GK Mock Test - 3


40 Questions MCQ Test Mock Test Series for CLAT 2020 | GK Mock Test - 3


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This mock test of GK Mock Test - 3 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT GK Mock Test - 3 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this GK Mock Test - 3 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this GK Mock Test - 3 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other GK Mock Test - 3 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

The deal signed between the U.S. and the Taliban in Doha on Saturday sets the stage for America to wind down the longest war in its history. It went into Afghanistan i n October 2001, a few weeks after the …(1)…. attacks, with the goals of defeating terrorists and rebuilding and stabilizing the central Asian country.
Almost 19 years later, the U.S. seeks to exit Afghanistan with assurances from the Taliban that the insurgents will not allow Afghan soil to be used by transnational terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda and that they would engage the Kabul government directly to find a lasting solution to the civil war. America‘s desperation is understandable. The __(2)__ war is estimated to have cost $2-trillion, with more than 3,500 American and coalition soldiers killed. Afghanistan lost hundreds of thousands of people, both civilians and soldiers. After all these, the Taliban is at its strongest moment since the U.S. launched the war. The insurgents control or contest the government control in half of the country, mainly in its hinterlands. The war had entered into a stalemate long ago and the U.S. failed to turn it around despite both American Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump having sent additional troops. Faced with no other way, the U.S. just wants to leave Afghanistan. But the problem is with the way it is getting out.
Q. Name the deal signed between U.S and Taliban in Doha.

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

The deal signed between the U.S. and the Taliban in Doha on Saturday sets the stage for America to wind down the longest war in its history. It went into Afghanistan i n October 2001, a few weeks after the …(1)…. attacks, with the goals of defeating terrorists and rebuilding and stabilizing the central Asian country.
Almost 19 years later, the U.S. seeks to exit Afghanistan with assurances from the Taliban that the insurgents will not allow Afghan soil to be used by transnational terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda and that they would engage the Kabul government directly to find a lasting solution to the civil war. America‘s desperation is understandable. The __(2)__ war is estimated to have cost $2-trillion, with more than 3,500 American and coalition soldiers killed. Afghanistan lost hundreds of thousands of people, both civilians and soldiers. After all these, the Taliban is at its strongest moment since the U.S. launched the war. The insurgents control or contest the government control in half of the country, mainly in its hinterlands. The war had entered into a stalemate long ago and the U.S. failed to turn it around despite both American Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump having sent additional troops. Faced with no other way, the U.S. just wants to leave Afghanistan. But the problem is with the way it is getting out.
Q. Fill in the blank (2) in above mentioned paragraph.

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

The deal signed between the U.S. and the Taliban in Doha on Saturday sets the stage for America to wind down the longest war in its history. It went into Afghanistan i n October 2001, a few weeks after the …(1)…. attacks, with the goals of defeating terrorists and rebuilding and stabilizing the central Asian country.
Almost 19 years later, the U.S. seeks to exit Afghanistan with assurances from the Taliban that the insurgents will not allow Afghan soil to be used by transnational terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda and that they would engage the Kabul government directly to find a lasting solution to the civil war. America‘s desperation is understandable. The __(2)__ war is estimated to have cost $2-trillion, with more than 3,500 American and coalition soldiers killed. Afghanistan lost hundreds of thousands of people, both civilians and soldiers. After all these, the Taliban is at its strongest moment since the U.S. launched the war. The insurgents control or contest the government control in half of the country, mainly in its hinterlands. The war had entered into a stalemate long ago and the U.S. failed to turn it around despite both American Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump having sent additional troops. Faced with no other way, the U.S. just wants to leave Afghanistan. But the problem is with the way it is getting out.
Q. Doha is the capital of which country?

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

The deal signed between the U.S. and the Taliban in Doha on Saturday sets the stage for America to wind down the longest war in its history. It went into Afghanistan i n October 2001, a few weeks after the …(1)…. attacks, with the goals of defeating terrorists and rebuilding and stabilizing the central Asian country.
Almost 19 years later, the U.S. seeks to exit Afghanistan with assurances from the Taliban that the insurgents will not allow Afghan soil to be used by transnational terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda and that they would engage the Kabul government directly to find a lasting solution to the civil war. America‘s desperation is understandable. The __(2)__ war is estimated to have cost $2-trillion, with more than 3,500 American and coalition soldiers killed. Afghanistan lost hundreds of thousands of people, both civilians and soldiers. After all these, the Taliban is at its strongest moment since the U.S. launched the war. The insurgents control or contest the government control in half of the country, mainly in its hinterlands. The war had entered into a stalemate long ago and the U.S. failed to turn it around despite both American Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump having sent additional troops. Faced with no other way, the U.S. just wants to leave Afghanistan. But the problem is with the way it is getting out.
Q. What is response of India to this deal signed by U.S & Taliban?

Solution:

B is the correct option. This deal was signed after the attacks of 9/11 and Indian accepted this deal signed by U.S & Taliban.

