Rohan and Sohan had certain amounts of money with them.The ratio of the amounts with them is 8:5 .Each day Rohan spends a certain amount and Sohan earns one - sixth of the amount that Rohan spends.After 9 days the ratio of th... more

Komal Verma answered  •  7 hours ago
Let Rohan has 8x and Sohan has 5x
let each day Rohan spends 6y so each day Sohan earns y
as per que
8x-54y/5x+9y=10/11
88x-594y=50x+90y
38x=684y
x=18y
now let after D more days the ratio of their amount will be 18:35
so
(8x-54y-6yD)/(5x+9y+yD)=18/35
90y-6yD/99y+yD=18/35
35(90-6D)=18(99+D)
3150-210D=1782+18D
228D=1368
D=6 more
... more

A shopkeeper sell a watch for Rs. 575 and makes a profit of 15%, he sells a different watch at a loss of 10%. Over all, he neither gains nor loses. What is cost price of the second watch?

Komal Verma answered  •  8 hours ago
Sp of first watch=575 at 15% profit
15%=3/20
sp=23 unit=575
1unit=25
cp=20 unti=500 rps

+15. -10
0
10. 15
2. 3
2=500
3=750
cost of second watch =750

Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.
In a month, Rohan goes to market for n times, all these days are decided by a rule that he will not go on same day again unless he covers all other days of a week. Also the difference between the days of his any two outings is never same. If 1st of July is Sunday, then what is the maximum value of n?
  • a)
    7
  • b)
    6
  • c)
    8
  • d)
    9
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Pioneer Academy answered  •  10 hours ago
For n to be maximum we have to arrange days will minimum difference between them. Now total day in July are 31.
Let ‘|’ denotes the days on which Rohan goes to market then | 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | = 29 days.
The number between ‘|’ represents the difference in days between two visits.
Hence, maximum days are 8. Note since we have to follow the first rule, the difference has to be arranged in different way and we can use 7 and 8 instead of 5 and 6 difference or any such combination as the total days are 31
One solution of this is 1, 9, 14, 17, 18, 20, 26, 29 or 30. Note multiple solutions are possible but in all case you cannot arrange them in such way that n > 8, as then numbers of days he does not go to market + number of days he goes to market > 31

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the word from the options which is Opposite in meaning to the given word.
Captivate
  • a)
    Attract
  • b)
    Charm
  • c)
    Disgust
  • d)
    Delight
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Deepti Jindal answered  •  10 hours ago
► Captivate means to attract and hold the attention or interest of, as by beauty or excellence or to enchant.
► Charm also means to impress or attract someone.
Disgust means to offend the good taste, moral sense.
► Delight is a high degree of pleasure or enjoyment; joy; rapture.
So, option 3 is appropriate.

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
Last fall, Toby Young did something ironic. Toby is the son of Michael Young, the British sociologist and Labour life peer whose 1958 satire The Rise of the Meritocracy has been credited with coining the term. In September, he published an 8,000-word reconsideration of his father's signature concept in an Australian monthly. The old man was right that meritocracy would gradually create a stratified and immobile society, he wrote, but wrong that abolishing selective education was the cure. Unlike my father, I'm not an egalitarian, Young wrote. If meritocracy creates a new caste system, the answer is more meritocracy. To restore equality of opportunity, he suggested subsidies for intelligence-maximizing embryo selection for poor parents,with below-average IQs. The irony lay in the implication that Young, because of who his father was, has special insight into the ideology that holds that it shouldn't matter who your father is.
His outlandish resort to eugenics suggests that Toby Young found himself at a loss for solutions, as all modern critics of meritocracy seem to do. The problems they describe are fundamental, but none of their remedies are more than tweaks to make the system more efficient or less prejudicial to the poor. For instance, in Excellent Sheep, William Deresiewicz accuses the Ivy League of imposing a malignant ruling class on the country, then meekly suggests that elite universities might solve the problem by giving greater weight in admissions to socioeconomic disadvantage and less to resum-stuffing. In The Tyranny of the Meritocracy, Lani Guinier belies the harsh terms of her title by advising that we simply learn to reward "democratic rather than testocratic merit". Christopher Hayes subtitled his debut book Twilight of the Elites "America after Meritocracy", but the remedies he prescribes are all meant to preserve meritocracy by making it more effective. In his latest book, Our Kids, Robert Putnam proves that American social mobility is in crisis, then reposes his hopes in such predictable nostrums as housing vouchers and universal pre-kindergarten.
When an author caps two hundred pages of rhetorical fire with fifteen pages of platitudes or utopian fantasy, that is called "the last chapter problem". When every author who takes up a question finds himself equally at a loss, that is something else. In this case, our authors fail as critics of meritocracy because they cannot get their heads outside of it. They are incapable of imagining what it would be like not to believe in it. They assume the validity of the very thing they should be questioning.
Meritocracy began by destroying an aristocracy; it has ended in creating a new one. Nearly every book in the American anti-meritocracy literature makes this charge, in what is usually its most empirically reinforced chapter.  But the solutions on offer never rise to the scale of the problem. Authors attack the meritocratic machine with screwdrivers, not sledgehammers, and differ only in which valve they want to adjust. Some think the solution is to tip more disadvantaged kids over the lip of the intake funnel, which would probably make things worse. If more people start competing for a finite number of slots, slim advantages like those that come from having grown up with two meritocrats for parents will only loom larger.  Others favor the slightly more radical solution of redefining our idea of merit, usually in a way that downplays what Guinier calls "pseudoscientific measures of excellence". She even has a replacement in mind, the Bial-Dale College Adaptability Index, the testing of which involves Legos. (Why are you laughing? It is backed by a study.)
My solution is quite different. The meritocracy is hardening into an aristocracy"so let it. Every society in history has had an elite, and what is an aristocracy but an elite that has put some care into making itself presentable? Allow the social forces that created this aristocracy to continue their work, and embrace the label. By all means this caste should admit as many worthy newcomers as is compatible with their sense of continuity. New brains, like new money, have been necessary to every ruling class, meritocratic or not. If ethnic balance is important to meritocrats, they should engineer it into the system. If geographic diversity strikes them as important, they should ensure that it exists, ideally while keeping an eye on the danger of hoovering up all of the native talent from regional America. But they must give up any illusion that such tinkering will make them representative of the country over which they preside. They are separate, parochial in their values, unique in their responsibilities. That is what makes them aristocratic.
Q. According to the author of the passage:
I. the solutions to the problems of meritocracy primarily suggest tinkering with the system rather than abolishing it.
II. the solutions for the problems posed by meritocracy are not just not strong enough to question the very validity of the system and break its very foundations.
III. solutions for meritocracy, such as the one that involve re-defining merit, miss the mark by making suggestions that are laughable in themselves.
... more

