GK Mock Test - 2


40 Questions MCQ Test Mock Test Series for CLAT 2020 | GK Mock Test - 2


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This mock test of GK Mock Test - 2 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT GK Mock Test - 2 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this GK Mock Test - 2 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this GK Mock Test - 2 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other GK Mock Test - 2 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

In late September .......(1)........, B.R. Ambedkar negotiated the Poona Pact with ........(2).....The background to the Poona Pact was the Communal Award of August 1932 which was declare by British Prime Minister .........(3)........, which, among other things, reserved 71 seats in the central legislature for the depressed classes. Gandhi, who was opposed to the Communal Award, saw it as a British attempt to split Hindus, and began a fast unto death to have it repealed. In a settlement negotiated with Gandhi, Ambedkar agreed for depressed class candidates to be elected by a joint electorate. However, on his insistence, slightly over twice as many seats (147) were reserved for the depressed classes in the legislature than what had been allotted under the Communal Award.
The concessions agreed to in the Poona Pact were precursors to the world‘s largest affirmative programme launched much later in independent India. A slew of measures were initiated later to uplift Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.

Q. Poona Pact which resulted in reservation of seats for depressed classes with joint legislature. Which of the following is correct year that will replace .....(1).... in pargraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

In late September .......(1)........, B.R. Ambedkar negotiated the Poona Pact with ........(2).....The background to the Poona Pact was the Communal Award of August 1932 which was declare by British Prime Minister .........(3)........, which, among other things, reserved 71 seats in the central legislature for the depressed classes. Gandhi, who was opposed to the Communal Award, saw it as a British attempt to split Hindus, and began a fast unto death to have it repealed. In a settlement negotiated with Gandhi, Ambedkar agreed for depressed class candidates to be elected by a joint electorate. However, on his insistence, slightly over twice as many seats (147) were reserved for the depressed classes in the legislature than what had been allotted under the Communal Award.
The concessions agreed to in the Poona Pact were precursors to the world‘s largest affirmative programme launched much later in independent India. A slew of measures were initiated later to uplift Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.

Q. Poona Pact was signed between BR Ambedkar and which of the following personality that has been replaced by ....(2)..... in the paragraph above?

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

In late September .......(1)........, B.R. Ambedkar negotiated the Poona Pact with ........(2).....The background to the Poona Pact was the Communal Award of August 1932 which was declare by British Prime Minister .........(3)........, which, among other things, reserved 71 seats in the central legislature for the depressed classes. Gandhi, who was opposed to the Communal Award, saw it as a British attempt to split Hindus, and began a fast unto death to have it repealed. In a settlement negotiated with Gandhi, Ambedkar agreed for depressed class candidates to be elected by a joint electorate. However, on his insistence, slightly over twice as many seats (147) were reserved for the depressed classes in the legislature than what had been allotted under the Communal Award.
The concessions agreed to in the Poona Pact were precursors to the world‘s largest affirmative programme launched much later in independent India. A slew of measures were initiated later to uplift Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.

Q. Communal Award of 1932 was declared by which British PM which gave separate electorate to depressed classes and has been replaced by .....(3)...... in the paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

In late September .......(1)........, B.R. Ambedkar negotiated the Poona Pact with ........(2).....The background to the Poona Pact was the Communal Award of August 1932 which was declare by British Prime Minister .........(3)........, which, among other things, reserved 71 seats in the central legislature for the depressed classes. Gandhi, who was opposed to the Communal Award, saw it as a British attempt to split Hindus, and began a fast unto death to have it repealed. In a settlement negotiated with Gandhi, Ambedkar agreed for depressed class candidates to be elected by a joint electorate. However, on his insistence, slightly over twice as many seats (147) were reserved for the depressed classes in the legislature than what had been allotted under the Communal Award.
The concessions agreed to in the Poona Pact were precursors to the world‘s largest affirmative programme launched much later in independent India. A slew of measures were initiated later to uplift Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.

Q. Communal Award of 1932 along with Depressed Classes also gave separate electorates to which of the following communities?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

In late September .......(1)........, B.R. Ambedkar negotiated the Poona Pact with ........(2).....The background to the Poona Pact was the Communal Award of August 1932 which was declare by British Prime Minister .........(3)........, which, among other things, reserved 71 seats in the central legislature for the depressed classes. Gandhi, who was opposed to the Communal Award, saw it as a British attempt to split Hindus, and began a fast unto death to have it repealed. In a settlement negotiated with Gandhi, Ambedkar agreed for depressed class candidates to be elected by a joint electorate. However, on his insistence, slightly over twice as many seats (147) were reserved for the depressed classes in the legislature than what had been allotted under the Communal Award.
The concessions agreed to in the Poona Pact were precursors to the world‘s largest affirmative programme launched much later in independent India. A slew of measures were initiated later to uplift Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.

Q. What did Mahatma Gandhi do to protest against separate electorates to Depressed Classes and get it done away with?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

The Centre‘s decision to postpone the first phase of the 2021 Census, earlier planned to start on April 1, was expected in view of the C OVID-19 outbreak that has brought life to a standstill in India and across the world. The Census is a massive exercise, which involves mass contact and diversion of resources.
According to the original schedule, the first phase, from April to September, would have included house listing and updating of the National Population Register, and the second phase, in February 2021, would have been population enumeration. The Centre has done well by putting off the first phase until further orders. The unexpected suspension of the Census operation also opens a fresh window, and an entirely new context, for reconciliation between the Centre and States on the exercise itself. Several State governments had made their opposition clear to the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, and the additional questions in the NPR pro forma that many fear is a prelude to something more cynical and divisive that is based on some quaint ideas of nationhood.

