IIFT Paper - 2008


150 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | IIFT Paper - 2008


Description
This mock test of IIFT Paper - 2008 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 150 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT IIFT Paper - 2008 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IIFT Paper - 2008 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this IIFT Paper - 2008 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IIFT Paper - 2008 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Three children won prizes in the ‘Tech India Quiz’ contest. They are from three schools: Lancer, Columbus and Leelavati, which are located in different states. One of the children is named Binod. Lancer school’s contestant did not come rst. Leelavati school’s contestant’s name is Rahman. Columbus school is not located in Andhra Pradesh. The contestant from Maharashtra got third place and is not from Leelavati School. The contestant from Karnataka did not secure rst position. Columbus school’s contestant’s name is not Badal. Which of the following statements is TRUE?

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Mother Dairy sells milk packets in boxes of different sizes to its vendors. The vendors are charged Rs. 20 per packet up to 2000 packets in a box. Additions can be made only in a lot size of 200 packets. Each addition of one lot to the box results in a discount of one rupee an all the packets in the box. What should be the maximum size of the box that would maximize the revenue per box for Mother Dairy?

Solution:

Addition of every 200 packets reduces the price by Rs.1 for all the packets in the box.

Beyond 3000 packets the revenue decreases. Hence, a box of 3000 packets would realize maximum revenue for mother dairy.

QUESTION: 3

All employees have to pass through three consecutive entrance doors to enter into the oce and one security guard is deployed at each door. These security guards report to the manager about those who come to oce after 10 AM. Ms. Rani is an employee of this oce and came late on the annual day. In order to avoid report to the manager she had to pay each security guard half of the money she had in her purse and 2 rupees more besides. She found only one rupee with her at the end. How much money Ms. Rani had before entering the oce on the annual day?

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Answer the questions based on the following information. Director of an institute wants to distribute teaching assignments of HRM, Psychology, Development Studies, Trade policy and Finance to ve of six newly appointed faculty members. Prof. Fotedar does not want any assignment if Prof. Das gets one of the ve. Prof. Chaudhury desires either HRM or Finance or no assignment. Prof. Banik opines that if Prof. Das gets either Psychology or Trade Policy then she must get the other one. Prof. Eswar insists on an assignment if Prof. Acharya gets one.

Q. Which of the following is valid faculty - assignment combination if all the faculty preferences are considered?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Director of an institute wants to distribute teaching assignments of HRM, Psychology, Development Studies, Trade policy and Finance to ve of six newly appointed faculty members. Prof. Fotedar does not want any assignment if Prof. Das gets one of the ve. Prof. Chaudhury desires either HRM or Finance or no assignment. Prof. Banik opines that if Prof. Das gets either Psychology or Trade Policy then she must get the other one. Prof. Eswar insists on an assignment if Prof. Acharya gets one.

Q. If Prof. Acharya gets HRM and Prof. Chaudhury gets Finance, then which of the following is not a correct faculty-assignment combination assuming all faculty preferences are considered?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Answer the questions based on the following information.

Five women decided to go for shopping to South Extension, New Delhi. They arrived at the designated meeting place in the following order: 1. Aradhana, 2. Chandrima, 3. Deepika, 4. Heena and 5. Sumitra. Each of them spent at least Rs. 1000. The woman who spent Rs. 2234 arrived before the woman who spent Rs. 1193. One of them spent Rs. 1340 and she was not Deepika. One woman spent Rs. 1378 more than Chandrima. One of them spent Rs. 2517 and she was not Aradhana. Heena spent more than Deepika. Sumitra spent the largest amount and Chandrima the smallest.

Q. What was the amount spent by Heena?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Five women decided to go for shopping to South Extension, New Delhi. They arrived at the designated meeting place in the following order: 1. Aradhana, 2. Chandrima, 3. Deepika, 4. Heena and 5. Sumitra. Each of them spent at least Rs. 1000. The woman who spent Rs. 2234 arrived before the woman who spent Rs. 1193. One of them spent Rs. 1340 and she was not Deepika. One woman spent Rs. 1378 more than Chandrima. One of them spent Rs. 2517 and she was not Aradhana. Heena spent more than Deepika. Sumitra spent the largest amount and Chandrima the smallest.

Q. Which of the following amount is spent by one of the women?

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Five women decided to go for shopping to South Extension, New Delhi. They arrived at the designated meeting place in the following order: 1. Aradhana, 2. Chandrima, 3. Deepika, 4. Heena and 5. Sumitra. Each of them spent at least Rs. 1000. The woman who spent Rs. 2234 arrived before the woman who spent Rs. 1193. One of them spent Rs. 1340 and she was not Deepika. One woman spent Rs. 1378 more than Chandrima. One of them spent Rs. 2517 and she was not Aradhana. Heena spent more than Deepika. Sumitra spent the largest amount and Chandrima the smallest.

Q. The lady who spent Rs. 1193 is:

Solution:

The amounts are Rs. 2,234, Rs. 1,193, Rs. 1,340 and Rs. 2,517. The fifth amount is not given.
∵ One woman’s amount = Chellamma’s amount + Rs. 1,378
∵ All the women spent more than Rs. 1,000.
∴ Chellamma’s amount
= Rs. 2,517 – Rs. 1,378
= Rs. 1,139
Answer image for Complex Arrangement, Logical Reasoning:2252-1The biggest amount of Rs. 2,517 is spent by Shahnaz.
Answer image for Complex Arrangement, Logical Reasoning:2252-2It is given that Helen spent more than Dhenuka and Dhenuka did not spend Rs. 1,340.
∴ Dhenuka spent Rs. 1,193.
 

QUESTION: 9

Answer the questions based on the following information.

In a motor race competition certain rules are given for the participants to follow. To control direction and speed of the motorists, guards are placed at different signal points with caps of different colour. Guard with red cap indicates the direction of participant’s movement and guards with green cap indicates the speed of the participant’s movement. At any signal point presence of three guards, two guards and one guard with red cap means the participant must stop, turn left and turn right respectively. Signal points with three guards, two guards and one guard with green cap means the participants must move at 10, 4 and 2 km/hour respectively.

Kartikay, one of the participants, starts at a point where his car was heading towards north and he encountered signals as follows: at start point one guard with green cap; after half an hour two guards with red cap and two guards with green cap at rst signal; after fteen minutes one guard with red cap at second signal; after half an hour one guard with red cap and three guards with green caps at third signal; after 24 minutes two guard with red cap and two guards with green cap at fourth signal; after 15 minutes three guard with red cap at fth signal. (Time mentioned in each case is applicable after crossing the previous signal)

Q. Total distance travelled by Kartikay from starting point till last signal is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

In a motor race competition certain rules are given for the participants to follow. To control direction and speed of the motorists, guards are placed at different signal points with caps of different colour. Guard with red cap indicates the direction of participant’s movement and guards with green cap indicates the speed of the participant’s movement. At any signal point presence of three guards, two guards and one guard with red cap means the participant must stop, turn left and turn right respectively. Signal points with three guards, two guards and one guard with green cap means the participants must move at 10, 4 and 2 km/hour respectively.

Kartikay, one of the participants, starts at a point where his car was heading towards north and he encountered signals as follows: at start point one guard with green cap; after half an hour two guards with red cap and two guards with green cap at rst signal; after fteen minutes one guard with red cap at second signal; after half an hour one guard with red cap and three guards with green caps at third signal; after 24 minutes two guard with red cap and two guards with green cap at fourth signal; after 15 minutes three guard with red cap at fth signal. (Time mentioned in each case is applicable after crossing the previous signal)

Q. What would be the nal position of Kartikay if one guard with red cap and two guards with green caps were placed at the rst signal point after the starting point?

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

In a motor race competition certain rules are given for the participants to follow. To control direction and speed of the motorists, guards are placed at different signal points with caps of different colour. Guard with red cap indicates the direction of participant’s movement and guards with green cap indicates the speed of the participant’s movement. At any signal point presence of three guards, two guards and one guard with red cap means the participant must stop, turn left and turn right respectively. Signal points with three guards, two guards and one guard with green cap means the participants must move at 10, 4 and 2 km/hour respectively.

Kartikay, one of the participants, starts at a point where his car was heading towards north and he encountered signals as follows: at start point one guard with green cap; after half an hour two guards with red cap and two guards with green cap at rst signal; after fteen minutes one guard with red cap at second signal; after half an hour one guard with red cap and three guards with green caps at third signal; after 24 minutes two guard with red cap and two guards with green cap at fourth signal; after 15 minutes three guard with red cap at fth signal. (Time mentioned in each case is applicable after crossing the previous signal)

Q. If at the starting point Kartikay was heading towards south what would be his nal position?

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Answer the questions based on the following information.

Mr. Mansingh has ve sons – Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Saurav, and three daughters – Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born rst followed by two daughters. Saurav is the eldest child and Janki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janki, plays hockey.

Q. Arun is the _________ child of Mr. Mansingh.

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Mr. Mansingh has ve sons – Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Saurav, and three daughters – Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born rst followed by two daughters. Saurav is the eldest child and Janki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janki, plays hockey.

Q. Saurav is a student of which school?

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Mr. Mansingh has ve sons – Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Saurav, and three daughters – Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born rst followed by two daughters. Saurav is the eldest child and Janki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janki, plays hockey.

Q. What game does Tamanna play?

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Mr. Mansingh has ve sons – Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Saurav, and three daughters – Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born rst followed by two daughters. Saurav is the eldest child and Janki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St. Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St. Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games. The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janki, plays hockey.

Q. Which of the following pairs was not born in succession (ignore the order)?

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Answer the questions based on the following information.

In each question below three statements (I, II, III) are given followed by four conclusions numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Choose the correct options (A & D) presented below.

Q.

Statements:

I. Some drivers are technicians
II. All technicians are engineers
III. Some engineers are lecturers

Conclusions:

1. Some technicians are lecturers
2. Some lecturers are drivers
3. All engineers are technicians
4. Some engineers are drivers

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

In each question below three statements (I, II, III) are given followed by four conclusions numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Choose the correct options (A & D) presented below.

Q. 

Statements:

I. Some barbers are fashion designers
II. No fashion designers are businessmen
III. Some businessmen are traders

Conclusions:

1. No Fashion designers are traders
2. Some traders are not fashion designers
3. Some fashion designers are traders
4. Some barbers are not businessmen

Solution:

QUESTION: 18

Pointing to Priya, father of Pritu says, “She is the daughter of the daughter of the wife of the only son of the grandfather of my sister.” How is Sushma related to Priya if Sushma is the sister of Pritu?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Answer the questions based on the following information.

To get admission in a management course at Dadhichi Institute of Management (DIM) following criteria are given. A candidate must:

1. be a graduate from a recognized university with minimum 54 percent marks.
2. not be more than 33 years of age as on 1.4.2008.
3. have secured 60 percent or more marks in the entrance test.
4. pay one-time deposit fee of Rs. 2,00,000 at time of admission.
5. pay tuition fee of Rs.4,000 per month.

Any candidate who fails to fulll the condition (4) at above, he/she may be referred to the chairman-admission.

Any candidate who has scored 80 percent mark in the entrance test but does not fulll the condition (1) at above, he/she may be referred to the director. Any candidate having work experience of at least 10 years in supervisory cadre and does not satisfy the condition (2) at above, he/she may be admitted under sponsored quota.

Given the above information and condition in each of the following questions, you have to decide which of the following course of action should be taken. You should not assume anything in case of any of the candidates.  Mark answer

I. if the candidate is admitted
II. if the candidate is not admitted
III. if the candidate is referred to the director
IV. if the candidate is referred to the chairman- admission
V. if the candidate is admitted under sponsor quota

Q. Kamaljeet secured 60 percent marks in graduation and was born on 15th April 1976. He scored 56 percent marks in the entrance test. He can pay one-time deposit of Rs. 2,00,000 and monthly tuition fee of Rs. 4,000.

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

To get admission in a management course at Dadhichi Institute of Management (DIM) following criteria are given. A candidate must:

1. be a graduate from a recognized university with minimum 54 percent marks.
2. not be more than 33 years of age as on 1.4.2008.
3. have secured 60 percent or more marks in the entrance test.
4. pay one-time deposit fee of Rs. 2,00,000 at time of admission.
5. pay tuition fee of Rs.4,000 per month.

Any candidate who fails to fulll the condition (4) at above, he/she may be referred to the chairman-admission.

Any candidate who has scored 80 percent mark in the entrance test but does not fulll the condition (1) at above, he/she may be referred to the director. Any candidate having work experience of at least 10 years in supervisory cadre and does not satisfy the condition (2) at above, he/she may be admitted under sponsored quota.

