UPSC Exam  >  UPSC Tests  >  Indian Polity for UPSC CSE  >  Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - UPSC MCQ

Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - UPSC MCQ


Test Description

20 Questions MCQ Test Indian Polity for UPSC CSE - Test: Working Of Institutions- 2

Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 for UPSC 2024 is part of Indian Polity for UPSC CSE preparation. The Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the UPSC exam syllabus.The Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 MCQs are made for UPSC 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 below.
Solutions of Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 questions in English are available as part of our Indian Polity for UPSC CSE for UPSC & Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 solutions in Hindi for Indian Polity for UPSC CSE course. Download more important topics, notes, lectures and mock test series for UPSC Exam by signing up for free. Attempt Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 | 20 questions in 20 minutes | Mock test for UPSC preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study Indian Polity for UPSC CSE for UPSC Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
1 Crore+ students have signed up on EduRev. Have you? Download the App
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 1

Who is the head of the Government in our country?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 1
The head of the Government in our country is the Prime Minister.

  • The Prime Minister is the highest-ranking official in the executive branch of the government.

  • They are responsible for leading the government and making important decisions on behalf of the country.

  • The Prime Minister is usually the leader of the political party that has the majority in the parliament.

  • They are appointed by the President of the country, who is the head of state.

  • The Prime Minister is responsible for forming the government, selecting cabinet ministers, and overseeing their work.

  • They represent the country both domestically and internationally.

  • The Prime Minister plays a crucial role in policy-making and implementing government initiatives.

  • They are accountable to the parliament and can be removed from office through a vote of no confidence.

  • The Prime Minister exercises significant authority and power in governing the country.

  • They collaborate with other branches of government, such as the judiciary and legislature, to ensure the smooth functioning of the state.

Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 2

Which of the following statements is very much correct regarding Office Memorandum?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 2
Explanation:
The correct statement regarding Office Memorandum is:
B: A Communication issued by an appropriate authority stating the policy or decision of the government
Here is a detailed explanation:
1. Office Memorandum is a type of communication issued by an appropriate authority.
2. It is used to state the policy or decision of the government.
3. Office Memorandum is an official document that provides instructions or guidance on a particular matter.
4. It is used to communicate important information within an organization or government department.
5. Office Memorandum is often used to announce new policies, procedures, or changes in existing policies.
6. It is an important tool for ensuring effective communication and coordination within the government.
7. Office Memorandum is usually circulated among relevant stakeholders and can be used as a reference document for future actions or decisions.
In summary, Office Memorandum is a communication issued by an appropriate authority to state government policies or decisions. It plays a crucial role in ensuring effective communication and coordination within the government or organization.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 3

Which of the following institutions can amend the Constitution?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 3
Which institution can amend the Constitution?
The institution that has the power to amend the Constitution varies depending on the country. As the question does not specify the country, let's provide information for both India and the United Kingdom.
India:
In India, the Constitution can be amended by the following institutions:
1. Parliament: The Parliament of India consists of two houses - the Lok Sabha (House of the People) and the Rajya Sabha (Council of States). Any amendment to the Constitution must be passed by a special majority in both houses of Parliament.
2. Lok Sabha: The Lok Sabha, the lower house of Parliament, has the power to initiate and pass constitutional amendments. However, for the amendment to become a part of the Constitution, it must also be approved by the Rajya Sabha.
3. State Legislature: In certain cases, the Constitution can be amended by the state legislatures. Amendments that affect the federal structure of the Constitution or the powers of the states can be made by a special majority of the state legislatures.
4. Council of States: The Rajya Sabha, the upper house of Parliament, also has the power to initiate constitutional amendments. However, these amendments must be approved by the Lok Sabha to become law.
United Kingdom:
In the United Kingdom, the Constitution does not have a single written document like India. Therefore, there is no specific institution dedicated to amending the Constitution. However, the UK Parliament has the power to bring about constitutional changes through ordinary legislation.
It is important to note that this answer is based on a general understanding and may vary depending on the specific laws and procedures of each country.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 4