Q. In the Census 2021, the option of ”Other” under the gender category will be changed to:

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

The Centre‘s decision to postpone the first phase of the 2021 Census, earlier planned to start on April 1, was expected in view of the C OVID-19 outbreak that has brought life to a standstill in India and across the world. The Census is a massive exercise, which involves mass contact and diversion of resources.
According to the original schedule, the first phase, from April to September, would have included house listing and updating of the National Population Register, and the second phase, in February 2021, would have been population enumeration. The Centre has done well by putting off the first phase until further orders. The unexpected suspension of the Census operation also opens a fresh window, and an entirely new context, for reconciliation between the Centre and States on the exercise itself. Several State governments had made their opposition clear to the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, and the additional questions in the NPR pro forma that many fear is a prelude to something more cynical and divisive that is based on some quaint ideas of nationhood.

Q. The Census 2021 will be conducted in ______ languages out of 22 scheduled languages (under 8th schedule) are English.

Solution:

Union Minister of State for Home Affairs Nityanand Rai said that Census 2021 will be conducted in 16 languages.

QUESTION: 8

The Centre‘s decision to postpone the first phase of the 2021 Census, earlier planned to start on April 1, was expected in view of the C OVID-19 outbreak that has brought life to a standstill in India and across the world. The Census is a massive exercise, which involves mass contact and diversion of resources.
According to the original schedule, the first phase, from April to September, would have included house listing and updating of the National Population Register, and the second phase, in February 2021, would have been population enumeration. The Centre has done well by putting off the first phase until further orders. The unexpected suspension of the Census operation also opens a fresh window, and an entirely new context, for reconciliation between the Centre and States on the exercise itself. Several State governments had made their opposition clear to the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, and the additional questions in the NPR pro forma that many fear is a prelude to something more cynical and divisive that is based on some quaint ideas of nationhood.

Q. The NPR exercise was to be carried out between April and September 2020 in all states and UTs, except _____?

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

The Centre‘s decision to postpone the first phase of the 2021 Census, earlier planned to start on April 1, was expected in view of the C OVID-19 outbreak that has brought life to a standstill in India and across the world. The Census is a massive exercise, which involves mass contact and diversion of resources.
According to the original schedule, the first phase, from April to September, would have included house listing and updating of the National Population Register, and the second phase, in February 2021, would have been population enumeration. The Centre has done well by putting off the first phase until further orders. The unexpected suspension of the Census operation also opens a fresh window, and an entirely new context, for reconciliation between the Centre and States on the exercise itself. Several State governments had made their opposition clear to the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, and the additional questions in the NPR pro forma that many fear is a prelude to something more cynical and divisive that is based on some quaint ideas of nationhood.

Q. The Census 2021 will be conducted through _____?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

The Centre‘s decision to postpone the first phase of the 2021 Census, earlier planned to start on April 1, was expected in view of the C OVID-19 outbreak that has brought life to a standstill in India and across the world. The Census is a massive exercise, which involves mass contact and diversion of resources.
According to the original schedule, the first phase, from April to September, would have included house listing and updating of the National Population Register, and the second phase, in February 2021, would have been population enumeration. The Centre has done well by putting off the first phase until further orders. The unexpected suspension of the Census operation also opens a fresh window, and an entirely new context, for reconciliation between the Centre and States on the exercise itself. Several State governments had made their opposition clear to the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, and the additional questions in the NPR pro forma that many fear is a prelude to something more cynical and divisive that is based on some quaint ideas of nationhood.

Q. A usual resident is defined, for the purposes of the NPR, as a person who:

Solution:

A is the correct option. A usual resident is defined, for the purposes of the NPR, as a person who has resided in a local area for the past six months or more, or a person who intends to reside in that area for the next six months.
The law compulsorily seeks to register every citizen of India and issue a national identity card.

QUESTION: 11

The legality of the removal of the Andhra Pradesh State Election Commissioner (SEC) is seriously in doubt. That it was the culmination of an open conflict between the Election Commissioner, N.
Ramesh Kumar, and Chief Minister ......(1)......makes it a glaring instance of misuse of power. The State government got the Governor to issue an ordinance to cut the SEC‘s tenure from five to three years, and amend the criterion for holding that office from being an officer of the rank of Principal Secretary and above to one who had served as a High Court judge. This automatically rendered Mr. Kumar‘s continuance invalid. Last month, just days before the local body polls were to be held, the SEC postponed the elections, citing the COVID-19 outbreak. The State government approached the Supreme Court, but the court declined to interfere. Having exhausted its legal remedy, the government should have waited for the ongoing fight against the disease to be over. The State government seems to have gone by legal opinion that cited Aparmita Prasad Singh vs. State of U.P. (2007) in which the Allahabad High Court ruled that cessation of tenure does not amount to removal, and upheld the State Election Commissioner‘s term being cut short. The Supreme Court, while dismissing an appeal against the order, kept open the legal questions arising from the case. Further, the Constitution, under Article .........(2)......., prohibits the variation of any condition of service to the detriment of any incumbent. Even if the State government argues that a change of tenure does not amount to varying the conditions of service, the new norm can only apply to the successor SEC, and not the one holding the office now.

Q. Under which of the following articles can Governor promulgate Ordinance?

Solution:

Article 213 in The Constitution Of India 1949. 213. Power of Governor to promulgate Ordinances during recess of Legislature.

