IIFT Mock Test -9


54 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | IIFT Mock Test -9


Description
This mock test of IIFT Mock Test -9 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 54 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT IIFT Mock Test -9 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IIFT Mock Test -9 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this IIFT Mock Test -9 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IIFT Mock Test -9 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Which of the following is not a SAARC country?

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Where is the headquarters of Intel located ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Which of the following will be the official mascot of FIFA 2018 World Cup?

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Which Indian film has been selected as the official entry to Oscar Awards 2017 in the foreign language film category?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Which of the following nations is a member of G-8?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Non-Violence is observed on which date?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

In Greek mythology, Nike was

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Heineken is an international brand originating in

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QUESTION: 9

Who of the following have won the Nobel Prize in Physics 2017?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

The headquarters of the International Court of Justice is at

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QUESTION: 11

Under the Indus Water Treaty (IWT), India has been given the exclusive right over the rivers of

1. Chenab    2. Ravi   3. Beas   4. Indus  5. Satluj  6. Jhelum

Select the correct answer using the codes given below.

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change deals with

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Which country has been officially declared measles free by the World Health Organisation (WHO)?

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Which Indian film has been chosen as India’s official entry in the Best Foreign Language Film category at Oscars 2018?

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Pench National Park is located in which state of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

India has recently signed pact with which international organisation for global promotion of traditional systems of medicine?

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

As per an announcement in September 2017 India's first Hyperloop project will come up in ……………

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

What does BEPZA stands for?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors are located in which country?

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

In which of the following countries the world’s largest blue star sappire has been found?

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

NITI Aayog will host Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES 2017) in which city?

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

The office of the UN General Assembly is in

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

Who has become India's first woman to join the International Olympic Committee?

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

The headquarters of the UNESCO is at

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

India started 'Operation Insaniyat' in September 2017 to provided assistance to ………….. in response to the humanitarian crisis being faced on account of the large influx of Rohingya refugees into that country from Myanmar.

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

A. At the same time, the historian searches for a coherent network of relationships among the pieces of evidence in order to provide a satisfactory set of answers to the research questions.

B. Through this critical analysis of evidence, the historian then writes a narrative that becomes a secondary account of the subject; admittedly, there exist certain biases in the posing of the questions, the evaluation of evidence, and the construction of a coherent network and secondary text.

C. At one end of the spectrum, the historian collects evidence and then writes an individualist, yet coherent, narrative account as response to the research question while at the other end of the spectrum, social science models or frameworks are used to organize and interpret historical evidence.

D. Narrative history places considerable value on collecting all the available evidence related to the particular questions posed for the study, and then subjecting the evidence to an evaluation of its relative importance or influence.

E. Narrative historians would claim, however, that to adopt an explicit theoretical model to explain or organize historical evidence constitutes even more of a bias.

Solution:

Note the words at the same time in line A, which speak of nothing but the idea broached in line C only (C-A). Line D talks of collecting evidence while line B talks of analysis of evidence, thus giving us another strongly linked pair (D-B). Line B alludes to certain biases, an idea further touched upon in line E. Note the word however in line E, which puts it in contrast with line B (B-E).

QUESTION: 27

A. The point here is that it is not sufficient to simply not intend to harm noncombatants; rather, one must intend not to harm noncombatants in every conceivable way.

B. To illustrate this point, Walzer cites as an example the efforts of a soldier in WWI whose mission was to clear cellars of enemy combatants in a recently seized urban area and in doing so, he took the additional measure of shouting out a warning in order to give noncombatants the opportunity to identify themselves and thus avoid harm.

C. What requires the soldiers to assume such additional risk are those instances where efforts to discriminate will be imperfect and that no matter how precise the combatants try to be, some noncombatants will be harmed.

D. Discrimination does not, however, directly entail a requirement to assume additional risk beyond what is required to accomplish the mission.

E. In those instances, the soldiers must take additional measures to mitigate the risk to noncombatants, even if that means assuming additional risks themselves.

Solution:

Line C clarifies and qualifies the point on discrimination and risk-taking raised in line D (D-C). Notice those instances in line E, which places it immediately next to line C which mentions such instances (D-C-E).  The example quoted in line B seeks to illustrate the point discussed in line E only while line A clarifies the nuances of this idea (D-C-E-BA).