What is ‘Parliament’?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 4
What is 'Parliament'?
Parliament is the supreme legislative body in many countries, responsible for making and passing laws. It is an important part of the political system and serves as a forum for debate and decision-making. Here is a detailed explanation of what Parliament is:
Definition:
- Parliament refers to the assembly of elected representatives who are responsible for making laws and representing the interests of the people.
Key Points:
- Parliament consists of elected representatives who are chosen by the people through democratic elections.
- The number of representatives in Parliament may vary from country to country, depending on the size and population of the nation.
- Parliament acts as a legislative body and has the power to create, amend, and repeal laws.
- It serves as a platform for politicians to discuss and debate various issues affecting the country.
- Parliament plays a crucial role in the governance of a nation by providing checks and balances to the executive branch of government.
- It ensures that the government is accountable to the people and that their voices are heard.
- Parliament also serves as a platform for opposition parties to voice their concerns and hold the government accountable.
- It is responsible for approving the national budget and overseeing government expenditures.
- Parliament plays a vital role in the process of decision-making and policy formulation.
- It is an important symbol of democracy and represents the will of the people.
Conclusion:
Parliament is the assembly of elected representatives responsible for making laws and representing the interests of the people. It acts as a legislative body, provides checks and balances to the government, and plays a crucial role in decision-making and policy formulation.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 5

Can the Houses of Parliament be dissolved? Select the correct option.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 5

Can the Houses of Parliament be dissolved?
Answer: C
Explanation:
The correct option is C: Rajya Sabha is a permanent house so it cannot be dissolved whereas, Lok Sabha can be dissolved.
Here is a detailed explanation:
1. Lok Sabha:
- Lok Sabha is the lower house of Parliament in India.
- It can be dissolved before the completion of its term by the President on the advice of the Prime Minister.
- The maximum term of Lok Sabha is 5 years, but it can be dissolved earlier if the Prime Minister advises the President to do so.
2. Rajya Sabha:
- Rajya Sabha is the upper house of Parliament in India.
- It is a permanent house and cannot be dissolved.
- The members of Rajya Sabha are elected by the elected members of the State Legislative Assemblies, and their term is 6 years.
3. Procedure for Dissolution:
- In case of the dissolution of Lok Sabha, a general election is conducted to elect new members.
- However, the dissolution of Lok Sabha does not affect the functioning of Rajya Sabha. Rajya Sabha continues to function as it is not subject to dissolution.
In conclusion, while Lok Sabha can be dissolved before the completion of its term, Rajya Sabha is a permanent house and cannot be dissolved.

Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 6

The President can appoint any person of his choice as Prime Minister of India.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 6
False
The President of India does not have the power to appoint any person of his choice as the Prime Minister of India. The process of appointing the Prime Minister in India is governed by the Constitution of India and follows a specific procedure. Here are the details:
Appointment of the Prime Minister:
- After a general election or in the event of the resignation or death of the previous Prime Minister, the President of India invites the leader of the political party or coalition that has the majority in the Lok Sabha (the lower house of Parliament) to form the government.
- The President's role is largely ceremonial in this process and he or she acts on the advice of the Prime Minister.
- The Prime Minister is usually the leader of the political party or coalition that has the majority in the Lok Sabha.
- The appointment of the Prime Minister is subject to the approval of the President.
Key Points:
- The President does not have the authority to appoint any person of his choice as the Prime Minister.
- The appointment is based on the majority support in the Lok Sabha.
- The Prime Minister is chosen from the leader of the political party or coalition that has the majority in the Lok Sabha.
- The President's role is largely ceremonial and he or she acts on the advice of the Prime Minister.
Therefore, it is incorrect to say that the President can appoint any person of his choice as the Prime Minister of India.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 7

