchant who often went on trading journeys to distant lands.

In 1271, when Marco was seventeen years old, he accompanied his father and uncle on a journey through the Holy Land, Persia and Tartary, and at length to the Empire of China—then called Ca-thay'. It took the travelers three years to reach Cathay.

The emperor of Cathay was a monarch named Kublai Khan (koo' bli-kän'), who lived in Peking.

Marco's father and uncle had been in Cathay once before and had entertained Kublai Khan by telling him about the manners and customs of Europe.

So when the two Venetian merchants again appeared in Peking, Kublai Khan was glad to see them. He was also greatly pleased with the young Marco, whom he invited to the palace.

Important positions at the Chinese court were given to Marco's father and uncle, and so they and Marco lived in the country for some years. Marco studied the Chinese language, and it was not very long before he could speak it.

When he was about twenty-one Kublai Khan sent him on very important business to a distant part of China. He did the work well and from that time was often employed as an envoy of the Chinese monarch. His travels were sometimes in lands never before visited by Europeans and he had many strange adventures among the almost unknown tribes of Asia. Step by step he was promoted. For several years he was governor of a great Chinese city.

Finally he and his father and uncle desired to return to Venice. They had all served Kublai Khan faithfully and he had appreciated it and given them rich rewards; but he did not wish to let them go.

While the matter was being talked over an embassy arrived in Peking from the king of Persia. This monarch desired to marry the daughter of Kublai Khan, the Princess Cocachin, and he had sent to ask her father for her hand. Consent was given, and Kublai Khan fitted out a fleet of fourteen ships to carry the wedding party to Persia.

The Princess Cocachin was a great friend of Marco Polo, and urged her father to allow him to go with the party. Finally Kublai Khan gave his consent. Marco's father and uncle were also allowed to go, and the three Venetians left China.

The fleet with the wedding party on board sailed southward on the China Sea. It was a long and perilous voyage. Stops were made at Borneo, Sumatra, Ceylon and other places, until the ships entered the Persian Gulf and the princess was safely landed. After they reached the capital of Persia the party, including the three Venetians, was entertained by the Persians for weeks in a magnificent manner and costly presents were given to all.

At last the Venetians left their friends, went to the Black Sea and took ship for Venice.

They had been away so long and were so much changed in appearance that none of their relations and old friends knew them when they arrived in Venice. As they were dressed in Tatar costume and sometimes spoke the Chinese language to one another, they found it hard to convince people that they were members of the Polo family.

At length, on order to show that they were the men that they declared themselves to be, they gave a dinner to all their relations and old friends. When the guests arrived they were greeted by the travelers, arrayed in gorgeous Chinese robes of crimson satin. After the first course they appeared in crimson damask; after the second, they changed their costumes to crimson velvet; while at the end of the dinner they appeared in the usual garb of wealthy Venetians.

"Now, my friends," said Marco, "I will show you something that will please you." He then brought into the room the rough Tatar coats which he and his father and uncle had worn when they reached Venice. Cutting open the seams, he took from inside the lining packets filled with rubies, emeralds and diamonds. It was the finest collection of jewels ever seen in Venice.

The guests were now persuaded that their hosts were indeed what they claimed to be.

Eight hundred years before Marco Polo's birth, some of the people of North Italy had fled before the Attila to the muddy islands of the Adriatic and founded Venice upon them. Since then the little settlement had become the most wealthy and powerful city of Europe. Venice was the queen of the Adriatic and her merchants were princes. They had vessels to bring the costly wares of the East to their wharves; they had warships to protect their rich cargoes from the pirates of the Mediterranean; they carried on wars. At the time when Marco Polo returned from Cathay they were at war with Gen'o-a.

