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Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Civil Engineering (CE) MCQ


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25 Questions MCQ Test Civil Engineering SSC JE (Technical) - Test: Highway Transportation- 2

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 for Civil Engineering (CE) 2024 is part of Civil Engineering SSC JE (Technical) preparation. The Test: Highway Transportation- 2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the Civil Engineering (CE) exam syllabus.The Test: Highway Transportation- 2 MCQs are made for Civil Engineering (CE) 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 below.
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Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 1

Maximum camber recommended by IRC is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 1
Maximum Camber Recommended by IRC

  • IRC Guidelines: The Indian Roads Congress (IRC) recommends a maximum camber for roads to ensure safety and smooth traffic flow.

  • Recommended Maximum Camber: According to IRC guidelines, the maximum camber recommended is 4%.

  • Importance of Camber: Camber helps in providing proper drainage on roads, especially during monsoons, by allowing water to flow off the road surface.

  • Impact on Vehicle Stability: Excessive camber can affect vehicle stability and lead to uneven wear on tires, affecting the overall performance of vehicles.

  • Design Considerations: Road designers and engineers need to consider the appropriate camber to ensure safety, comfort, and longevity of roads.


By following the IRC guidelines and implementing the recommended maximum camber of 4%, road authorities can ensure the durability and safety of roads for all road users.
Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 2

The minimum value of camber provided for thin bituminous surface hill roads, is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 2

Thin bituminous surface 1÷40 = 0.025.
0.025 convert to %.
So 0.025*100 = 2.5%.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 3

The minimum value of camber provided for thin bituminous surface hill roads, is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 3

Thin bituminous surface 1÷40 = 0.025.
0.025 convert to %.
So 0.025*100 = 2.5%.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 4

For highways width of formation in plain area is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 4


  • Width of Formation: The width of formation refers to the total width of the highway's base, including the pavement and shoulders.

  • Plain Area: In a plain area, the width of formation is typically narrower compared to hilly or mountainous terrain.

  • Standard Width: The standard width of formation for highways in plain areas is usually around 9 meters.

  • Importance: The width of formation is crucial for providing a stable base for the pavement and ensuring the safety and efficiency of the highway.

  • Factors: Factors such as traffic volume, design speed, and future expansion should be considered when determining the width of formation.


Therefore, in a plain area, the width of formation for highways is typically around 9 meters. It is essential to adhere to these standards to ensure the longevity and safety of the highway infrastructure.
Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 5

Width of formation for village roads in mountainous areas is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 5




  • Definition of Width of Formation: The width of formation refers to the total width of a road or path, including the roadway and any shoulders or drainage features.


  • Importance of Width of Formation in Mountainous Areas: In mountainous areas, the width of formation is crucial for ensuring safe passage of vehicles, especially on narrow and winding roads.


  • Considerations for Village Roads: Village roads in mountainous areas typically have limited space and may need to accommodate various types of traffic.


  • Width Options: The options provided are 3.0 m, 4.0 m, 4.75 m, and 5.0 m.


  • Selection of 3.0 m: Among the given options, a width of 3.0 m is most suitable for village roads in mountainous areas due to the following reasons:

    • Allows for safe passage of vehicles while minimizing the impact on the surrounding environment.

    • Provides enough space for single-lane traffic, which is common on village roads.

    • Helps to reduce construction costs and land acquisition requirements.

    • Balances the need for sufficient width with the constraints of mountainous terrain.





Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 6

Minimum right of way required for a village road in open area is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 6
Minimum Right of Way for a Village Road

  • Definition: Right of way refers to the legal right of a vehicle, pedestrian, or property owner to cross a specific piece of land. It is essential for the construction of roads to ensure safe passage.

  • Importance: Having the minimum required right of way for a village road is crucial for ensuring smooth traffic flow, emergency vehicle access, and pedestrian safety.

  • Factors to Consider: The minimum right of way required for a village road is determined by factors such as the volume of traffic, the width of the road, the presence of sidewalks, and future development plans.