Who holds the most important and powerful position in the Government?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 7
Answer:
The most important and powerful position in the government varies depending on the country and its political system. However, in many countries, the Prime Minister or President holds significant power and influence. Let's examine the roles and powers of each position:
Prime Minister:
- The Prime Minister is the head of the government in a parliamentary system.
- They are usually elected by the legislative body or appointed by the reigning monarch or president.
- The Prime Minister is responsible for leading the executive branch and implementing government policies.
- They have the power to make decisions on behalf of the government, propose legislation, and represent the country at the international level.
- In some countries, the Prime Minister holds more power than the President, while in others, the President is the dominant figure.
President:
- The President is the head of state in many countries, including presidential systems.
- They are often directly elected by the citizens or chosen by an electoral college.
- The President represents the country domestically and internationally, and they often have ceremonial duties.
- Depending on the country, the President may have varying levels of executive power, ranging from significant authority to more symbolic roles.
- In presidential systems, the President is usually responsible for appointing government officials, vetoing legislation, and leading the executive branch.
Supreme Court:
- The Supreme Court is the highest judicial authority in many countries, including the United States.
- Its primary role is to interpret and apply the law, ensuring that it aligns with the country's constitution.
- The Supreme Court is responsible for settling legal disputes, protecting individual rights, and ensuring the separation of powers.
- While the Supreme Court is an important branch of government, it does not hold executive or legislative powers.
Conclusion:
The question of who holds the most important and powerful position in the government cannot be definitively answered as it depends on the country's political system. However, in many countries, the Prime Minister or President holds significant power and influence, while the Supreme Court ensures the rule of law and the protection of individual rights.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 8

Why do democratic governments insist on Institutions?
(i) Institutions make it difficult to have a good decision taken very quickly
(ii) Make it easy to rush through a bad decision
(iii) Institutions provide an opportunity for a wider set of people to foe consulted in any decision
(iv) In order to have delayed and complicated decision.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 8
Why do democratic governments insist on Institutions?
Explanation:
Institutions play a crucial role in democratic governments as they provide a framework for decision-making and ensure accountability and transparency. Here are the reasons why democratic governments insist on institutions:
1. Institutions make it difficult to have a good decision taken very quickly: Democratic governments value careful deliberation and consensus-building. Institutions provide a structured process for decision-making, which involves considering multiple perspectives and gathering relevant information. This ensures that decisions are well-thought-out and take into account the potential consequences.
2. Make it easy to rush through a bad decision: Rushing through decisions without proper evaluation and consultation can lead to unfavorable outcomes. Institutions help prevent hasty decision-making by requiring careful analysis, discussion, and input from various stakeholders. This reduces the likelihood of making impulsive or poorly informed choices.
3. Institutions provide an opportunity for a wider set of people to be consulted in any decision: Democratic governments strive to involve citizens in the decision-making process. Institutions such as legislative bodies, advisory committees, and public consultations allow for the inclusion of diverse perspectives and ensure that decisions are representative of the people's interests.
4. In order to have delayed and complicated decision: While institutions may introduce some level of complexity and delay in decision-making, this is often necessary to ensure thoroughness and prevent arbitrary or authoritarian decision-making. By requiring a careful and inclusive process, institutions help safeguard against rash or ill-considered choices.
In conclusion, democratic governments insist on institutions because they promote thoughtful decision-making, encourage public participation, and safeguard against hasty or arbitrary choices. Institutions provide a necessary framework for democratic governance, ensuring accountability and transparency in decision-making processes.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 9

Which of the following decisions can be taken by the President on his own?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 9
Decision that can be taken by the President on his own:
- Ask for reconsideration of a bill passed by both the Houses of Parliament
Explanation:
- The President of India has certain powers and responsibilities outlined in the Constitution. While most decisions require the advice and recommendation of the Council of Ministers, there are certain decisions that can be taken by the President on his own.
- Out of the given options, only option A, which is "Ask for reconsideration of a bill passed by both the Houses of Parliament," can be taken by the President on his own. This means that the President can return a bill for reconsideration to the Parliament if he believes that it requires further discussion or amendment.
- Option B, which is "Appointment of Chief Justice of India," is not taken by the President alone. The President appoints the Chief Justice of India in consultation with the Chief Justice of India and other judges of the Supreme Court and the High Courts.
- Option C, which is "Appointment of an IAS officer," is also not taken by the President alone. The appointment of IAS officers is done by the Central Government based on the recommendations of the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC).
- Therefore, the correct answer is option D, which states "None of the above."
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 10

