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Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - CAT MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test Verbal Ability (VA) & Reading Comprehension (RC) - Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks)

Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) for CAT 2024 is part of Verbal Ability (VA) & Reading Comprehension (RC) preparation. The Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) MCQs are made for CAT 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) below.
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Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 1

Use the adjective or adverb form of the word.
The driver of the car was ---- injured. (serious / seriously)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 1

The driver of the car was seriously injured.



  • Adjective form: serious

  • Adverb form: seriously


Explanation:



  • Adjective: An adjective is a word that modifies a noun or pronoun. It provides more information about the noun or pronoun in terms of its quality, state, or characteristics. In this sentence, the word "serious" describes the noun "injured" and tells us the extent of the injury.

  • Adverb: An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, adjective, or other adverb. It provides more information about how an action is performed or the degree to which something is done. In this sentence, the word "seriously" modifies the verb "was" and tells us the severity of the injury.


Therefore, in the given sentence, the correct answer is "seriously" as it is the adverb form of the word "serious" and properly modifies the verb "was" to describe the driver's injury.

Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 2

The driver of the car had ---- injuries. (serious / seriously)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 2
Explanation:
The correct answer is "serious."
Reasoning:
- The word "injuries" indicates that the sentence is referring to the physical harm caused to the driver.
- The term "serious" is an adjective that describes the severity of the injuries.
- In this context, "serious" is the correct choice because it describes the extent of the injuries sustained by the driver.
Detailed
- The word "serious" is an adjective used to describe the severity or gravity of something.
- In the sentence, it is used to describe the injuries of the driver.
- The word "seriously" is an adverb and would not be suitable in this context.
- Adverbs are used to modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, but "injuries" is a noun.
- The correct sentence would be "The driver of the car had serious injuries."
- This sentence conveys that the driver's injuries were significant or severe in nature.
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Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 3

I think you behaved very ----. (selfish/selfishly)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 3
Explanation:
When determining whether to use "selfish" or "selfishly" in this sentence, we need to consider the context and the part of speech required. In this case, we are describing how someone behaved, which requires an adverb. The correct adverb form is "selfishly." Here is a detailed explanation:
- Part of speech: The word "selfish" is an adjective, while "selfishly" is an adverb. Adjectives describe nouns, while adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.
- Describing behavior: In the sentence, we are describing how someone behaved. To modify the verb "behaved," we need an adverb, which is "selfishly."
- Adverb form: Adverbs are formed by adding "-ly" to the adjective form. In this case, "selfish" becomes "selfishly" when describing behavior.
- Example: If we were to use the adjective form, the sentence would be "I think you behaved very selfish." However, this would not accurately describe how the person behaved.
- Correct usage: The correct adverb form is "selfishly," which accurately describes the behavior of the person being referred to in the sentence.
Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 4

Rose is ---- upset about losing her job. (terrible / terribly)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 4
Explanation:
Terrible vs. Terribly:
- "Terrible" is an adjective that describes a noun, indicating that something is of low quality or causing distress.
- "Terribly" is an adverb that describes a verb, indicating that an action is done in an extreme or intense manner.
Using "Terribly" in the sentence:
- In the given sentence, the word "upset" is a verb, so we need an adverb to describe how Rose feels about losing her job.
- Since "terribly" is the adverb form of "terrible," it properly describes the intensity of Rose's upset emotions.
Why "Terribly" is the correct answer:
- Losing a job is a significant event that often causes emotional distress and turmoil.
- The word "terribly" intensifies the degree of upset, indicating that Rose is extremely, deeply, or excessively upset about losing her job.
- The use of "terribly" conveys a stronger emotional impact compared to the adjective "terrible" in this context.
Therefore, the correct answer is "terribly."
Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 5

There was a ---- change in the weather. (sudden / suddenly)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 5
Explanation:
The correct word to use in this sentence is "sudden." Here's why:
Definition:
- "Sudden" is an adjective that means happening quickly and unexpectedly. It describes a change that occurs without warning or preparation.
Usage:
- The word "sudden" is used to describe a change in the weather, indicating that the change happened quickly and caught people by surprise.
Comparison:
- "Suddenly" is an adverb that describes an action or event happening in a sudden manner. It is used to modify verbs and not suitable for describing a change in the weather.
Examples:
- "There was a sudden change in the weather." This sentence correctly uses "sudden" to describe the unexpected and rapid change in the weather.
- "The storm arrived suddenly." In this sentence, "suddenly" is used to describe how the storm arrived, indicating the quick and unexpected nature of its arrival.
Conclusion:
- In the given sentence, we need to use an adjective to describe the change in the weather. Since "sudden" fits the context by conveying the unexpected and rapid nature of the change, it is the correct choice.
Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 6