QUESTION: 28

DIRECTIONS for the question: In the following question, the options A, B, C and D have a word written in four different ways, of which only one is correct Identify the correctly spelt word.

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

DIRECTIONS for the question: In each of the following question, out of the given group of wordings, choose one appropriately spelled.

Which of the following options has both the words spelled correctly?

Solution:

''Liable, Libel'' is the pair of words with correct spelling

QUESTION: 30

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

Because my passions has been exposing government-funded sacred cows and disrupting statist narratives, I am an___________.

Solution:

In this case, we need a word which highlights how the given person does not follow state directives and does not follow the established norms. We need a word which implies the sentiment of being a rebel. Let us have a look at the meanings of the given words to identify the correct answer:

Cannibal: A person who eats human flesh.

Turncoat: A disloyal person who betrays or deserts his cause or religion or political party or friend etc.

Heretic: a person holding an opinion at odds with what is generally accepted.

Revisionist: A Communist who tries to rewrite Marxism to justify a retreat from the revolutionary position.

In the given context, we can see that option 3 is the best fit in the given case.

QUESTION: 31

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the alternative that CANNOT go into the sentence in the blank space to make a coherent sentence:

The Indian parents have to marry off their daughters to a suitable boy at right age, whatever the cost and sacrifice. They fear their daughter's________ being violated if she grows to a certain age without being married.

Solution:

In this case, chastity (the state or practice of refraining from extramarital, or especially from all, sexual intercourse), honour and dignity fit the given blank. Each of these refers to a similar sentiment. The word that does not fit the given blank is option 1.

QUESTION: 32

DIRECTIONS for the question: In the sentence provided a part of the sentence is underlined. Beneath the sentence, four/five different ways of paraphrasing the underlined part are indicated. Choose the best alternative amongst the four/five.

It is well established in the automobile industry that how deliveries are made and the frequency of post-sale services can be crucial for long term viability.

Solution:

In this case, the two elements in the list (how deliveries are made and the frequency of post-sale services) are not in similar form. They lack parallel structure. The correct way of expressing the two parts of the list are: how deliveries are made and how frequently post-sales services are provided.

This configuration places these two parts in parallel structure. The given expression is present in option 4.

QUESTION: 33

DIRECTIONS for the question: In the sentence provided a part of the sentence is underlined. Beneath the sentence, four/five different ways of paraphrasing the underlined part are indicated. Choose the best alternative amongst the four/five.

Like Pamuk, the language of Salman Rushdie is rich, articulate and symbolic and provides the reader an experience to behold.

Solution:

In this case, you need to understand that the comparison is being made in the language of two authors and not the authors themselves. Considering this, we need to use the possessive form of the two nouns in this case. The apt comparison is made in option 2, wherein the language of Pamuk is compared with language of Rushdie (also this option follows parallel structure in describing these two writers).

QUESTION: 34

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

PELLUCID : MUDDY

Solution:

Pellucid means 'transparently clear; easily understandable' and muddy means 'not clear to the mind/dirty and messy; covered with mud or muck'. Thus, these two words are antonyms of one another.

The meanings of the other words are:

Confused: Perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements; filled with bewilderment.

Defiled: Morally blemished; stained or impure.

Obscure: Make less visible or unclear.

Vague: Not clearly understood or expressed.

Vivid: Evoking lifelike images within the mind/Having the clarity and freshness of immediate experience.

Murky: Deliberately unclear; unclear in a dishonest or bad way.

Tenuous: Having thin consistency/Lacking substance or significance.

Obtuse: Taking more than usual time to learn or understand; lacking intellectual acuity.

We can see from the above word meanings that option 3 is the best answer in the given case.

QUESTION: 35

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

COVERT : FURTIVE

Solution:

In this case, covert (secret or hidden) and furtive (marked by quiet and caution and secrecy; taking pains to avoid being observed) are synonymous with each other. The other pair of synonyms in the options is clandestine (conducted with or marked by hidden aims or methods) and sneaky (marked by deception). The meanings of the other options are highlighted below:

Explicit: Precisely and clearly communicated or readily observable; leaving nothing to implication.

Surreptitious: Marked by quiet and caution and secrecy; taking pains to avoid being observed.