QUESTION: 12

The legality of the removal of the Andhra Pradesh State Election Commissioner (SEC) is seriously in doubt. That it was the culmination of an open conflict between the Election Commissioner, N.
Ramesh Kumar, and Chief Minister ......(1)......makes it a glaring instance of misuse of power. The State government got the Governor to issue an ordinance to cut the SEC‘s tenure from five to three years, and amend the criterion for holding that office from being an officer of the rank of Principal Secretary and above to one who had served as a High Court judge. This automatically rendered Mr. Kumar‘s continuance invalid. Last month, just days before the local body polls were to be held, the SEC postponed the elections, citing the COVID-19 outbreak. The State government approached the Supreme Court, but the court declined to interfere. Having exhausted its legal remedy, the government should have waited for the ongoing fight against the disease to be over. The State government seems to have gone by legal opinion that cited Aparmita Prasad Singh vs. State of U.P. (2007) in which the Allahabad High Court ruled that cessation of tenure does not amount to removal, and upheld the State Election Commissioner‘s term being cut short. The Supreme Court, while dismissing an appeal against the order, kept open the legal questions arising from the case. Further, the Constitution, under Article .........(2)......., prohibits the variation of any condition of service to the detriment of any incumbent. Even if the State government argues that a change of tenure does not amount to varying the conditions of service, the new norm can only apply to the successor SEC, and not the one holding the office now.

Q. Which of the following options will be correct choice to replace .....(1).....?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

The legality of the removal of the Andhra Pradesh State Election Commissioner (SEC) is seriously in doubt. That it was the culmination of an open conflict between the Election Commissioner, N.
Ramesh Kumar, and Chief Minister ......(1)......makes it a glaring instance of misuse of power. The State government got the Governor to issue an ordinance to cut the SEC‘s tenure from five to three years, and amend the criterion for holding that office from being an officer of the rank of Principal Secretary and above to one who had served as a High Court judge. This automatically rendered Mr. Kumar‘s continuance invalid. Last month, just days before the local body polls were to be held, the SEC postponed the elections, citing the COVID-19 outbreak. The State government approached the Supreme Court, but the court declined to interfere. Having exhausted its legal remedy, the government should have waited for the ongoing fight against the disease to be over. The State government seems to have gone by legal opinion that cited Aparmita Prasad Singh vs. State of U.P. (2007) in which the Allahabad High Court ruled that cessation of tenure does not amount to removal, and upheld the State Election Commissioner‘s term being cut short. The Supreme Court, while dismissing an appeal against the order, kept open the legal questions arising from the case. Further, the Constitution, under Article .........(2)......., prohibits the variation of any condition of service to the detriment of any incumbent. Even if the State government argues that a change of tenure does not amount to varying the conditions of service, the new norm can only apply to the successor SEC, and not the one holding the office now.

Q. Which Article will replace .....(2)..... in the above paragraph and relates to tenure of State Election Commissioner?

Solution:

A is the correct option.Article 243 (K) provides that  Subject to the provisions of any law made by the Legislature of a State the conditions of service and tenure of office of the State Election Commissioner shall be such as the Governor may by rule determine.

QUESTION: 14

The legality of the removal of the Andhra Pradesh State Election Commissioner (SEC) is seriously in doubt. That it was the culmination of an open conflict between the Election Commissioner, N.
Ramesh Kumar, and Chief Minister ......(1)......makes it a glaring instance of misuse of power. The State government got the Governor to issue an ordinance to cut the SEC‘s tenure from five to three years, and amend the criterion for holding that office from being an officer of the rank of Principal Secretary and above to one who had served as a High Court judge. This automatically rendered Mr. Kumar‘s continuance invalid. Last month, just days before the local body polls were to be held, the SEC postponed the elections, citing the COVID-19 outbreak. The State government approached the Supreme Court, but the court declined to interfere. Having exhausted its legal remedy, the government should have waited for the ongoing fight against the disease to be over. The State government seems to have gone by legal opinion that cited Aparmita Prasad Singh vs. State of U.P. (2007) in which the Allahabad High Court ruled that cessation of tenure does not amount to removal, and upheld the State Election Commissioner‘s term being cut short. The Supreme Court, while dismissing an appeal against the order, kept open the legal questions arising from the case. Further, the Constitution, under Article .........(2)......., prohibits the variation of any condition of service to the detriment of any incumbent. Even if the State government argues that a change of tenure does not amount to varying the conditions of service, the new norm can only apply to the successor SEC, and not the one holding the office now.

Q. What is the tenure of Election Commissioner of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

The legality of the removal of the Andhra Pradesh State Election Commissioner (SEC) is seriously in doubt. That it was the culmination of an open conflict between the Election Commissioner, N.
Ramesh Kumar, and Chief Minister ......(1)......makes it a glaring instance of misuse of power. The State government got the Governor to issue an ordinance to cut the SEC‘s tenure from five to three years, and amend the criterion for holding that office from being an officer of the rank of Principal Secretary and above to one who had served as a High Court judge. This automatically rendered Mr. Kumar‘s continuance invalid. Last month, just days before the local body polls were to be held, the SEC postponed the elections, citing the COVID-19 outbreak. The State government approached the Supreme Court, but the court declined to interfere. Having exhausted its legal remedy, the government should have waited for the ongoing fight against the disease to be over. The State government seems to have gone by legal opinion that cited Aparmita Prasad Singh vs. State of U.P. (2007) in which the Allahabad High Court ruled that cessation of tenure does not amount to removal, and upheld the State Election Commissioner‘s term being cut short. The Supreme Court, while dismissing an appeal against the order, kept open the legal questions arising from the case. Further, the Constitution, under Article .........(2)......., prohibits the variation of any condition of service to the detriment of any incumbent. Even if the State government argues that a change of tenure does not amount to varying the conditions of service, the new norm can only apply to the successor SEC, and not the one holding the office now.