Given the above information and condition in each of the following questions, you have to decide which of the following course of action should be taken. You should not assume anything in case of any of the candidates.  Mark answer

I. if the candidate is admitted
II. if the candidate is not admitted
III. if the candidate is referred to the director
IV. if the candidate is referred to the chairman- admission
V. if the candidate is admitted under sponsor quota

Q. Gourav is a rst-class science graduate who obtained 81 percent marks in the entrance test. He has 12 years of work experience in supervisory cadre. He can pay the stipulated one- time deposit and monthly tuition fees. His date of birth is 20th October, 1970.

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Read the following information and answer the questions given below it.

For selection of lms produced before December 2007 for the national lm festival of India, following criteria are given.

1. The lm must be submitted to the National Film Development Corporation (NFDC) by 31.10.2007.
2. The production cost of the lm should not exceed Rupees Five crores.
3. The director of the lm should have passed a three year course either from the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) or from Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute.
4. The length of the lm should not exceed 150 minutes.
5. The lm must have been approved by the lm censor board of India.
6. However, if the lm fulls all the above criteria except

(a) criteria 2 above, it must be sent to the nance secretary
(b) criteria 3 above, the director has done at least a one year course from FTII or Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute, the lm is kept as a stand-bye

On the basis of above information and information provided below, decide the course of action in each case. No further information is available. You are not to assume anything.

Mark answer

I.if the lm is to be selected
II.if the lm is not to be selected
III.if the lm should be sent to the nance secretary
IV.if the lm should be kept as a stand-bye
V.if the data given about the lm are not adequate to make a decision.

Q. Film Dainandini was produced at the cost of Rupees 2.5 crore. It was submitted to the NFDC on 29th September 2007. The director of the lm Govind Chadha passed a 3-year course from FTII. Length of lm was 120 minutes and has been approved by the censor board of India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

For selection of lms produced before December 2007 for the national lm festival of India, following criteria are given.

1. The lm must be submitted to the National Film Development Corporation (NFDC) by 31.10.2007.
2. The production cost of the lm should not exceed Rupees Five crores.
3. The director of the lm should have passed a three year course either from the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) or from Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute.
4. The length of the lm should not exceed 150 minutes.
5. The lm must have been approved by the lm censor board of India.
6. However, if the lm fulls all the above criteria except

(a) criteria 2 above, it must be sent to the nance secretary
(b) criteria 3 above, the director has done at least a one year course from FTII or Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute, the lm is kept as a stand-bye

On the basis of above information and information provided below, decide the course of action in each case. No further information is available. You are not to assume anything.

Mark answer

I.if the lm is to be selected
II.if the lm is not to be selected
III.if the lm should be sent to the nance secretary
IV.if the lm should be kept as a stand-bye
V.if the data given about the lm are not adequate to make a decision.

Q. Bhadrasalam is a 135-minute lm directed by Katyani, who was a student of Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute from 1996 to 1999. The cost of producing the lm was Rupees 2.3 crore and it was submitted to NFDC on 24th July 2007. The lm has been approved by the censor board of India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

For selection of lms produced before December 2007 for the national lm festival of India, following criteria are given.

1. The lm must be submitted to the National Film Development Corporation (NFDC) by 31.10.2007.
2. The production cost of the lm should not exceed Rupees Five crores.
3. The director of the lm should have passed a three year course either from the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) or from Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute.
4. The length of the lm should not exceed 150 minutes.
5. The lm must have been approved by the lm censor board of India.
6. However, if the lm fulls all the above criteria except

(a) criteria 2 above, it must be sent to the nance secretary
(b) criteria 3 above, the director has done at least a one year course from FTII or Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute, the lm is kept as a stand-bye

On the basis of above information and information provided below, decide the course of action in each case. No further information is available. You are not to assume anything.

Mark answer

I.if the lm is to be selected
II.if the lm is not to be selected
III.if the lm should be sent to the nance secretary
IV.if the lm should be kept as a stand-bye
V.if the data given about the lm are not adequate to make a decision.

Q. Rakesh Mohan, the director of lm Ek Bar Achanak, has successfully completed a 2-years course at Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute. The 150-minute lm was produced at rupees 4.85 crore. It has approved by the censor board of India and submitted to NFDC on 30th Nov. 2007

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

Answer the questions based on the following information.

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689
Step 4 is the last step for the given input

Q. If the input is given as “655, 436, 764, 799, 977, 572, 333”, which of the following step will be “333, 436, 572, 655, 977, 764, 799”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689
Step 4 is the last step for the given input

Q. How many steps will be required to get the nal output from the following input?

Input: 544, 653, 325, 688, 461, 231, 857

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689
Step 4 is the last step for the given input

Q. Step third for an input is “432, 433, 542, 666, 734, 355, 574” What will be the rst step for the input?

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

A number arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Illustrations of the input and the steps of arrangement is given below

Input: 245, 316, 436, 519, 868, 710, 689
Step 1: 710, 316, 436, 519, 868, 245, 689
Step 2: 710, 316, 245, 519, 868, 436, 689
Step 3: 710, 316, 245, 436, 868, 519, 689
Step 4: 710, 316, 245, 436, 519, 868, 689
Step 4 is the last step for the given input

Q. What will be the third step for the following input?

Input: 653, 963, 754, 345, 364, 861, 541

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Answer the questions based on the following information.

A wood arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Following is the illustration of the input and the steps of arrangement:

Input: She was interested in doing art film
Step 1: art she was interested in doing film
Step 2: art was she interested in doing film
Step 3: art was in she interested doing film
Step 4: art was in film she interested doing
Step 5: art was in film doing she interested

Step 5 is the last step of the given input. Now study the logic and rules followed in the above steps, nd out appropriate step for the question given below for the given input.

Q. Which of the following will be the last step for the input given below?

Input: he is going out to search air

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

A wood arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Following is the illustration of the input and the steps of arrangement:

Input: She was interested in doing art film
Step 1: art she was interested in doing film
Step 2: art was she interested in doing film
Step 3: art was in she interested doing film
Step 4: art was in film she interested doing
Step 5: art was in film doing she interested

Step 5 is the last step of the given input. Now study the logic and rules followed in the above steps, nd out appropriate step for the question given below for the given input.

Q. If step 2 of an input is “not is the casino considering legal action”, which step is: “not is casino action legal the considering”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

A wood arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. Following is the illustration of the input and the steps of arrangement:

Input: She was interested in doing art film
Step 1: art she was interested in doing film
Step 2: art was she interested in doing film
Step 3: art was in she interested doing film
Step 4: art was in film she interested doing
Step 5: art was in film doing she interested

Step 5 is the last step of the given input. Now study the logic and rules followed in the above steps, nd out appropriate step for the question given below for the given input.

Q. How many steps will be required to get the nal output from the following input? Input: Father needs to check on the boy

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Among Anil, Bibek, Charu, Debu, and Eswar, Eswar is taller than Debu but not as fat as Debu. Charu is taller than Anil but shorter than Bibek. Anil is fatter than Debu but not as fat as Bibek. Eswar is thinner than Charu, who is thinner than Debu. Eswar is shorter than Anil. Who is the thinnest person?

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

Pointing to a photograph Yuvraj says, “He is the only brother of the only daughter of my sister’s maternal grandmother.” Pointing to another photograph Sourav says, “he is the only brother of the only daughter of my sister’s maternalgrandmother.” If among the two photographs,one was either of Sourav or Yuvraj, and the photograph, towards which Yuvraj was pointing,was not of Sourav, then how is Yuvraj related to Sourav?

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

DSBO Company produces Z units of output at a total cost of Rs. R, where  At what level of output will the average variable cost attain its minimum?

Solution:

Total cost for Z units
R = Z3/10 - 5Z2 + 10Z + 5
Average Variable cost (V) = Z2/10 - 5Z + 10
This attains its minimum value when 
dV/dZ = Z/5 - 5 = 0
or Z = 25

QUESTION: 34

If H1 , H2 , H3 , ..., Hn , are n Harmonic means between ‘a’ and ‘b’ (≠ a), then value of 

Solution:

QUESTION: 35

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Suppose a, b and c are in Arithmetic Progression and a2, b2 and c2 are in Geometric Progression. If  then the value of a =

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

If three positive real numbers a, b and c (c > a) are in Harmonic Progression, then log (a + c) + log (a - 2b + c) is equal to:

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Sum of the serie 12 - 23 + 32 - 42 +....+ 20012 - 20022 + 20032 is :

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

The number of ways in which a mixed double tennis game can be arranged amongst 9 married couples if no husband and wife play in the same game is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

The interior angles of a polygon are in Arithmetic Progression. If the smallest angle is 120° and common difference is 5°, then number of sides in the polygon is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 41

A ladder 25 metres long is placed against a wall with its foot 7 metres away from the foot of the wall. How far should the foot be drawn out so that the top of the ladder may come down by half the distance of the total distance if the foot is drawn out?

Solution:
QUESTION: 42

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

If the positive real numbers a, b and c are in Arithmetic Progression, such that abc = 4, then minimum possible value of b is:

Solution:

We know, from AM ≥ GM, for positive quantities, that
[(a+b+c)]/3 ≥ (abc)1/3
[​(a+c)+b]/3 ≥ (abc)1/3
But 2b = (a+c).  
This implies 3b/3 ≥ (4)1/3
b ≥ (2)2/3

QUESTION: 44

If one root of the equation ax2 + bx + c = 0 is double of the other, the 2b2

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

A boat goes 30 km upstream and 44 km downstream in 10 hours. In 13 hours, it can go 40 km upstream and 55 km down-stream. The speed of the boat in still water is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

A pole has to be erected on the boundary of a circular park of diameter 13 metres in such a way that the difference of its distances from two diametrically opposite xed gates A and B on the boundary is 7 metres. The distance of the pole from one of the gates is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

The mean salary in ICM LTD. was Rs. 1,500, and the standard deviation was Rs. 400. A year later each employee got a Rs. 100 raise. After another year each employee’s salary (including the above mentioned raise) was increased by 20%. The standard deviation of the current salary is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

A spiral is made up of 13 successive semicircles, with centres alternately at A and B, starting with the centre at A. The radii of semicircles thus developed are 0.5 cm, 1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, 2.0 cm and so on. The total length of the spiral is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

A medical clinic tests blood for certain disease from which approximately one person in a hundred suffers. People come to the clinic in group of 50. The operator of the clinic wonders whether he can increase the eciency of the testing procedure by conducting pooled tests. In the pooled tests, the operator would pool the 50 blood samples and test them altogether. If the polled test was negative, he could pronounce the whole group healthy. If not, he could then test each person’s blood individually. The expected number of tests the operator will have to perform if he pools the blood samples are:

Solution:
QUESTION: 51

The game of “chuck-a-luck” is played at carnivals in some parts of Europe. Its rules are as follows: if u pick a number from 1 to 6 and the operator rolls three dice. If the number you picked comes up on all three dice, the operator pays you €3; if it comes up on two dice, you are paid €2; and if it comes up on just one die, you are paid €1. Only if the number you picked does not come up at all, you pay the operator €1. The probability that you will win money playing in this game is

Solution:
QUESTION: 52

Answer the questions based on the following information.

Rajat is sales manager of Dubin Computers Ltd. and looks after Delhi market. The company sells laptops in India. He is currently trying to select a distributor for coming ve years. The distributor ensures that the products are accessible to the customers in the market. Market share of a company depends on the coverage by the distributor. The total prot potential of the entire laptop market in Delhi is Rs. 5 crores in the current year and present value of next four years’ cumulative prot potential is Rs. 15 crores. The rst choice for Rajat is to enter into long-term contract with a distributor M/s Jagan with whom Dubin has done business in the past, and whose distribution system reaches 55 percent of all potential customers. At the last moment, however, a colleague suggests Rajat to consider signing a one-year contract with other distributors. Distributors M/s Bola and M/s James are willing to be partner with Dubin. Although a year ago M/s Bola’s and M/s James’s coverage reached only 40 and 25 percent of customers respectively, they claim to have invested heavily in distribution resources and now expect to be able to reach 60 percent and 75 percent of customers respectively. The probability of M/s Bola’s claim and M/s James’s claim to be true is 0.60 and 0.20 respectively. The knowledge about distributors’ coverage will evolve over time. The assumption is that the true level of coverage offered by the new distributors could be discovered, with certainty, through a one-year trail, and this trail will reveal exactly one of the two levels of coverage: for example in case of M/s Bola – 40 percent (as it was last year) or 60 percent (as claimed). In addition, it is also assumed that whatever the coverage is for both distributors, it will not change over time. Rajat narrows down on three choices, which are as follows:

Choice 1. Give a ve year contract to the familiar distributor M/s Jagan. Choice 2. Give a one year contract to the new distributor M/s Bola, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s Bola on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years' contract with M/s Jagan. Choice 3. Give a one-year contract to the new distributor M/s James, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s James on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years contract with M/s Jagan..