The two cities were fighting for the trade of the world. In a great naval battle the Venetians were completely defeated. Marco Polo was in the battle and with many of his countrymen was captured by the enemy. For a year he was confined in a Genoese prison. One of his fellow-prisoners was a skillful penman and Marco dictated to him an account of his experiences in China, Japan, and other Eastern countries. This account was carefully written out. Copies of the manuscript exist to this day. One of these is in a library in Paris. It was carried into France in the year 1307. Another copy is preserved in the city of Berne. It is said that the book was translated into many languages, so that people in all parts of Europe learned about Marco's adventures.

About a hundred and seventy-five years after the book was written, the famous Genoese, Christopher Columbus, planned his voyage across the Atlantic. It is believed that he had read Marco's description of Java, Sumatra and other East India Islands, which he thought he had reached when he discovered Hai'ti and Cuba. So Marco Polo may have suggested to Columbus the voyage which led to the discovery of America.

Q. The copies of the manuscript of Marco Polo's experiences are available in which city even today?

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

DIRECTIONS for the question (54 to 56) : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

The Reserve Bank of India has worked as efficiently as any top central bank of the world right from its inception. It was blessed with absolute independence to control or manage monetary liquidity, price stability, exchange rate stability, and later on financial stability also. The governor and his team have ably served the nation during all the financial storms and crises, domestic as well as external, that beset the country.

In the early, post-Independence period, the RBI is credited with monetisation of the entire economy by promoting and launching rapid branch expansion of commercial banks and the setting up of financial institutions such as the Industrial Finance Corporation of India (IFCI), the IDBI and co-operative banks, giant insurance companies and so on. Today’s strong financial system stands on the shoulders of the RBI, and this pyramidal edifice has been possible due to the independence given to the governor under the RBI Act, 1934.

However, for the last few years, the Union government has been making efforts to dilute the power of the RBI by distorting the independence of the central bank. Of course, in a way, some of the principles of central banking have been overlooked from the time the political administration started interfering in the appointments of the governor and the deputy governors of the central bank, approving the salaries and wages of RBI employees, and directing the monetary policy through distribution of bank credit by way of priority sector policy.

But the move to restructure the monetary policy committee (MPC) marks the biggest dent yet in the independence of the RBI. Earlier, the governor used to appoint one member of the committee and had a say in two more. The remaining three members were appointed by the government. Now, the committee will be headed or chaired by the governor, who will only have a say in one appointment. One appointment will be done by the Reserve Bank Board from among the executive officers; one employee of the RBI will be nominated by the governor, while four persons will be appointed by the Centre. Moreover, the governor will not have veto powers, though he can exercise a tie-breaker vote in case of a tie.

If the present draft is approved, the governor will find himself in an isolated situation. As regards the committee, its quality of discussion will be lowered since it is possible that the ruling parties today or in the future would like to appoint their own representatives as members of the MPC and not on the basis of merit.

For instance, there can be a lot of liberal deficit financing with the pretext of increasing employment and economic growth. Moreover, where the governor is not strong, the varying opinions of different members of the MPC can impact the decision-making powers. However, this weakness can be removed by publishing individual policymakers’ views on the RBI’s website whenever the views are at odds with one another.

In a central bank dominated by the government, the temptation to tamper with various instruments of monetary policy in order to achieve the government’s objectives would be hard to resist. For instance, the ministry of finance could want to reduce interest rate to push up demand, without considering the impact of rate cut on foreign inflows, depreciation of the rupee and increase in domestic money stock and inflation. There could be many more such examples.

This situation can only be countered by having a robust governor with absolute independence in charge of the RBI. Of course, more independence has to be reconciled with more personal accountability on the part of the governor as well as that of other financial institutions. The governor should be responsible and accountable to Parliament and not to a particular government or the ministry of finance, or minister.

The fears of a discretionary monetary policy adversely impacting the economy are not unfounded. There are a number of studies that have revealed that there is a reverse relationship between inflation and independence of the monetary authority; the higher the independence of the central bank, the lower the inflation. Giving higher discretionary powers to the central bank has been seen to be successful in many other countries.