Talent Skill Learning answered  •  10 hours ago
Each of the statements can be derived from the lines: But the solutions on offer never rise to the scale of the problem. Authors attack the meritocratic machine with screwdrivers, not sledgehammers, and differ only in which valve they want to adjust.......Others favor the slightly more radical solution of redefining our idea of merit, usually in a way that downplays what Guinier calls "pseudoscientific measures of excellence". She even has a replacement in mind, the Bial-Dale College Adaptability Index, the testing of which involves Legos. (Why are you laughing? It is backed by a study.)

Analyse the following caselet and answer the questions that follow:
Purushottam Bhatnagar owns and operates a sweetshop Puru and Sons. He is about 60 years old and is eager to hand over the business to his sons Ratan and Pramod. He however, fears that his sons, fresh from college may not understand the tricks of the trade.
Purushottam's eldest son discovered that the shop repackaged sweets that were close to expiry and sold them at a discount under different names. These sweets usually get sold very fast. But his son was concerned about the possible consequences of this practice. Purushottam was thinking of the following arguments to convince his son.
1. These sweets are consumed the same day and therefore there is no cause for worry.
2. Reduced prices give enough indication about the sweets to the customers.
3. These products are preferred by those who cannot afford full price and, in a way, this is a service done to them.
4. In the past 30 years not a single person has reported ill because of consumption of these sweets.
5. Repackaging and selling sweets is a common practice.
Q. Which combination of arguments below is MOST LIKELY to convince Ratan?
... more

Nipun Tuteja answered  •  10 hours ago
Statement 1 by itself is not a correct answer since “no cause of worry” is not supported by any evidence. This support comes from Statement 4. Therefore Statement 1 together with Statement 4 will convince Ratan. Therefore, Option B is the right answer.