Q. The expected present value of the ve years cumulative prot with choice 3 is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

Rajat is sales manager of Dubin Computers Ltd. and looks after Delhi market. The company sells laptops in India. He is currently trying to select a distributor for coming ve years. The distributor ensures that the products are accessible to the customers in the market. Market share of a company depends on the coverage by the distributor. The total prot potential of the entire laptop market in Delhi is Rs. 5 crores in the current year and present value of next four years’ cumulative prot potential is Rs. 15 crores. The rst choice for Rajat is to enter into long-term contract with a distributor M/s Jagan with whom Dubin has done business in the past, and whose distribution system reaches 55 percent of all potential customers. At the last moment, however, a colleague suggests Rajat to consider signing a one-year contract with other distributors. Distributors M/s Bola and M/s James are willing to be partner with Dubin. Although a year ago M/s Bola’s and M/s James’s coverage reached only 40 and 25 percent of customers respectively, they claim to have invested heavily in distribution resources and now expect to be able to reach 60 percent and 75 percent of customers respectively. The probability of M/s Bola’s claim and M/s James’s claim to be true is 0.60 and 0.20 respectively. The knowledge about distributors’ coverage will evolve over time. The assumption is that the true level of coverage offered by the new distributors could be discovered, with certainty, through a one-year trail, and this trail will reveal exactly one of the two levels of coverage: for example in case of M/s Bola – 40 percent (as it was last year) or 60 percent (as claimed). In addition, it is also assumed that whatever the coverage is for both distributors, it will not change over time. Rajat narrows down on three choices, which are as follows:

Choice 1. Give a ve year contract to the familiar distributor M/s Jagan. Choice 2. Give a one year contract to the new distributor M/s Bola, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s Bola on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years' contract with M/s Jagan. Choice 3. Give a one-year contract to the new distributor M/s James, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s James on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years contract with M/s Jagan..

Q. Which of the following statements is TRUE?

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

Rajat is sales manager of Dubin Computers Ltd. and looks after Delhi market. The company sells laptops in India. He is currently trying to select a distributor for coming ve years. The distributor ensures that the products are accessible to the customers in the market. Market share of a company depends on the coverage by the distributor. The total prot potential of the entire laptop market in Delhi is Rs. 5 crores in the current year and present value of next four years’ cumulative prot potential is Rs. 15 crores. The rst choice for Rajat is to enter into long-term contract with a distributor M/s Jagan with whom Dubin has done business in the past, and whose distribution system reaches 55 percent of all potential customers. At the last moment, however, a colleague suggests Rajat to consider signing a one-year contract with other distributors. Distributors M/s Bola and M/s James are willing to be partner with Dubin. Although a year ago M/s Bola’s and M/s James’s coverage reached only 40 and 25 percent of customers respectively, they claim to have invested heavily in distribution resources and now expect to be able to reach 60 percent and 75 percent of customers respectively. The probability of M/s Bola’s claim and M/s James’s claim to be true is 0.60 and 0.20 respectively. The knowledge about distributors’ coverage will evolve over time. The assumption is that the true level of coverage offered by the new distributors could be discovered, with certainty, through a one-year trail, and this trail will reveal exactly one of the two levels of coverage: for example in case of M/s Bola – 40 percent (as it was last year) or 60 percent (as claimed). In addition, it is also assumed that whatever the coverage is for both distributors, it will not change over time. Rajat narrows down on three choices, which are as follows:

Choice 1. Give a ve year contract to the familiar distributor M/s Jagan.
Choice 2. Give a one year contract to the new distributor M/s Bola, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s Bola on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years' contract with M/s Jagan. Choice 3. Give a one-year contract to the new distributor M/s James, and base next year’s decision to renew contract with M/s James on observed coverage for next four years or enter into a four years contract with M/s Jagan..

Q. If the distributor M/s James claims a coverage of 55% instead of 75% and probability of this claim to be true is 0.70 instead of 0.20 then which of the following statement is true?

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

Mc Donald’s ran a campaign in which it gave game cards to its customers. These game cards made it possible for customers to win hamburgers, French fries, soft drinks, and other fast-food items, as well as cash prizes. Each card had 10 covered spots that could be uncovered by rubbing them with a coin. Beneath three of these spots were “No Prize” signs. Beneath the other seven spots were names of the prizes, two of which were identical. For, example, one card might have two pictures of a hamburger, one picture of a coke, one of French fries, one of a milk shake, one of a $5, one of $1000, and three “No Prize” signs. For this card the customer could win a hamburger. To win on any card, the customer had to uncover the two matching spots (which showed the potential prize for that card)before uncovering a “No Prize”; any card with a “No Prize” uncovered was automatically void. Assuming that the two matches and the three “No Prize” signs were arranged randomly on the cards, what is the probability of a customer winning?

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

While packing for a business trip Mr. Debashis has packed 3 pairs of shoes, 4 pants, 3 half-pants, 6 shirts, 3 sweater and 2 jackets. The outt is dened as consisting of a pair of shoes, a choice of “lower wear” (either a pant or a half-pant), a choice of “upper wear” (it could be a shirt or a sweater or both) and nally he may or may not choose to wear a jacket. How many different outts are possible?

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

then which of the following is correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

If D is the midpoint of side BC of a triangle ABC and AD is the perpendicular to AC then

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

A cylinder, a Hemi-sphere and a cone stand on the same base and have the same heights. The ratio of the areas of their curved surface is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Find the TRUE Statement

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. The special type wagons expressed as a percentage of total wagons were at almost same level during the following pair of years

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. The Departmental wagons expressed as a percentage of total wagons was maximum during:

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Find out the LOWEST annual growth rate among the following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Find out the FALSE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Find out the HIGHEST annual growth rate among the following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

Answer the questions based on the following graph.

Q. In which year the annual growth rate of total production (of all products) is highest?

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

Answer the questions based on the following graph.

Q. If the stability of the production during 1990 to 1995 is dened as

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

Answer the questions based on the following graph.

Q. If four products P, Q, R and S shown in the graph are sold at price of Rs. 9, Rs. 4, Rs.13 and Rs.3 respectively during 1990-1995, then the total revenue of all the products is lowest in which year?

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

Answer the questions based on the following graph.

Q. Individual revenue of P, Q, R and S for the entire period (1990-1995) is calculated based on the price of Rs.9, Rs.4, Rs.13 and Rs.3 respectively. Which product fetches the lowest revenue?

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

Answer the questions based on the following graph.

Q. Four products P, Q, R and S shown in the graph are sold at price of Rs.9, Rs.4, Rs.13 and Rs.3 respectively during 1990-1995. Which of the following statements is TRUE?

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q.Mark the HIGHEST FDI inow growth rate among the following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Mark the LOWEST FDI inow growth rate among the following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Mark the TRUE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

Answer the questions based on the following table.

 Q. Mark the FALSE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Mark the TRUE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Mark the LOWEST percentage among the following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Identify the TRUE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Mark the HIGHEST annual growth rate among the following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Mark the FALSE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

Answer the questions based on the following table.

Q. Mark the FALSE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 81

Answer the questions based on the following two graphs, assuming that there is no xed cost component and all the units produced are sold in the same year.

Q. In which year per unit cost is HIGHEST?

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

Answer the questions based on the following two graphs, assuming that there is no xed cost component and all the units produced are sold in the same year.

Q. What is the approximate average quantity sold during the period 2000-2010?

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

Answer the questions based on the following two graphs, assuming that there is no xed cost component and all the units produced are sold in the same year.

Q. If volatility of a variable during 2000-2010 is dened as   then which of the following is TRUE ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

Answer the questions based on the following two graphs, assuming that there is no xed cost component and all the units produced are sold in the same year.

Q. If the price per unit decreases by 20% during 2000-2004 and cost per unit increases by 20% during 2005-2010, then during how many number of years there is loss?

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

Answer the questions based on the following two graphs, assuming that there is no xed cost component and all the units produced are sold in the same year.

Q. If the price per unit decreases by 20% during 2000-2004 and cost per unit increases by 20% during 2005-2010, then the cumulative prot for the entire period 2000-2010 decreases by:

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end of each passage:

Turning the business involved more than segmenting and pulling out of retail. It also meant maximizing every strength we had in order to boost our prot margins. In re-examining the direct model, we realized that inventory management was not just core strength; it could be an incredible opportunity for us, and one that had not yet been discovered by any of our competitors.

In Version 1.0 the direct model, we eliminated the reseller, thereby eliminating the mark-up and the cost of maintaining a store. In Version 1.1, we went one step further to reduce inventory ineciencies. Traditionally, a long chain of partners was involved in getting a product to the customer. Let’s say you have a factory building a PC we’ll call model #4000. The system is then sent to the distributor, which sends it to the warehouse, which sends it to the dealer, who eventually pushes it on to the consumer by advertising, “I’ve got model #4000. Come and buy it.” If the consumer says, “But I want model #8000,” the dealer replies, “Sorry, I only have model #4000.” Meanwhile, the factory keeps building model #4000s and pushing the inventory into the channel.

The result is a glut of model #4000s that nobody wants. Inevitably, someone ends up with too much inventory, and you see big price corrections. The retailer can’t sell it at the suggested retail price, so the manufacturer loses money on price protection (a practice common in our industry of compensating dealers for reductions in suggested selling price). Companies with long, multi-step distribution systems will often ll their distribution channels with products in an attempt to clear out older targets. This dangerous and inecient practice is called “channel stung”. Worst of all, the customer ends up paying for it by purchasing systems that are already out of date

Because we were building directly to ll our customers’ orders, we didn’t have nished goods inventory devaluing on a daily basis. Because we aligned our suppliers to deliver components as we used them, we were able to minimize raw material inventory. Reductions in component costs could be passed on to our customers quickly, which made them happier and improved our competitive advantage. It also allowed us to deliver the latest technology to our customers faster than our competitors.

The direct model turns conventional manufacturing inside out. Conventional manufacturing, because your plant can’t keep going. But if you don’t know what you need to build because of dramatic changes in demand, you run the risk of ending up with terric amounts of excess and obsolete inventory. That is not the goal. The concept behind the direct model has nothing to do with stockpiling and everything to do with information. The quality of your information is inversely proportional to the amount of assets required, in this case excess inventory. With less information about customer needs, you need massive amounts of inventory. So, if you have great information – that is, you know exactly what people want and how much - you need that much less inventory. Less inventory, of course, corresponds to less inventory depreciation. In the computer industry, component prices are always falling as suppliers introduce faster chips, bigger disk drives and modems with ever-greater bandwidth. Let’s say that Dell has six days of inventory. Compare that to an indirect competitor who has twenty-ve days of inventory with another thirty in their distribution channel. That’s a difference of forty-nine days, and in forty-nine days, the cost of materials will decline about 6 percent.

Then there’s the threat of getting stuck with obsolete inventory if you’re caught in a transition to a next- generation product, as we were with those memory chip in 1989. As the product approaches the end of its life, the manufacturer has to worry about whether it has too much in the channel and whether a competitor will dump products, destroying prot margins for everyone. This is a perpetual problem in the computer industry, but with the direct model, we have virtually eliminated it. We know when our customers are ready to move on technologically, and we can get out of the market before its most precarious time. We don’t have to subsidize our losses by charging higher prices for other products.

And ultimately, our customer wins. Optimal inventory management really starts with the design process. You want to design the product so that the entire product supply chain, as well as the manufacturing process, is oriented not just for speed but for what we call velocity. Speed means being fast in the rst place. Velocity means squeezing time out of every step in the process.

Inventory velocity has become a passion for us. To achieve maximum velocity, you have to design your products in a way that covers the largest part of the market with the fewest number of parts. For example, you don’t need nine different disk drives when you can serve 98 percent of the market with only four. We also learned to take into account the variability of the lost cost and high cost components. Systems were recongured to allow for a greater variety of low-cost parts and a limited variety of expensive parts. The goal was to decrease the number of components to manage, which increased the velocity, which decreased the risk of inventory depreciation, which increased the overall health of our business system.

We were also able to reduce inventory well below the levels anyone thought possible by constantly challenging and surprising ourselves with the result. We had our internal skeptics when we rst started pushing for ever-lower levels of inventory. I remember the head of our procurement group telling me that this was like “ying low to the ground 300 knots.” He was worried that we wouldn’t see the trees.

In 1993, we had $2.9 billion in sales and $220 million in inventory. Four years later, we posted $12.3 billion in sales and had inventory of $33 million. We’re now down to six days of inventory and we’re starting to measure it in hours instead of days. Once you reduce your inventory while maintaining your growth rate, a signicant amount of risk comes from the transition from one generation of product to the next. Without traditional stockpiles of inventory, it is critical to precisely time the discontinuance of the older product line with the ramp-up in customer demand for the newer one. Since we were introducing new products all the time, it became imperative to avoid the huge drag effect from mistakes made during transitions. E&O; – short for “excess and obsolete” - became taboo at Dell. We would debate about whether our E&O; was 30 or 50 cent per PC. Since anything less than $20 per PC is not bad, when you’re down in the cents range, you’re approaching stellar performance.