QUESTION: 5

The deal signed between the U.S. and the Taliban in Doha on Saturday sets the stage for America to wind down the longest war in its history. It went into Afghanistan i n October 2001, a few weeks after the …(1)…. attacks, with the goals of defeating terrorists and rebuilding and stabilizing the central Asian country.
Almost 19 years later, the U.S. seeks to exit Afghanistan with assurances from the Taliban that the insurgents will not allow Afghan soil to be used by transnational terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda and that they would engage the Kabul government directly to find a lasting solution to the civil war. America‘s desperation is understandable. The __(2)__ war is estimated to have cost $2-trillion, with more than 3,500 American and coalition soldiers killed. Afghanistan lost hundreds of thousands of people, both civilians and soldiers. After all these, the Taliban is at its strongest moment since the U.S. launched the war. The insurgents control or contest the government control in half of the country, mainly in its hinterlands. The war had entered into a stalemate long ago and the U.S. failed to turn it around despite both American Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump having sent additional troops. Faced with no other way, the U.S. just wants to leave Afghanistan. But the problem is with the way it is getting out.
Q. Which of the following is best option to fill up …..(1)….?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

The decision by global watchdog, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), at its plenary in __(1)__, to keep Pakistan on its ”greylist” for monitoring its record against terror financing was no surprise. While the Pakistan government has yet to complete the 27-point action plan it was given in June 2018, it has, according to the FATF, made some progress. As a result, the 39-member group that includes India decided to extend Pakistan‘s September 2019 d eadline until June 2020. Actions Pakistan still needs to carry out include tightening security and banking restrictions to block loopholes through which designated groups including the Taliban, al-Qaeda, Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad access funding. It also calls on Pakistan to begin prosecutions against terrorists and sanction entities that are flouting the UNSC‘s rules for designated terror organizations. The FATF Chairman‘s final comment says Pakistan must comply with all 27-action points — it has cleared about 14 — in the next four months or face financial strictures by being placed on the ”blacklist”. Pakistan is one of 18 countries on the greylist; Iran and North Korea are on the blacklist.
The FATF‘s sharp language is significant, yet according to the force‘s consensus rules, Pakistan believes it might be able to slip through the deadlines if it is able to ensure that three countries, China, Turkey and Malaysia, which have pledged support, veto any move to blacklist it.
Q. FATF maintains two different lists of countries, which are 2 categories of those lists?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

The decision by global watchdog, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), at its plenary in __(1)__, to keep Pakistan on its ”greylist” for monitoring its record against terror financing was no surprise. While the Pakistan government has yet to complete the 27-point action plan it was given in June 2018, it has, according to the FATF, made some progress. As a result, the 39-member group that includes India decided to extend Pakistan‘s September 2019 d eadline until June 2020. Actions Pakistan still needs to carry out include tightening security and banking restrictions to block loopholes through which designated groups including the Taliban, al-Qaeda, Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad access funding. It also calls on Pakistan to begin prosecutions against terrorists and sanction entities that are flouting the UNSC‘s rules for designated terror organizations. The FATF Chairman‘s final comment says Pakistan must comply with all 27-action points — it has cleared about 14 — in the next four months or face financial strictures by being placed on the ”blacklist”. Pakistan is one of 18 countries on the greylist; Iran and North Korea are on the blacklist.
The FATF‘s sharp language is significant, yet according to the force‘s consensus rules, Pakistan believes it might be able to slip through the deadlines if it is able to ensure that three countries, China, Turkey and Malaysia, which have pledged support, veto any move to blacklist it.
Q. Who is the current President of FATF?

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

The decision by global watchdog, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), at its plenary in __(1)__, to keep Pakistan on its ”greylist” for monitoring its record against terror financing was no surprise. While the Pakistan government has yet to complete the 27-point action plan it was given in June 2018, it has, according to the FATF, made some progress. As a result, the 39-member group that includes India decided to extend Pakistan‘s September 2019 d eadline until June 2020. Actions Pakistan still needs to carry out include tightening security and banking restrictions to block loopholes through which designated groups including the Taliban, al-Qaeda, Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad access funding. It also calls on Pakistan to begin prosecutions against terrorists and sanction entities that are flouting the UNSC‘s rules for designated terror organizations. The FATF Chairman‘s final comment says Pakistan must comply with all 27-action points — it has cleared about 14 — in the next four months or face financial strictures by being placed on the ”blacklist”. Pakistan is one of 18 countries on the greylist; Iran and North Korea are on the blacklist.
The FATF‘s sharp language is significant, yet according to the force‘s consensus rules, Pakistan believes it might be able to slip through the deadlines if it is able to ensure that three countries, China, Turkey and Malaysia, which have pledged support, veto any move to blacklist it.
Q. Fill in the blank ….(1)….. with city that headquarters FATF?

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

The decision by global watchdog, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), at its plenary in __(1)__, to keep Pakistan on its ”greylist” for monitoring its record against terror financing was no surprise. While the Pakistan government has yet to complete the 27-point action plan it was given in June 2018, it has, according to the FATF, made some progress. As a result, the 39-member group that includes India decided to extend Pakistan‘s September 2019 d eadline until June 2020. Actions Pakistan still needs to carry out include tightening security and banking restrictions to block loopholes through which designated groups including the Taliban, al-Qaeda, Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad access funding. It also calls on Pakistan to begin prosecutions against terrorists and sanction entities that are flouting the UNSC‘s rules for designated terror organizations. The FATF Chairman‘s final comment says Pakistan must comply with all 27-action points — it has cleared about 14 — in the next four months or face financial strictures by being placed on the ”blacklist”. Pakistan is one of 18 countries on the greylist; Iran and North Korea are on the blacklist.
The FATF‘s sharp language is significant, yet according to the force‘s consensus rules, Pakistan believes it might be able to slip through the deadlines if it is able to ensure that three countries, China, Turkey and Malaysia, which have pledged support, veto any move to blacklist it.
Q. Which of the following correctly describes initial mandate of FATF which stands for Financial Action Task Force ?

Solution:

The correct option is A.

The initial mandate of FATF was to counter money laundering. In 2001, its mandate expanded to include terror financing.