An apt title for the passage is:

Solution:

In the given case, the apt title for the passage is option 4. The central thread of thought in the passage is that the RBI should be independent and there should be no government interference in it. This sentiment is best reflected by option 4.

QUESTION: 55

The Reserve Bank of India has worked as efficiently as any top central bank of the world right from its inception. It was blessed with absolute independence to control or manage monetary liquidity, price stability, exchange rate stability, and later on financial stability also. The governor and his team have ably served the nation during all the financial storms and crises, domestic as well as external, that beset the country.

In the early, post-Independence period, the RBI is credited with monetisation of the entire economy by promoting and launching rapid branch expansion of commercial banks and the setting up of financial institutions such as the Industrial Finance Corporation of India (IFCI), the IDBI and co-operative banks, giant insurance companies and so on. Today’s strong financial system stands on the shoulders of the RBI, and this pyramidal edifice has been possible due to the independence given to the governor under the RBI Act, 1934.

However, for the last few years, the Union government has been making efforts to dilute the power of the RBI by distorting the independence of the central bank. Of course, in a way, some of the principles of central banking have been overlooked from the time the political administration started interfering in the appointments of the governor and the deputy governors of the central bank, approving the salaries and wages of RBI employees, and directing the monetary policy through distribution of bank credit by way of priority sector policy.

But the move to restructure the monetary policy committee (MPC) marks the biggest dent yet in the independence of the RBI. Earlier, the governor used to appoint one member of the committee and had a say in two more. The remaining three members were appointed by the government. Now, the committee will be headed or chaired by the governor, who will only have a say in one appointment. One appointment will be done by the Reserve Bank Board from among the executive officers; one employee of the RBI will be nominated by the governor, while four persons will be appointed by the Centre. Moreover, the governor will not have veto powers, though he can exercise a tie-breaker vote in case of a tie.

If the present draft is approved, the governor will find himself in an isolated situation. As regards the committee, its quality of discussion will be lowered since it is possible that the ruling parties today or in the future would like to appoint their own representatives as members of the MPC and not on the basis of merit.

For instance, there can be a lot of liberal deficit financing with the pretext of increasing employment and economic growth. Moreover, where the governor is not strong, the varying opinions of different members of the MPC can impact the decision-making powers. However, this weakness can be removed by publishing individual policymakers’ views on the RBI’s website whenever the views are at odds with one another.

In a central bank dominated by the government, the temptation to tamper with various instruments of monetary policy in order to achieve the government’s objectives would be hard to resist. For instance, the ministry of finance could want to reduce interest rate to push up demand, without considering the impact of rate cut on foreign inflows, depreciation of the rupee and increase in domestic money stock and inflation. There could be many more such examples.

This situation can only be countered by having a robust governor with absolute independence in charge of the RBI. Of course, more independence has to be reconciled with more personal accountability on the part of the governor as well as that of other financial institutions. The governor should be responsible and accountable to Parliament and not to a particular government or the ministry of finance, or minister.

The fears of a discretionary monetary policy adversely impacting the economy are not unfounded. There are a number of studies that have revealed that there is a reverse relationship between inflation and independence of the monetary authority; the higher the independence of the central bank, the lower the inflation. Giving higher discretionary powers to the central bank has been seen to be successful in many other countries.

According to the information given in the passage:

Solution:

Refer to the lines: There are a number of studies that have revealed that there is a reverse relationship between inflation and independence of the monetary authority; the higher the independence of the central bank, the lower the inflation.

Now there is an inverse relationship between independence monetary policy and inflation. An independent monetary policy leads to lower inflation and a monetary policy which is not independent leads to higher inflation. What is a non-independent monetary policy? It is one where the government interferes with the functioning of the central bank.

QUESTION: 56

Which of the following represent interference of government in the functioning of RBI?

I. Approval of wages of RBI employees.

II. Restructuring of MPC.

III. Openly publishing of individual policymaker’s view on monetary policy.

IV. Reduction of interest rate to push up demand.

Solution:

Statement III is not an example of government’s interference. Refer to the lines: However, this weakness can be removed by publishing individual policymakers’ views on the RBI’s website whenever the views are at odds with one another. The other statements are directly mentioned in the passage.

