Sample English Mock Test


40 Questions MCQ Test Mock Test Series for CLAT 2020 | Sample English Mock Test


Description
This mock test of Sample English Mock Test for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT Sample English Mock Test (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Sample English Mock Test quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this Sample English Mock Test exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Sample English Mock Test extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Directions (Q. 1 - 5): Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been given in bold to help locate them while answering some of the questions

Each one has his reasons; for one, art is a flight: for another, a means of conquering. But one can flee into a hermitage, into madness, into death. One can conquer arm. Why does it have to be written, why does one have to manage his escapes and conquests by writing? Because, behind the various aims of the authors, there is a deeper and more immediate choice which is common to all of us. We shall try to elucidate this choice and we shall see whether it is not in the name of this very choice of writing that the engagement of writers must be required.

Each of our perceptions is accompanied by the consciousness that human reality is a ‘revealer’, that is, it is through the human reality that ‘there is’ being, or, to put it differently, that man is the means by which things are manifested. It is our presence in the world which multiples relations. It is we who set up a relationship between this tree and that bit of sky. Thanks to us, that star which has been dead for millennia, that quarter moon, and that dark river are disclosed in the unity of a landscape. It is the speed of our auto and our airplane, which organizes the great masses of the earth. With each of our acts, the world reveals to us a new face. But, if we know that we are the directors of being, we also know that we are not its producers. If we turn away from this landscape, it will sink back into its dark permanence. At least, it will sink back; there is no one made enough to think that it is going to be annihilated. It is we who shall be annihilated, and the earth will remain in its lethargy until another consciousness comes along to awaken it. Thus, to our inner certainty of being ‘revealers’ is added that of being inessential in relation to the thing revealed.

One of the chief motives of artistic creation is certainly the need of feeling that we are essential in relationship to the world. If I fix on canvas or in writing, a certain aspect of the fields or the sea or a look on someone’s face which I have disclosed, I am conscious of having produced them by condensing relationships. By introducing order where there was none, by imposing the unity of mind on the diversity of things. That is, I think myself essential in relation to my creation. But this time, it is the created object which escapes me; I cannot reveal and produce at the same time. The creation becomes inessential in relation to the creative activity. First of all, even if it appears to others as definitive the created object always seems to us in a state of suspension; we can always change this line, that shade, that word. Thus, it never forces itself. A novice painter asked his teacher, ‘When should I consider my painting finished?’ And the teacher answered. ‘When you can look at it in amazement and say to yourself’ “I’m the one who did that!””

Which amounts to saying never. For it is virtually considering one’s work with someone else’s eyes and revealing what has been created. But it is self evident that we are proportionally less conscious of the thing produced and more conscious of our productive activity. When it is a matter of poetry or carpentry, we work according to traditional norms. With tools whose usage is codified, it is Heidegger’s famous hypothesis – they who are working with our hands. In this case, the result can seem to us sufficiently strange to preserve its objectivity in our eyes. But if we ourselves produce the rules of production, the measure, the criteria, and if our creative drive comes from the very depth of our heart, then we never find anything but ourselves in our work. It is we who have invented the laws by which we judge it. It is our history, our love, our gaiety that we recognize in it. Even if we should regard it without touching it any further, we never receive from it that gaiety or love, we put them into it. The results which we have obtained on canvas or paper never seem to us objective. We are too familiar with the processes of which they are  a ruse, and when we seek to perceive our work, we create it again, we repeat mentally the operations which produced each of its aspects that appear as a result. Thus, in the perception, the object is given as the essential thing and the subject as the inessential. The latter seeks essentiality in the creation and obtains it, but then it is the object which becomes the inessential.

The dialectic is nowhere more apparent than in the art of writing, for the literary object is a peculiar top, which exists only in movement. To make it come into view, a concrete act called reading is necessary, and it lasts only as long as this act can last. Beyond that, there are only black marks on paper. Now, the writer cannot read what he writes. Whereas the shoemaker can put on the shoes he has just made if they are his size, and the architect can live in the house he has built. In reading, one foresees; one waits. He foresees the end of the sentence, the following sentence, the next page. He waits for them, to confirm, or disappoint his foresights. The reading is composed of a host of hypotheses, followed by the awakenings of hopes and deceptions. Readers are always ahead of the sentence they are reading in a merely probable future, which partly collapses and partly comes together in proportion as they progress, which withdraws from one page to the next and forms the moving horizon of the literary object. Without waiting, without a future, without ignorance, there is no objectivity.