QUESTION: 10

The decision by global watchdog, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), at its plenary in __(1)__, to keep Pakistan on its ”greylist” for monitoring its record against terror financing was no surprise. While the Pakistan government has yet to complete the 27-point action plan it was given in June 2018, it has, according to the FATF, made some progress. As a result, the 39-member group that includes India decided to extend Pakistan‘s September 2019 d eadline until June 2020. Actions Pakistan still needs to carry out include tightening security and banking restrictions to block loopholes through which designated groups including the Taliban, al-Qaeda, Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad access funding. It also calls on Pakistan to begin prosecutions against terrorists and sanction entities that are flouting the UNSC‘s rules for designated terror organizations. The FATF Chairman‘s final comment says Pakistan must comply with all 27-action points — it has cleared about 14 — in the next four months or face financial strictures by being placed on the ”blacklist”. Pakistan is one of 18 countries on the greylist; Iran and North Korea are on the blacklist.
The FATF‘s sharp language is significant, yet according to the force‘s consensus rules, Pakistan believes it might be able to slip through the deadlines if it is able to ensure that three countries, China, Turkey and Malaysia, which have pledged support, veto any move to blacklist it.
Q. Which of the following countries is in the black list of FATF?

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Sometimes, the leash follows the dog, but given the importance of control, the sequence can seem insignificant. It only matters that there remains a good hold over the circumstances. No matter then that the Assisted Reproductive Technology Regulation (ART) Bill, which was cleared by UNION Cabinet this week, came after the Surrogacy Bill that it should have preceded. Together, the ART Bill; the Surrogacy Bill; the amendment to the MTP Act ; and the older Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act present a bouquet of legislation that will have a positive impact on the reproductive rights and choices of women in India. The ART Bill to regulate clinics offering fertility treatments has been long in the works, and was first presented publicly way back in 2008.
ART measures help couples unable to conceive naturally to bear children with the aid of state-of-theart technology to achieve pregnancy, leading to safe delivery. India has a rich history of employing ART, though the initial years went officially undocumented at that time. In the late 1970s, only months after the birth of Louise Brown, the first ’test tube baby‘, Kolkata-based doctor Subhas Mukherjee announced the birth of the world‘s second test tube baby.
Subsequently, the industry saw phenomenal growth as infertility rates went up. A market projection (by Fortune Business Insights) said the size of the ART market is expected to reach $45 billion by 2026.
Among Asian countries, India‘s ART market is pegged at third position. A lack of regulation and the consequent laxity in operations drove a lot of traffic from other nations to India. This, in turn, along with the relatively low costs, led to the mushrooming of ART clinics across the country. Undoubtedly, this also led to a plethora of legal, social and ethical issues.
Q. Who is Union Minister of Health and Family Welfare?

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Sometimes, the leash follows the dog, but given the importance of control, the sequence can seem insignificant. It only matters that there remains a good hold over the circumstances. No matter then that the Assisted Reproductive Technology Regulation (ART) Bill, which was cleared by UNION Cabinet this week, came after the Surrogacy Bill that it should have preceded. Together, the ART Bill; the Surrogacy Bill; the amendment to the MTP Act ; and the older Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act present a bouquet of legislation that will have a positive impact on the reproductive rights and choices of women in India. The ART Bill to regulate clinics offering fertility treatments has been long in the works, and was first presented publicly way back in 2008.
ART measures help couples unable to conceive naturally to bear children with the aid of state-of-theart technology to achieve pregnancy, leading to safe delivery. India has a rich history of employing ART, though the initial years went officially undocumented at that time. In the late 1970s, only months after the birth of Louise Brown, the first ’test tube baby‘, Kolkata-based doctor Subhas Mukherjee announced the birth of the world‘s second test tube baby.
Subsequently, the industry saw phenomenal growth as infertility rates went up. A market projection (by Fortune Business Insights) said the size of the ART market is expected to reach $45 billion by 2026.
Among Asian countries, India‘s ART market is pegged at third position. A lack of regulation and the consequent laxity in operations drove a lot of traffic from other nations to India. This, in turn, along with the relatively low costs, led to the mushrooming of ART clinics across the country. Undoubtedly, this also led to a plethora of legal, social and ethical issues.
Q. Which of the following is/are correct with respect to Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2020 ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Sometimes, the leash follows the dog, but given the importance of control, the sequence can seem insignificant. It only matters that there remains a good hold over the circumstances. No matter then that the Assisted Reproductive Technology Regulation (ART) Bill, which was cleared by UNION Cabinet this week, came after the Surrogacy Bill that it should have preceded. Together, the ART Bill; the Surrogacy Bill; the amendment to the MTP Act ; and the older Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act present a bouquet of legislation that will have a positive impact on the reproductive rights and choices of women in India. The ART Bill to regulate clinics offering fertility treatments has been long in the works, and was first presented publicly way back in 2008.
ART measures help couples unable to conceive naturally to bear children with the aid of state-of-theart technology to achieve pregnancy, leading to safe delivery. India has a rich history of employing ART, though the initial years went officially undocumented at that time. In the late 1970s, only months after the birth of Louise Brown, the first ’test tube baby‘, Kolkata-based doctor Subhas Mukherjee announced the birth of the world‘s second test tube baby.
Subsequently, the industry saw phenomenal growth as infertility rates went up. A market projection (by Fortune Business Insights) said the size of the ART market is expected to reach $45 billion by 2026.
Among Asian countries, India‘s ART market is pegged at third position. A lack of regulation and the consequent laxity in operations drove a lot of traffic from other nations to India. This, in turn, along with the relatively low costs, led to the mushrooming of ART clinics across the country. Undoubtedly, this also led to a plethora of legal, social and ethical issues.
Q. What is the full form of IVF?