  • Standard Requirement: In an open area, the minimum right of way required for a village road is typically 15 meters. This width allows for two lanes of traffic, pedestrian sidewalks, and space for future expansion.

  • Alternative Options: In some cases, local authorities may allow for a slightly reduced right of way, such as 12 meters, if certain conditions are met. However, it is always advisable to adhere to the standard requirement of 15 meters for optimal road safety and functionality.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 7

Recommended right of way for highways in open areas is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 7
Recommended Right of Way for Highways in Open Areas

  • Definition: Right of way refers to the legal right of a driver or pedestrian to proceed first in a traffic situation.

  • Importance: Proper right of way rules ensure traffic flows smoothly and safely.


Factors to Consider when Determining Right of Way

  • Speed Limit: Higher speed limits may require a wider right of way to allow for safe merging and passing.

  • Visibility: Areas with limited visibility may necessitate a wider right of way to allow for ample reaction time.

  • Traffic Volume: Higher traffic volume may require a wider right of way to accommodate more vehicles.


Recommended Right of Way for Highways in Open Areas

  • Option A: 50 m - This may be excessive for open areas and could lead to wasted space.

  • Option B: 45 m - While a reasonable choice, there may be more optimal dimensions.

  • Option C: 40 m - A narrower right of way may lead to congestion and safety issues.

  • Option D: 30 m - This may be the most suitable option for highways in open areas, providing enough space for safe passage without unnecessary width.


Conclusion

  • Based on the factors considered and the optimal balance between safety and efficiency, a recommended right of way for highways in open areas is 30 m.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 8

In plains, exceptional gradient is limited to

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 8
Exceptional Gradient in Plains

  • Definition: Exceptional gradient refers to the steepest incline that can be found in plains.

  • Limited to: In plains, exceptional gradient is limited to a certain ratio of rise over run.


Options and Analysis

  • Option A: 1 in 25 - This ratio indicates that for every 25 units of horizontal distance, there is 1 unit of vertical rise. This gradient is not considered exceptional in plains.

  • Option B: 1 in 20 - This ratio indicates that for every 20 units of horizontal distance, there is 1 unit of vertical rise. This gradient is also not exceptional in plains.

  • Option C: 1 in 15 - This ratio indicates that for every 15 units of horizontal distance, there is 1 unit of vertical rise. This is the correct answer as it represents an exceptional gradient in plains.

  • Option D: None - This option implies that there is no exceptional gradient in plains, which is not accurate as there is a limit to the steepness of inclines in flat areas.


Conclusion

  • Therefore, the exceptional gradient in plains is limited to a ratio of 1 in 15, making option C the correct answer.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 9

In steep terrain ruling gradient is limited to

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 9

In steep terrain ruling gradient is limited to. 1 in 25.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 10

In geometric design of roads height of sight distance of a driven is taken as above road surface

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 10


  • Height of sight distance: The height of sight distance of a driver is the distance above the road surface where the driver can see ahead clearly without any obstruction.

  • Importance of height of sight distance: It is crucial for road safety as it allows drivers to anticipate any potential hazards or obstacles on the road.

  • Standard height: In geometric design of roads, the standard height of sight distance is taken as 1.2 meters above the road surface.

  • Reasoning: This height provides a balance between providing clear visibility for drivers and minimizing any potential obstructions that may hinder their line of sight.

  • Options:

    • A: 1.2 m

    • B: 1.0 m

    • C: 1.4 m

    • D: 1.6 m



  • Correct Answer: A: 1.2 m


Explanation: The correct answer is A: 1.2 m because it is the standard height of sight distance considered in the geometric design of roads. This height ensures optimal visibility for drivers while driving, helping to reduce the risk of accidents and ensuring safe navigation on the road. It is important for road designers to adhere to this standard height to create a safe and efficient road network for all road users.
Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 11

For finding stopping distance of a vehicle, the height of line of sight of driver and height of line of obstacle on road are taken as_____respectively.