Q. Who is present Chief Election Commissioner of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

At a time when the World Health Organisation has been seeking at least $675 million additional funding for critical response efforts in countries most in need during the pandemic, U.S.
President Trump has done the unthinkable — halting funding to WHO while a review is conducted to assess its ”role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of corona virus” and for ”failing to adequately obtain, vet, and share information in a timely and transparent fashion”. The decision comes a week after he first threatened to put funding on hold for the global health body. At over $500 million .........(1)........ is WHO‘s biggest contributor. But halting funding at a crucial time will not only impact the functioning of the global body but also hurt humanity. Many low and middle-income countries that look up to WHO for guidance and advice, and even for essentials such as testing kits and masks, will be badly hit for no fault of theirs. With a little over two million cases and over 1,27,000 deaths globally, the pandemic has been unprecedented in scale. When solidarity and unmitigated support from every member-state is necessary to win the war against the virus, withholding funding will not be in the best interest of any country, the U.S. included. Failures due to oversight or other reasons, by WHO or member-states can always be looked into but not in the midst of a pandemic.

Q. Where are the headquarters of WHO present?

Solution:

D is the correct option.WHO headquarters is located in Geneva, Switzerland. There are 6 WHO regions, each with a regional office. In addition, WHO has 149 field offices in countries, territories or areas.

QUESTION: 17

At a time when the World Health Organisation has been seeking at least $675 million additional funding for critical response efforts in countries most in need during the pandemic, U.S.
President Trump has done the unthinkable — halting funding to WHO while a review is conducted to assess its ”role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of corona virus” and for ”failing to adequately obtain, vet, and share information in a timely and transparent fashion”. The decision comes a week after he first threatened to put funding on hold for the global health body. At over $500 million .........(1)........ is WHO‘s biggest contributor. But halting funding at a crucial time will not only impact the functioning of the global body but also hurt humanity. Many low and middle-income countries that look up to WHO for guidance and advice, and even for essentials such as testing kits and masks, will be badly hit for no fault of theirs. With a little over two million cases and over 1,27,000 deaths globally, the pandemic has been unprecedented in scale. When solidarity and unmitigated support from every member-state is necessary to win the war against the virus, withholding funding will not be in the best interest of any country, the U.S. included. Failures due to oversight or other reasons, by WHO or member-states can always be looked into but not in the midst of a pandemic.

Q. Which of the following report is released by WHO?

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

At a time when the World Health Organisation has been seeking at least $675 million additional funding for critical response efforts in countries most in need during the pandemic, U.S.
President Trump has done the unthinkable — halting funding to WHO while a review is conducted to assess its ”role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of corona virus” and for ”failing to adequately obtain, vet, and share information in a timely and transparent fashion”. The decision comes a week after he first threatened to put funding on hold for the global health body. At over $500 million .........(1)........ is WHO‘s biggest contributor. But halting funding at a crucial time will not only impact the functioning of the global body but also hurt humanity. Many low and middle-income countries that look up to WHO for guidance and advice, and even for essentials such as testing kits and masks, will be badly hit for no fault of theirs. With a little over two million cases and over 1,27,000 deaths globally, the pandemic has been unprecedented in scale. When solidarity and unmitigated support from every member-state is necessary to win the war against the virus, withholding funding will not be in the best interest of any country, the U.S. included. Failures due to oversight or other reasons, by WHO or member-states can always be looked into but not in the midst of a pandemic.

Q. Which country is the biggest contributor of funds to WHO and will replace .....(1).... in the paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

At a time when the World Health Organisation has been seeking at least $675 million additional funding for critical response efforts in countries most in need during the pandemic, U.S.
President Trump has done the unthinkable — halting funding to WHO while a review is conducted to assess its ”role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of corona virus” and for ”failing to adequately obtain, vet, and share information in a timely and transparent fashion”. The decision comes a week after he first threatened to put funding on hold for the global health body. At over $500 million .........(1)........ is WHO‘s biggest contributor. But halting funding at a crucial time will not only impact the functioning of the global body but also hurt humanity. Many low and middle-income countries that look up to WHO for guidance and advice, and even for essentials such as testing kits and masks, will be badly hit for no fault of theirs. With a little over two million cases and over 1,27,000 deaths globally, the pandemic has been unprecedented in scale. When solidarity and unmitigated support from every member-state is necessary to win the war against the virus, withholding funding will not be in the best interest of any country, the U.S. included. Failures due to oversight or other reasons, by WHO or member-states can always be looked into but not in the midst of a pandemic.

Q. Coronaviruses are the family of viruses which of the following viruses are part of this family?

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

At a time when the World Health Organisation has been seeking at least $675 million additional funding for critical response efforts in countries most in need during the pandemic, U.S.
President Trump has done the unthinkable — halting funding to WHO while a review is conducted to assess its ”role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of corona virus” and for ”failing to adequately obtain, vet, and share information in a timely and transparent fashion”. The decision comes a week after he first threatened to put funding on hold for the global health body. At over $500 million .........(1)........ is WHO‘s biggest contributor. But halting funding at a crucial time will not only impact the functioning of the global body but also hurt humanity. Many low and middle-income countries that look up to WHO for guidance and advice, and even for essentials such as testing kits and masks, will be badly hit for no fault of theirs. With a little over two million cases and over 1,27,000 deaths globally, the pandemic has been unprecedented in scale. When solidarity and unmitigated support from every member-state is necessary to win the war against the virus, withholding funding will not be in the best interest of any country, the U.S. included. Failures due to oversight or other reasons, by WHO or member-states can always be looked into but not in the midst of a pandemic.

Q. Who is present Director General of WHO?

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

The Supreme Court‘s order stripping a Manipur Minister of his office and barring him from entering the State Assembly may appear drastic and unusual, but is quite a reasonable and necessary course of action. T. Shyam kumar was elected as a Congress candidate, but defected to the BJP to join the Biren Singh Cabinet. In a landmark judgment in January, which put an end to the deliberate inaction of Presiding Officers on petitions for disqualifying defectors, a Bench headed by Justice Rohinton F. Nariman had ruled that courts have the power to fix a time-frame for Speakers to dispose of petitions under the anti-defection law. The court invoked its extraordinary powers under Article 142 of the Constitution to take the sort of measures that would kick in if the defector concerned had been disqualified.