Unfasten: Cause to become undone.

Bunged: Give a tip or gratuity to in return for a service, beyond the compensation agreed on.

Chitchat: Light informal conversation for social occasions.

QUESTION: 36

DIRECTIONS for the question:  A number of sentences are given below, sandwiched between sentences labelled 1 and 6, which are at their respective positions. These senteces, when properly sequenced form a coherent paragraph in the context of 1 and 6. Each sentence is labeled with a letter. Choose the logical order of sentences from among the four given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

1. Procrastination also reflects

i. an air-pollution scandal; a eurozone wobble; a court-ruling against the export of data to the US;

ii. the difficult times that Europe is living through

iii. for whatever is the current crisis –

iv. and non-urgent business is pushed aside

6. a sharp increase in migration.

Solution:

In this case, part i and part 6 are a direct link-up (the continuation of the list is the clue here). Part ii follows part 1 as its form the introductions of the paragraph. Part iv follows part ii and part iii mentions the crisis which are discussed further in part i. This is a fairly easy question and all you need to do is be on the lookout for clues.

QUESTION: 37

DIRECTIONS for the question:  A number of sentences are given below, sandwiched between sentences labelled 1 and 6, which are at their respective positions. These senteces, when properly sequenced form a coherent paragraph in the context of 1 and 6. Each sentence is labeled with a letter. Choose the logical order of sentences from among the four given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

1. Both brave or reckless or possessed enough

i. they left themselves wide open to generations of self-appointed detectives,

ii. to use the material of their own painful lives

iii. determined to truffle out the truth of their complicated and mysterious alliance,

iv. to fuel their work,

6. never mind the human collateral damaged along the way.

Solution:

In the given case, part ii follows part 1. It highlights how the subject implied in part 1 (both refers to two people here) used their own lives to build their work. The comma in part iv indicates that it follows part ii. Also, the next set of connected parts is part i and part iii. These two parts describe how the given subjects were investigated by self-appointed detectives (part iii follows part i as it describes the action). Thus, we arrive at our correct answer, option 3.

QUESTION: 38

DIRECTIONS for the question: The question has four/five sentences. One of them is acceptable in formal english as it is grammatically correct. Spot that sentence.

Solution:

Sentence 1: The adverb 'sweetly' needs to be used in place of the adjective 'sweet'. 'Sweetly' modifies the verb 'sings'.

Sentence 2: The correct sentence is 'Ramesh met me prior to his departure.'

Sentence 3: The correct sentence is 'I know that Ramesh sells the purest honey only'.

Sentence 4 is correct.

QUESTION: 39

DIRECTIONS for the question: The question has four/five sentences. One of them is acceptable in formal english as it is grammatically correct. Spot that sentence.

Solution:

Sentence 1: The correct sentence is 'Neither the employees nor the manager neglected his duty'.

Sentence 2: The correct sentence is 'I wish I were a millionaire'.

Sentence 4: The correct sentence is ' He knelt before the altar'.

Sentence 3 is correct.

QUESTION: 40

DIRECTIONS for the question: Find the ODD one out from the group of words which are related in some way or the other

Solution:

Options 1, 2 and 3 are synonyms of each other whereas option 4 is the antonym of the remaining options.

QUESTION: 41

DIRECTIONS for the question: Find the ODD one out from the group of words which are related in some way or the other

Solution:

Options 1, 2 and 3 are synonyms of each other whereas option 4 is the antonym of the remaining options.

QUESTION: 42

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

It is time to head back to the _______ board.

Solution:

The correct idiom is 'Back to the Drawing Board' which means 'when an attempt fails and it's time to start all over'.

QUESTION: 43

DIRECTIONS for the question: Complete the sentence by filling in the appropriate blank/blanks from the options provided.

She jumped ____ the chair as soon as she saw a lizard.

Solution:

Onto is a preposition meaning on top on, to a position, upon. Hence, it is the most appropriate choice in this question, option 4.

QUESTION: 44

How many words of 4 and more letter words can be made using A E F R L N T, with E being compulsory in each word?