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Sometimes, the leash follows the dog, but given the importance of control, the sequence can seem insignificant. It only matters that there remains a good hold over the circumstances. No matter then that the Assisted Reproductive Technology Regulation (ART) Bill, which was cleared by UNION Cabinet this week, came after the Surrogacy Bill that it should have preceded. Together, the ART Bill; the Surrogacy Bill; the amendment to the MTP Act ; and the older Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act present a bouquet of legislation that will have a positive impact on the reproductive rights and choices of women in India. The ART Bill to regulate clinics offering fertility treatments has been long in the works, and was first presented publicly way back in 2008.
ART measures help couples unable to conceive naturally to bear children with the aid of state-of-theart technology to achieve pregnancy, leading to safe delivery. India has a rich history of employing ART, though the initial years went officially undocumented at that time. In the late 1970s, only months after the birth of Louise Brown, the first ’test tube baby‘, Kolkata-based doctor Subhas Mukherjee announced the birth of the world‘s second test tube baby.
Subsequently, the industry saw phenomenal growth as infertility rates went up. A market projection (by Fortune Business Insights) said the size of the ART market is expected to reach $45 billion by 2026.
Among Asian countries, India‘s ART market is pegged at third position. A lack of regulation and the consequent laxity in operations drove a lot of traffic from other nations to India. This, in turn, along with the relatively low costs, led to the mushrooming of ART clinics across the country. Undoubtedly, this also led to a plethora of legal, social and ethical issues.
Q. What is full form of MTP Act?

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Sometimes, the leash follows the dog, but given the importance of control, the sequence can seem insignificant. It only matters that there remains a good hold over the circumstances. No matter then that the Assisted Reproductive Technology Regulation (ART) Bill, which was cleared by UNION Cabinet this week, came after the Surrogacy Bill that it should have preceded. Together, the ART Bill; the Surrogacy Bill; the amendment to the MTP Act ; and the older Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act present a bouquet of legislation that will have a positive impact on the reproductive rights and choices of women in India. The ART Bill to regulate clinics offering fertility treatments has been long in the works, and was first presented publicly way back in 2008.
ART measures help couples unable to conceive naturally to bear children with the aid of state-of-theart technology to achieve pregnancy, leading to safe delivery. India has a rich history of employing ART, though the initial years went officially undocumented at that time. In the late 1970s, only months after the birth of Louise Brown, the first ’test tube baby‘, Kolkata-based doctor Subhas Mukherjee announced the birth of the world‘s second test tube baby.
Subsequently, the industry saw phenomenal growth as infertility rates went up. A market projection (by Fortune Business Insights) said the size of the ART market is expected to reach $45 billion by 2026.
Among Asian countries, India‘s ART market is pegged at third position. A lack of regulation and the consequent laxity in operations drove a lot of traffic from other nations to India. This, in turn, along with the relatively low costs, led to the mushrooming of ART clinics across the country. Undoubtedly, this also led to a plethora of legal, social and ethical issues.
Q. Which of the following options are true with respect to Assisted Reproductive Technology Regulation (ART) Bill?

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

It is quite understandable that a recent Supreme Court judgment, that there is no fundamental right to claim reservation in promotions, has caused some political alarm. The received wisdom in affirmative action jurisprudence is that a series of Constitution amendments and judgments have created a sound legal framework for reservation in public employment, subject to the fulfillment of certain constitutional requirements. And that it has solidified into an entitlement for the backward classes, including the SCs and STs. However, the latest judgment is a reminder that affirmative action programmes allowed in the Constitution flow from ”enabling provisions” and are not rights as such. This legal position is not new. Major judgments — these include those by Constitution Benches — note that Article 16(4), on reservation in posts, is enabling in nature. In other words, the state is not bound to provide reservations, but if it does so, it must be in favour of sections that are backward and inadequately represented in the services based on quantifiable data. Thus, the Court is not wrong in setting aside an Uttarakhand High Court order directing data collection on the adequacy or inadequacy of representation of SC/ST candidates in the State‘s services. Its reasoning is that once there is a decision not to extend reservation — in this case, in promotions — to the section, the question whether its representation in the services is inadequate is irrelevant.
Q. The Central Government of India recently introduced EWS Reservation. Under it ______quota is provided for the Economically Weaker Sections (EWS) among General Category candidates in government jobs and educational institutions.
Complete the above sentence by choosing one of the following options:

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

It is quite understandable that a recent Supreme Court judgment, that there is no fundamental right to claim reservation in promotions, has caused some political alarm. The received wisdom in affirmative action jurisprudence is that a series of Constitution amendments and judgments have created a sound legal framework for reservation in public employment, subject to the fulfillment of certain constitutional requirements. And that it has solidified into an entitlement for the backward classes, including the SCs and STs. However, the latest judgment is a reminder that affirmative action programmes allowed in the Constitution flow from ”enabling provisions” and are not rights as such. This legal position is not new. Major judgments — these include those by Constitution Benches — note that Article 16(4), on reservation in posts, is enabling in nature. In other words, the state is not bound to provide reservations, but if it does so, it must be in favour of sections that are backward and inadequately represented in the services based on quantifiable data. Thus, the Court is not wrong in setting aside an Uttarakhand High Court order directing data collection on the adequacy or inadequacy of representation of SC/ST candidates in the State‘s services. Its reasoning is that once there is a decision not to extend reservation — in this case, in promotions — to the section, the question whether its representation in the services is inadequate is irrelevant.
Q. The Supreme Court of India ruled in 1992-that reservation could not exceed?