Q. The author holds that:

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Each one has his reasons; for one, art is a flight: for another, a means of conquering. But one can flee into a hermitage, into madness, into death. One can conquer arm. Why does it have to be written, why does one have to manage his escapes and conquests by writing? Because, behind the various aims of the authors, there is a deeper and more immediate choice which is common to all of us. We shall try to elucidate this choice and we shall see whether it is not in the name of this very choice of writing that the engagement of writers must be required.

Each of our perceptions is accompanied by the consciousness that human reality is a ‘revealer’, that is, it is through the human reality that ‘there is’ being, or, to put it differently, that man is the means by which things are manifested. It is our presence in the world which multiples relations. It is we who set up a relationship between this tree and that bit of sky. Thanks to us, that star which has been dead for millennia, that quarter moon, and that dark river are disclosed in the unity of a landscape. It is the speed of our auto and our airplane, which organizes the great masses of the earth. With each of our acts, the world reveals to us a new face. But, if we know that we are the directors of being, we also know that we are not its producers. If we turn away from this landscape, it will sink back into its dark permanence. At least, it will sink back; there is no one made enough to think that it is going to be annihilated. It is we who shall be annihilated, and the earth will remain in its lethargy until another consciousness comes along to awaken it. Thus, to our inner certainty of being ‘revealers’ is added that of being inessential in relation to the thing revealed.

One of the chief motives of artistic creation is certainly the need of feeling that we are essential in relationship to the world. If I fix on canvas or in writing, a certain aspect of the fields or the sea or a look on someone’s face which I have disclosed, I am conscious of having produced them by condensing relationships. By introducing order where there was none, by imposing the unity of mind on the diversity of things. That is, I think myself essential in relation to my creation. But this time, it is the created object which escapes me; I cannot reveal and produce at the same time. The creation becomes inessential in relation to the creative activity. First of all, even if it appears to others as definitive the created object always seems to us in a state of suspension; we can always change this line, that shade, that word. Thus, it never forces itself. A novice painter asked his teacher, 'When should I consider my painting finished?’ And the teacher answered. ‘When you can look at it in amazement and say to yourself’ “I’m the one who did that!””

Which amounts to saying never. For it is virtually considering one’s work with someone else’s eyes and revealing what has been created. But it is self evident that we are proportionally less conscious of the thing produced and more conscious of our productive activity. When it is a matter of poetry or carpentry, we work according to traditional norms. With tools whose usage is codified, it is Heidegger’s famous hypothesis – they who are working with our hands. In this case, the result can seem to us sufficiently strange to preserve its objectivity in our eyes. But if we ourselves produce the rules of production, the measure, the criteria, and if our creative drive comes from the very depth of our heart, then we never find anything but ourselves in our work. It is we who have invented the laws by which we judge it. It is our history, our love, our gaiety that we recognize in it. Even if we should regard it without touching it any further, we never receive from it that gaiety or love, we put them into it. The results which we have obtained on canvas or paper never seem to us objective. We are too familiar with the processes of which they are a ruse, and when we seek to perceive our work, we create it again, we repeat mentally the operations which produced each of its aspects that appear as a result. Thus, in the perception, the object is given as the essential thing and the subject as the inessential. The latter seeks essentiality in the creation and obtains it, but then it is the object which becomes the inessential.

The dialectic is nowhere more apparent than in the art of writing, for the literary object is a peculiar top, which exists only in movement. To make it come into view, a concrete act called reading is necessary, and it lasts only as long as this act can last. Beyond that, there are only black marks on paper. Now, the writer cannot read what he writes. Whereas the shoemaker can put on the shoes he has just made if they are his size, and the architect can live in the house he has built. In reading, one foresees; one waits. He foresees the end of the sentence, the following sentence, the next page. He waits for them, to confirm, or disappoint his foresights. The reading is composed of a host of hypotheses, followed by the awakenings of hopes and deceptions. Readers are always ahead of the sentence they are reading in a merely probable future, which partly collapses and partly comes together in proportion as they progress, which withdraws from one page to the next and forms the moving horizon of the literary object. Without waiting, without a future, without ignorance, there is no objectivity.

Q. 

It is the author’s contention that;

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Each one has his reasons; for one, art is a flight: for another, a means of conquering. But one can flee into a hermitage, into madness, into death. One can conquer arm. Why does it have to be written, why does one have to manage his escapes and conquests by writing? Because, behind the various aims of the authors, there is a deeper and more immediate choice which is common to all of us. We shall try to elucidate this choice and we shall see whether it is not in the name of this very choice of writing that the engagement of writers must be required.