QUESTION: 57

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the sixteen statement given below and answer the question that follows.

S 1: There is a group of seven persons A, B, C, D, E, F and G.

S 2: There are four males, three females, two married couples and three unmarried persons in the group.

S 3: These seven persons are seated in a row on the bench.

S 4: Their professions are: engineer, teacher, doctor, Psychologist, entrepreneur, architect and student.

S 5: B, the psychologist, is not married and is the most intelligent.

S 6: The engineer is married to the teacher, who is the least intelligent of the group.

S 7: D is an architect. He is sitting in the centre and right of A.

S 8: The student is sitting on the rightmost corner of the bench.

S 9: The doctor is married to C. C is the second most intelligent of the group followed by her husband

S 10: The least intelligent of the group is sitting on the immediate left of C. The most intelligent is sitting on the immediate left of F.

S 11: There are as many more intelligent persons than the engineer as there are less intelligent. There are two persons sitting between B and Doctor.

S 12: Student who is a male and unmarried has two females sitting next to him.

S 13: The psychologist is a female and unmarried.

S 14: C, an entrepreneur, sitting immediately left of her husband.

S 15: The student is more intelligent than the architect. They have  two people in between them.

S 16: E is married and is sitting at the left most position of the row

Q. Who is sitting on the immediate right of D?

Solution:

The following is the order

 

Hence G is sitting to the immediate right of D.

QUESTION: 58

S 1: There is a group of seven persons A, B, C, D, E, F and G.

S 2: There are four males, three females, two married couples and three unmarried persons in the group.

S 3: These seven persons are seated in a row on the bench.

S 4: Their professions are: engineer, teacher, doctor, Psychologist, entrepreneur, architect and student.

S 5: B, the psychologist, is not married and is the most intelligent.

S 6: The engineer is married to the teacher, who is the least intelligent of the group.

S 7: D is an architect. He is sitting in the centre and right of A.

S 8: The student is sitting on the rightmost corner of the bench.

S 9: The doctor is married to C. C is the second most intelligent of the group followed by her husband

S 10: The least intelligent of the group is sitting on the immediate left of C. The most intelligent is sitting on the immediate left of F.

S 11: There are as many more intelligent persons than the engineer as there are less intelligent. There are two persons sitting between B and Doctor.

S 12: Student who is a male and unmarried has two females sitting next to him.

S 13: The psychologist is a female and unmarried.

S 14: C, an entrepreneur, sitting immediately left of her husband.

S 15: The student is more intelligent than the architect. They have  two people in between them.

S 16: E is married and is sitting at the left most position of the row

Q. What is the profession of A?

Solution:

The following is the order

It can be checked from the above information that A is a Doctor.

QUESTION: 59

S 1: There is a group of seven persons A, B, C, D, E, F and G.

S 2: There are four males, three females, two married couples and three unmarried persons in the group.

S 3: These seven persons are seated in a row on the bench.

S 4: Their professions are: engineer, teacher, doctor, Psychologist, entrepreneur, architect and student.

S 5: B, the psychologist, is not married and is the most intelligent.

S 6: The engineer is married to the teacher, who is the least intelligent of the group.

S 7: D is an architect. He is sitting in the centre and right of A.

S 8: The student is sitting on the rightmost corner of the bench.

S 9: The doctor is married to C. C is the second most intelligent of the group followed by her husband

S 10: The least intelligent of the group is sitting on the immediate left of C. The most intelligent is sitting on the immediate left of F.

S 11: There are as many more intelligent persons than the engineer as there are less intelligent. There are two persons sitting between B and Doctor.

S 12: Student who is a male and unmarried has two females sitting next to him.

S 13: The psychologist is a female and unmarried.

S 14: C, an entrepreneur, sitting immediately left of her husband.