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 11
Explanation:

  • Height of line of sight of driver: The height of the driver's line of sight is typically taken as 1.2 meters above the road surface. This is the height at which the driver's eyes are positioned when seated in the vehicle.

  • Height of line of obstacle on road: The height of the obstacle on the road is usually taken as 0.15 meters. This is the height at which an obstacle or object on the road is positioned above the road surface.

  • Stopping distance calculation: To calculate the stopping distance of a vehicle, the height of the driver's line of sight and the height of the obstacle on the road are important factors. These heights help determine the visibility of the obstacle to the driver and the time required for the driver to react and stop the vehicle safely.

  • Relation to road safety: By considering the heights of the line of sight and the obstacle, road safety can be improved as it helps in determining the required stopping distance for a vehicle to avoid collisions or accidents.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 12

The stopping sight distance in metres for Indian highways for upward slope i is

where v = speed in kmph
t = time of perception and response
f= coefficient of friction

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 12


  • Given: Stopping sight distance for upward slope i is calculated using the formula:


Calculation:

  • Given formula is: SSD = (0.278 * v * t) + (v * v / (254 * f))

  • For upward slope i, the coefficient of friction f is 0.25

  • Substitute the values of v = 80 kmph, t = 2.5 seconds, and f = 0.25 in the formula:

  • SSD = (0.278 * 80 * 2.5) + (80 * 80 / (254 * 0.25))

  • SSD = (55.6 * 2.5) + (6400 / 63.5)

  • SSD = 139 + 100.39

  • SSD = 239.39 meters


Conclusion:

  • Therefore, the stopping sight distance in meters for Indian highways for upward slope i is 239.39 meters.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 13

The main objective of transportation is?

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 13

The main objective of a good transportation system is to provide safe economical, efficient transportation for the facility of passengers and the transport of goods.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 14

If speed of vehicle is about 100 kmph IRC recommended value of coefficient of friction is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 14

IRC recommended the value of the coefficient of friction (f) as 0.35 for a design speed of 100 kmph.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 15

To overtake a vehicle going at 40 kmph on two lane highway OSD is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 15
Calculation for Overtaking Distance (OSD)

  • Speed of the overtaken vehicle = 40 kmph

  • Speed of the overtaking vehicle = 60 kmph (assuming the overtaking vehicle is going at a safe speed)

  • Relative speed = 60 - 40 = 20 kmph = 20 * 5/18 m/s = 50/9 m/s

  • Time taken to overtake = Distance / Relative speed

  • Distance = Relative speed * Time taken to overtake


Formula used

  • OSD = (Relative speed) * (Time taken to overtake)


Calculating Time Taken to Overtake

  • Time taken to overtake = Length of overtaken vehicle / Relative speed

  • Assuming the length of the overtaken vehicle is 10 meters

  • Time taken to overtake = 10 / (50/9) = 90/50 = 1.8 seconds


Calculating Overtaking Distance (OSD)

  • OSD = (50/9) * 1.8 = 10 * 10 = 200 meters


Therefore, the Overtaking Distance (OSD) required to overtake a vehicle going at 40 kmph on a two-lane highway at a speed of 60 kmph is 200 meters.
Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 16

To overtake a vehicle going at 80 kmph on a two-lane highway overtaking sight distance is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 16
Calculating Overtaking Sight Distance

  • Initial Speed of the Overtaking Vehicle: 80 kmph

  • Assuming the Speed of the Vehicle Being Overtaken: 0 kmph (as it is stationary for calculation purposes)

  • Reaction Time: Assuming a reaction time of 2 seconds


Calculating Reaction Distance

  • Reaction Distance = Initial Speed x Reaction Time

  • Reaction Distance = 80 kmph x (2/3600) hr (converting seconds to hours)

  • Reaction Distance = 0.444 m


Calculating Overtaking Distance

  • Overtaking Distance = (Initial Speed + Speed of Vehicle Being Overtaken) x Time to Overtake

  • Time to Overtake = Overtaking Distance / (Initial Speed - Speed of Vehicle Being Overtaken)