Each of our perceptions is accompanied by the consciousness that human reality is a ‘revealer’, that is, it is through the human reality that ‘there is’ being, or, to put it differently, that man is the means by which things are manifested. It is our presence in the world which multiples relations. It is we who set up a relationship between this tree and that bit of sky. Thanks to us, that star which has been dead for millennia, that quarter moon, and that dark river are disclosed in the unity of a landscape. It is the speed of our auto and our airplane, which organizes the great masses of the earth. With each of our acts, the world reveals to us a new face. But, if we know that we are the directors of being, we also know that we are not its producers. If we turn away from this landscape, it will sink back into its dark permanence. At least, it will sink back; there is no one made enough to think that it is going to be annihilated. It is we who shall be annihilated, and the earth will remain in its lethargy until another consciousness comes along to awaken it. Thus, to our inner certainty of being ‘revealers’ is added that of being inessential in relation to the thing revealed.

One of the chief motives of artistic creation is certainly the need of feeling that we are essential in relationship to the world. If I fix on canvas or in writing, a certain aspect of the fields or the sea or a look on someone’s face which I have disclosed, I am conscious of having produced them by condensing relationships. By introducing order where there was none, by imposing the unity of mind on the diversity of things. That is, I think myself essential in relation to my creation. But this time, it is the created object which escapes me; I cannot reveal and produce at the same time. The creation becomes inessential in relation to the creative activity. First of all, even if it appears to others as definitive the created object always seems to us in a state of suspension; we can always change this line, that shade, that word. Thus, it never forces itself. A novice painter asked his teacher, 'When should I consider my painting finished?’ And the teacher answered. ‘When you can look at it in amazement and say to yourself’ “I’m the one who did that!””

Which amounts to saying never. For it is virtually considering one’s work with someone else’s eyes and revealing what has been created. But it is self evident that we are proportionally less conscious of the thing produced and more conscious of our productive activity. When it is a matter of poetry or carpentry, we work according to traditional norms. With tools whose usage is codified, it is Heidegger’s famous hypothesis – they who are working with our hands. In this case, the result can seem to us sufficiently strange to preserve its objectivity in our eyes. But if we ourselves produce the rules of production, the measure, the criteria, and if our creative drive comes from the very depth of our heart, then we never find anything but ourselves in our work. It is we who have invented the laws by which we judge it. It is our history, our love, our gaiety that we recognize in it. Even if we should regard it without touching it any further, we never receive from it that gaiety or love, we put them into it. The results which we have obtained on canvas or paper never seem to us objective. We are too familiar with the processes of which they are a ruse, and when we seek to perceive our work, we create it again, we repeat mentally the operations which produced each of its aspects that appear as a result. Thus, in the perception, the object is given as the essential thing and the subject as the inessential. The latter seeks essentiality in the creation and obtains it, but then it is the object which becomes the inessential.

The dialectic is nowhere more apparent than in the art of writing, for the literary object is a peculiar top, which exists only in movement. To make it come into view, a concrete act called reading is necessary, and it lasts only as long as this act can last. Beyond that, there are only black marks on paper. Now, the writer cannot read what he writes. Whereas the shoemaker can put on the shoes he has just made if they are his size, and the architect can live in the house he has built. In reading, one foresees; one waits. He foresees the end of the sentence, the following sentence, the next page. He waits for them, to confirm, or disappoint his foresights. The reading is composed of a host of hypotheses, followed by the awakenings of hopes and deceptions. Readers are always ahead of the sentence they are reading in a merely probable future, which partly collapses and partly comes together in proportion as they progress, which withdraws from one page to the next and forms the moving horizon of the literary object. Without waiting, without a future, without ignorance, there is no objectivity.

Q. The passage makes a distinction between perception and creation in terms of;

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Each one has his reasons; for one, art is a flight: for another, a means of conquering. But one can flee into a hermitage, into madness, into death. One can conquer arm. Why does it have to be written, why does one have to manage his escapes and conquests by writing? Because, behind the various aims of the authors, there is a deeper and more immediate choice which is common to all of us. We shall try to elucidate this choice and we shall see whether it is not in the name of this very choice of writing that the engagement of writers must be required.