Q. Find out the TRUE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

Turning the business involved more than segmenting and pulling out of retail. It also meant maximizing every strength we had in order to boost our prot margins. In re-examining the direct model, we realized that inventory management was not just core strength; it could be an incredible opportunity for us, and one that had not yet been discovered by any of our competitors.

In Version 1.0 the direct model, we eliminated the reseller, thereby eliminating the mark-up and the cost of maintaining a store. In Version 1.1, we went one step further to reduce inventory ineciencies. Traditionally, a long chain of partners was involved in getting a product to the customer. Let’s say you have a factory building a PC we’ll call model #4000. The system is then sent to the distributor, which sends it to the warehouse, which sends it to the dealer, who eventually pushes it on to the consumer by advertising, “I’ve got model #4000. Come and buy it.” If the consumer says, “But I want model #8000,” the dealer replies, “Sorry, I only have model #4000.” Meanwhile, the factory keeps building model #4000s and pushing the inventory into the channel.

The result is a glut of model #4000s that nobody wants. Inevitably, someone ends up with too much inventory, and you see big price corrections. The retailer can’t sell it at the suggested retail price, so the manufacturer loses money on price protection (a practice common in our industry of compensating dealers for reductions in suggested selling price). Companies with long, multi-step distribution systems will often ll their distribution channels with products in an attempt to clear out older targets. This dangerous and inecient practice is called “channel stung”. Worst of all, the customer ends up paying for it by purchasing systems that are already out of date

Because we were building directly to ll our customers’ orders, we didn’t have nished goods inventory devaluing on a daily basis. Because we aligned our suppliers to deliver components as we used them, we were able to minimize raw material inventory. Reductions in component costs could be passed on to our customers quickly, which made them happier and improved our competitive advantage. It also allowed us to deliver the latest technology to our customers faster than our competitors.

The direct model turns conventional manufacturing inside out. Conventional manufacturing, because your plant can’t keep going. But if you don’t know what you need to build because of dramatic changes in demand, you run the risk of ending up with terric amounts of excess and obsolete inventory. That is not the goal. The concept behind the direct model has nothing to do with stockpiling and everything to do with information. The quality of your information is inversely proportional to the amount of assets required, in this case excess inventory. With less information about customer needs, you need massive amounts of inventory. So, if you have great information – that is, you know exactly what people want and how much - you need that much less inventory. Less inventory, of course, corresponds to less inventory depreciation. In the computer industry, component prices are always falling as suppliers introduce faster chips, bigger disk drives and modems with ever-greater bandwidth. Let’s say that Dell has six days of inventory. Compare that to an indirect competitor who has twenty-ve days of inventory with another thirty in their distribution channel. That’s a difference of forty-nine days, and in forty-nine days, the cost of materials will decline about 6 percent.

Then there’s the threat of getting stuck with obsolete inventory if you’re caught in a transition to a next- generation product, as we were with those memory chip in 1989. As the product approaches the end of its life, the manufacturer has to worry about whether it has too much in the channel and whether a competitor will dump products, destroying prot margins for everyone. This is a perpetual problem in the computer industry, but with the direct model, we have virtually eliminated it. We know when our customers are ready to move on technologically, and we can get out of the market before its most precarious time. We don’t have to subsidize our losses by charging higher prices for other products.

And ultimately, our customer wins. Optimal inventory management really starts with the design process. You want to design the product so that the entire product supply chain, as well as the manufacturing process, is oriented not just for speed but for what we call velocity. Speed means being fast in the rst place. Velocity means squeezing time out of every step in the process.

Inventory velocity has become a passion for us. To achieve maximum velocity, you have to design your products in a way that covers the largest part of the market with the fewest number of parts. For example, you don’t need nine different disk drives when you can serve 98 percent of the market with only four. We also learned to take into account the variability of the lost cost and high cost components. Systems were recongured to allow for a greater variety of low-cost parts and a limited variety of expensive parts. The goal was to decrease the number of components to manage, which increased the velocity, which decreased the risk of inventory depreciation, which increased the overall health of our business system.

We were also able to reduce inventory well below the levels anyone thought possible by constantly challenging and surprising ourselves with the result. We had our internal skeptics when we rst started pushing for ever-lower levels of inventory. I remember the head of our procurement group telling me that this was like “ying low to the ground 300 knots.” He was worried that we wouldn’t see the trees.

In 1993, we had $2.9 billion in sales and $220 million in inventory. Four years later, we posted $12.3 billion in sales and had inventory of $33 million. We’re now down to six days of inventory and we’re starting to measure it in hours instead of days. Once you reduce your inventory while maintaining your growth rate, a signicant amount of risk comes from the transition from one generation of product to the next. Without traditional stockpiles of inventory, it is critical to precisely time the discontinuance of the older product line with the ramp-up in customer demand for the newer one. Since we were introducing new products all the time, it became imperative to avoid the huge drag effect from mistakes made during transitions. E&O; – short for “excess and obsolete” - became taboo at Dell. We would debate about whether our E&O; was 30 or 50 cent per PC. Since anything less than $20 per PC is not bad, when you’re down in the cents range, you’re approaching stellar performance.

Q. Find out the FALSE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

Turning the business involved more than segmenting and pulling out of retail. It also meant maximizing every strength we had in order to boost our prot margins. In re-examining the direct model, we realized that inventory management was not just core strength; it could be an incredible opportunity for us, and one that had not yet been discovered by any of our competitors.

In Version 1.0 the direct model, we eliminated the reseller, thereby eliminating the mark-up and the cost of maintaining a store. In Version 1.1, we went one step further to reduce inventory ineciencies. Traditionally, a long chain of partners was involved in getting a product to the customer. Let’s say you have a factory building a PC we’ll call model #4000. The system is then sent to the distributor, which sends it to the warehouse, which sends it to the dealer, who eventually pushes it on to the consumer by advertising, “I’ve got model #4000. Come and buy it.” If the consumer says, “But I want model #8000,” the dealer replies, “Sorry, I only have model #4000.” Meanwhile, the factory keeps building model #4000s and pushing the inventory into the channel.

The result is a glut of model #4000s that nobody wants. Inevitably, someone ends up with too much inventory, and you see big price corrections. The retailer can’t sell it at the suggested retail price, so the manufacturer loses money on price protection (a practice common in our industry of compensating dealers for reductions in suggested selling price). Companies with long, multi-step distribution systems will often ll their distribution channels with products in an attempt to clear out older targets. This dangerous and inecient practice is called “channel stung”. Worst of all, the customer ends up paying for it by purchasing systems that are already out of date

Because we were building directly to ll our customers’ orders, we didn’t have nished goods inventory devaluing on a daily basis. Because we aligned our suppliers to deliver components as we used them, we were able to minimize raw material inventory. Reductions in component costs could be passed on to our customers quickly, which made them happier and improved our competitive advantage. It also allowed us to deliver the latest technology to our customers faster than our competitors.

The direct model turns conventional manufacturing inside out. Conventional manufacturing, because your plant can’t keep going. But if you don’t know what you need to build because of dramatic changes in demand, you run the risk of ending up with terric amounts of excess and obsolete inventory. That is not the goal. The concept behind the direct model has nothing to do with stockpiling and everything to do with information. The quality of your information is inversely proportional to the amount of assets required, in this case excess inventory. With less information about customer needs, you need massive amounts of inventory. So, if you have great information – that is, you know exactly what people want and how much - you need that much less inventory. Less inventory, of course, corresponds to less inventory depreciation. In the computer industry, component prices are always falling as suppliers introduce faster chips, bigger disk drives and modems with ever-greater bandwidth. Let’s say that Dell has six days of inventory. Compare that to an indirect competitor who has twenty-ve days of inventory with another thirty in their distribution channel. That’s a difference of forty-nine days, and in forty-nine days, the cost of materials will decline about 6 percent.

Then there’s the threat of getting stuck with obsolete inventory if you’re caught in a transition to a next- generation product, as we were with those memory chip in 1989. As the product approaches the end of its life, the manufacturer has to worry about whether it has too much in the channel and whether a competitor will dump products, destroying prot margins for everyone. This is a perpetual problem in the computer industry, but with the direct model, we have virtually eliminated it. We know when our customers are ready to move on technologically, and we can get out of the market before its most precarious time. We don’t have to subsidize our losses by charging higher prices for other products.

And ultimately, our customer wins. Optimal inventory management really starts with the design process. You want to design the product so that the entire product supply chain, as well as the manufacturing process, is oriented not just for speed but for what we call velocity. Speed means being fast in the rst place. Velocity means squeezing time out of every step in the process.

Inventory velocity has become a passion for us. To achieve maximum velocity, you have to design your products in a way that covers the largest part of the market with the fewest number of parts. For example, you don’t need nine different disk drives when you can serve 98 percent of the market with only four. We also learned to take into account the variability of the lost cost and high cost components. Systems were recongured to allow for a greater variety of low-cost parts and a limited variety of expensive parts. The goal was to decrease the number of components to manage, which increased the velocity, which decreased the risk of inventory depreciation, which increased the overall health of our business system.

We were also able to reduce inventory well below the levels anyone thought possible by constantly challenging and surprising ourselves with the result. We had our internal skeptics when we rst started pushing for ever-lower levels of inventory. I remember the head of our procurement group telling me that this was like “ying low to the ground 300 knots.” He was worried that we wouldn’t see the trees.

In 1993, we had $2.9 billion in sales and $220 million in inventory. Four years later, we posted $12.3 billion in sales and had inventory of $33 million. We’re now down to six days of inventory and we’re starting to measure it in hours instead of days. Once you reduce your inventory while maintaining your growth rate, a signicant amount of risk comes from the transition from one generation of product to the next. Without traditional stockpiles of inventory, it is critical to precisely time the discontinuance of the older product line with the ramp-up in customer demand for the newer one. Since we were introducing new products all the time, it became imperative to avoid the huge drag effect from mistakes made during transitions. E&O; – short for “excess and obsolete” - became taboo at Dell. We would debate about whether our E&O; was 30 or 50 cent per PC. Since anything less than $20 per PC is not bad, when you’re down in the cents range, you’re approaching stellar performance.

Q. Choose the option which best matches the following sets:

Solution:
QUESTION: 89

Turning the business involved more than segmenting and pulling out of retail. It also meant maximizing every strength we had in order to boost our prot margins. In re-examining the direct model, we realized that inventory management was not just core strength; it could be an incredible opportunity for us, and one that had not yet been discovered by any of our competitors.

In Version 1.0 the direct model, we eliminated the reseller, thereby eliminating the mark-up and the cost of maintaining a store. In Version 1.1, we went one step further to reduce inventory ineciencies. Traditionally, a long chain of partners was involved in getting a product to the customer. Let’s say you have a factory building a PC we’ll call model #4000. The system is then sent to the distributor, which sends it to the warehouse, which sends it to the dealer, who eventually pushes it on to the consumer by advertising, “I’ve got model #4000. Come and buy it.” If the consumer says, “But I want model #8000,” the dealer replies, “Sorry, I only have model #4000.” Meanwhile, the factory keeps building model #4000s and pushing the inventory into the channel.

The result is a glut of model #4000s that nobody wants. Inevitably, someone ends up with too much inventory, and you see big price corrections. The retailer can’t sell it at the suggested retail price, so the manufacturer loses money on price protection (a practice common in our industry of compensating dealers for reductions in suggested selling price). Companies with long, multi-step distribution systems will often ll their distribution channels with products in an attempt to clear out older targets. This dangerous and inecient practice is called “channel stung”. Worst of all, the customer ends up paying for it by purchasing systems that are already out of date

Because we were building directly to ll our customers’ orders, we didn’t have nished goods inventory devaluing on a daily basis. Because we aligned our suppliers to deliver components as we used them, we were able to minimize raw material inventory. Reductions in component costs could be passed on to our customers quickly, which made them happier and improved our competitive advantage. It also allowed us to deliver the latest technology to our customers faster than our competitors.

The direct model turns conventional manufacturing inside out. Conventional manufacturing, because your plant can’t keep going. But if you don’t know what you need to build because of dramatic changes in demand, you run the risk of ending up with terric amounts of excess and obsolete inventory. That is not the goal. The concept behind the direct model has nothing to do with stockpiling and everything to do with information. The quality of your information is inversely proportional to the amount of assets required, in this case excess inventory. With less information about customer needs, you need massive amounts of inventory. So, if you have great information – that is, you know exactly what people want and how much - you need that much less inventory. Less inventory, of course, corresponds to less inventory depreciation. In the computer industry, component prices are always falling as suppliers introduce faster chips, bigger disk drives and modems with ever-greater bandwidth. Let’s say that Dell has six days of inventory. Compare that to an indirect competitor who has twenty-ve days of inventory with another thirty in their distribution channel. That’s a difference of forty-nine days, and in forty-nine days, the cost of materials will decline about 6 percent.