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

It is quite understandable that a recent Supreme Court judgment, that there is no fundamental right to claim reservation in promotions, has caused some political alarm. The received wisdom in affirmative action jurisprudence is that a series of Constitution amendments and judgments have created a sound legal framework for reservation in public employment, subject to the fulfillment of certain constitutional requirements. And that it has solidified into an entitlement for the backward classes, including the SCs and STs. However, the latest judgment is a reminder that affirmative action programmes allowed in the Constitution flow from ”enabling provisions” and are not rights as such. This legal position is not new. Major judgments — these include those by Constitution Benches — note that Article 16(4), on reservation in posts, is enabling in nature. In other words, the state is not bound to provide reservations, but if it does so, it must be in favour of sections that are backward and inadequately represented in the services based on quantifiable data. Thus, the Court is not wrong in setting aside an Uttarakhand High Court order directing data collection on the adequacy or inadequacy of representation of SC/ST candidates in the State‘s services. Its reasoning is that once there is a decision not to extend reservation — in this case, in promotions — to the section, the question whether its representation in the services is inadequate is irrelevant.
Q. Inclusion in the list of Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribes can be made through order of which of the following?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

It is quite understandable that a recent Supreme Court judgment, that there is no fundamental right to claim reservation in promotions, has caused some political alarm. The received wisdom in affirmative action jurisprudence is that a series of Constitution amendments and judgments have created a sound legal framework for reservation in public employment, subject to the fulfillment of certain constitutional requirements. And that it has solidified into an entitlement for the backward classes, including the SCs and STs. However, the latest judgment is a reminder that affirmative action programmes allowed in the Constitution flow from ”enabling provisions” and are not rights as such. This legal position is not new. Major judgments — these include those by Constitution Benches — note that Article 16(4), on reservation in posts, is enabling in nature. In other words, the state is not bound to provide reservations, but if it does so, it must be in favour of sections that are backward and inadequately represented in the services based on quantifiable data. Thus, the Court is not wrong in setting aside an Uttarakhand High Court order directing data collection on the adequacy or inadequacy of representation of SC/ST candidates in the State‘s services. Its reasoning is that once there is a decision not to extend reservation — in this case, in promotions — to the section, the question whether its representation in the services is inadequate is irrelevant.
Q. Which article envisages the establishment of the National Commission for Scheduled Castes?

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

It is quite understandable that a recent S upreme Court judgment, that there is no fundamental right to claim reservation in promotions, has caused some political alarm. The received wisdom in affirmative action jurisprudence is that a series of Constitution amendments and judgments have created a sound legal framework for reservation in public employment, subject to the fulfillment of certain constitutional requirements. And that it has solidified into an entitlement for the backward classes, including the SCs and STs. However, the latest judgment is a reminder that affirmative action programmes allowed in the Constitution flow from ”enabling provisions” and are not rights as such. This legal position is not new. Major judgments — these include those by Constitution Benches — note that Article 16(4), on reservation in posts, is enabling in nature. In other words, the state is not bound to provide reservations, but if it does so, it must be in favour of sections that are backward and inadequately represented in the services based on quantifiable data. Thus, the Court is not wrong in setting aside an Uttarakhand High Court order directing data collection on the adequacy or inadequacy of representation of SC/ST candidates in the State‘s services. Its reasoning is that once there is a decision not to extend reservation — in this case, in promotions — to the section, the question whether its representation in the services is inadequate is irrelevant.
Q. The Original Constitution of India has provided reservation for _____ until 1960 (article 334).
Complete the above sentence choosingcorrect option?

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

The report by a German cybersecurity firm that medical details of millions of Indian patients were leaked and are freely available on the Internet is worrying. The firm listed 1.02 million studies of Indian patients and 121 million medical images, including CT Scans, MRIs and even photos of the patients, as being available. Such information has the potential to be mined for deeper data analysis and for creating profiles that could be used for social engineering, phishing and online identity theft, among other practices that thrive on the availability of such data on the Darknet — restricted computer networks which exchange information using means such as peer-to-peer file sharing. The reason for the availability of this data is the absence of any security in the Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) servers used by medical professionals and which seem to have been connected to the public Internet without protection.
Public data leaks have been quite common in India — from government websites enabling the download of Aadhar numbers to electoral data rolls being downloaded in bulk, among others. Unlike the data protection regulations in place in the European Union and in the U.S., India still lacks a comprehensive legal framework to protect data privacy which is a…..(1)…... The Draft Personal Data Protection Bill 2019 is still to be tabled but could enable protection of privacy.
Q. Which of the following options will fill up ……(1)…..with regards to Right to privacy ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

The report by a German cybersecurity firm that medical details of millions of Indian patients were leaked and are freely available on the Internet is worrying. The firm listed 1.02 million studies of Indian patients and 121 million medical images, including CT Scans, MRIs and even photos of the patients, as being available. Such information has the potential to be mined for deeper data analysis and for creating profiles that could be used for social engineering, phishing and online identity theft, among other practices that thrive on the availability of such data on the Darknet — restricted computer networks which exchange information using means such as peer-to-peer file sharing. The reason for the availability of this data is the absence of any security in the Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) servers used by medical professionals and which seem to have been connected to the public Internet without protection.
Public data leaks have been quite common in India — from government websites enabling the download of Aadhar numbers to electoral data rolls being downloaded in bulk, among others. Unlike the data protection regulations in place in the European Union and in the U.S., India still lacks a comprehensive legal framework to protect data privacy which is a…..(1)…... The Draft Personal Data Protection Bill 2019 is still to be tabled but could enable protection of privacy.

Q. Data Protection Bill was prepared by a committee headed by?

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

The report by a German cybersecurity firm that medical details of millions of Indian patients were leaked and are freely available on the Internet is worrying. The firm listed 1.02 million studies of Indian patients and 121 million medical images, including CT Scans, MRIs and even photos of the patients, as being available. Such information has the potential to be mined for deeper data analysis and for creating profiles that could be used for social engineering, phishing and online identity theft, among other practices that thrive on the availability of such data on the Darknet — restricted computer networks which exchange information using means such as peer-to-peer file sharing. The reason for the availability of this data is the absence of any security in the Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) servers used by medical professionals and which seem to have been connected to the public Internet without protection.
Public data leaks have been quite common in India — from government websites enabling the download of Aadhar numbers to electoral data rolls being downloaded in bulk, among others. Unlike the data protection regulations in place in the European Union and in the U.S., India still lacks a comprehensive legal framework to protect data privacy which is a…..(1)…... The Draft Personal Data Protection Bill 2019 is still to be tabled but could enable protection of privacy.
Q. Why does data protection matter?