Each of our perceptions is accompanied by the consciousness that human reality is a ‘revealer’, that is, it is through the human reality that ‘there is’ being, or, to put it differently, that man is the means by which things are manifested. It is our presence in the world which multiples relations. It is we who set up a relationship between this tree and that bit of sky. Thanks to us, that star which has been dead for millennia, that quarter moon, and that dark river are disclosed in the unity of a landscape. It is the speed of our auto and our airplane, which organizes the great masses of the earth. With each of our acts, the world reveals to us a new face. But, if we know that we are the directors of being, we also know that we are not its producers. If we turn away from this landscape, it will sink back into its dark permanence. At least, it will sink back; there is no one made enough to think that it is going to be annihilated. It is we who shall be annihilated, and the earth will remain in its lethargy until another consciousness comes along to awaken it. Thus, to our inner certainty of being ‘revealers’ is added that of being inessential in relation to the thing revealed.

One of the chief motives of artistic creation is certainly the need of feeling that we are essential in relationship to the world. If I fix on canvas or in writing, a certain aspect of the fields or the sea or a look on someone’s face which I have disclosed, I am conscious of having produced them by condensing relationships. By introducing order where there was none, by imposing the unity of mind on the diversity of things. That is, I think myself essential in relation to my creation. But this time, it is the created object which escapes me; I cannot reveal and produce at the same time. The creation becomes inessential in relation to the creative activity. First of all, even if it appears to others as definitive the created object always seems to us in a state of suspension; we can always change this line, that shade, that word. Thus, it never forces itself. A novice painter asked his teacher, 'When should I consider my painting finished?’ And the teacher answered. ‘When you can look at it in amazement and say to yourself’ “I’m the one who did that!””

Which amounts to saying never. For it is virtually considering one’s work with someone else’s eyes and revealing what has been created. But it is self evident that we are proportionally less conscious of the thing produced and more conscious of our productive activity. When it is a matter of poetry or carpentry, we work according to traditional norms. With tools whose usage is codified, it is Heidegger’s famous hypothesis – they who are working with our hands. In this case, the result can seem to us sufficiently strange to preserve its objectivity in our eyes. But if we ourselves produce the rules of production, the measure, the criteria, and if our creative drive comes from the very depth of our heart, then we never find anything but ourselves in our work. It is we who have invented the laws by which we judge it. It is our history, our love, our gaiety that we recognize in it. Even if we should regard it without touching it any further, we never receive from it that gaiety or love, we put them into it. The results which we have obtained on canvas or paper never seem to us objective. We are too familiar with the processes of which they are a ruse, and when we seek to perceive our work, we create it again, we repeat mentally the operations which produced each of its aspects that appear as a result. Thus, in the perception, the object is given as the essential thing and the subject as the inessential. The latter seeks essentiality in the creation and obtains it, but then it is the object which becomes the inessential.

The dialectic is nowhere more apparent than in the art of writing, for the literary object is a peculiar top, which exists only in movement. To make it come into view, a concrete act called reading is necessary, and it lasts only as long as this act can last. Beyond that, there are only black marks on paper. Now, the writer cannot read what he writes. Whereas the shoemaker can put on the shoes he has just made if they are his size, and the architect can live in the house he has built. In reading, one foresees; one waits. He foresees the end of the sentence, the following sentence, the next page. He waits for them, to confirm, or disappoint his foresights. The reading is composed of a host of hypotheses, followed by the awakenings of hopes and deceptions. Readers are always ahead of the sentence they are reading in a merely probable future, which partly collapses and partly comes together in proportion as they progress, which withdraws from one page to the next and forms the moving horizon of the literary object. Without waiting, without a future, without ignorance, there is no objectivity.

Q. 

The art of writing manifests the dialectic of perception and creation because:

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Each one has his reasons; for one, art is a flight: for another, a means of conquering. But one can flee into a hermitage, into madness, into death. One can conquer arm. Why does it have to be written, why does one have to manage his escapes and conquests by writing? Because, behind the various aims of the authors, there is a deeper and more immediate choice which is common to all of us. We shall try to elucidate this choice and we shall see whether it is not in the name of this very choice of writing that the engagement of writers must be required.

Each of our perceptions is accompanied by the consciousness that human reality is a ‘revealer’, that is, it is through the human reality that ‘there is’ being, or, to put it differently, that man is the means by which things are manifested. It is our presence in the world which multiples relations. It is we who set up a relationship between this tree and that bit of sky. Thanks to us, that star which has been dead for millennia, that quarter moon, and that dark river are disclosed in the unity of a landscape. It is the speed of our auto and our airplane, which organizes the great masses of the earth. With each of our acts, the world reveals to us a new face. But, if we know that we are the directors of being, we also know that we are not its producers. If we turn away from this landscape, it will sink back into its dark permanence. At least, it will sink back; there is no one made enough to think that it is going to be annihilated. It is we who shall be annihilated, and the earth will remain in its lethargy until another consciousness comes along to awaken it. Thus, to our inner certainty of being ‘revealers’ is added that of being inessential in relation to the thing revealed.