Then there’s the threat of getting stuck with obsolete inventory if you’re caught in a transition to a next- generation product, as we were with those memory chip in 1989. As the product approaches the end of its life, the manufacturer has to worry about whether it has too much in the channel and whether a competitor will dump products, destroying prot margins for everyone. This is a perpetual problem in the computer industry, but with the direct model, we have virtually eliminated it. We know when our customers are ready to move on technologically, and we can get out of the market before its most precarious time. We don’t have to subsidize our losses by charging higher prices for other products.

And ultimately, our customer wins. Optimal inventory management really starts with the design process. You want to design the product so that the entire product supply chain, as well as the manufacturing process, is oriented not just for speed but for what we call velocity. Speed means being fast in the rst place. Velocity means squeezing time out of every step in the process.

Inventory velocity has become a passion for us. To achieve maximum velocity, you have to design your products in a way that covers the largest part of the market with the fewest number of parts. For example, you don’t need nine different disk drives when you can serve 98 percent of the market with only four. We also learned to take into account the variability of the lost cost and high cost components. Systems were recongured to allow for a greater variety of low-cost parts and a limited variety of expensive parts. The goal was to decrease the number of components to manage, which increased the velocity, which decreased the risk of inventory depreciation, which increased the overall health of our business system.

We were also able to reduce inventory well below the levels anyone thought possible by constantly challenging and surprising ourselves with the result. We had our internal skeptics when we rst started pushing for ever-lower levels of inventory. I remember the head of our procurement group telling me that this was like “ying low to the ground 300 knots.” He was worried that we wouldn’t see the trees.

In 1993, we had $2.9 billion in sales and $220 million in inventory. Four years later, we posted $12.3 billion in sales and had inventory of $33 million. We’re now down to six days of inventory and we’re starting to measure it in hours instead of days. Once you reduce your inventory while maintaining your growth rate, a signicant amount of risk comes from the transition from one generation of product to the next. Without traditional stockpiles of inventory, it is critical to precisely time the discontinuance of the older product line with the ramp-up in customer demand for the newer one. Since we were introducing new products all the time, it became imperative to avoid the huge drag effect from mistakes made during transitions. E&O; – short for “excess and obsolete” - became taboo at Dell. We would debate about whether our E&O; was 30 or 50 cent per PC. Since anything less than $20 per PC is not bad, when you’re down in the cents range, you’re approaching stellar performance.

Q. Find out the FALSE Statement

Solution:
QUESTION: 90

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end of each passage:

My comrade and I had been quartered in Jamaica, and from there we had been drafting off to the British settlement of Belize, lying away west and north of the Mosquito Coast. At Belize there had been great alarm of one cruel gang of pirates (there were always more pirates than enough in those Caribbean Seas), and as they got the better of our English cruisers by running into out-of-the-way creeks and shallows, and taking the land when they were hotly pressed, the governor of Belize had received orders from home to keep a sharp look-out for them along shore. Now, there was an armed sloop came once a year from Port Royal, Jamaica, to the Island, laden with all manner of necessaries to eat, and to drink, and to wear, and to use in various ways; and it was aboard of that sloop which had touched at Belize, that I was standing, leaning over the bulwarks.

The Island was occupied by a very small English colony. It had been given the name of Silver-Store. The reason of its being so called, was, that the English colony owned and worked a silver-mine over on the mainland, in Honduras, and used this Island as a safe and convenient place to store their silver in, until it was annually fetched away by the sloop. It was brought down from the mine to the coast on the backs of mules, attended by friendly local people and guarded by white men; from thence it was conveyed over to SilverStore, when the weather was fair, in the canoes of that country; from Silver-Store, it was carried to Jamaica by the armed sloop once ayear, as I have already mentioned; from Jamaica, it went, of course, all over the world.

How I came to be aboard the armed sloop is easily told. Four-and-twenty marines under command of a lieutenant - that ocer’s name was Linderwood - had been told off at Belize, to proceed to Silver-Store, in aid of boats and seamen stationed there for the chase of the Pirates. The Island was considered a good post of observation against the pirates, both by land and sea; neither the pirate ship nor yet her boats had been seen by any of us, but they had been so much heard of, that the reinforcement was sent. Of that party, I was one. It included a corporal and a sergeant. Charker was corporal, and the sergeant’s name was Drooce. He was the most tyrannical non- commissioned ocer in His Majesty’s service.

The night came on, soon after I had had the foregoing words with Charker. All the wonderful bright colours went out of the sea and sky in a few minutes, and all the stars in the Heavens seemed to shine out together, and to look down at themselves in the sea, over one another’s shoulders, millions deep.

Next morning, we cast anchor off the Island. There was a snug harbour within a little reef; there was a sandy beach; there were cocoanut trees with high straight stems, quite bare, and foliage at the top like plumes of magnicent green feathers; there were all the objects that are usually seen in those parts, and I am not going to describe them, having something else to tell about.

Great rejoicings, to be sure, were made on our arrival. All the ags in the place were hoisted, all the guns in the place were red, and all the people in the place came down to look at us. One of the local people had come off outside the reef, to pilot us in, and remained on board after we had let go our anchor.

My ocer, Lieutenant Linderwood, was as ill as the captain of the sloop, and was carried ashore, too. They were both young men of about my age, who had been delicate in the West India climate. I thought I was much tter for the work than they were, and that if all of us had our deserts, I should be both of them rolled into one. (It may be imagined what sort of an ocer of marines I should have made, without the power of reading a written order. And as to any knowledge how to command the sloop—Lord! I should have sunk her in a quarter of an hour!) However, such were my reections; and when we men were ashore and dismissed, I strolled about the place along with Charker, making my observations in a similar spirit.

It was a pretty place: in all its arrangements partly South American and partly English, and very agreeable to look at on that account, being like a bit of home that had got chipped off and had oated away to that spot, accommodating itself to circumstances as it drifted along. The huts of the local people, to the number of ve- and-twenty, perhaps, were down by the beach to the left of the anchorage. On the right was a sort of barrack, with a South American Flag and the Union Jack, ying from the same staff, where the little English colony could all come together, if they saw occasion. It was a walled square of building, with a sort of pleasure-ground inside, and inside that again a sunken block like a powder magazine, with a little square trench round it, and steps down to the door.

Charker and I were looking in at the gate, which was not guarded; and I had said to Charker, in reference to the bit like a powder magazine, “That’s where they keep the silver you see;” and Charker had said to me, after thinking it over, “And silver ain’t gold. Is it, Gill?”

Q. Find out the TRUE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

My comrade and I had been quartered in Jamaica, and from there we had been drafting off to the British settlement of Belize, lying away west and north of the Mosquito Coast. At Belize there had been great alarm of one cruel gang of pirates (there were always more pirates than enough in those Caribbean Seas), and as they got the better of our English cruisers by running into out-of-the-way creeks and shallows, and taking the land when they were hotly pressed, the governor of Belize had received orders from home to keep a sharp look-out for them along shore. Now, there was an armed sloop came once a year from Port Royal, Jamaica, to the Island, laden with all manner of necessaries to eat, and to drink, and to wear, and to use in various ways; and it was aboard of that sloop which had touched at Belize, that I was standing, leaning over the bulwarks.

The Island was occupied by a very small English colony. It had been given the name of Silver-Store. The reason of its being so called, was, that the English colony owned and worked a silver-mine over on the mainland, in Honduras, and used this Island as a safe and convenient place to store their silver in, until it was annually fetched away by the sloop. It was brought down from the mine to the coast on the backs of mules, attended by friendly local people and guarded by white men; from thence it was conveyed over to SilverStore, when the weather was fair, in the canoes of that country; from Silver-Store, it was carried to Jamaica by the armed sloop once ayear, as I have already mentioned; from Jamaica, it went, of course, all over the world.

How I came to be aboard the armed sloop is easily told. Four-and-twenty marines under command of a lieutenant - that ocer’s name was Linderwood - had been told off at Belize, to proceed to Silver-Store, in aid of boats and seamen stationed there for the chase of the Pirates. The Island was considered a good post of observation against the pirates, both by land and sea; neither the pirate ship nor yet her boats had been seen by any of us, but they had been so much heard of, that the reinforcement was sent. Of that party, I was one. It included a corporal and a sergeant. Charker was corporal, and the sergeant’s name was Drooce. He was the most tyrannical non- commissioned ocer in His Majesty’s service.

The night came on, soon after I had had the foregoing words with Charker. All the wonderful bright colours went out of the sea and sky in a few minutes, and all the stars in the Heavens seemed to shine out together, and to look down at themselves in the sea, over one another’s shoulders, millions deep.

Next morning, we cast anchor off the Island. There was a snug harbour within a little reef; there was a sandy beach; there were cocoanut trees with high straight stems, quite bare, and foliage at the top like plumes of magnicent green feathers; there were all the objects that are usually seen in those parts, and I am not going to describe them, having something else to tell about.

Great rejoicings, to be sure, were made on our arrival. All the ags in the place were hoisted, all the guns in the place were red, and all the people in the place came down to look at us. One of the local people had come off outside the reef, to pilot us in, and remained on board after we had let go our anchor.

My ocer, Lieutenant Linderwood, was as ill as the captain of the sloop, and was carried ashore, too. They were both young men of about my age, who had been delicate in the West India climate. I thought I was much tter for the work than they were, and that if all of us had our deserts, I should be both of them rolled into one. (It may be imagined what sort of an ocer of marines I should have made, without the power of reading a written order. And as to any knowledge how to command the sloop—Lord! I should have sunk her in a quarter of an hour!) However, such were my reections; and when we men were ashore and dismissed, I strolled about the place along with Charker, making my observations in a similar spirit.

It was a pretty place: in all its arrangements partly South American and partly English, and very agreeable to look at on that account, being like a bit of home that had got chipped off and had oated away to that spot, accommodating itself to circumstances as it drifted along. The huts of the local people, to the number of ve- and-twenty, perhaps, were down by the beach to the left of the anchorage. On the right was a sort of barrack, with a South American Flag and the Union Jack, ying from the same staff, where the little English colony could all come together, if they saw occasion. It was a walled square of building, with a sort of pleasure-ground inside, and inside that again a sunken block like a powder magazine, with a little square trench round it, and steps down to the door.

Charker and I were looking in at the gate, which was not guarded; and I had said to Charker, in reference to the bit like a powder magazine, “That’s where they keep the silver you see;” and Charker had said to me, after thinking it over, “And silver ain’t gold. Is it, Gill?”

Q. Find out the FALSE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

My comrade and I had been quartered in Jamaica, and from there we had been drafting off to the British settlement of Belize, lying away west and north of the Mosquito Coast. At Belize there had been great alarm of one cruel gang of pirates (there were always more pirates than enough in those Caribbean Seas), and as they got the better of our English cruisers by running into out-of-the-way creeks and shallows, and taking the land when they were hotly pressed, the governor of Belize had received orders from home to keep a sharp look-out for them along shore. Now, there was an armed sloop came once a year from Port Royal, Jamaica, to the Island, laden with all manner of necessaries to eat, and to drink, and to wear, and to use in various ways; and it was aboard of that sloop which had touched at Belize, that I was standing, leaning over the bulwarks.

The Island was occupied by a very small English colony. It had been given the name of Silver-Store. The reason of its being so called, was, that the English colony owned and worked a silver-mine over on the mainland, in Honduras, and used this Island as a safe and convenient place to store their silver in, until it was annually fetched away by the sloop. It was brought down from the mine to the coast on the backs of mules, attended by friendly local people and guarded by white men; from thence it was conveyed over to SilverStore, when the weather was fair, in the canoes of that country; from Silver-Store, it was carried to Jamaica by the armed sloop once ayear, as I have already mentioned; from Jamaica, it went, of course, all over the world.

How I came to be aboard the armed sloop is easily told. Four-and-twenty marines under command of a lieutenant - that ocer’s name was Linderwood - had been told off at Belize, to proceed to Silver-Store, in aid of boats and seamen stationed there for the chase of the Pirates. The Island was considered a good post of observation against the pirates, both by land and sea; neither the pirate ship nor yet her boats had been seen by any of us, but they had been so much heard of, that the reinforcement was sent. Of that party, I was one. It included a corporal and a sergeant. Charker was corporal, and the sergeant’s name was Drooce. He was the most tyrannical non- commissioned ocer in His Majesty’s service.

The night came on, soon after I had had the foregoing words with Charker. All the wonderful bright colours went out of the sea and sky in a few minutes, and all the stars in the Heavens seemed to shine out together, and to look down at themselves in the sea, over one another’s shoulders, millions deep.

Next morning, we cast anchor off the Island. There was a snug harbour within a little reef; there was a sandy beach; there were cocoanut trees with high straight stems, quite bare, and foliage at the top like plumes of magnicent green feathers; there were all the objects that are usually seen in those parts, and I am not going to describe them, having something else to tell about.