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

The report by a German cybersecurity firm that medical details of millions of Indian patients were leaked and are freely available on the Internet is worrying. The firm listed 1.02 million studies of Indian patients and 121 million medical images, including CT Scans, MRIs and even photos of the patients, as being available. Such information has the potential to be mined for deeper data analysis and for creating profiles that could be used for social engineering, phishing and online identity theft, among other practices that thrive on the availability of such data on the Darknet — restricted computer networks which exchange information using means such as peer-to-peer file sharing. The reason for the availability of this data is the absence of any security in the Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) servers used by medical professionals and which seem to have been connected to the public Internet without protection.
Public data leaks have been quite common in India — from government websites enabling the download of Aadhar numbers to electoral data rolls being downloaded in bulk, among others. Unlike the data protection regulations in place in the European Union and in the U.S., India still lacks a comprehensive legal framework to protect data privacy which is a…..(1)…... The Draft Personal Data Protection Bill 2019 is still to be tabled but could enable protection of privacy.
Q. All of the following are examples of real security and privacy threats except which of the following?

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

The report by a German cybersecurity firm that medical details of millions of Indian patients were leaked and are freely available on the Internet is worrying. The firm listed 1.02 million studies of Indian patients and 121 million medical images, including CT Scans, MRIs and even photos of the patients, as being available. Such information has the potential to be mined for deeper data analysis and for creating profiles that could be used for social engineering, phishing and online identity theft, among other practices that thrive on the availability of such data on the Darknet — restricted computer networks which exchange information using means such as peer-to-peer file sharing. The reason for the availability of this data is the absence of any security in the Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) servers used by medical professionals and which seem to have been connected to the public Internet without protection.
Public data leaks have been quite common in India — from government websites enabling the download of Aadhar numbers to electoral data rolls being downloaded in bulk, among others. Unlike the data protection regulations in place in the European Union and in the U.S., India still lacks a comprehensive legal framework to protect data privacy which is a…..(1)…... The Draft Personal Data Protection Bill 2019 is still to be tabled but could enable protection of privacy.
Q. EDI(Electronic Data Interchange) use :

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

It needs no reiteration that the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) has acted as insurance for landless labourers during crop failures, agrarian crises and periods of a stressed economy. With the ongoing economic slowdown resulting in depressed rural wages and the lack of adequate opportunity to work, the MGNREGS has provided much needed succour and this explains why demand for it has peaked in the last few months across various parts of the country. The report that 15 States have already overshot budgets for the scheme‘s implementation and many have not been able to pay wage dues should be a cause for concern.
Compounding the situation is the fact that the Centre is on the verge of running out of funds. This problem was not unexpected. While in absolute terms, the allocations for the scheme in the budget presented in July 2019 were higher compared to the previous financial year, the outlay fell in relative terms as a percentage of the overall allocations. The outlay was also lower than the actual expenditure in the previous year, which indicated the importance of the scheme in arresting rural distress.
Q. MGNREGA was passed in which of the following year?

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

It needs no reiteration that the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) has acted as insurance for landless labourers during crop failures, agrarian crises and periods of a stressed economy. With the ongoing economic slowdown resulting in depressed rural wages and the lack of adequate opportunity to work, the MGNREGS has provided much needed succour and this explains why demand for it has peaked in the last few months across various parts of the country. The report that 15 States have already overshot budgets for the scheme‘s implementation and many have not been able to pay wage dues should be a cause for concern.
Compounding the situation is the fact that the Centre is on the verge of running out of funds. This problem was not unexpected. While in absolute terms, the allocations for the scheme in the budget presented in July 2019 were higher compared to the previous financial year, the outlay fell in relative terms as a percentage of the overall allocations. The outlay was also lower than the actual expenditure in the previous year, which indicated the importance of the scheme in arresting rural distress.
Q. Which of the following is correct ?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

It needs no reiteration that the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) has acted as insurance for landless labourers during crop failures, agrarian crises and periods of a stressed economy. With the ongoing economic slowdown resulting in depressed rural wages and the lack of adequate opportunity to work, the MGNREGS has provided much needed succour and this explains why demand for it has peaked in the last few months across various parts of the country. The report that 15 States have already overshot budgets for the scheme‘s implementation and many have not been able to pay wage dues should be a cause for concern.
Compounding the situation is the fact that the Centre is on the verge of running out of funds. This problem was not unexpected. While in absolute terms, the allocations for the scheme in the budget presented in July 2019 were higher compared to the previous financial year, the outlay fell in relative terms as a percentage of the overall allocations. The outlay was also lower than the actual expenditure in the previous year, which indicated the importance of the scheme in arresting rural distress.
Q. Consider the following statements:
1) MGNREGA fulfills the constitutional rights in India
2) MGNREGA is to be implemented mainly by gram panchayats
3) The places where the recent unseasonal rain and hailstorms have affected crops the governments will increase the number of work days under the MGNREGS to 200 from 100
Which of the above statements are correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

It needs no reiteration that the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) has acted as insurance for landless labourers during crop failures, agrarian crises and periods of a stressed economy. With the ongoing economic slowdown resulting in depressed rural wages and the lack of adequate opportunity to work, the MGNREGS has provided much needed succour and this explains why demand for it has peaked in the last few months across various parts of the country. The report that 15 States have already overshot budgets for the scheme‘s implementation and many have not been able to pay wage dues should be a cause for concern.
Compounding the situation is the fact that the Centre is on the verge of running out of funds. This problem was not unexpected. While in absolute terms, the allocations for the scheme in the budget presented in July 2019 were higher compared to the previous financial year, the outlay fell in relative terms as a percentage of the overall allocations. The outlay was also lower than the actual expenditure in the previous year, which indicated the importance of the scheme in arresting rural distress.
Q. What is the mode of payment for the workers/beneficiaries under MGNREGA ?