One of the chief motives of artistic creation is certainly the need of feeling that we are essential in relationship to the world. If I fix on canvas or in writing, a certain aspect of the fields or the sea or a look on someone’s face which I have disclosed, I am conscious of having produced them by condensing relationships. By introducing order where there was none, by imposing the unity of mind on the diversity of things. That is, I think myself essential in relation to my creation. But this time, it is the created object which escapes me; I cannot reveal and produce at the same time. The creation becomes inessential in relation to the creative activity. First of all, even if it appears to others as definitive the created object always seems to us in a state of suspension; we can always change this line, that shade, that word. Thus, it never forces itself. A novice painter asked his teacher, 'When should I consider my painting finished?’ And the teacher answered. ‘When you can look at it in amazement and say to yourself’ “I’m the one who did that!””

Which amounts to saying never. For it is virtually considering one’s work with someone else’s eyes and revealing what has been created. But it is self evident that we are proportionally less conscious of the thing produced and more conscious of our productive activity. When it is a matter of poetry or carpentry, we work according to traditional norms. With tools whose usage is codified, it is Heidegger’s famous hypothesis – they who are working with our hands. In this case, the result can seem to us sufficiently strange to preserve its objectivity in our eyes. But if we ourselves produce the rules of production, the measure, the criteria, and if our creative drive comes from the very depth of our heart, then we never find anything but ourselves in our work. It is we who have invented the laws by which we judge it. It is our history, our love, our gaiety that we recognize in it. Even if we should regard it without touching it any further, we never receive from it that gaiety or love, we put them into it. The results which we have obtained on canvas or paper never seem to us objective. We are too familiar with the processes of which they are a ruse, and when we seek to perceive our work, we create it again, we repeat mentally the operations which produced each of its aspects that appear as a result. Thus, in the perception, the object is given as the essential thing and the subject as the inessential. The latter seeks essentiality in the creation and obtains it, but then it is the object which becomes the inessential.

The dialectic is nowhere more apparent than in the art of writing, for the literary object is a peculiar top, which exists only in movement. To make it come into view, a concrete act called reading is necessary, and it lasts only as long as this act can last. Beyond that, there are only black marks on paper. Now, the writer cannot read what he writes. Whereas the shoemaker can put on the shoes he has just made if they are his size, and the architect can live in the house he has built. In reading, one foresees; one waits. He foresees the end of the sentence, the following sentence, the next page. He waits for them, to confirm, or disappoint his foresights. The reading is composed of a host of hypotheses, followed by the awakenings of hopes and deceptions. Readers are always ahead of the sentence they are reading in a merely probable future, which partly collapses and partly comes together in proportion as they progress, which withdraws from one page to the next and forms the moving horizon of the literary object. Without waiting, without a future, without ignorance, there is no objectivity.

Q

A writer, as an artist,

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions (Q. 6 - 15): In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 6 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty.

Solution: Because it's the most appropriate term going with the statement. clearly moving won't be an answer. and "sitting fixed" doesn't make sense. and we mostly use static to describe non living objects and motionless for living objects
QUESTION: 7

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 7 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty.

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 8 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty.

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 9 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 10 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 11 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 12 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 13 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 14 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. four or five words are suggested, Find one of which fits at number 15 appropriately. 

At the table, a man, unlike ordinary people, was sitting (6). He was a (7) with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long (8) like a woman’s and a (9) beard. His face was yellow with an (10) tint, in it, his checks were (11) his back long and narrow, and the hand on which his shaggy head was (12) so thin and delicate that it was (13) to look at it. His head was already (14) with silver, and seeing his (15), aged-looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Pick out the most appropriate pair to fill in the blanks in same order. In a world ---- by men for so many years, women are only thought ---- for jobs like typists, receptionists and teachers.

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Hence the word sophistry has an unfavourable ………. And means arguing deceitfully, attempting to turn a poor case into a good one by means of clever but …….. reasoning.   

Solution:

The first blank can be con... morefused between option A and D, but for the 2nd blank Cogent is the best word as it means clear and logical hence by the process of elimination. 