Q. Anti defection law is present under which schedule of Indian Constitution?

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

The Supreme Court‘s order stripping a Manipur Minister of his office and barring him from entering the State Assembly may appear drastic and unusual, but is quite a reasonable and necessary course of action. T. Shyam kumar was elected as a Congress candidate, but defected to the BJP to join the Biren Singh Cabinet. In a landmark judgment in January, which put an end to the deliberate inaction of Presiding Officers on petitions for disqualifying defectors, a Bench headed by Justice Rohinton F. Nariman had ruled that courts have the power to fix a time-frame for Speakers to dispose of petitions under the anti-defection law. The court invoked its extraordinary powers under Article 142 of the Constitution to take the sort of measures that would kick in if the defector concerned had been disqualified.

Q. Under Anti defection Law a nominated member of Parliament will be disqualified to hold his seat if he joins any political party after how many months of his nomination?

Solution:

A is the correct option. Disqualification on grounds of defection states that a nominated member shall be disqualified if he/she joins any political party after six months from the date he/she takes his seat.

QUESTION: 23

The Supreme Court‘s order stripping a Manipur Minister of his office and barring him from entering the State Assembly may appear drastic and unusual, but is quite a reasonable and necessary course of action. T. Shyam kumar was elected as a Congress candidate, but defected to the BJP to join the Biren Singh Cabinet. In a landmark judgment in January, which put an end to the deliberate inaction of Presiding Officers on petitions for disqualifying defectors, a Bench headed by Justice Rohinton F. Nariman had ruled that courts have the power to fix a time-frame for Speakers to dispose of petitions under the anti-defection law. The court invoked its extraordinary powers under Article 142 of the Constitution to take the sort of measures that would kick in if the defector concerned had been disqualified.

Q. Under 91st amendment members will be saved from disqualification if there is merger of parties. According to this amendment merger means:-

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

The Supreme Court‘s order stripping a Manipur Minister of his office and barring him from entering the State Assembly may appear drastic and unusual, but is quite a reasonable and necessary course of action. T. Shyam kumar was elected as a Congress candidate, but defected to the BJP to join the Biren Singh Cabinet. In a landmark judgment in January, which put an end to the deliberate inaction of Presiding Officers on petitions for disqualifying defectors, a Bench headed by Justice Rohinton F. Nariman had ruled that courts have the power to fix a time-frame for Speakers to dispose of petitions under the anti-defection law. The court invoked its extraordinary powers under Article 142 of the Constitution to take the sort of measures that would kick in if the defector concerned had been disqualified.

Q. Who was the PM of India when Anti Defection Law was passed?

Solution:

D is the correct option.Rajiv Gandhi's first action as Prime Minister was passing the anti-defection law in January 1985. According to this law, an elected Member of Parliament or legislative assembly could not join an opposition party until the next election.

QUESTION: 25

The Supreme Court‘s order stripping a Manipur Minister of his office and barring him from entering the State Assembly may appear drastic and unusual, but is quite a reasonable and necessary course of action. T. Shyam kumar was elected as a Congress candidate, but defected to the BJP to join the Biren Singh Cabinet. In a landmark judgment in January, which put an end to the deliberate inaction of Presiding Officers on petitions for disqualifying defectors, a Bench headed by Justice Rohinton F. Nariman had ruled that courts have the power to fix a time-frame for Speakers to dispose of petitions under the anti-defection law. The court invoked its extraordinary powers under Article 142 of the Constitution to take the sort of measures that would kick in if the defector concerned had been disqualified.

Q. Which of the following bodies can give advise in matters related to Anti Defection?

Solution:

A is the correct option.Various expert committees have recommended that rather than the Presiding Officer, the decision to disqualify a member should be made by the President (in case of MPs) or the Governor (in case of MLAs) on the advice of the Election Commission.

QUESTION: 26

Union Transport Minister ____(1)____ has expressed optimism that the significant a mendments made to the Motor Vehicles Act have begun reducing the terrible death toll due to accidents on India‘s roads. As the prime mover of these changes, he finds the reported reduction in crashes, notably in Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Manipur, Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Maharashtra, proof of the law‘s beneficial impact.
Any reduction in road safety incidents in a rapidly motorizing country is encouraging, but the cold reality is that data on those who lose their lives or are incapacitated do not reflect a marked decline. In fact, they underscore the culture of indifference among States. Unlike acute crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which has sent governments scrambling to save lives and stop economic derailment, a chronic malaise such as deadly road accidents begets only token measures. What else could explain policymakers tolerating the loss of about 1.5 lakh lives each year since 2015, with the graph rising from 80,888 fatalities in 2001? Small reductions in this infamous tally, which ___(2)____  took note of at a transporters ‘summit, have little meaning, since they do not represent a trend of targeted reductions. The new Motor Vehicles law does have more muscle in being able to levy stringent penalties for road rule violations — some States are using it — but that is not the same as saying that India has moved to a scientific road system marked by good engineering, sound enforcement, appropriate technology use and respect for all road users. In fact, a World Bank ’Delivering Road Safety in India ‘report is apprehensive that rapid motorization and more high-speed road infrastructure have raised the risks for road users.

Q. According to The Motor Vehicles (Amendment) Act, 2019 the penalties for drunken driving, driving without license, dangerous driving, over-speeding, etc. will be increased by _________ every year on __________?

Solution:

B is the correct option. According to The Motor Vehicles (Amendment) Act, 2019 the penalties for drunken driving, driving without license, dangerous driving, over-speeding, etc. will be increased by 10% every year on April 1. 