Great rejoicings, to be sure, were made on our arrival. All the ags in the place were hoisted, all the guns in the place were red, and all the people in the place came down to look at us. One of the local people had come off outside the reef, to pilot us in, and remained on board after we had let go our anchor.

My ocer, Lieutenant Linderwood, was as ill as the captain of the sloop, and was carried ashore, too. They were both young men of about my age, who had been delicate in the West India climate. I thought I was much tter for the work than they were, and that if all of us had our deserts, I should be both of them rolled into one. (It may be imagined what sort of an ocer of marines I should have made, without the power of reading a written order. And as to any knowledge how to command the sloop—Lord! I should have sunk her in a quarter of an hour!) However, such were my reections; and when we men were ashore and dismissed, I strolled about the place along with Charker, making my observations in a similar spirit.

It was a pretty place: in all its arrangements partly South American and partly English, and very agreeable to look at on that account, being like a bit of home that had got chipped off and had oated away to that spot, accommodating itself to circumstances as it drifted along. The huts of the local people, to the number of ve- and-twenty, perhaps, were down by the beach to the left of the anchorage. On the right was a sort of barrack, with a South American Flag and the Union Jack, ying from the same staff, where the little English colony could all come together, if they saw occasion. It was a walled square of building, with a sort of pleasure-ground inside, and inside that again a sunken block like a powder magazine, with a little square trench round it, and steps down to the door.

Charker and I were looking in at the gate, which was not guarded; and I had said to Charker, in reference to the bit like a powder magazine, “That’s where they keep the silver you see;” and Charker had said to me, after thinking it over, “And silver ain’t gold. Is it, Gill?”

Q. Find out the TRUE Statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

My comrade and I had been quartered in Jamaica, and from there we had been drafting off to the British settlement of Belize, lying away west and north of the Mosquito Coast. At Belize there had been great alarm of one cruel gang of pirates (there were always more pirates than enough in those Caribbean Seas), and as they got the better of our English cruisers by running into out-of-the-way creeks and shallows, and taking the land when they were hotly pressed, the governor of Belize had received orders from home to keep a sharp look-out for them along shore. Now, there was an armed sloop came once a year from Port Royal, Jamaica, to the Island, laden with all manner of necessaries to eat, and to drink, and to wear, and to use in various ways; and it was aboard of that sloop which had touched at Belize, that I was standing, leaning over the bulwarks.

The Island was occupied by a very small English colony. It had been given the name of Silver-Store. The reason of its being so called, was, that the English colony owned and worked a silver-mine over on the mainland, in Honduras, and used this Island as a safe and convenient place to store their silver in, until it was annually fetched away by the sloop. It was brought down from the mine to the coast on the backs of mules, attended by friendly local people and guarded by white men; from thence it was conveyed over to SilverStore, when the weather was fair, in the canoes of that country; from Silver-Store, it was carried to Jamaica by the armed sloop once ayear, as I have already mentioned; from Jamaica, it went, of course, all over the world.

How I came to be aboard the armed sloop is easily told. Four-and-twenty marines under command of a lieutenant - that ocer’s name was Linderwood - had been told off at Belize, to proceed to Silver-Store, in aid of boats and seamen stationed there for the chase of the Pirates. The Island was considered a good post of observation against the pirates, both by land and sea; neither the pirate ship nor yet her boats had been seen by any of us, but they had been so much heard of, that the reinforcement was sent. Of that party, I was one. It included a corporal and a sergeant. Charker was corporal, and the sergeant’s name was Drooce. He was the most tyrannical non- commissioned ocer in His Majesty’s service.

The night came on, soon after I had had the foregoing words with Charker. All the wonderful bright colours went out of the sea and sky in a few minutes, and all the stars in the Heavens seemed to shine out together, and to look down at themselves in the sea, over one another’s shoulders, millions deep.

Next morning, we cast anchor off the Island. There was a snug harbour within a little reef; there was a sandy beach; there were cocoanut trees with high straight stems, quite bare, and foliage at the top like plumes of magnicent green feathers; there were all the objects that are usually seen in those parts, and I am not going to describe them, having something else to tell about.

Great rejoicings, to be sure, were made on our arrival. All the ags in the place were hoisted, all the guns in the place were red, and all the people in the place came down to look at us. One of the local people had come off outside the reef, to pilot us in, and remained on board after we had let go our anchor.

My ocer, Lieutenant Linderwood, was as ill as the captain of the sloop, and was carried ashore, too. They were both young men of about my age, who had been delicate in the West India climate. I thought I was much tter for the work than they were, and that if all of us had our deserts, I should be both of them rolled into one. (It may be imagined what sort of an ocer of marines I should have made, without the power of reading a written order. And as to any knowledge how to command the sloop—Lord! I should have sunk her in a quarter of an hour!) However, such were my reections; and when we men were ashore and dismissed, I strolled about the place along with Charker, making my observations in a similar spirit.

It was a pretty place: in all its arrangements partly South American and partly English, and very agreeable to look at on that account, being like a bit of home that had got chipped off and had oated away to that spot, accommodating itself to circumstances as it drifted along. The huts of the local people, to the number of ve- and-twenty, perhaps, were down by the beach to the left of the anchorage. On the right was a sort of barrack, with a South American Flag and the Union Jack, ying from the same staff, where the little English colony could all come together, if they saw occasion. It was a walled square of building, with a sort of pleasure-ground inside, and inside that again a sunken block like a powder magazine, with a little square trench round it, and steps down to the door.

Charker and I were looking in at the gate, which was not guarded; and I had said to Charker, in reference to the bit like a powder magazine, “That’s where they keep the silver you see;” and Charker had said to me, after thinking it over, “And silver ain’t gold. Is it, Gill?”

Q. Mark the FALSE statement:

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given at the end of each passage:

We now come to the second part of our journey under the sea. The rst ended with the moving scene in the coral cemetery which left a deep impression on my mind. I could no longer content myself with the theory which satised Conseil. That worthy fellow persisted in seeing in the Commander of the Nautilus one of those unknown servants who returns mankind contempt for indifference. For him, he was a misunderstood genius who, tired of earth’s deceptions, had taken refuge in this inaccessible medium, where he might follow his instincts freely. To my mind, this explains but one side of Captain Nemo’s character. Indeed, the mystery of that last night during which we had been chained in prison, the sleep, and the precaution so violently taken by the Captain of snatching from my eyes the glass I had raised to sweep the horizon, the mortal wound of the man, due to an unaccountable shock of the Nautilus, all put me on a new track. No; Captain Nemo was not satised with shunning man. His formidable apparatus not only suited his instinct of freedom, but perhaps also the design of some terrible retaliation.

That day, at noon, the second ocer came to take the altitude of the sun. I mounted the platform, and watched the operation. As he was taking observations with the sextant, one of the sailors of the Nautilus (the strong man who had accompanied us on our rst submarine excursion to the Island of Crespo) came to clean the glasses of the lantern. I examined the ttings of the apparatus, the strength of which was increased a hundredfold by lenticular rings, placed similar to those in a lighthouse, and which projected their brilliance in a horizontal plane. The electric lamp was combined in such a way as to give its most powerful light. Indeed, it was produced in vacuo, which insured both its steadiness and its intensity. This vacuum economized the graphite points between which the luminous arc was developed - an important point of economy for Captain Nemo, who could not easily have replaced them; and under these conditions their waste was imperceptible. When the Nautilus was ready to continue its submarine journey, I went down to the saloon. The panel was closed, and the course marked direct west.

We were furrowing the waters of the Indian Ocean, a vast liquid plain, with a surface of 1,200,000,000 of acres, and whose waters are so clear and transparent that any one leaning over them would turn giddy. The Nautilus usually oated between fty and a hundred fathoms deep. We went on so for some days. To anyone but myself, who had a great love for the sea, the hours would have seemed long and monotonous; but the daily walks on the platform, when I steeped myself in the reviving air of the ocean, the sight of the rich waters through the windows of the saloon, the books in the library, the compiling of my memoirs, took up all my time, and left me not a moment of ennui or weariness.

From the 21 st to the 23 rd of January the Nautilus went at the rate of two hundred and fty leagues in twenty- four hours, being ve hundred and forty miles, or twenty-two miles an hour. If we recognized so many different varieties of sh, it was because, attracted by the electric light, they tried to follow us; the greater part, however, were soon distanced by our speed, though some kept their place in the waters of the Nautilus for a time. The morning of the 24 th , we observed Keeling Island, a coral formation, planted with magnicent cocos, and which had been visited by Mr. Darwin and Captain Fitzroy. The Nautilus skirted the shores of this desert island for a little distance. Soon Keeling Island disappeared from the horizon, and our course was directed to the north- west in the direction of the Indian Peninsula.

From Keeling Island our course was slower and more variable, often taking us into great depths. Several times they made use of the inclined planes, which certain internal levers placed obliquely to the waterline. I observed that in the upper regions the water was always colder in the high levels than at the surface of the sea. On the 25th of January the ocean was entirely deserted; the Nautilus passed the day on the surface, beating the waves with its powerful screw and making them rebound to a great height. Three parts of this day I spent on the platform. I watched the sea. Nothing on the horizon till about four o’clock then there was a steamer running west on our counter. Her masts were visible for an instant, but she could not see the Nautilus, being too low in the water. I fancied this steamboat belonged to the P.O. Company, which runs from Ceylon to Sydney, touching at King George’s Point and Melbourne.

At ve o’clock in the evening, before that eeting twilight which binds night to day in tropical zones, Conseil and I were astonished by a curious spectacle. It was a shoal of Argonauts travelling along on the surface of the ocean. We could count several hundreds. These graceful molluscs moved backwards by means of their locomotive tube, through which they propelled the water already drawn in. Of their eight tentacles, six were elongated, and stretched out oating on the water, whilst the other two, rolled up at, were spread to the wing like a light sail. I saw their spiral-shaped and uted shells, which Cuvier justly compares to an elegant skiff. For nearly an hour the Nautilus oated in the midst of this shoal of molluscs.

The next day, 26 th of January, we cut the equator at the eighty-second meridian and entered the northern hemisphere. During the day a formidable troop of sharks accompanied us. They were “cestracio philippi” sharks, with brown backs and whitish bellies, armed with eleven rows of teeth, their throat being marked with a large black spot surrounded with white like an eye. There were also some Isabella sharks, with rounded snouts marked with dark spots. These powerful creatures often hurled themselves at the windows of the saloon with such violence as to make us feel very insecure. But the Nautilus, accelerating her speed, easily left the most rapid of them behind.

About seven o’clock in the evening, the Nautilus, half- immersed, was sailing in a sea of milk. At rst sight the ocean seemed lactied. Was it the effect of the lunar rays? No; for the moon, scarcely two days old, was still lying hidden under the horizon in the rays of the sun. The whole sky, though lit by the sidereal rays, seemed black by contrast with the whiteness of the waters. Conseil could not believe his eyes, and questioned me as to the cause of this strange phenomenon. Happily I was able to answer him.

“It is called a milk sea,” I explained. “A large extent of white waves is often to be seen on the coasts of Amboyna, and in these parts of the sea.”  “But, sir,” said Conseil, “can you tell me what causes such an effect? For I suppose the water is not really turned into milk.”  “No, my boy; and the whiteness which surprises you is caused only by the presence of myriads of luminous little worm, gelatinous and without colour, of the thickness of a hair, and whose length is not more than seven-thousandths of an inch. These insects adhere to one another sometimes for several leagues.”

“Several leagues!” exclaimed Conseil.

“Yes, my boy; and you need not try to compute the number of these infusoria. You will not be able, for, if I am not mistaken, ships have oated on these milk seas for more than forty miles.”

Towards midnight the sea suddenly resumed its usual colour; but behind us, even to the limits of the horizon, the sky reected the whitened waves, and for a long time seemed impregnated with the vague glimmerings of an aurora borealis

Q. Find the TRUE Sentence:

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

We now come to the second part of our journey under the sea. The rst ended with the moving scene in the coral cemetery which left a deep impression on my mind. I could no longer content myself with the theory which satised Conseil. That worthy fellow persisted in seeing in the Commander of the Nautilus one of those unknown servants who returns mankind contempt for indifference. For him, he was a misunderstood genius who, tired of earth’s deceptions, had taken refuge in this inaccessible medium, where he might follow his instincts freely. To my mind, this explains but one side of Captain Nemo’s character. Indeed, the mystery of that last night during which we had been chained in prison, the sleep, and the precaution so violently taken by the Captain of snatching from my eyes the glass I had raised to sweep the horizon, the mortal wound of the man, due to an unaccountable shock of the Nautilus, all put me on a new track. No; Captain Nemo was not satised with shunning man. His formidable apparatus not only suited his instinct of freedom, but perhaps also the design of some terrible retaliation.