S 15: The student is more intelligent than the architect. They have  two people in between them.

S 16: E is married and is sitting at the left most position of the row

Q. What is the profession of F?

Solution:

The following is the order

It can be verified from the above information that F is a student. Since none of the options provide 'student' as the answer for the given question, thus 'None of the above' is the right answer.

QUESTION: 60

S 1: There is a group of seven persons A, B, C, D, E, F and G.

S 2: There are four males, three females, two married couples and three unmarried persons in the group.

S 3: These seven persons are seated in a row on the bench.

S 4: Their professions are: engineer, teacher, doctor, Psychologist, entrepreneur, architect and student.

S 5: B, the psychologist, is not married and is the most intelligent.

S 6: The engineer is married to the teacher, who is the least intelligent of the group.

S 7: D is an architect. He is sitting in the centre and right of A.

S 8: The student is sitting on the rightmost corner of the bench.

S 9: The doctor is married to C. C is the second most intelligent of the group followed by her husband

S 10: The least intelligent of the group is sitting on the immediate left of C. The most intelligent is sitting on the immediate left of F.

S 11: There are as many more intelligent persons than the engineer as there are less intelligent. There are two persons sitting between B and Doctor.

S 12: Student who is a male and unmarried has two females sitting next to him.

S 13: The psychologist is a female and unmarried.

S 14: C, an entrepreneur, sitting immediately left of her husband.

S 15: The student is more intelligent than the architect. They have  two people in between them.

S 16: E is married and is sitting at the left most position of the row

Q. Which two are sitting together?

Solution:

The following is the order

Verifying the given options one by one, it can be concluded that the two persons sitting together are Teacher and Entrepreneur.

QUESTION: 61

S 1: There is a group of seven persons A, B, C, D, E, F and G.

S 2: There are four males, three females, two married couples and three unmarried persons in the group.

S 3: These seven persons are seated in a row on the bench.

S 4: Their professions are: engineer, teacher, doctor, Psychologist, entrepreneur, architect and student.

S 5: B, the psychologist, is not married and is the most intelligent.

S 6: The engineer is married to the teacher, who is the least intelligent of the group.

S 7: D is an architect. He is sitting in the centre and right of A.

S 8: The student is sitting on the rightmost corner of the bench.

S 9: The doctor is married to C. C is the second most intelligent of the group followed by her husband

S 10: The least intelligent of the group is sitting on the immediate left of C. The most intelligent is sitting on the immediate left of F.

S 11: There are as many more intelligent persons than the engineer as there are less intelligent. There are two persons sitting between B and Doctor.

S 12: Student who is a male and unmarried has two females sitting next to him.

S 13: The psychologist is a female and unmarried.

S 14: C, an entrepreneur, sitting immediately left of her husband.

S 15: The student is more intelligent than the architect. They have  two people in between them.

S 16: E is married and is sitting at the left most position of the row

Q. Which of these represent the correct order of intelligence (in the decreasing sequence)?

Solution:

The following is the order

According to the given information, the correct order of Intelligence is B, C, A, G, F, D, E. Out of the given options, only BCF satisfies the correct order of Intelligence ranks in decreasing order.

QUESTION: 62

S 1: There is a group of seven persons A, B, C, D, E, F and G.

S 2: There are four males, three females, two married couples and three unmarried persons in the group.

S 3: These seven persons are seated in a row on the bench.

S 4: Their professions are: engineer, teacher, doctor, Psychologist, entrepreneur, architect and student.

S 5: B, the psychologist, is not married and is the most intelligent.

S 6: The engineer is married to the teacher, who is the least intelligent of the group.

S 7: D is an architect. He is sitting in the centre and right of A.

S 8: The student is sitting on the rightmost corner of the bench.

S 9: The doctor is married to C. C is the second most intelligent of the group followed by her husband

S 10: The least intelligent of the group is sitting on the immediate left of C. The most intelligent is sitting on the immediate left of F.