Solution:

Some of the words that can be made with these letters are:

  1. Fern
  2. Felt
  3. Rent
  4. Tear
  5. Earn
  6. Fare
  7. Left
  8. Fear
  9. Fate
  10. Rate
  11. Near
  12. Lean
  13. Leaf
  14. Teal
  15. Learn
  16. Learnt

We can see that these are greater than 12 already.

QUESTION: 45

How many words of 4 and more letters can be made using E H T K M O D, with E being compulsory in each word?

Solution:

Some of the words that can be made with these letters are:

  1. Mode
  2. Home
  3. Dome
  4. Them

We can see that these are greater than 3 already.

QUESTION: 46

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development', TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both. The convention on bio-diversity in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual property right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. The author points out that intellectual property rights and their administration mechanism

Solution:

Para 2 clearly explains that TRIPS is in direct conflict with the agenda of the Rio summit which talked about bio-diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development.

QUESTION: 47

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development, TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both. The convention on bio-diversity in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual properly right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. “As per the TRIPs agreement not much differentiation is made between a developed country such as the USA and an undeveloped country such as Sudan."In the light of the passage, this is

Solution:

Para 1 &2 describe that the purpose of TRIPs is global standardisation and uniformity irrespective of the level of development of a member country

QUESTION: 48

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity (CB4. focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development, TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both.

The convention on bio-diversity (CB4. in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual properly right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. According to the author, a higher-yield seed variety is not always welcome as it also ultimately leads to

Solution:

Para 4 states line 5...... "Narrowing of genetic base... more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics"

Therefore B is the right answer

QUESTION: 49

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

TRIPs agreement provides a comprehensive set of global trade rules for the protection of copyright patents, trademarks, industrial designs, trade secrets, semiconductor lay out designs, and geographical indications, that apply to all the member-countries irrespective of their levels of development, natural and human endowments and history. Every member-country has been asked by the WTO to amend its national patent law to conform to that universal, globalised format. Under Article 65, the developed countries have been asked to change their laws and the less developed countries within another five years, and an additional five years for legislation relating to pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food, alloys, etc. The least developed countries have been asked to make those changes by 2005 AD.

This attempt at global standardisation and uniformity by way of TRIPs agreement is in conflict with the main thrust of the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 that set out the conditions for sustainable development. These two revel two contrasting types of international approaches and norms

While the 1992 Earth Summit and the 1993 convention on bio-diversity (CB4. focused on 'diversity as being fundamental to sustain life and development, TRlPs and WTO are pushing for 'conformity' to international standardized norms on patents, services, labour, investment and what not irrespective of their history, ecology, level of economic development, etc. But despite their diametrically opposed viewpoints, 170 countries signed CBD upholding the need for diversity, and 50 countries signed the TRIPs agreement in 1994 claiming the urgency of uniformity, with a very large element of common names (130) in both.

The convention on bio-diversity (CB4. in its Article 16.5 specifically asserts that intellectual properly right must not be in conflict with conservation on and sustainable use of bio-diversity, a provision that has been totally ignored by those who compose the TRlPs agreement. While in case of agriculture the higher yield of patented products induces the farmers to switch from a more varied production pattern, the resulting narrowing of genetic base makes the economy and society more vulnerable to plant diseases and epidemics. Ii is true that the move towards cultivation of a smaller number of higher yielding varieties and the uniform spread of the same variety over a large space predates the present debate on patent, particularly since the introduction of the green revolution technology in the mid-sixties, but there can be no doubt that the latter has brought about a qualitative change in the scenario and has created possibility of a vast quantitative change too in that direction. So far no attempt has been made to reconcile the two conflicting approaches of CBD and TRIPs. If diversity is so important for sustaining life, how can WTO demand conformity to standardised global formats?

Q. Out of the countries that signed CBD, the percentage of those that signed the TRIPs also, is about

Solution:

Para 3: 170 countries signed the CBD and common names (countries which signed both)between the TRIPs and CBD are 130. 130 is about 76.5% of 170.

QUESTION: 50

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.

We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.

Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.

In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.

One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.

Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.

Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province of Ngari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.

The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.

We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go to Lhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.

The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-footpeak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacredMount Kailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalaya range. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.

We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Which of the following is the correct statement ?

Solution:

From the passage statement A is correct.

The second option is incorrect as (para 7 line 5 refers .."After  some hesitation ,he promised to communicate.....some months".