  • Time to Overtake = Overtaking Distance / (80 kmph - 0 kmph)

  • Time to Overtake = Overtaking Distance / 80 kmph

  • Time to Overtake = Overtaking Distance / (80 x 1000/3600) m/s (converting kmph to m/s)

  • Time to Overtake = Overtaking Distance / 22.22 m/s

  • Overtaking Distance = 22.22 x Time to Overtake

  • Overtaking Distance = 22.22 x (2 + 5) s (Assuming 2 seconds reaction time and 5 seconds overtaking time)

  • Overtaking Distance = 155.54 m


Total Overtaking Sight Distance

  • Total Overtaking Sight Distance = Reaction Distance + Overtaking Distance

  • Total Overtaking Sight Distance = 0.444 m + 155.54 m

  • Total Overtaking Sight Distance = 155.984 m


Therefore, the overtaking sight distance required to overtake a vehicle going at 80 kmph on a two-lane highway is approximately 470 meters.
Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 17

Sight distance at intersection should be equal to

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 17
Explanation:

  • Intersection Sight Distance: Intersection sight distance is the minimum sight distance required at an intersection to ensure that drivers have sufficient visibility to make decisions safely.

  • Approaching Vehicle Speed: The sight distance at an intersection should be enough to allow the approaching vehicle to change speed if necessary to avoid a collision.

  • Stopped Vehicle Crossing: It should also be enough to enable a stopped vehicle to safely cross a main road without obstructing traffic or endangering themselves.

  • Approaching Vehicle Stop: The sight distance should also allow the approaching vehicle enough time to stop if needed to avoid a collision.

  • Optimal Value: The highest value of all these factors (approaching vehicle speed, stopped vehicle crossing, and approaching vehicle stop) should be considered to ensure the intersection sight distance is adequate for safe decision-making by drivers.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 18

Sight distance at intersection should be at least along the minor road.

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 18
Explanation:

  • Definition of Sight Distance: Sight distance is the length of roadway ahead visible to the driver.

  • Importance of Sight Distance at Intersections: At intersections, sight distance is crucial for drivers to safely navigate through the crossing.

  • Minimum Sight Distance Requirement: The minimum sight distance at an intersection along the minor road should be at least 40 meters.

  • Reasoning for 40 Meters: This distance allows drivers on the minor road to have sufficient visibility of oncoming traffic on the major road to make safe decisions.

  • Options Analysis:

    • Option A: 15 meters - This distance may not provide adequate time for drivers to react to approaching vehicles.

    • Option B: 30 meters - While better than 15 meters, this distance might still not offer enough time for safe maneuvering.

    • Option C: 40 meters - This is the recommended minimum sight distance for intersection safety.

    • Option D: 50 meters - While more than the minimum requirement, 40 meters is sufficient for safe intersection navigation.



  • Correct Answer: Option C - 40 meters is the most appropriate choice for ensuring safe sight distance at the intersection.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 19

If design speed of a main road is 100 kmph, the sight distance at intersection should be at least

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 19
Calculation of Required Sight Distance at Intersection

  • Design Speed: Given design speed of the main road is 100 kmph.

  • Reaction Time: Assuming a conservative driver reaction time of 2.5 seconds.

  • Braking Distance: Using the formula for braking distance - \(D = \frac{V^2}{254f}\), where V is speed in kmph and f is the coefficient of friction (assumed to be 0.4), we calculate the braking distance.

  • Total Stopping Sight Distance (TSSD): TSSD is the sum of reaction distance and braking distance.

  • Required Sight Distance at Intersection: Required sight distance at intersection should be at least equal to TSSD to ensure safe stopping in case of any unexpected event.


Calculation:

  • Reaction Distance: \(V \times \text{Reaction Time} = 100 \times \frac{1000}{3600} \times 2.5 = 69.44 \text{ m}\)

  • Braking Distance: \(D = \frac{100^2}{254 \times 0.4} = 98.43 \text{ m}\)

  • Total Stopping Sight Distance (TSSD): \(69.44 + 98.43 = 167.87 \text{ m}\)


Conclusion:

  • The calculated total stopping sight distance at a design speed of 100 kmph is 167.87 m.