The Supreme Court does not have one of these functions.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 10
Explanation:
The Supreme Court is the highest judicial authority in a country and has various functions and powers. However, one of the functions listed in the options is not performed by the Supreme Court. Let's examine each option:
A: It settles disputes between centre and states
- The Supreme Court has the power to settle disputes between the central government and state governments in federal countries like India. This is an important function of the Supreme Court.
B: It defends fundamental rights
- The Supreme Court plays a crucial role in protecting and upholding fundamental rights guaranteed by the constitution. It ensures that the rights of individuals are not violated by the government or any other authority.
C: It dismisses the executive
- This statement is incorrect. The Supreme Court does not have the power to dismiss the executive. The executive branch is responsible for the administration of the government, and the Supreme Court's role is to interpret and apply the law.
D: It performs a judicial review
- Judicial review is one of the key functions of the Supreme Court. It allows the court to review the constitutionality of laws and executive actions and strike them down if they are found to be unconstitutional.
Therefore, the correct answer is option C: "It dismisses the executive." The Supreme Court does not have the power to dismiss the executive.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 11

Who among the following is not part of the permanent executive?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 11
Permanent Executive:
- The permanent executive refers to the civil servants who hold positions in the government administration and are responsible for the day-to-day functioning of the government.
- They are appointed through competitive exams and serve in their positions until retirement.
- The permanent executive is distinct from the political executive, which includes elected officials such as ministers and the prime minister.
Options:
A: District Collector
- The district collector is a part of the permanent executive.
- They are responsible for the administration of a district and report to the state government.
B: Superintendent of Police
- The superintendent of police is also a part of the permanent executive.
- They are responsible for maintaining law and order in a district and report to the district collector.
C: Minister of State for Home Affairs
- The Minister of State for Home Affairs is not a part of the permanent executive.
- This position is a political appointment and is responsible for assisting the Minister of Home Affairs in policy-making and decision-making.
D: Accountant General
- The Accountant General is a part of the permanent executive.
- They are responsible for the maintenance of the state's accounts and audit functions.
Conclusion:
The Minister of State for Home Affairs is not a part of the permanent executive.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 12

Which of the following institutions is not a part of Parliament in India?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 12
Answer:
Institutions that are part of Parliament in India:
- Lok Sabha
- Rajya Sabha
- President
Institution that is not a part of Parliament in India:
- Gram Panchayat
Detailed
The Parliament in India is the supreme legislative body and consists of two houses - Lok Sabha (House of the People) and Rajya Sabha (Council of States). The President of India is also an integral part of the Parliament. However, the Gram Panchayat is not a part of Parliament in India.
- Lok Sabha: Lok Sabha is the lower house of Parliament and represents the people of India. Members of Lok Sabha are directly elected by the people through general elections.
- Rajya Sabha: Rajya Sabha is the upper house of Parliament and represents the states and union territories of India. The members of Rajya Sabha are elected by the members of State Legislative Assemblies.
- President: The President of India is the head of state and also an integral part of the Parliament. The President's role in the legislative process includes giving assent to bills passed by Parliament and addressing both houses.
- Gram Panchayat: Gram Panchayat, on the other hand, is a local self-government institution at the village level in India. It is not a part of the Parliament but plays a crucial role in rural governance.
In conclusion, while Lok Sabha, Rajya Sabha, and President are important components of the Parliament in India, the Gram Panchayat is not a part of Parliament.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 13

Which Institution settles disputes between citizens and the government.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 13
Institution that settles disputes between citizens and the government:

  • Supreme Court: The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States and has the ultimate authority to settle disputes between citizens and the government. It serves as the final interpreter of the Constitution and has the power to make decisions that are binding on all lower courts.

  • District Court: District courts are the trial courts of the federal court system. While they hear a wide range of cases, they primarily handle civil and criminal cases. Disputes between citizens and the government can be initially heard in district courts.

  • High Court: The term "High Court" can refer to different courts in different countries. In some countries, such as Australia and India, the High Court is the highest court and has the authority to settle disputes between citizens and the government. However, in the context of the United States, the term "High Court" is not commonly used.

  • None of these: This option is incorrect as there is an institution that settles disputes between citizens and the government, which is the Supreme Court.

Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 14

Parliament decides legal disputes between two state governments.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 14
False
Parliament does not have the authority to decide legal disputes between two state governments. Here's why:
Separation of powers:
- In a federal system like India, power is divided between the central government and the state governments. This division ensures a separation of powers and allows each level of government to function independently.
- The judiciary is responsible for resolving legal disputes and interpreting the law. It is an independent branch of government and is separate from the executive and legislative branches.
The role of the judiciary:
- The judiciary, including the Supreme Court, is the highest authority in the interpretation and application of the law. It has the power to resolve disputes between different levels of government, including disputes between state governments.
- State governments can approach the judiciary to seek resolution of their disputes, and the judiciary will make the final decision based on the constitutional provisions and legal principles.
The role of Parliament:
- Parliament is responsible for making laws and legislation at the central level. It is the legislative branch of the government.
- While Parliament can pass laws that affect the functioning of state governments, it does not have the authority to directly resolve disputes between state governments.
Conclusion:
Parliament does not decide legal disputes between two state governments. That role is reserved for the judiciary, which is an independent branch of government responsible for interpreting and applying the law.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 15

In India, we do not have an integrated judiciary.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 15
False


The statement that India does not have an integrated judiciary is false. India has a unified and integrated judiciary system that functions at both the national and state levels. Here are the key points to support this answer:
1. Structure of the Judiciary:
- The judiciary in India is structured hierarchically, with the Supreme Court at the top, followed by High Courts in each state, and subordinate courts at the district and lower levels.
- The Supreme Court acts as the apex court and has the power of judicial review over the actions of the executive and legislative branches.
2. Role of the Supreme Court:
- The Supreme Court of India is the highest judicial authority in the country. It has the power to interpret the Constitution, protect fundamental rights, and settle disputes between the central and state governments.
- It acts as a federal court, ensuring the uniformity of law across the country.
3. High Courts and Subordinate Courts:
- Each state in India has its own High Court, which has the power of superintendence and control over the subordinate courts within its jurisdiction.
- Subordinate courts include district courts, sessions courts, and various specialized courts and tribunals.
4. Independence of the Judiciary:
- The judiciary in India is independent of the executive and legislative branches, ensuring the separation of powers.
- Judges are appointed through a rigorous process and enjoy security of tenure and impartiality in their decision-making.
5. Jurisdiction and Jurisprudence:
- The Indian judiciary has jurisdiction over various areas of law, including civil, criminal, constitutional, administrative, and others.
- It follows a mix of common law principles, statutory laws, and precedents in its jurisprudence.
6. Judicial Activism:
- The Indian judiciary is known for its activism in protecting fundamental rights, promoting social justice, and addressing public interest issues.
- It often takes suo moto cognizance of matters and delivers landmark judgments that shape the legal landscape of the country.
Therefore, it is evident that India does have an integrated judiciary, which is essential for upholding the rule of law and ensuring justice for its citizens.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 16

Apart from Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha, who else constitutes the Parliament?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 16

The Indian Parliament comprises of 3 elements : The President and the two Houses— Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha.  The President of India is the Head of the State and serves for a term of 5 years.

Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 17

An assembly of people’s representatives with the power to enact laws for a country is called a/an Legislature.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 17

A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government.

Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 18

What is the total number of elected members in the Lok Sabha?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 18
Answer:
The total number of elected members in the Lok Sabha is 543.
Explanation:
In India, the Lok Sabha is the lower house of the Parliament and represents the people of the country. The number of elected members in the Lok Sabha is determined by the Constitution of India.
Here is a detailed explanation of the total number of elected members in the Lok Sabha:
1. Constitutional Provisions: According to Article 81 of the Constitution of India, the Lok Sabha should consist of not more than 550 members. Out of these, 530 members represent the states and 20 members represent the Union territories.
2. Allocation of Seats: The allocation of seats in the Lok Sabha is based on the population of each state and Union territory. The Fourteenth Schedule of the Constitution specifies the number of seats for each state and Union territory.
3. Delimitation Commission: The Delimitation Commission is responsible for the readjustment of the boundaries of parliamentary and assembly constituencies. It reviews the allocation of seats in the Lok Sabha after every census.
4. Representation of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes: The Constitution also provides for the reservation of seats for Scheduled Castes (SCs) and Scheduled Tribes (STs) in the Lok Sabha. The number of reserved seats is determined in proportion to the population of SCs and STs in each state and Union territory.
5. Updated Number of Seats: As of now, the Lok Sabha consists of 543 elected members. Out of these, 530 members represent the states and 13 members represent the Union territories. The remaining seats are reserved for SCs and STs.
Therefore, the correct answer is option C: 543.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 19

Which of the two houses is more powerful?