The climate was mainly fine and warm". So,option C is inappropiate. Also, the no.of people accompanied is not 7.

So, option 4 is also incorrect

QUESTION: 51

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.

We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.

Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.

In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.

One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.

Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.

Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province of Ngari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.

The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.

We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go to Lhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.

The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-footpeak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacredMount Kailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalaya range. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.

We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Mark all the options from those given below the lists that correctly match items in the list

Solution:

The correct combinations are

Agent Burning-Glass        Garpon Caravan

Gyanyima Market            Norbu Guide

Hence the correct choice is B

QUESTION: 52

From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.

We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.

Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.

In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.

One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.

Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.

Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province ofNgari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.

The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.

We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go toLhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.

The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred MountKailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalayarange. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.

We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Mark the correct statement

Solution:

Option 1 is wrong because they were not served european style tea. Option 2 is wrong because the pass was issued till nagari as mentioned in para 7th. Option 3 is right as the 4th para last line talks about it. Option 4 is incorrect as there is no mention of such a comparison.

QUESTION: 53

From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.

We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.

Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.

In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.

One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.

Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.

Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province ofNgari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.

The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.

We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go toLhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.

The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred MountKailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalayarange. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.

We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Mark the correct statement

Solution:

Option A is incorrect as biggest market was at Gyanyima, According to the last para IInd  Last line.

According to para 4 line 2, Tibetian officials not only gifted butter, but also meat and flour.So,option B would be inappropiate.

Option D is incorrect as the Garpon was incharge of 5 districts which were adminstered by the nobles of 5th,6th and 7th rank as stated in 6th paragraph ,4th line.

QUESTION: 54

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

Although the legal systems of England and the United States are superficially similar, they differ profoundly in their approaches to and uses of legal reasons: substantive reasons are more common than formal reasons in the United States, whereas in England the reverse is true. This distinction reflects a difference in the visions of law that prevails in the two countries. In England, the law has traditionally been viewed as a system of rules; the United States favours a vision of law as an outward expression of community's sense of right and justice.

Substantive reasons, as applied to law, are based on moral, economic, political and other considerations. These reasons are found both "in the law" and "outside the law" so to speak. Substantive reasons inform the content of a large part of the law: constitutions, statutes, contracts, verdicts, and the like. Consider, for example, a statute providing that "no vehicles shall be taken into public parks." Suppose that no specific rationales or purposes were explicitly written into the statute, but that it was clear (from its legislative history) that the substantive purpose of the statute was to ensure quiet and safety in the park. Now suppose that a veterans' group mounts a World War II jeep (in running order but without a battery) as a war memorial on a concrete slab in the park, and charges are brought against its members. Most judges in the United States would find the defendants not guilty because what they did had no adverse effect on park's quiet and safety.

Formal reasons are different in that they frequently prevent substantive reasons from coming into play, even when substantive reasons are explicitly incorporated into the law at hand. For example, when a document fails to comply with stipulated requirements, the court may render the document legally ineffective. A Will requiring written witness may be declared null and void and, therefore, unenforceable for the formal reason that the requirement was not observed. Once the legal rule - that a Will is invalid for lack of proper witnessing - has been clearly established, and the legality of the rule is not in question, application of that rule precludes from consideration substantive arguments in favour of the Will's validity or enforcement.

Legal scholars in England and the United States have long bemused themselves with extreme examples of formal and substantive reasoning. On the one hand, formal reasoning in England has led to wooden interpretations of statutes and an unwillingness to develop the common law through judicial activism. On the other hand, freewheeling substantive reasoning in the United States has resulted in statutory interpretations so liberal that the texts of some statutes have been ignored.

Q. Which one of the following best describes the content of the passage as a whole ?

Solution:

The given passage talks about the legal systems of the United Stated and England and how different they are in their use of legal reasons. Therefore, option (c) is the correct answer. The passage doesn''t talk of any similarities and differences between the legal systems of England and the United States, except that in their use of legal reasons. Hence, option (a) is incorrect. Option (b) is incorrect since the author uses examples not to re-evaluate the legal systems per se but to explain the use of substantive and formal reasons in their respective legal systems. Option (d) is incorrect as the passage doesn''t talk of the development of legal reasoning in general but only as limited to England and the United States.

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