That day, at noon, the second ocer came to take the altitude of the sun. I mounted the platform, and watched the operation. As he was taking observations with the sextant, one of the sailors of the Nautilus (the strong man who had accompanied us on our rst submarine excursion to the Island of Crespo) came to clean the glasses of the lantern. I examined the ttings of the apparatus, the strength of which was increased a hundredfold by lenticular rings, placed similar to those in a lighthouse, and which projected their brilliance in a horizontal plane. The electric lamp was combined in such a way as to give its most powerful light. Indeed, it was produced in vacuo, which insured both its steadiness and its intensity. This vacuum economized the graphite points between which the luminous arc was developed - an important point of economy for Captain Nemo, who could not easily have replaced them; and under these conditions their waste was imperceptible. When the Nautilus was ready to continue its submarine journey, I went down to the saloon. The panel was closed, and the course marked direct west.

We were furrowing the waters of the Indian Ocean, a vast liquid plain, with a surface of 1,200,000,000 of acres, and whose waters are so clear and transparent that any one leaning over them would turn giddy. The Nautilus usually oated between fty and a hundred fathoms deep. We went on so for some days. To anyone but myself, who had a great love for the sea, the hours would have seemed long and monotonous; but the daily walks on the platform, when I steeped myself in the reviving air of the ocean, the sight of the rich waters through the windows of the saloon, the books in the library, the compiling of my memoirs, took up all my time, and left me not a moment of ennui or weariness.

From the 21 st to the 23 rd of January the Nautilus went at the rate of two hundred and fty leagues in twenty- four hours, being ve hundred and forty miles, or twenty-two miles an hour. If we recognized so many different varieties of sh, it was because, attracted by the electric light, they tried to follow us; the greater part, however, were soon distanced by our speed, though some kept their place in the waters of the Nautilus for a time. The morning of the 24 th , we observed Keeling Island, a coral formation, planted with magnicent cocos, and which had been visited by Mr. Darwin and Captain Fitzroy. The Nautilus skirted the shores of this desert island for a little distance. Soon Keeling Island disappeared from the horizon, and our course was directed to the north- west in the direction of the Indian Peninsula.

From Keeling Island our course was slower and more variable, often taking us into great depths. Several times they made use of the inclined planes, which certain internal levers placed obliquely to the waterline. I observed that in the upper regions the water was always colder in the high levels than at the surface of the sea. On the 25th of January the ocean was entirely deserted; the Nautilus passed the day on the surface, beating the waves with its powerful screw and making them rebound to a great height. Three parts of this day I spent on the platform. I watched the sea. Nothing on the horizon till about four o’clock then there was a steamer running west on our counter. Her masts were visible for an instant, but she could not see the Nautilus, being too low in the water. I fancied this steamboat belonged to the P.O. Company, which runs from Ceylon to Sydney, touching at King George’s Point and Melbourne.

At ve o’clock in the evening, before that eeting twilight which binds night to day in tropical zones, Conseil and I were astonished by a curious spectacle. It was a shoal of Argonauts travelling along on the surface of the ocean. We could count several hundreds. These graceful molluscs moved backwards by means of their locomotive tube, through which they propelled the water already drawn in. Of their eight tentacles, six were elongated, and stretched out oating on the water, whilst the other two, rolled up at, were spread to the wing like a light sail. I saw their spiral-shaped and uted shells, which Cuvier justly compares to an elegant skiff. For nearly an hour the Nautilus oated in the midst of this shoal of molluscs.

The next day, 26 th of January, we cut the equator at the eighty-second meridian and entered the northern hemisphere. During the day a formidable troop of sharks accompanied us. They were “cestracio philippi” sharks, with brown backs and whitish bellies, armed with eleven rows of teeth, their throat being marked with a large black spot surrounded with white like an eye. There were also some Isabella sharks, with rounded snouts marked with dark spots. These powerful creatures often hurled themselves at the windows of the saloon with such violence as to make us feel very insecure. But the Nautilus, accelerating her speed, easily left the most rapid of them behind.

About seven o’clock in the evening, the Nautilus, half- immersed, was sailing in a sea of milk. At rst sight the ocean seemed lactied. Was it the effect of the lunar rays? No; for the moon, scarcely two days old, was still lying hidden under the horizon in the rays of the sun. The whole sky, though lit by the sidereal rays, seemed black by contrast with the whiteness of the waters. Conseil could not believe his eyes, and questioned me as to the cause of this strange phenomenon. Happily I was able to answer him.

“It is called a milk sea,” I explained. “A large extent of white waves is often to be seen on the coasts of Amboyna, and in these parts of the sea.”  “But, sir,” said Conseil, “can you tell me what causes such an effect? For I suppose the water is not really turned into milk.”  “No, my boy; and the whiteness which surprises you is caused only by the presence of myriads of luminous little worm, gelatinous and without colour, of the thickness of a hair, and whose length is not more than seven-thousandths of an inch. These insects adhere to one another sometimes for several leagues.”

“Several leagues!” exclaimed Conseil.

“Yes, my boy; and you need not try to compute the number of these infusoria. You will not be able, for, if I am not mistaken, ships have oated on these milk seas for more than forty miles.”

Towards midnight the sea suddenly resumed its usual colour; but behind us, even to the limits of the horizon, the sky reected the whitened waves, and for a long time seemed impregnated with the vague glimmerings of an aurora borealis

Q. Find the FALSE sentence:

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

We now come to the second part of our journey under the sea. The rst ended with the moving scene in the coral cemetery which left a deep impression on my mind. I could no longer content myself with the theory which satised Conseil. That worthy fellow persisted in seeing in the Commander of the Nautilus one of those unknown servants who returns mankind contempt for indifference. For him, he was a misunderstood genius who, tired of earth’s deceptions, had taken refuge in this inaccessible medium, where he might follow his instincts freely. To my mind, this explains but one side of Captain Nemo’s character. Indeed, the mystery of that last night during which we had been chained in prison, the sleep, and the precaution so violently taken by the Captain of snatching from my eyes the glass I had raised to sweep the horizon, the mortal wound of the man, due to an unaccountable shock of the Nautilus, all put me on a new track. No; Captain Nemo was not satised with shunning man. His formidable apparatus not only suited his instinct of freedom, but perhaps also the design of some terrible retaliation.

That day, at noon, the second ocer came to take the altitude of the sun. I mounted the platform, and watched the operation. As he was taking observations with the sextant, one of the sailors of the Nautilus (the strong man who had accompanied us on our rst submarine excursion to the Island of Crespo) came to clean the glasses of the lantern. I examined the ttings of the apparatus, the strength of which was increased a hundredfold by lenticular rings, placed similar to those in a lighthouse, and which projected their brilliance in a horizontal plane. The electric lamp was combined in such a way as to give its most powerful light. Indeed, it was produced in vacuo, which insured both its steadiness and its intensity. This vacuum economized the graphite points between which the luminous arc was developed - an important point of economy for Captain Nemo, who could not easily have replaced them; and under these conditions their waste was imperceptible. When the Nautilus was ready to continue its submarine journey, I went down to the saloon. The panel was closed, and the course marked direct west.

We were furrowing the waters of the Indian Ocean, a vast liquid plain, with a surface of 1,200,000,000 of acres, and whose waters are so clear and transparent that any one leaning over them would turn giddy. The Nautilus usually oated between fty and a hundred fathoms deep. We went on so for some days. To anyone but myself, who had a great love for the sea, the hours would have seemed long and monotonous; but the daily walks on the platform, when I steeped myself in the reviving air of the ocean, the sight of the rich waters through the windows of the saloon, the books in the library, the compiling of my memoirs, took up all my time, and left me not a moment of ennui or weariness.

From the 21 st to the 23 rd of January the Nautilus went at the rate of two hundred and fty leagues in twenty- four hours, being ve hundred and forty miles, or twenty-two miles an hour. If we recognized so many different varieties of sh, it was because, attracted by the electric light, they tried to follow us; the greater part, however, were soon distanced by our speed, though some kept their place in the waters of the Nautilus for a time. The morning of the 24 th , we observed Keeling Island, a coral formation, planted with magnicent cocos, and which had been visited by Mr. Darwin and Captain Fitzroy. The Nautilus skirted the shores of this desert island for a little distance. Soon Keeling Island disappeared from the horizon, and our course was directed to the north- west in the direction of the Indian Peninsula.

From Keeling Island our course was slower and more variable, often taking us into great depths. Several times they made use of the inclined planes, which certain internal levers placed obliquely to the waterline. I observed that in the upper regions the water was always colder in the high levels than at the surface of the sea. On the 25th of January the ocean was entirely deserted; the Nautilus passed the day on the surface, beating the waves with its powerful screw and making them rebound to a great height. Three parts of this day I spent on the platform. I watched the sea. Nothing on the horizon till about four o’clock then there was a steamer running west on our counter. Her masts were visible for an instant, but she could not see the Nautilus, being too low in the water. I fancied this steamboat belonged to the P.O. Company, which runs from Ceylon to Sydney, touching at King George’s Point and Melbourne.

At ve o’clock in the evening, before that eeting twilight which binds night to day in tropical zones, Conseil and I were astonished by a curious spectacle. It was a shoal of Argonauts travelling along on the surface of the ocean. We could count several hundreds. These graceful molluscs moved backwards by means of their locomotive tube, through which they propelled the water already drawn in. Of their eight tentacles, six were elongated, and stretched out oating on the water, whilst the other two, rolled up at, were spread to the wing like a light sail. I saw their spiral-shaped and uted shells, which Cuvier justly compares to an elegant skiff. For nearly an hour the Nautilus oated in the midst of this shoal of molluscs.

The next day, 26 th of January, we cut the equator at the eighty-second meridian and entered the northern hemisphere. During the day a formidable troop of sharks accompanied us. They were “cestracio philippi” sharks, with brown backs and whitish bellies, armed with eleven rows of teeth, their throat being marked with a large black spot surrounded with white like an eye. There were also some Isabella sharks, with rounded snouts marked with dark spots. These powerful creatures often hurled themselves at the windows of the saloon with such violence as to make us feel very insecure. But the Nautilus, accelerating her speed, easily left the most rapid of them behind.

About seven o’clock in the evening, the Nautilus, half- immersed, was sailing in a sea of milk. At rst sight the ocean seemed lactied. Was it the effect of the lunar rays? No; for the moon, scarcely two days old, was still lying hidden under the horizon in the rays of the sun. The whole sky, though lit by the sidereal rays, seemed black by contrast with the whiteness of the waters. Conseil could not believe his eyes, and questioned me as to the cause of this strange phenomenon. Happily I was able to answer him.

“It is called a milk sea,” I explained. “A large extent of white waves is often to be seen on the coasts of Amboyna, and in these parts of the sea.”  “But, sir,” said Conseil, “can you tell me what causes such an effect? For I suppose the water is not really turned into milk.”  “No, my boy; and the whiteness which surprises you is caused only by the presence of myriads of luminous little worm, gelatinous and without colour, of the thickness of a hair, and whose length is not more than seven-thousandths of an inch. These insects adhere to one another sometimes for several leagues.”

“Several leagues!” exclaimed Conseil.

“Yes, my boy; and you need not try to compute the number of these infusoria. You will not be able, for, if I am not mistaken, ships have oated on these milk seas for more than forty miles.”

Towards midnight the sea suddenly resumed its usual colour; but behind us, even to the limits of the horizon, the sky reected the whitened waves, and for a long time seemed impregnated with the vague glimmerings of an aurora borealis

Q. Match the following:

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

We now come to the second part of our journey under the sea. The rst ended with the moving scene in the coral cemetery which left a deep impression on my mind. I could no longer content myself with the theory which satised Conseil. That worthy fellow persisted in seeing in the Commander of the Nautilus one of those unknown servants who returns mankind contempt for indifference. For him, he was a misunderstood genius who, tired of earth’s deceptions, had taken refuge in this inaccessible medium, where he might follow his instincts freely. To my mind, this explains but one side of Captain Nemo’s character. Indeed, the mystery of that last night during which we had been chained in prison, the sleep, and the precaution so violently taken by the Captain of snatching from my eyes the glass I had raised to sweep the horizon, the mortal wound of the man, due to an unaccountable shock of the Nautilus, all put me on a new track. No; Captain Nemo was not satised with shunning man. His formidable apparatus not only suited his instinct of freedom, but perhaps also the design of some terrible retaliation.

That day, at noon, the second ocer came to take the altitude of the sun. I mounted the platform, and watched the operation. As he was taking observations with the sextant, one of the sailors of the Nautilus (the strong man who had accompanied us on our rst submarine excursion to the Island of Crespo) came to clean the glasses of the lantern. I examined the ttings of the apparatus, the strength of which was increased a hundredfold by lenticular rings, placed similar to those in a lighthouse, and which projected their brilliance in a horizontal plane. The electric lamp was combined in such a way as to give its most powerful light. Indeed, it was produced in vacuo, which insured both its steadiness and its intensity. This vacuum economized the graphite points between which the luminous arc was developed - an important point of economy for Captain Nemo, who could not easily have replaced them; and under these conditions their waste was imperceptible. When the Nautilus was ready to continue its submarine journey, I went down to the saloon. The panel was closed, and the course marked direct west.