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 19
Introduction:
In India, the Parliament consists of two houses - Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha. The Lok Sabha is the lower house, while the Rajya Sabha is the upper house. Both houses have different powers and functions. In this comparison, we will analyze which of the two houses is more powerful.
Comparison:
Lok Sabha:
- Lok Sabha is the directly elected house of Parliament.
- It represents the people of India and their interests.
- The members of Lok Sabha are elected by the people through general elections.
- It has the power to introduce and pass bills related to finance, budget, and other important matters.
- The Lok Sabha has the power to impeach the President of India.
- The Prime Minister and Council of Ministers are accountable to Lok Sabha.
- It has more members compared to Rajya Sabha.
Rajya Sabha:
- Rajya Sabha is the house that represents the states and union territories of India.
- Its members are elected by the members of State Legislative Assemblies.
- It has the power to review and suggest amendments to bills introduced by Lok Sabha.
- Rajya Sabha plays a crucial role in the process of legislation.
- It represents the interests of the states and can safeguard their rights.
- It has a continuous existence as only one-third of its members retire every two years.
Conclusion:
Based on the powers and functions mentioned above, it can be concluded that the Lok Sabha is more powerful compared to the Rajya Sabha. The Lok Sabha represents the people and has the authority to pass important bills, impeach the President, and hold the Council of Ministers accountable. However, it is important to note that both houses play significant roles in the legislative process and are essential for the functioning of the Indian Parliament.
Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 20

The courts which function under the supervision and orders of the High Court are known as Subordinate Courts.

Detailed Solution for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 - Question 20
Subordinate Courts under the High Court
The statement given in the question is true. The courts that operate under the supervision and orders of the High Court are referred to as Subordinate Courts. Here is a detailed explanation:
1. Hierarchy of Courts:
- In a judicial system, there is a hierarchy of courts that ensures smooth functioning and the administration of justice.
- At the top of the hierarchy is the Supreme Court, followed by the High Court, and then the Subordinate Courts.
2. High Court:
- The High Court is a superior court of law and exercises jurisdiction over a specific territory or state.
- It has the power of superintendence and control over all courts within its jurisdiction, including the Subordinate Courts.
3. Subordinate Courts:
- The Subordinate Courts, also known as lower courts, are the courts that function under the direct supervision and control of the High Court.
- These courts are responsible for handling cases of a lower magnitude, including civil, criminal, and other matters.
- Subordinate Courts include District Courts, Sessions Courts, Magistrate Courts, and other specialized tribunals.
4. Powers and Orders:
- The Subordinate Courts operate under the general guidance and orders of the High Court.
- The High Court has the authority to issue guidelines, directions, and orders to ensure the proper functioning and administration of justice in the Subordinate Courts.
- The High Court also has the power to hear appeals and revise the decisions made by the Subordinate Courts.
5. Judicial System Efficiency:
- The hierarchy of courts, with the High Court overseeing the Subordinate Courts, helps maintain the efficiency and integrity of the judicial system.
- The High Court's supervision ensures that the Subordinate Courts follow legal procedures, deliver justice, and maintain consistency in their decisions.
In conclusion, the statement that the courts functioning under the supervision and orders of the High Court are known as Subordinate Courts is true. The Subordinate Courts play a vital role in delivering justice at a lower level, while the High Court ensures their proper functioning and adherence to legal procedures.
132 videos|662 docs|304 tests
Information about Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 Page
In this test you can find the Exam questions for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2 solved & explained in the simplest way possible. Besides giving Questions and answers for Test: Working Of Institutions- 2, EduRev gives you an ample number of Online tests for practice
132 videos|662 docs|304 tests
Download as PDF

How to Prepare for UPSC

Read our guide to prepare for UPSC which is created by Toppers & the best Teachers
Download the FREE EduRev App
Track your progress, build streaks, highlight & save important lessons and more!