Solution:

B is the correct option. As per NREGASoft, around 99% of the wages are being paid electronically into the Bank/Post Office accounts of MGNREGA workers through Electronic Fund Management System (eFMS).

QUESTION: 30

It needs no reiteration that the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) has acted as insurance for landless labourers during crop failures, agrarian crises and periods of a stressed economy. With the ongoing economic slowdown resulting in depressed rural wages and the lack of adequate opportunity to work, the MGNREGS has provided much needed succour and this explains why demand for it has peaked in the last few months across various parts of the country. The report that 15 States have already overshot budgets for the scheme‘s implementation and many have not been able to pay wage dues should be a cause for concern.
Compounding the situation is the fact that the Centre is on the verge of running out of funds. This problem was not unexpected. While in absolute terms, the allocations for the scheme in the budget presented in July 2019 were higher compared to the previous financial year, the outlay fell in relative terms as a percentage of the overall allocations. The outlay was also lower than the actual expenditure in the previous year, which indicated the importance of the scheme in arresting rural distress.
Q. What is the quota for women in MGNREGA ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

That the Supreme Court struck down as ”disproportionate” a 2 018 circular by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) that directed entities not to provide services to those trading in ”virtual currencies” (cryptocurrencies) is understandable. After all, despite ministerial committee recommendations, and warnings by Banking regulator __(1)___ about the problematic nature of their payment and exchange methods, the use of virtual currencies over the Internet continues to remain legal in India. But the immediate effect of the RBI circular was to choke the agencies that sought to provide a platform to facilitate trading in virtual currencies by cutting them off from banks. This, the petitioners claimed, had a chilling effect on the fledgling virtual currency exchanges industry in India and went against their entrepreneurial right to operate a business enshrined in Article 19(1)(g). The Court conceded this limited point saying that the ”RBI has not come out with a stand that any of the entities regulated by it... have suffered any loss... on account of [cryptocurrency] exchanges” and this provides relief to the firms providing the virtual exchanges.
Q. Why had RBI banned cryptocurrencies in 2018?

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

That the Supreme Court struck down as ”disproportionate” a 2 018 circular by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) that directed entities not to provide services to those trading in ”virtual currencies” (cryptocurrencies) is understandable. After all, despite ministerial committee recommendations, and warnings by Banking regulator __(1)___ about the problematic nature of their payment and exchange methods, the use of virtual currencies over the Internet continues to remain legal in India. But the immediate effect of the RBI circular was to choke the agencies that sought to provide a platform to facilitate trading in virtual currencies by cutting them off from banks. This, the petitioners claimed, had a chilling effect on the fledgling virtual currency exchanges industry in India and went against their entrepreneurial right to operate a business enshrined in Article 19(1)(g). The Court conceded this limited point saying that the ”RBI has not come out with a stand that any of the entities regulated by it... have suffered any loss... on account of [cryptocurrency] exchanges” and this provides relief to the firms providing the virtual exchanges.
Q. Which of the following regulator will come instead of…….(1)….. in above mentioned paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

That the Supreme Court struck down as ”disproportionate” a 2 018 circular by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) that directed entities not to provide services to those trading in ”virtual currencies” (cryptocurrencies) is understandable. After all, despite ministerial committee recommendations, and warnings by Banking regulator __(1)___ about the problematic nature of their payment and exchange methods, the use of virtual currencies over the Internet continues to remain legal in India. But the immediate effect of the RBI circular was to choke the agencies that sought to provide a platform to facilitate trading in virtual currencies by cutting them off from banks. This, the petitioners claimed, had a chilling effect on the fledgling virtual currency exchanges industry in India and went against their entrepreneurial right to operate a business enshrined in Article 19(1)(g). The Court conceded this limited point saying that the ”RBI has not come out with a stand that any of the entities regulated by it... have suffered any loss... on account of [cryptocurrency] exchanges” and this provides relief to the firms providing the virtual exchanges.
Q. Which of the following Right is now not a fundamental right in Indian Constitution?

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

That the Supreme Court struck down as ”disproportionate” a 2 018 circular by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) that directed entities not to provide services to those trading in ”virtual currencies” (cryptocurrencies) is understandable. After all, despite ministerial committee recommendations, and warnings by Banking regulator __(1)___ about the problematic nature of their payment and exchange methods, the use of virtual currencies over the Internet continues to remain legal in India. But the immediate effect of the RBI circular was to choke the agencies that sought to provide a platform to facilitate trading in virtual currencies by cutting them off from banks. This, the petitioners claimed, had a chilling effect on the fledgling virtual currency exchanges industry in India and went against their entrepreneurial right to operate a business enshrined in Article 19(1)(g). The Court conceded this limited point saying that the ”RBI has not come out with a stand that any of the entities regulated by it... have suffered any loss... on account of [cryptocurrency] exchanges” and this provides relief to the firms providing the virtual exchanges.
Q. Cryptocurrencies work on which technology?

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

That the Supreme Court struck down as ”disproportionate” a 2 018 circular by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) that directed entities not to provide services to those trading in ”virtual currencies” (cryptocurrencies) is understandable. After all, despite ministerial committee recommendations, and warnings by Banking regulator __(1)___ about the problematic nature of their payment and exchange methods, the use of virtual currencies over the Internet continues to remain legal in India. But the immediate effect of the RBI circular was to choke the agencies that sought to provide a platform to facilitate trading in virtual currencies by cutting them off from banks. This, the petitioners claimed, had a chilling effect on the fledgling virtual currency exchanges industry in India and went against their entrepreneurial right to operate a business enshrined in Article 19(1)(g). The Court conceded this limited point saying that the ”RBI has not come out with a stand that any of the entities regulated by it... have suffered any loss... on account of [cryptocurrency] exchanges” and this provides relief to the firms providing the virtual exchanges.
Q. What is meaning of Fiat Currency?

