Bulbul Yadav asked   •  7 hours ago

Read the following passage given below and answer the question that follows by choosing the most appropriate option. 
The study of history provides many benefits. First, we learn from the past. We may repeat mistakes, but, at least, we have the opportunity to avoid them. Second, history teaches what questions to ask about the present. Contrary to some people's view, the study of history is not the memorization of names, dates, and places. It is a thoughtful examination of the forces that have shaped the courses of human life. We can examine events from the past and then draw interpretation about current events. History teaches us about likely outcomes. Another benefit of the study of history is the broad range of benefits experience which is covered. War and peace are certainly covered as are national and international affairs. However, matters of culture (art, literature, and music) are also included in historical study. Human nature is an important part of history: emotions like passion, greed, and insecurity have influenced the shaping of world affairs. Anyone who thinks that the study of history is boring has not really studied. 
Q. Which method of teaching history would the author of the passage support? 
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Deepti Sareen asked   •  10 hours ago

Directions (1-10) : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.
I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.
It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.
I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.
Q. How old is the narrator, the one who is telling you the story and how old is Nick?
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Wahid Khan asked   •  yesterday

Directions (19–20) : Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word in underline. 
“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.
The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 
Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 
Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 
Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.
Q. Pleasant
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Akshay Kumar asked   •  yesterday

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow by selecting the most appropriate option. 
1. Nammescong Creek flowed into the backs of my thighs as fished, pausing between casts to secure my balance in the current and admire a new hatch of pale yellow mayflies lift from the stream. Over my shoulder, the sun dropped into a farmer's cornfield, the final patch of orange light on the water enough for me to spot the small, vaguely metallic object at my feet. A credit card? Retrieving it, ran my thumb over its raised lettering, rubbing away the mud and a string of algae. A name appeared, along with an expiration date. June 1984. I had discovered arrowheads here in the past, so it didn't seem misplaced to finds tool used by modern man to obtain a meal. 
2. I took a moment to consider how the card had come to rest in the bed of the Nammy. thought maybe there was a story in it. I was curious to know if the owner has lost his wallet while fishing, the whole trip ruined the second he'd inventoried his cash or dug out his license for a game warden. Over time the leather would've rotted into fish food, with the scoured plastic remaining. I wondered how many miles the card might have ridden on spring floods over the past quarter of a century. For all knew he could've been robbed, the thieves stripping out the money and tossing the billfold away later as they crossed a bridge. 
3. Looking him up and phoning, I recited the card number and issuing bank. He laughed, recalling it as the first credit account he'd even taken out, a line of imaginary cash in those years when he had no real money. But that finally changed, he explained, after an industrial accident cost him his left eye, the payoff from the plant enabling him to retire eight years earlier than expected and moves to a small hobby farm in southern Virginia. He told me a glass eye wasn't his style, so he had taken to wearing an eye patch, which his wife still hates and his grandchildren - ages three, five and seven - have always loved, as it makes Grandpop look like a pirate. He called them his Miracle Grandbabies, born to a daughter who struggled with alcohol and drug addiction for years - her rock-bottom in 1984, a year before she cleaned up for good. 
4. But in the end, the man couldn't remember ever losing his wallet, either by accident or theft. He said he'd never fished the Nammy, that, in fact, he'd always thought the sport a little boring and so I came to realize there was no story here. 
Q. "Flowed into the backs of my thighs" informs the reader that the narrator was fishing while 
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Alishaka asked   •  yesterday

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.
Rahul, a young householder, used to study the scriptures everyday under a Guru. One day the guru was explaining the following passage from the Upanishads: “No husband is loved by his wife for his own sake but it is all for the sake of the Self……….No sons are loved by their father for their sake but is all for the sake of the Self that the sons become dear to him.” At that stage, Rahul intervened and said, “Sir, in my case, both my parents and my wife love me so dearly for my own sake that if I am delayed by a few minutes in reaching home they get highly agitated and if something happens to me they will die.” The Guruji said, “You shall learn the truth of it tomorrow when you see the result of a test I am going to hold. Before going to bed tonight you must swallow this herbal powder. As a result, you will lie as if dead tomorrow morning but you will be able to hear all that is spoken in your presence. After a few hours when the effect of this medicine wears off, you will become normal and get up. You will see the fun.” Rahul did as instructed and in the morning his wife and parents found him ‘dead’–lying motionless without any pulse or heartbeat. The Guruji was apprised of the situation and he came over. They entreated him to bring Rahul back to life by using his divine powers. The Guruji asked for a jar full of water and said, “I shall draw out all the bad destiny responsible for your son’s death into his water. One of you will have to drink this water. The one who drinks will die immediately while Rahul will be restored to life. Tell me who among you is prepared to die for him ?” Both the parents refused, saying, “We are old and helping each other mutually. If one dies, the other will not have anybody to help. So our drinking the water is out of question”. Rahul’s young wife also said, “I am very young and have not seen anything of this world yet. When such old people, who have seen life in its fullness, do not want to die how can you expect me to volunteer for death?” A bright idea flashed into the mind of the father who told the Guruji, “Sir, you are a renunciate and have to relatives to mourn your death. Why don’t you drink the water yourself? We will conduct your funeral in a grand manner.” 
Q. Which of the following can best explain the clause “Rahul did as instructed” as given in the passage? 
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Rajmani Singh asked   •  yesterday

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.
It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.
I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.
Q. Which sentence tells us that Nick was very happy at the thought of giving his mother a gift?
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Dalbir Kambo asked   •  yesterday

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow by selecting the most appropriate option. 
1.Nammescong Creek flowed into the backs of my thighs as fished, pausing between casts to secure my balance in the current and admire a new hatch of pale yellow mayflies lift from the stream. Over my shoulder, the sun dropped into a farmer's cornfield, the final patch of orange light on the water enough for me to spot the small, vaguely metallic object at my feet. A credit card? Retrieving it, ran my thumb over its raised lettering, rubbing away the mud and a string of algae. A name appeared, along with an expiration date. June 1984. I had discovered arrowheads here in the past, so it didn't seem misplaced to finds tool used by modern man to obtain a meal. 
2. I took a moment to consider how the card had come to rest in the bed of the Nammy. thought maybe there was a story in it. I was curious to know if the owner has lost his wallet while fishing, the whole trip ruined the second he'd inventoried his cash or dug out his license for a game warden. Over time the leather would've rotted into fish food, with the scoured plastic remaining. I wondered how many miles the card might have ridden on spring floods over the past quarter of a century. For all knew he could've been robbed, the thieves stripping out the money and tossing the billfold away later as they crossed a bridge. 
3. Looking him up and phoning, I recited the card number and issuing bank. He laughed, recalling it as the first credit account he'd even taken out, a line of imaginary cash in those years when he had no real money. But that finally changed, he explained, after an industrial accident cost him his left eye, the payoff from the plant enabling him to retire eight years earlier than expected and moves to a small hobby farm in southern Virginia. He told me a glass eye wasn't his style, so he had taken to wearing an eye patch, which his wife still hates and his grandchildren - ages three, five and seven - have always loved, as it makes Grand pop look like a pirate. He called them his Miracle Grandbabies, born to a daughter who struggled with alcohol and drug addiction for years - her rock-bottom in 1984, a year before she cleaned up for good. 
4. But in the end, the main couldn't remember ever losing his wallet, either by accident or theft. He said he'd never fished the Nammy, that, in fact, he'd always thought the sport a little boring and so I came to realize there was no story here. 
 
    Q. 'The whole trip ruined' was because of the 
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