QUESTION: 27

Union Transport Minister ____(1)____ has expressed optimism that the significant a mendments made to the Motor Vehicles Act have begun reducing the terrible death toll due to accidents on India‘s roads. As the prime mover of these changes, he finds the reported reduction in crashes, notably in Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Manipur, Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Maharashtra, proof of the law‘s beneficial impact.
Any reduction in road safety incidents in a rapidly motorizing country is encouraging, but the cold reality is that data on those who lose their lives or are incapacitated do not reflect a marked decline. In fact, they underscore the culture of indifference among States. Unlike acute crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which has sent governments scrambling to save lives and stop economic derailment, a chronic malaise such as deadly road accidents begets only token measures. What else could explain policymakers tolerating the loss of about 1.5 lakh lives each year since 2015, with the graph rising from 80,888 fatalities in 2001? Small reductions in this infamous tally, which ___(2)____  took note of at a transporters ‘summit, have little meaning, since they do not represent a trend of targeted reductions. The new Motor Vehicles law does have more muscle in being able to levy stringent penalties for road rule violations — some States are using it — but that is not the same as saying that India has moved to a scientific road system marked by good engineering, sound enforcement, appropriate technology use and respect for all road users. In fact, a World Bank ’Delivering Road Safety in India ‘report is apprehensive that rapid motorization and more high-speed road infrastructure have raised the risks for road users.

Q. The new Act has extended the period for renewal of driving licenses from one month to _________ after the date of expiry.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Union Transport Minister ____(1)____ has expressed optimism that the significant a mendments made to the Motor Vehicles Act have begun reducing the terrible death toll due to accidents on India‘s roads. As the prime mover of these changes, he finds the reported reduction in crashes, notably in Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Manipur, Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Maharashtra, proof of the law‘s beneficial impact.
Any reduction in road safety incidents in a rapidly motorizing country is encouraging, but the cold reality is that data on those who lose their lives or are incapacitated do not reflect a marked decline. In fact, they underscore the culture of indifference among States. Unlike acute crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which has sent governments scrambling to save lives and stop economic derailment, a chronic malaise such as deadly road accidents begets only token measures. What else could explain policymakers tolerating the loss of about 1.5 lakh lives each year since 2015, with the graph rising from 80,888 fatalities in 2001? Small reductions in this infamous tally, which ___(2)____  took note of at a transporters ‘summit, have little meaning, since they do not represent a trend of targeted reductions. The new Motor Vehicles law does have more muscle in being able to levy stringent penalties for road rule violations — some States are using it — but that is not the same as saying that India has moved to a scientific road system marked by good engineering, sound enforcement, appropriate technology use and respect for all road users. In fact, a World Bank ’Delivering Road Safety in India ‘report is apprehensive that rapid motorization and more high-speed road infrastructure have raised the risks for road users.

Q. According to The Motor Vehicles (Amendment) Act, 2019, if a vehicle manufacturer fails to comply with motor vehicle standards, the penalty will be a fine of ________?

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

Union Transport Minister ____(1)____ has expressed optimism that the significant a mendments made to the Motor Vehicles Act have begun reducing the terrible death toll due to accidents on India‘s roads. As the prime mover of these changes, he finds the reported reduction in crashes, notably in Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Manipur, Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Maharashtra, proof of the law‘s beneficial impact.
Any reduction in road safety incidents in a rapidly motorizing country is encouraging, but the cold reality is that data on those who lose their lives or are incapacitated do not reflect a marked decline. In fact, they underscore the culture of indifference among States. Unlike acute crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which has sent governments scrambling to save lives and stop economic derailment, a chronic malaise such as deadly road accidents begets only token measures. What else could explain policymakers tolerating the loss of about 1.5 lakh lives each year since 2015, with the graph rising from 80,888 fatalities in 2001? Small reductions in this infamous tally, which ___(2)____  took note of at a transporters ‘summit, have little meaning, since they do not represent a trend of targeted reductions. The new Motor Vehicles law does have more muscle in being able to levy stringent penalties for road rule violations — some States are using it — but that is not the same as saying that India has moved to a scientific road system marked by good engineering, sound enforcement, appropriate technology use and respect for all road users. In fact, a World Bank ’Delivering Road Safety in India ‘report is apprehensive that rapid motorization and more high-speed road infrastructure have raised the risks for road users.

Q. Name the Union Minister in blanks (1) and (2) in the paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

Union Transport Minister ____(1)____ has expressed optimism that the significant a mendments made to the Motor Vehicles Act have begun reducing the terrible death toll due to accidents on India‘s roads. As the prime mover of these changes, he finds the reported reduction in crashes, notably in Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Manipur, Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Maharashtra, proof of the law‘s beneficial impact.
Any reduction in road safety incidents in a rapidly motorizing country is encouraging, but the cold reality is that data on those who lose their lives or are incapacitated do not reflect a marked decline. In fact, they underscore the culture of indifference among States. Unlike acute crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which has sent governments scrambling to save lives and stop economic derailment, a chronic malaise such as deadly road accidents begets only token measures. What else could explain policymakers tolerating the loss of about 1.5 lakh lives each year since 2015, with the graph rising from 80,888 fatalities in 2001? Small reductions in this infamous tally, which ___(2)____  took note of at a transporters ‘summit, have little meaning, since they do not represent a trend of targeted reductions. The new Motor Vehicles law does have more muscle in being able to levy stringent penalties for road rule violations — some States are using it — but that is not the same as saying that India has moved to a scientific road system marked by good engineering, sound enforcement, appropriate technology use and respect for all road users. In fact, a World Bank ’Delivering Road Safety in India ‘report is apprehensive that rapid motorization and more high-speed road infrastructure have raised the risks for road users.