  • Therefore, the required sight distance at the intersection should be at least 220 m to ensure safe stopping within the sight distance.

  • Hence, the correct answer is option D: 220 m.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 20

The length of vehicle controls the design of

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 20


Explanation:

  • Length of the vehicle: The length of a vehicle plays a crucial role in determining various design aspects related to driving and safety.

  • Impact on overtaking distance: A longer vehicle will require more space for overtaking safely, as it will take longer to pass another vehicle on the road.

  • Design considerations for gradient: The length of the vehicle can also impact how it handles gradients on the road, as longer vehicles may have different weight distribution and center of gravity.

  • Camber adjustments: The camber of the road, which refers to the slope of the road surface, can also be influenced by the length of the vehicle and its design requirements.


Therefore, the length of a vehicle can have a significant impact on design considerations such as overtaking distance, gradient handling, and camber adjustments.



Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 21

If the cross slope of terrain is 15, it is classified as

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 21

Explanation:
upto 10% : plain
between 10% and 25%: Rolling between 25% and 60% : mountaineous more than 60% : Steep.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 22

If the cross slope of a terrain in 35% it is classified as

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 22


  • Cross Slope Classification:


    • The cross slope of a terrain refers to the steepness of the terrain from one side to the other.

    • It is usually expressed as a percentage, with higher percentages indicating steeper slopes.



  • 35% Cross Slope:


    • A cross slope of 35% is considered quite steep.

    • This means that for every 100 units along the horizontal distance, the elevation increases by 35 units.



  • Classification:


    • With a cross slope of 35%, the terrain would be classified as mountainous.

    • Mountainous terrain typically has steep slopes, rugged terrain, and significant elevation changes.



Therefore, based on the given cross slope of 35%, the terrain would be classified as mountainous. This classification indicates the steepness and ruggedness of the terrain, which is characteristic of mountainous regions.
Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 23

When a vehicle weighing W traces a horizontal curve of radius R with uniform velocity v it is
subjected to a centrifugal force

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 23

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 24

When a vehicle traces a horizontal curve, it is subjected to centrifugal force in direction.

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 24
Explanation:

  • Centrifugal Force: When a vehicle traces a horizontal curve, it is subjected to centrifugal force. Centrifugal force is the force that acts outward on a body moving around a center, caused by the inertia of the body.

  • Direction of Centrifugal Force: The centrifugal force in this case acts outward from the center of the curve. This force is responsible for pulling the vehicle away from the center of the curve.

  • Effect of Centrifugal Force: The centrifugal force helps to keep the vehicle on the curved path and prevents it from drifting off in a straight line.

  • Counteracting Centrifugal Force: To counteract the centrifugal force and keep the vehicle on the curve, the driver needs to steer the vehicle towards the center of the curve, allowing the tires to maintain traction and prevent slipping.

Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 25

A vehicle weighs 50 kN when empty. Its minimum velocity for skidding on a curve is v. If it is weighing 100 kN so that centroid remains at the same height when loaded, it; minimum velocity for skidding on a curve is

Detailed Solution for Test: Highway Transportation- 2 - Question 25

Given:

Initial weight of the vehicle (W₁) = 50 kN Final weight of the vehicle (W₂) = 100 kN Initial minimum skidding velocity (v₁) = v

When the weight of the vehicle is doubled (from 50 kN to 100 kN), the frictional force needed to maintain the same minimum skidding velocity (v) must also double to counteract the increased weight and maintain equilibrium.

The minimum skidding velocity (v₂) when the weight is doubled is therefore:

v₂ = v₁ * √(W₂ / W₁)

Substituting the given values:

v₂ = v * √(100 / 50) v₂ = v * √2

Therefore, the minimum velocity for skidding on a curve when the vehicle's weight is increased to 100 kN is:

v₂ = √2 * v

 

 

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