We were furrowing the waters of the Indian Ocean, a vast liquid plain, with a surface of 1,200,000,000 of acres, and whose waters are so clear and transparent that any one leaning over them would turn giddy. The Nautilus usually oated between fty and a hundred fathoms deep. We went on so for some days. To anyone but myself, who had a great love for the sea, the hours would have seemed long and monotonous; but the daily walks on the platform, when I steeped myself in the reviving air of the ocean, the sight of the rich waters through the windows of the saloon, the books in the library, the compiling of my memoirs, took up all my time, and left me not a moment of ennui or weariness.

From the 21 st to the 23 rd of January the Nautilus went at the rate of two hundred and fty leagues in twenty- four hours, being ve hundred and forty miles, or twenty-two miles an hour. If we recognized so many different varieties of sh, it was because, attracted by the electric light, they tried to follow us; the greater part, however, were soon distanced by our speed, though some kept their place in the waters of the Nautilus for a time. The morning of the 24 th , we observed Keeling Island, a coral formation, planted with magnicent cocos, and which had been visited by Mr. Darwin and Captain Fitzroy. The Nautilus skirted the shores of this desert island for a little distance. Soon Keeling Island disappeared from the horizon, and our course was directed to the north- west in the direction of the Indian Peninsula.

From Keeling Island our course was slower and more variable, often taking us into great depths. Several times they made use of the inclined planes, which certain internal levers placed obliquely to the waterline. I observed that in the upper regions the water was always colder in the high levels than at the surface of the sea. On the 25th of January the ocean was entirely deserted; the Nautilus passed the day on the surface, beating the waves with its powerful screw and making them rebound to a great height. Three parts of this day I spent on the platform. I watched the sea. Nothing on the horizon till about four o’clock then there was a steamer running west on our counter. Her masts were visible for an instant, but she could not see the Nautilus, being too low in the water. I fancied this steamboat belonged to the P.O. Company, which runs from Ceylon to Sydney, touching at King George’s Point and Melbourne.

At ve o’clock in the evening, before that eeting twilight which binds night to day in tropical zones, Conseil and I were astonished by a curious spectacle. It was a shoal of Argonauts travelling along on the surface of the ocean. We could count several hundreds. These graceful molluscs moved backwards by means of their locomotive tube, through which they propelled the water already drawn in. Of their eight tentacles, six were elongated, and stretched out oating on the water, whilst the other two, rolled up at, were spread to the wing like a light sail. I saw their spiral-shaped and uted shells, which Cuvier justly compares to an elegant skiff. For nearly an hour the Nautilus oated in the midst of this shoal of molluscs.

The next day, 26 th of January, we cut the equator at the eighty-second meridian and entered the northern hemisphere. During the day a formidable troop of sharks accompanied us. They were “cestracio philippi” sharks, with brown backs and whitish bellies, armed with eleven rows of teeth, their throat being marked with a large black spot surrounded with white like an eye. There were also some Isabella sharks, with rounded snouts marked with dark spots. These powerful creatures often hurled themselves at the windows of the saloon with such violence as to make us feel very insecure. But the Nautilus, accelerating her speed, easily left the most rapid of them behind.

About seven o’clock in the evening, the Nautilus, half- immersed, was sailing in a sea of milk. At rst sight the ocean seemed lactied. Was it the effect of the lunar rays? No; for the moon, scarcely two days old, was still lying hidden under the horizon in the rays of the sun. The whole sky, though lit by the sidereal rays, seemed black by contrast with the whiteness of the waters. Conseil could not believe his eyes, and questioned me as to the cause of this strange phenomenon. Happily I was able to answer him.

“It is called a milk sea,” I explained. “A large extent of white waves is often to be seen on the coasts of Amboyna, and in these parts of the sea.”  “But, sir,” said Conseil, “can you tell me what causes such an effect? For I suppose the water is not really turned into milk.”  “No, my boy; and the whiteness which surprises you is caused only by the presence of myriads of luminous little worm, gelatinous and without colour, of the thickness of a hair, and whose length is not more than seven-thousandths of an inch. These insects adhere to one another sometimes for several leagues.”

“Several leagues!” exclaimed Conseil.

“Yes, my boy; and you need not try to compute the number of these infusoria. You will not be able, for, if I am not mistaken, ships have oated on these milk seas for more than forty miles.”

Towards midnight the sea suddenly resumed its usual colour; but behind us, even to the limits of the horizon, the sky reected the whitened waves, and for a long time seemed impregnated with the vague glimmerings of an aurora borealis

Q. Find the TRUE statement

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Find the most appropriate word from the given choices which is described by the meaning provided in the question.

Q. Meaning: a bowl-shaped drinking vessel

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

Find the most appropriate word from the given choices which is described by the meaning provided in the question.

Q. Meaning: denition of a substance, especially a strong acid; erosive; mordant.

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

Find the most appropriate word from the given choices which is described by the meaning provided in the question.

Q. Meaning: an upward slope or grade (as in a road); rise; raise; climb; upgrade.

Solution:
QUESTION: 101

Select the most appropriate word(s) from the given choices to ll the blank(s).

Q. Justice Minister Bola Ige, confronted with the general incivility of local police, placed a __on the cads. Said the Hon. Bola Ige, “I pray that God will make big holes in their pockets.

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

Select the most appropriate word(s) from the given choices to ll the blank(s).

Q. I ____i____ that he will pass his exam and get a good job. I will make a ____ii____ .There will be a new government in less than a year.

Solution:

QUESTION: 103

Select the most appropriate word(s) from the given choices to ll the blank(s)

Q. Imagine an _______ public gure attacked by press and public, who is facing an inquiry into allegations of having obtained money by deception.

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

Select the most appropriate word(s) from the given choices to ll the blank(s).

Q. His listeners enjoyed his ____ wit but his victims often _____ at its satire.

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

A ve digit number divisible by 3 is to be formed using the numerals 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 without repetition. The total number of ways in which this can be done is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

If 2, a, b, c, d, e, f and 65 form an arithmetic progression, nd out the value of ‘e’

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

A contract is to be completed in 56 days and 104 men are set to work, each working 8 hours a day. After 30 days, 2/5th of the work is nished. How many additional men may be employed so that work may be completed on time, each man now working 9 hours per day?

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

A bag contains 8 red and 6 blue balls. If 5 balls are drawn at random, what is the probability that 3 of them are red and 2 are blue?

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

Select the option which is having similar analogy vis-a-vis the analogy given in the question.

Q. TRAVESTY: PARAGON ::

Solution:
QUESTION: 110

Select the option which is having similar analogy vis-a-vis the analogy given in the question.

CONTRITE: OBDURATE ::

Solution:
QUESTION: 111

Select the option which is having similar analogy vis-a-vis the analogy given in the question.

PECCADILLO: FLAW ::

Solution:
QUESTION: 112

Select the option which is having similar analogy vis-a-vis the analogy given in the question.

MUTTER: INDISTINCT ::

Solution:
QUESTION: 113

Select the most OPPOSITE of the given word from the given choices.

REQUIEM

Solution:
QUESTION: 114

Select the most OPPOSITE of the given word from the given choices.

STOLIDITY

Solution:
QUESTION: 115

Select the most OPPOSITE of the given word from the given choices.

ASPERSION

Solution:
QUESTION: 116

A number of sentences are given below which, when properly sequenced form a COHERENT PARAGRAPH. Choose the most LOGICAL ORDER of sentences from the choices given to construct a COHERENT PARAGRAPH.

Q. 

I. The economy’s performance in expenditure terms was even poorer with real GDP contracting by 0.6% after a gain of 0.5% in the October-December quarter.
II. On an output basis—the government’s preferred measure because it is less volatile thin expenditure-based GDP—the economy contracted by 0.3% in real terms from the previous quarter.
III. Data from Statistics New Zealand, a government agency, published on June 27th show an almost uniformly abysmal economic performance in January-March 2008.
IV. This was the rst contraction since late 2005, made worse by the fact that the previous quarter’s growth rate was revised down from 1% to 0.8%.

Solution:
QUESTION: 117

A number of sentences are given below which, when properly sequenced form a COHERENT PARAGRAPH. Choose the most LOGICAL ORDER of sentences from the choices given to construct a COHERENT PARAGRAPH.

Q. 

I. Matti Meri, a teacher-trainer at Helsinki University, was a teacher at the time.
II. By the time comprehensives reached the more populous south, teachers were eager to join in what was clearly a roaring success.
III. “Grammar-school teachers were quite afraid of the reforms,” he recalls.
IV. “They used to teach only one-third of the students. But the comprehensive schools used almost the same curriculum as the grammar schools had—and we discovered that the two- thirds were mostly able to cope with it.”
V. Comprehensive schools were introduced in 1972 in the sparsely populated north, and then over the next four years in the rest of the country.

Solution:

Statement I talks about sometime frame "at the time". Hence, it can't be an opening sentence. The time frame mentioned in statement I is given in statement V(year 1997).
Therefore, we can say that V, I is a mandatory pair.
“Grammar-school teachers were quite afraid of the reforms,” he recalls.Here, word 'he' refers to Matti Meri, therefore, we can say that statement I and III are mandatory pairs.
Therefore Option A is correct.
 

QUESTION: 118

A number of sentences are given below which, when properly sequenced form a COHERENT PARAGRAPH. Choose the most LOGICAL ORDER of sentences from the choices given to construct a COHERENT PARAGRAPH.

Q. 

I. “It is a clear illustration of the major role played by diet and culture on your risk of chronic disorders,” he says.
II. Little is known about its effects, but changing its levels, possibly through diet or with different gut bacteria, might help to control high blood pressure.
III. Chinese and Japanese people are very similar at a genetic level, but Dr Nicholson found big differences in the type and variety of metabolites in their blood and urine.
IV. “Metabolomics can provide very specic pointers as to what is going wrong and new ways of intervening.”
V. For instance, he found an unexpected metabolic marker, called formate that seems to have a role in regulating blood pressure.

Solution:
QUESTION: 119

There are four sentences S1, S2, S3, S4 where the underlined word is used either correctly or incorrectly. Choose the option which lists the sentences, where the underlined word is used correctly.

S1. Only 22% of the people voted. The rest were totally disinterested.
S2. The management and the union asked a completely disinterested party to mediate between them.
S3. I don’t know why he didn’t go to the exhibition. Perhaps he was too busy or just disinterested.
S4. France’s intervention in the dispute was not entirely disinterested. It gave her increased power and inuence in the area.

Solution:
QUESTION: 120

There are four sentences S1, S2, S3, S4 where the underlined phrase is used either correctly or incorrectly. Choose the option which lists the sentences, where the underlined phrase is used correctly.

S1. Good Lord, I’m not rich! on the contrary, I’m constantly in debt.
S2. She’s very intelligent, but on the contrary she’s apt to be impatient.
S3. Yes, it’s a very cosmopolitan city. On the contrary, it’s very expensive.
S4. I don’t think he’ll pass the exam. On the contrary, I think he’ll almost certainly fail.

Solution:
QUESTION: 121

Which of the following country is not a member of G8 group of countries?

Solution:
QUESTION: 122

Which prominent intergovernmental organization launched the movement, ‘Education For All’ (EFA):

Solution:
QUESTION: 123

Which of the following country is a member of OECD group?

Solution:
QUESTION: 124

Select the correct Year - Olympic host cities match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 125

Select the correct IPL Franchise - Owner match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 126

Which of the following country is not a member of Nuclear Suppliers Group?

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

Select the correct Bharat Ratna recipient-Year match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 128

Select the match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 129

Select the WRONG International Organization - Location of Headquarter - Country match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 130

Select the WRONG Venue of Hockey World Cup - Year - Winner match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 131

Select the WRONG Book - Author match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 132

Select the WRONG Country - Name of Parliament match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 133

Which of the following books has been authored by P. Chidambaram?

Solution:
QUESTION: 134

Which of the treaty was signed amongst the European nations for entering into the monetary union?

Solution:
QUESTION: 135

Which of the following Indian automobile major has a tie-up with a German insurer?

Solution:
QUESTION: 136

Which Indian company has acquired General Chemical Industrial Products Inc. of USA in 2008?

Solution:
QUESTION: 137

Which of the following is not part of the Central Police Forces under the Union Government of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 138

In descending order, which of the following group of countries is correct about the length of India’s land borders with its neighbors?

Solution:
QUESTION: 139

Chronologically which one of the following is correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 140

Which of the following mountain peak is not located in India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 141

Select the correct Organization — Purpose match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 142

In descending order, which one of the following is the correct sex ratio of states in India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 143

Select the correct Artists — Instruments match:

Solution:
QUESTION: 144

Select the correct Sobriquets — Primary Names match: