Test: British Economic Impact In India - 1


30 Questions MCQ Test History for UPSC (Civil Services) Prelims | Test: British Economic Impact In India - 1


Description
This mock test of Test: British Economic Impact In India - 1 for UPSC helps you for every UPSC entrance exam. This contains 30 Multiple Choice Questions for UPSC Test: British Economic Impact In India - 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Test: British Economic Impact In India - 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. UPSC students definitely take this Test: British Economic Impact In India - 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Test: British Economic Impact In India - 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for UPSC on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

The British promoted the sale of Indian opium in

Solution:

In the early 1700’s the Portuguese introduced a new form of smoke-able opium to China. The opium was mixed with tobacco and became a new commodity in China. Opium trade was originally dominated by the Dutch, but was soon taken over by the British due to British rule in India and the foundation of the East India Company. The British started to trade opium for silver in southern China, and from there the opium trade exploded. British exportation of opium from India to China facilitated a flow of silver into India. This compensated for the British drain on India and solidified India as a substantial financial base for England. For these reasons, the British heavily pushed opium trade with China.

QUESTION: 2

The Govemment of India tried to increase the number of purchasers of British goods by following a policy of

Solution:

The Government of India also tried to increase the number of purchasers of British goods by following a policy of fresh conquests and direct occupation of protected states like Awadh. ... However, not only were Indian industries not protected by the foreign rulers but foreign goods were given free entry.

QUESTION: 3

Indian exports to foreign countries fell rapidly due to

Solution:

C is the correct option.Indian exports to foreign countries fell rapidly due to Prohibitive import duties and Development of machine industries.
A tariff so high that it makes an import prohibitively expensive. A prohibitive tariff discourages importers from bringing goods into the country in the first place because they will be difficult to sell. For example, a country may levy a 900% tariff on a good that it wishes to keep out.

QUESTION: 4

Which country banned import of Indian opium?

Solution:

China and Britain banned import of Indian opium.
 

QUESTION: 5

Why was ‘Economic Drain’ peculiar to British rule?

Solution:

The correct answer is B as Impact of British Rule on India .The British exported to Britain part of India's wealth and resources for which India got no adequate economic or material return.  Previously the rulers had spent the revenue they extracted from the people inside the country

QUESTION: 6

How was Britain different from earlier powers that had come to India?

Solution:

C is the correct option.Even the worst of previous Indian governments had spent the revenue  ... But the British remained perpetual foreigners. Englishmen, working and trading in India, nearly always planned to go back to Britain and the Indian Government was controlled by a foreign company of merchants and the Government of Britain.

QUESTION: 7

The drain of wealth from Bengal began in 1757.From which of the following did the East India Company not extort fortunes?

Solution:

The drain of wealth from Bengal began in 1757 when the Company's servants began to carry home immense fortunes extorted from Indian rulers, zamindars, merchants, and from other common people. They sent home nearly £ 6 million between 1758 and 1765.

QUESTION: 8

The East India Company began to purchase Indian goods out of the revenue of Bengal and to export them to England. These purchases were called

Solution:

In 1765, the company acquired the Diwani of Bengal & began purchase of the Indian goods out of the revenue of Bengal and exported them. These purchases were known as Company's investment.

QUESTION: 9

Who admitted in 1840 that India was “required to transmit annually to this country (Britain), without any return except in the small value of military stores, a sum amounting to between two and three million sterling”?

Solution:

In 1840, Lord Ellenborough admitted that India was “required to transmit annually to this country (Britain), without any return except in the small value of military stores, a sum amounting to between two and three million sterling”.

QUESTION: 10

For which of the following, the decline of traditional exports of cotton and silk manufacturers in the face of Manchester competition, did not raise acute remittance problems?

Solution:

D is the correct option.None of the given lead to the decline of traditional exports of cotton and silk manufacturers in the face of Manchester competition, did not raise acute remittance problems.The First World War may have spelt the beginning of the end for the textile industry, but the Second World War brought about a short reprieve.

QUESTION: 11

Indian opium was exported to China for purchasing

Solution:

Indian opium was exported to China for purchasing tea.

QUESTION: 12

Which factor had become absolutely vital for the whole complex mechanism of the United Kingdom’s balance of payments by the end of the 19th century?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

While explaining the mechanism of drain, who remarked “The Secretary of State drawn bills on the Government treasury in India, and it is mainly through these bills, which are paid in India out of the public revenues, that the merchant obtains the money that he requires in India, and the Secretary of States the money that he requires in England”?

Solution:

The correct answer is C as While explaining the mechanism of drain, JOHN STARCHY remarked “The Secretary of State drawn bills on the Government treasury in India, and it is mainly through these bills, which are paid in India out of the public revenues, that the merchant obtains the money that he requires in India, and the Secretary of States the money that he requires in England”

QUESTION: 14

Which of the following argued before the Welby Commission in 1895 that the amount being drained away represented a potential surplus which might have raised Indian income considerably if invested properly inside India?