Q. Which of the following options are correct with regards to provisions in in Motor Vehicle Act ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Even as electoral democracy has taken strong root in India, there is no gain saying the fact that some unhealthy patterns have emerged. While voter electoral participation has remained robust, with the poor voting in large numbers, candidates and winners in Assembly and Lok Sabha polls have largely been from affluent sections — some even with several criminal cases against them. With elections becoming expensive, most parties have sought to field richer candidates irrespective of their merit in representing public interest.
Current campaign finance regulations by the Election Commission of India that seek transparency on expenses by party and candidate, and prescribe limits on a candidate‘s expenditure, have not been sufficient deterrents. Poll results have tended to be a function of either party or leader preference by the voter rather than a statement on the capability of the candidate. In many cases, capable candidates stand no chance against the money power of more affluent candidates. News that the ECI is considering tightening ways to cap the expenditure of parties is therefore quite welcome, as it should provide a more level playing field. But even this can be meaningful only if there is more transparency in campaign finance which suggests that the electoral bonds system, as it is in place now, is untenable. The ECI has also suggested bringing social media and print media under the “silent period”ambit after campaigning ends. Regulating social media will be difficult and it remains to be seen how the ECI will implement this.

Q. Which day is celebrated as ‘National Voters Day‘ in India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

Even as electoral democracy has taken strong root in India, there is no gain saying the fact that some unhealthy patterns have emerged. While voter electoral participation has remained robust, with the poor voting in large numbers, candidates and winners in Assembly and Lok Sabha polls have largely been from affluent sections — some even with several criminal cases against them. With elections becoming expensive, most parties have sought to field richer candidates irrespective of their merit in representing public interest.
Current campaign finance regulations by the Election Commission of India that seek transparency on expenses by party and candidate, and prescribe limits on a candidate‘s expenditure, have not been sufficient deterrents. Poll results have tended to be a function of either party or leader preference by the voter rather than a statement on the capability of the candidate. In many cases, capable candidates stand no chance against the money power of more affluent candidates. News that the ECI is considering tightening ways to cap the expenditure of parties is therefore quite welcome, as it should provide a more level playing field. But even this can be meaningful only if there is more transparency in campaign finance which suggests that the electoral bonds system, as it is in place now, is untenable. The ECI has also suggested bringing social media and print media under the “silent period”ambit after campaigning ends. Regulating social media will be difficult and it remains to be seen how the ECI will implement this.

Q. In Elections in India ,a candidate cannot contest from more than how many constituencies?

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

Even as electoral democracy has taken strong root in India, there is no gain saying the fact that some unhealthy patterns have emerged. While voter electoral participation has remained robust, with the poor voting in large numbers, candidates and winners in Assembly and Lok Sabha polls have largely been from affluent sections — some even with several criminal cases against them. With elections becoming expensive, most parties have sought to field richer candidates irrespective of their merit in representing public interest.
Current campaign finance regulations by the Election Commission of India that seek transparency on expenses by party and candidate, and prescribe limits on a candidate‘s expenditure, have not been sufficient deterrents. Poll results have tended to be a function of either party or leader preference by the voter rather than a statement on the capability of the candidate. In many cases, capable candidates stand no chance against the money power of more affluent candidates. News that the ECI is considering tightening ways to cap the expenditure of parties is therefore quite welcome, as it should provide a more level playing field. But even this can be meaningful only if there is more transparency in campaign finance which suggests that the electoral bonds system, as it is in place now, is untenable. The ECI has also suggested bringing social media and print media under the “silent period”ambit after campaigning ends. Regulating social media will be difficult and it remains to be seen how the ECI will implement this.

Q. Which of the following articles in Indian Constitution is related to the Election Commission of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

Even as electoral democracy has taken strong root in India, there is no gain saying the fact that some unhealthy patterns have emerged. While voter electoral participation has remained robust, with the poor voting in large numbers, candidates and winners in Assembly and Lok Sabha polls have largely been from affluent sections — some even with several criminal cases against them. With elections becoming expensive, most parties have sought to field richer candidates irrespective of their merit in representing public interest.
Current campaign finance regulations by the Election Commission of India that seek transparency on expenses by party and candidate, and prescribe limits on a candidate‘s expenditure, have not been sufficient deterrents. Poll results have tended to be a function of either party or leader preference by the voter rather than a statement on the capability of the candidate. In many cases, capable candidates stand no chance against the money power of more affluent candidates. News that the ECI is considering tightening ways to cap the expenditure of parties is therefore quite welcome, as it should provide a more level playing field. But even this can be meaningful only if there is more transparency in campaign finance which suggests that the electoral bonds system, as it is in place now, is untenable. The ECI has also suggested bringing social media and print media under the “silent period”ambit after campaigning ends. Regulating social media will be difficult and it remains to be seen how the ECI will implement this.

Q. The 61st Amendment Act to the Constitution of India reduced the minimum age for voting. Which of the following options is correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Even as electoral democracy has taken strong root in India, there is no gain saying the fact that some unhealthy patterns have emerged. While voter electoral participation has remained robust, with the poor voting in large numbers, candidates and winners in Assembly and Lok Sabha polls have largely been from affluent sections — some even with several criminal cases against them. With elections becoming expensive, most parties have sought to field richer candidates irrespective of their merit in representing public interest.
Current campaign finance regulations by the Election Commission of India that seek transparency on expenses by party and candidate, and prescribe limits on a candidate‘s expenditure, have not been sufficient deterrents. Poll results have tended to be a function of either party or leader preference by the voter rather than a statement on the capability of the candidate. In many cases, capable candidates stand no chance against the money power of more affluent candidates. News that the ECI is considering tightening ways to cap the expenditure of parties is therefore quite welcome, as it should provide a more level playing field. But even this can be meaningful only if there is more transparency in campaign finance which suggests that the electoral bonds system, as it is in place now, is untenable. The ECI has also suggested bringing social media and print media under the “silent period”ambit after campaigning ends. Regulating social media will be difficult and it remains to be seen how the ECI will implement this.