S 11: There are as many more intelligent persons than the engineer as there are less intelligent. There are two persons sitting between B and Doctor.

S 12: Student who is a male and unmarried has two females sitting next to him.

S 13: The psychologist is a female and unmarried.

S 14: C, an entrepreneur, sitting immediately left of her husband.

S 15: The student is more intelligent than the architect. They have  two people in between them.

S 16: E is married and is sitting at the left most position of the row

Q. Which of the given statements in the question is definitely superfluous?

Solution:

The following is the order

S13 is the superfluous statement because the similar information is provided in S5 and S10.

QUESTION: 63

Sitting at a square table are a smuggler, a mafia boss, a bootlegger and a contract killer. Only two of these men, Mama and Kalia, are genuine criminals. The other two are CID officers posing as criminals. Mama is sitting opposite the Mafia boss; the junior CID officer is sitting to the left of the smuggler and the senior CID officer is sitting opposite the bootlegger. The junior officer disguised as

Solution:

QUESTION: 64

Eight friends Q, R, S, T, V, W, Y and Z are sitting around a circular table, facing the centre. There are three males and five females in the group of friends. No two males are immediate neighbours of each other.

V sits second to the right of his wife.

S sits third to the right of V.

W sits second to the right of her husband Z. Z is not an immediate neighbour of V's wife.

T is a male and Y is not an immediate neighbor of V.

R sits second to the right of Q.

Q. What is the position of T with respect to Z?

Solution:

QUESTION: 65

Eight friends Q, R, S, T, V, W, Y and Z are sitting around a circular table, facing the centre. There are three males and five females in the group of friends. No two males are immediate neighbours of each other.

V sits second to the right of his wife.

S sits third to the right of V.

W sits second to the right of her husband Z. Z is not an immediate neighbour of V's wife.

T is a male and Y is not an immediate neighbor of V.

R sits second to the right of Q.

Q. Which of the following statements regarding S is definitely correct ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 66

Eight friends Q, R, S, T, V, W, Y and Z are sitting around a circular table, facing the centre. There are three males and five females in the group of friends. No two males are immediate neighbours of each other.

V sits second to the right of his wife.

S sits third to the right of V.

W sits second to the right of her husband Z. Z is not an immediate neighbour of V's wife.

T is a male and Y is not an immediate neighbor of V.

R sits second to the right of Q.

Q. Who amongst the following is V's wife ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 67

Eight friends Q, R, S, T, V, W, Y and Z are sitting around a circular table, facing the centre. There are three males and five females in the group of friends. No two males are immediate neighbours of each other.

V sits second to the right of his wife.

S sits third to the right of V.

W sits second to the right of her husband Z. Z is not an immediate neighbour of V's wife.

T is a male and Y is not an immediate neighbor of V.

R sits second to the right of Q.

Q. Who amongst the following has a male sitting to the immediate left and the right?

Solution:

QUESTION: 68

Eight friends Q, R, S, T, V, W, Y and Z are sitting around a circular table, facing the centre. There are three males and five females in the group of friends. No two males are immediate neighbours of each other.

V sits second to the right of his wife.

S sits third to the right of V.

W sits second to the right of her husband Z. Z is not an immediate neighbour of V's wife.

T is a male and Y is not an immediate neighbor of V.

R sits second to the right of Q.

 

Q. Which of the following is not true regarding T?

Solution:

QUESTION: 69

If it is possible to make only one meaningful word from the second, the third, the seventh and the tenth letters of the word FRIGHTENED,what will be the third letter of that word? If it is possible to make more than one word your answer is M and if it is not possible to make any meaningful word your answer is N.

Solution:

F   R   I   G   H   T   E   N    E    D . 2nd , 3rd, 7th and 10th letters are R,   I,   E,   D and the word formed can be RIDE , REID , DIRE , DIER.

Therefore correct answer is M

QUESTION: 70

Whenever I study LR, my day goes well.

A. I studied LR        B. My day did not go well    C. My day went well    D. I did not study LR