Solution:

The drain theory had sever critics from the beginning. The drain, it has been argued, was greatly exaggerated by nationalists, since foreign trade and export surplus could amount to only a small part of India’s national income. But surely Naoroji had a point here when he argued (before the Welby Commission in 1895) that the amount being drained away represented a potential surplus which might have raised Indian income considerably if invested properly inside India.

QUESTION: 15

Who opined that “England receives nothing from India except in return for English services rendered or English capital expended”?

Solution:

Sir John Strachey GCSI CIE (5 June 1823 – 19 December 1907) was an English civil servant in British India.

QUESTION: 16

Work on the Grand Trunk Road from Calcutta to Delhi was completed in the 1850’s. When was it begun?

Solution:

Work on the Grand Trunk Road from Calcutta to Delhi began in 1839 and completed in the 1850's. Efforts were also made to link by road the major cities, ports, and markets of the country.

QUESTION: 17

The earliest suggestion to build a railway in India was made in Madras in

Solution:

India's first railway proposals were made in Madras in 1832. The Red Hill Railway, the country's first train, ran from Red Hills to Chintadripet bridge in Madras in 1837. It was hauled by a rotary steam-engine locomotive manufactured by William Avery.

QUESTION: 18

The first railway line in India was opened to traffic in 1853.It ran between

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Which of the following was an ardent advocate of rapid railway construction in India?

Solution:

Lord Dalhousie, who became Governor-General of India in 1849, was an ardent advocate of rapid railway construction.

QUESTION: 20

In India, railways were built through private enterprise as well as state agency after

Solution:

After 1880, railways were built through private enterprise as well as through state agency. By 1905 nearly 45,000 kms of railways had been built.

QUESTION: 21

By 1905, how many miles of railways had been built in India?

Solution:

The correct answer is C as  By 1905 28000 miles of railways had been built in India

QUESTION: 22

Postage stamps were introduced by

Solution:

Your answer is lord Dalhousie introduced postage stamps in india . he served as governor general of india from 1848 to 1856. during the reign of lord Dalhousie , in 1952 ,first postage stamps were used in india at district scinde. on first October 1954, the first all india stamp was issued.

QUESTION: 23

Which aspect/s is/are about the development of railways in India?. 1. The amount of over 350 crores invested in railways was Indian capital .II. The amount of over 350 crores invested in railways was mostly by British investors. III. For the first 50 years investors suffered financial losses .IV. Railways were developed in India primarily for serving the economic, political, and military interests of British imperialism.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

The first telegraph line was opened in 1853 between

Solution:

The first telegraph line between Calcutta and Agra was opened.

QUESTION: 25

The main burden of providing money for the East India Company, whether for profits or for wars of expansion, fell on the

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

Why didn’t the peasant (ryot) or the zamindar do anything to improve cultivation

Solution:

They do nothing to improve their land because they fear they can be evicted from their land at any time. If they improve their farming, the zamindar immediately increases the share he takes from them.

QUESTION: 27

How much land revenue did the zamindars, under Permanent Settlement, have to pay to the East India Company?

Solution:

They were given hereditary rights of succession of the lands under them. The amount to be paid by the landlords was fixed. It was agreed that this would not increase in future (permanent in nature). The fixed amount was 10/11th portion of the revenue for the government and 1/10th was for the Zamindar.

QUESTION: 28

By the Permanent Settlement, zamindars and revenue collectors were converted into landlords. Which of the following is correct?

Solution:

First, the zamindars and revenue collectors were converted into so many landlords. They were not only to act as agents of the government in collecting land revenue from the ryot but also to become the owners of the entire land in their zamindaris. Their right of ownership was made hereditary and transferable. Hence rent of revenue was fixed very high. Zamindars were to give 10/11th of the rental they derived, keeping the only 1/11th for themselves.

QUESTION: 29

The Permanent Zamindari Settlement was not extended to

Solution:

Moreover, the Permanent Settlement enabled the Company to maximise its income as land revenue was now fixed higher than it had ever been in the past. ... The Permanent Zamindari Settlement was later extended to Orissa, the Northern Districts of Madras, and the District of Varanasi.

QUESTION: 30

The British introduced a temporary zamindari settlement under which the zamindars were made owners of land but the revenue they had to pay was revised periodically. Where was this done?

Solution:

The Ryotwari Settlement was in the end introduced in parts of the Madras and Bombay Presidencies in the beginning of the nineteenth century. The settlement under the Ryotwari system was not made permanent. It was revised periodically after 20 to 30 years when the revenue demand was usually raised.