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

The application on behalf of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, seeking to be heard as amicus curiae in the pending litigation in the Supreme Court against the C itizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, is undoubtedly an unusual step. As expected, the government sees it as unwarranted interference. It does appear that the move is unnecessary as the global human rights perspective that High Commissioner Michelle Bachelet Jeria hopes to present is most likely to be raised by some of the petitioners themselves. After all, most of the 140-odd petitions argue that the CAA fails to extend the equal protection of law to all immigrants in the country. But, to be fair, the High Commissioner is not seeking to be a petitioner. On the contrary, she is offering the undoubted expertise that the premier U.N. body possesses in aid of the Court. She has appreciated the amendment‘s positive side, noting its potential to redress the ”irregular” condition of some migrants through a quicker citizenship process. It must be noted that the Court has relied on principles contained in international legal instruments in some of its judgments.
The moot question is whether the U.N. High Commissioner ought to be given an opportunity to assist the Court in the matter, or whether, even without such assistance, the Court will countenance arguments based on the salutary provisions of international conventions that India is a party to.
Q. The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has its headquarters in______?

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

The application on behalf of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, seeking to be heard as amicus curiae in the pending litigation in the Supreme Court against the C itizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, is undoubtedly an unusual step. As expected, the government sees it as unwarranted interference. It does appear that the move is unnecessary as the global human rights perspective that High Commissioner Michelle Bachelet Jeria hopes to present is most likely to be raised by some of the petitioners themselves. After all, most of the 140-odd petitions argue that the CAA fails to extend the equal protection of law to all immigrants in the country. But, to be fair, the High Commissioner is not seeking to be a petitioner. On the contrary, she is offering the undoubted expertise that the premier U.N. body possesses in aid of the Court. She has appreciated the amendment‘s positive side, noting its potential to redress the ”irregular” condition of some migrants through a quicker citizenship process. It must be noted that the Court has relied on principles contained in international legal instruments in some of its judgments.
The moot question is whether the U.N. High Commissioner ought to be given an opportunity to assist the Court in the matter, or whether, even without such assistance, the Court will countenance arguments based on the salutary provisions of international conventions that India is a party to.
Q. The Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) seeks to allow refugees from certain minority communities who are facing religious persecution or fear of religious persecution in ______, ______ and ______ eligible for Indian citizenship by amending the Citizenship Act of 1955.  

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

The application on behalf of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, seeking to be heard as amicus curiae in the pending litigation in the Supreme Court against the C itizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, is undoubtedly an unusual step. As expected, the government sees it as unwarranted interference. It does appear that the move is unnecessary as the global human rights perspective that High Commissioner Michelle Bachelet Jeria hopes to present is most likely to be raised by some of the petitioners themselves. After all, most of the 140-odd petitions argue that the CAA fails to extend the equal protection of law to all immigrants in the country. But, to be fair, the High Commissioner is not seeking to be a petitioner. On the contrary, she is offering the undoubted expertise that the premier U.N. body possesses in aid of the Court. She has appreciated the amendment‘s positive side, noting its potential to redress the ”irregular” condition of some migrants through a quicker citizenship process. It must be noted that the Court has relied on principles contained in international legal instruments in some of its judgments.
The moot question is whether the U.N. High Commissioner ought to be given an opportunity to assist the Court in the matter, or whether, even without such assistance, the Court will countenance arguments based on the salutary provisions of international conventions that India is a party to.

Q. “ _______acts as a watchdog of human rights in the India.”
Complete the above sentence by opting outone of the following options:

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

The application on behalf of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, seeking to be heard as amicus curiae in the pending litigation in the Supreme Court against the C itizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, is undoubtedly an unusual step. As expected, the government sees it as unwarranted interference. It does appear that the move is unnecessary as the global human rights perspective that High Commissioner Michelle Bachelet Jeria hopes to present is most likely to be raised by some of the petitioners themselves. After all, most of the 140-odd petitions argue that the CAA fails to extend the equal protection of law to all immigrants in the country. But, to be fair, the High Commissioner is not seeking to be a petitioner. On the contrary, she is offering the undoubted expertise that the premier U.N. body possesses in aid of the Court. She has appreciated the amendment‘s positive side, noting its potential to redress the ”irregular” condition of some migrants through a quicker citizenship process. It must be noted that the Court has relied on principles contained in international legal instruments in some of its judgments.
The moot question is whether the U.N. High Commissioner ought to be given an opportunity to assist the Court in the matter, or whether, even without such assistance, the Court will countenance arguments based on the salutary provisions of international conventions that India is a party to.
Q. Who is the current Union Home Minister of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

The application on behalf of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, seeking to be heard as amicus curiae in the pending litigation in the Supreme Court against the C itizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019, is undoubtedly an unusual step. As expected, the government sees it as unwarranted interference. It does appear that the move is unnecessary as the global human rights perspective that High Commissioner Michelle Bachelet Jeria hopes to present is most likely to be raised by some of the petitioners themselves. After all, most of the 140-odd petitions argue that the CAA fails to extend the equal protection of law to all immigrants in the country. But, to be fair, the High Commissioner is not seeking to be a petitioner. On the contrary, she is offering the undoubted expertise that the premier U.N. body possesses in aid of the Court. She has appreciated the amendment‘s positive side, noting its potential to redress the ”irregular” condition of some migrants through a quicker citizenship process. It must be noted that the Court has relied on principles contained in international legal instruments in some of its judgments.
The moot question is whether the U.N. High Commissioner ought to be given an opportunity to assist the Court in the matter, or whether, even without such assistance, the Court will countenance arguments based on the salutary provisions of international conventions that India is a party to.
Q. The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) is a UN Secretariat department, that promotes and protects for all people all the rights enshrined in?

Solution:

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