Everybody at the party was ---- dressed. (colorful / colorfully)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 6

To determine whether the correct option is "colorful" or "colorfully" in the given sentence, we need to understand the grammatical rules regarding the use of adjectives and adverbs.
1. Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns, whereas adverbs describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.
2. In this case, "dressed" is a verb, and we need to describe the manner in which the people were dressed, so we need an adverb.
3. The adverb form of "colorful" is "colorfully."
Therefore, the correct answer is "colorfully."
Key Points:
- Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns, while adverbs describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.
- "Dressed" is a verb in the given sentence.
- The adverb form of "colorful" is "colorfully."
- In this sentence, we need to describe the manner in which the people were dressed, so we use the adverb "colorfully."
Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 7

Linda likes wearing ---- clothes. (colorful / colorfully)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 7
Introduction:
Linda is someone who enjoys wearing a specific type of clothing. In this case, we need to determine whether she prefers colorful or colorfully clothes. Let's take a closer look at the options and choose the correct one.
Explanation:
- Colorful: This is an adjective that describes something as having many colors or being full of bright hues.
- Colorfully: This is an adverb that modifies a verb or an adjective, indicating that something is done in a colorful or vibrant manner.
Choice: The correct answer is "colorful" because it describes Linda's clothes. Here's why:
- Linda likes wearing clothes that have many colors or are vibrant in appearance. This implies that her clothes are visually appealing and eye-catching.
- The word "colorful" is an adjective that directly describes the noun "clothes," indicating their characteristic of having multiple colors or being bright and vivid.
- On the other hand, if we were to use "colorfully" in this context, it would imply that Linda wears her clothes in a colorful manner rather than the clothes themselves being colorful.
Conclusion:
In conclusion, Linda prefers wearing colorful clothes. This means that her clothing choices are visually appealing, full of different hues, and stand out in a crowd.
Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 8

She fell and hurt herself quite ----.(bad / badly)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 8

Explanation:
When determining whether to use "bad" or "badly" in this sentence, we need to consider the context in which it is used.
Usage of "bad" vs "badly":
- "Bad" is an adjective that describes a noun or pronoun. It is used to describe the quality or state of something or someone.
- "Badly" is an adverb that describes a verb. It is used to describe how an action is performed.
In the given sentence, we are describing how the person hurt herself, which is an action. Therefore, we need to use the adverb "badly" to indicate the manner in which the action was performed.
Additional Information:
- Adjectives modify nouns or pronouns.
- Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.
- "Badly" is the correct choice in this sentence because it describes the action of falling and hurting oneself.
Example:
- She fell and hurt herself quite badly. (Describes the action of falling and hurting oneself)
Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 9

Don't go up that ladder. It doesn't look ----. (safe / safely)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 9
Explanation:
The correct word to fill in the blank is "safe." Here's why:
- The sentence is referring to the condition of the ladder, indicating that it does not look safe.
- "Safe" is an adjective that describes something as free from harm or danger.
- In this context, the word "safely" would be an adverb, which is used to describe how an action is performed. However, the sentence is focusing on the ladder itself, not how someone would climb it.
- Therefore, the adjective "safe" is the appropriate choice to describe the ladder's condition.
In summary, the sentence should read, "Don't go up that ladder. It doesn't look safe."
Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 10

He looked at me ---- when I interrupted him. (angry / angrily)


Detailed Solution for Adjective/Adverb - Test (Fill In The Blanks) - Question 10
Answer:

In this sentence, the word "looked" is a verb that describes how the subject (he) viewed or observed something. The word "at" is a preposition that indicates the direction of the subject's gaze. The phrase "at me" is the object of the preposition and specifies whom the subject was looking at.


The missing word in the sentence is an adverb that describes how the subject looked at the speaker. Since the subject was interrupted, it can be inferred that he was not pleased or happy about the interruption. Therefore, the correct adverb to use in this sentence is "angrily."


Here's a breakdown of the sentence:



  • Subject: He

  • Verb: looked

  • Preposition: at

  • Object of the Preposition: me

  • Adverb: angrily (describing how he looked)


By using the adverb "angrily," the sentence conveys the emotion and attitude of the subject when he was interrupted.

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