Q. What is the full form of EVM  which are used in our country in the elections?

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

It should rank as an irony that as a founder-leader of the International Solar Alliance, India has not yet e lectrified a significant number of government schools, while extolling the elegance and virtue of ___(1)___ electricity talked about in International Solar Alliance to the rest of the world. The lack of power in schools is taken note of by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Human Resource Development in its latest report on budgetary grants for school education and literacy for 2020-21. Under the framework of concurrent powers, the Centre operates its own schemes and sponsors several school education programmes covering the States, notably Samagra Shiksha and the Mid Day Meal scheme. Yet, as the panel found from data for 2017-18, only 56.45% of government schools had electricity and 56.98% a playground, while almost 40% lacked a boundary wall. There are some high-performing States, but even in politically wellrepresented Uttar Pradesh, almost 70% of schools lacked electricity. Other depressing insights from the district information database as of end-2019, are: neglect of toilet construction for children with special needs, failure to build toilets for girls in a third of secondary schools and laboratories for higher secondary science students.
The tardy progress on such important facilities, in spite of the projects having been sanctioned, shows the low priority that school education is being accorded.

Q. Where are the headquarters of International Solar Alliance(ISA)?

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

It should rank as an irony that as a founder-leader of the International Solar Alliance, India has not yet e lectrified a significant number of government schools, while extolling the elegance and virtue of ___(1)___ electricity talked about in International Solar Alliance to the rest of the world. The lack of power in schools is taken note of by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Human Resource Development in its latest report on budgetary grants for school education and literacy for 2020-21. Under the framework of concurrent powers, the Centre operates its own schemes and sponsors several school education programmes covering the States, notably Samagra Shiksha and the Mid Day Meal scheme. Yet, as the panel found from data for 2017-18, only 56.45% of government schools had electricity and 56.98% a playground, while almost 40% lacked a boundary wall. There are some high-performing States, but even in politically wellrepresented Uttar Pradesh, almost 70% of schools lacked electricity. Other depressing insights from the district information database as of end-2019, are: neglect of toilet construction for children with special needs, failure to build toilets for girls in a third of secondary schools and laboratories for higher secondary science students.
The tardy progress on such important facilities, in spite of the projects having been sanctioned, shows the low priority that school education is being accorded.

Q. ‘Samagra Shiksha – an integrated scheme for school education’. Is a scheme for school education extending from ………?

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

It should rank as an irony that as a founder-leader of the International Solar Alliance, India has not yet e lectrified a significant number of government schools, while extolling the elegance and virtue of ___(1)___ electricity talked about in International Solar Alliance to the rest of the world. The lack of power in schools is taken note of by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Human Resource Development in its latest report on budgetary grants for school education and literacy for 2020-21. Under the framework of concurrent powers, the Centre operates its own schemes and sponsors several school education programmes covering the States, notably Samagra Shiksha and the Mid Day Meal scheme. Yet, as the panel found from data for 2017-18, only 56.45% of government schools had electricity and 56.98% a playground, while almost 40% lacked a boundary wall. There are some high-performing States, but even in politically wellrepresented Uttar Pradesh, almost 70% of schools lacked electricity. Other depressing insights from the district information database as of end-2019, are: neglect of toilet construction for children with special needs, failure to build toilets for girls in a third of secondary schools and laboratories for higher secondary science students.
The tardy progress on such important facilities, in spite of the projects having been sanctioned, shows the low priority that school education is being accorded.

Q. Right to Education Act (RTE) which is now a fundamental right comes under which of the following articles of the Constitution of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

It should rank as an irony that as a founder-leader of the International Solar Alliance, India has not yet e lectrified a significant number of government schools, while extolling the elegance and virtue of ___(1)___ electricity talked about in International Solar Alliance to the rest of the world. The lack of power in schools is taken note of by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Human Resource Development in its latest report on budgetary grants for school education and literacy for 2020-21. Under the framework of concurrent powers, the Centre operates its own schemes and sponsors several school education programmes covering the States, notably Samagra Shiksha and the Mid Day Meal scheme. Yet, as the panel found from data for 2017-18, only 56.45% of government schools had electricity and 56.98% a playground, while almost 40% lacked a boundary wall. There are some high-performing States, but even in politically wellrepresented Uttar Pradesh, almost 70% of schools lacked electricity. Other depressing insights from the district information database as of end-2019, are: neglect of toilet construction for children with special needs, failure to build toilets for girls in a third of secondary schools and laboratories for higher secondary science students.
The tardy progress on such important facilities, in spite of the projects having been sanctioned, shows the low priority that school education is being accorded.

Q. Which of the following options is best suited for……(1)…… in above mentioned paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

It should rank as an irony that as a founder-leader of the International Solar Alliance, India has not yet e lectrified a significant number of government schools, while extolling the elegance and virtue of ___(1)___ electricity talked about in International Solar Alliance to the rest of the world. The lack of power in schools is taken note of by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Human Resource Development in its latest report on budgetary grants for school education and literacy for 2020-21. Under the framework of concurrent powers, the Centre operates its own schemes and sponsors several school education programmes covering the States, notably Samagra Shiksha and the Mid Day Meal scheme. Yet, as the panel found from data for 2017-18, only 56.45% of government schools had electricity and 56.98% a playground, while almost 40% lacked a boundary wall. There are some high-performing States, but even in politically wellrepresented Uttar Pradesh, almost 70% of schools lacked electricity. Other depressing insights from the district information database as of end-2019, are: neglect of toilet construction for children with special needs, failure to build toilets for girls in a third of secondary schools and laboratories for higher secondary science students.
The tardy progress on such important facilities, in spite of the projects having been sanctioned, shows the low priority that school education is being accorded.

Q. Right to Education was made fundamental right  by passing of which of the following Constitutional Amendment ?

Solution:

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