QUESTION: 18

This partly explains how the Mehta family has been able to ……… its lavish lifestyle in recent times, despite the fact that all its assets have been ……… 

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Kautilya was a great political thinker and his strong …….. personality is …….. throughout the thoughts and expressions in the Arthashastra. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

The Minister felt that the ………. made by the Committee was …….. even though similar schemes had worked earlier. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Directions (Q. 21 - 25): In the following sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in italicized letter. For each italicized part, four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the italicized part.

Q. Though long, your essay is vague on the point. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

In the following sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in italicized letter. For each italicized part, four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the italicized part.

Q. 

The field was even enough for the joggers to have their practice.

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

In the following sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in italicized letter. For each italicized part, four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the italicized part.

Q. 

On public occasions, she was very punctilious about forms and manners.

Solution:

The correct option is B.

Punctillios means showing great attention to detail or correct behaviour. Careful can be used in place of this word.

QUESTION: 24

In the following sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in italicized letter. For each italicized part, four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the italicized part.

Q. 

This library was built with donations from the munificent citizens of the city.

Solution:

The correct option is B

Munificent means characterized by or displaying great generosity.

QUESTION: 25

In the following sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in italicized letter. For each italicized part, four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the italicized part.

Q. 

The perspicuity of the lawyer’s arguments was remarkable.

Solution:

Lucidity is the correct answer as it is the synonym of perspicuity which means clarity, plainness, intelligibility, transparency.

QUESTION: 26

Directions (Q. 26 - 30): Fill in the Blanks

Q. 

You will have to catch the morning flight, so you ……….. better get ready.

Solution:

For suggestions, modal ‘should’ is used

QUESTION: 27

Take possession of the records immediately lest they are ………. with. 

Solution:

‘tampered’ with… is the correct combination

QUESTION: 28

The sun disappeared behind the lacy ………. of the stretched-out mountains. 

Solution:

‘silhouette’ means ‘shadow’, so option ‘C’ is right

QUESTION: 29

You cannot devise a method which ……. all possibly of error. 

Solution:

Only ‘Excludes’ makes sense here.

QUESTION: 30

He very successfully ……… all the allegations leveled against him. 

Solution:

alligations are ‘rebutted’ so option ‘D’

QUESTION: 31

Directions (Q. 31 - 35): In each of the following sentences, four or five options are given. You are, required to identify the best way of writing the sentence in the contest of the correct usage of standard written English, while doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.

Q. The process by which the community influences the actions of its members is known as social control.

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

In each of the following sentences, four or five options are given. You are, required to identify the best way of writing the sentence in the contest of the correct usage of standard written English, while doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.
To be sure, there would be scarcely no time left over for other things if school children would have been expected to have considered all sides of every matter on which they had opinions. 

Solution:

Option C is the correct answer as it is the best way of expressing the idea. All the other options are awkward. Scarcely is already negative so word ‘no’ will not be used in the same line.

QUESTION: 33

In each of the following sentences, four or five options are given. You are, required to identify the best way of writing the sentence in the contest of the correct usage of standard written English, while doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.
Depending on skilful suggestions, argument is seldom used in advertising. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

In each of the following sentences, four or five options are given. You are, required to identify the best way of writing the sentence in the contest of the correct usage of standard written English, while doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.
When this war is over, no kingdom will either be isolated in war or peace. 

Solution:

Either should precede the two choices offered. This sentence is the case of incorrect usage of Correlative conjunctions.

QUESTION: 35

In each of the following sentences, four or five options are given. You are, required to identify the best way of writing the sentence in the contest of the correct usage of standard written English, while doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.
The twelve-hour work day not only has been reduced to one of ten hours but also, in some lines of work, to below eight hours. 

Solution:

The correct option is D.

It is the correct framing of sentences.

QUESTION: 36

Directions (36-40): In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.

Q.

A speech made by someone without any rehearsal.

Solution:

‘Extempore’ is a speech made without any Rehearsal. It is an unprepared speech.

QUESTION: 37

In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.
Murder of a brother 

Solution:

‘fratricide’ is killing a sibling

QUESTION: 38

In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.
A physician who specialises in disease of skin  

Solution:

‘Dermatologist’ is a skin doctor.

QUESTION: 39

In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.
Mania for stealing articles 

Solution:

‘Kleptomania’ is a habit of stealing.

QUESTION: 40

In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.
To kill someone for political reasons 

Solution:

‘reprisal’ is fighting back.

Related tests