DIRECTIONS for questions: The passage given below is accompanied by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.
Immortality has gone secular. It’s now the subject of serious investment - both intellectual and financial - by philosophers, scientists and the Silicon Valley. But if we treat death as a problem, what are the ethical implications of the highly speculative ‘solutions’ being mooted?
Of course, we don’t currently have the means of achieving human immortality, nor is it clear that we ever will. But two hypothetical options have attracted the most attention: rejuvenation technology, and mind uploading.
Rejuvenation promises to remove and reverse the damage of ageing at the cellular level. Gerontologists argue that growing old is a disease that we can circumvent by having our cells replaced or repaired at regular intervals. Practically speaking, this might mean that every few years, you would visit a rejuvenation clinic. Doctors would not only remove infected, cancerous or otherwise unhealthy cells, but also induce healthy ones to regenerate more effectively and remove accumulated waste products. This deep makeover would ‘turn back the clock’ on your body, leaving you physiologically younger than your actual age. You would, however, remain just as vulnerable to death from acute trauma - that is, from injury and poisoning, whether accidental or not - as you were before.
The other option would be mind uploading, in which your brain is digitally scanned and copied onto a computer. This method presupposes that consciousness is akin to software running on some kind of organic hard-disk - that what makes you ‘you’ is the sum total of the information stored in the brain’s operations, and therefore it should be possible to migrate the self onto a different physical substrate or platform. This remains a highly controversial stance. However, let’s leave aside for now the question of where ‘you’ really reside, and play with the idea that it might be possible to replicate the brain in digital form one day.
Unlike rejuvenation, mind uploading could actually offer something tantalisingly close to true immortality. Just as we currently backup files on external drives and cloud storage, your uploaded mind could be copied innumerable times and backed up in secure locations.
Despite this advantage, mind uploading presents some difficult ethical issues. Some philosophers think there is a possibility that your upload would appear functionally identical to your old self without having any conscious experience of the world.
You’d be more of a zombie than a person, let alone you. Others have argued that since you are reducible to the processes and content of your brain, a functionally identical copy of it - no matter the substrate on which it runs - could not possibly yield anything other than you.
What if the whole process is so qualitatively different from biological existence as to make you utterly terrified or even catatonic? If so, what if you can’t communicate to outsiders or switch yourself off? In this case, your immortality would amount to more of a curse than a blessing. Death might not be so bad after all, but unfortunately it might no longer be an option.
Which option is more ethically fraught? In our view, ‘mere’ rejuvenation would probably be a less problematic choice. Yes, vanquishing death for the entire human species would greatly exacerbate our existing problems of overpopulation and inequality - but the problems would at least be reasonably familiar. We can be pretty certain, for instance, that rejuvenation would widen the gap between the rich and poor, and would eventually force us to make decisive calls about resource use, whether to limit the rate of growth of the population, and so forth. On the other hand, mind uploading would open up a plethora of completely new and unfamiliar ethical quandaries.
Q. Which of the following is not a negative consequence of rejuvenation technology?
I. Those who undergo rejuvenation become vulnerable to injury, poisoning and trauma.
II. Rejuvenation could widen the gap between the rich and the poor.
III. Rejuvenation could increase the population burden.
IV. Rejuvenation is still a hypothesis, and not practically feasible.
... more

Aadhar Academy answered  •  10 hours ago
I - Consider the sentence, ‘You would, however, remain just as vulnerable to death from acute trauma - that is, from injury and poisoning, whether accidental or not - as you were before'. This is one of the shortcomings of the rejuvenation technology - why it cannot offer a permanent solution to immortality. It is not a consequence. It is not that people who undergo rejuvenation become vulnerable to injury or poisoning. Hence, I cannot be counted as a negative consequence.
II - From ‘We can be pretty certain, for instance, that rejuvenation would widen the gap between the rich and poor’, we can understand that II is a consequence.
III - From ‘In our view, mere' rejuvenation would probably be a less problematic choice. Yes, vanquishing death for the entire human species would greatly exacerbate our existing problems of overpopulation and inequality', we can understand that a population burst is a consequence (not just of rejuvenation, mind you, but of immortality in general).
IV - This is once again a caveat, a disclaimer that these technologies for achieving immortality are not available to us. This is not a consequence. Hence, IV can be counted out.
Hence, Option b is the answer.

If f1(x) = x2 + 11x + n and f2(x) = x, then the largest positive integer n for which the equation f1(x) = f2(x) has two distinct real roots is
Correct answer is '24'. Can you explain this answer?

Nipuns Institute answered  •  10 hours ago
f1(x) = x2 + 11x + n and f2(x) = x,
f1(x) = f2(x)
x2 + 11x + n = x
x2 + 10x + n = 0
For this equation to have distinct real roots, b2 - 4ac>0
102> 4n
=> n < 100/4
=> n < 25
Thus, largest integral value that n can take is 24.
Positive Mark: 3
Negative Mark: 0
 
 

In the table below the check marks indicate all languages spoken by five people: Paula, Quentin, Robert, Sally and Terence. For example, Paula speaks only Chinese and English.
These five people form three teams, Team 1, Team 2 and Team 3. Each team has either 2 or 3 members. A team is said to speak a particular language if at least one of its members speak that language.
The following facts are known. 
(1) Each team speaks exactly four languages and has the same number of members. 
(2) English and Chinese are spoken by all three teams, Basque and French by exactly two teams and the other languages by exactly one team. 
(3) None of the teams include both Quentin and Robert. 
(4) Paula and Sally are together in exactly two teams. 
(5) Robert is in Team 1 and Quentin is in Team 3.
Q. Who among the following four is not a member of Team 2?
  • a)
    Paula
  • b)
    Terence 
  • c)
    Quentin
  • d)
    Sally
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Bakliwal Institute answered  •  10 hours ago
From statement 1 and 2,Each team speaks exactly four languages. English and Chinese are spoken by all three teams, Basque and French by exactly two teams and the other languages by exactly one team, multiple options are possible.
In the following tables: A, B, C can be any team among Team 1,Team 2,Team 3.
From the data given in the question, the person who speaks Arabic also speaks French. Thus the only option possible is 'Table 2'.
According to statement 4, "Paula and Sally are together in exactly two teams."
Sally knows Basque, thus, she will be in group A and B, with Paula.
According to statement 5, Robert(Arabic) is in Team 1 and Quentin(Dutch) is in Team 3.
Thus, Group C is Team 1 and Group A is Team 3.
From the table, the correct option is C.

A large store has only three departments, Clothing, Produce, and Electronics. The following figure shows the percentages of revenue and cost from the three departments for the years 2016, 2017 and 2018. The dotted lines depict percentage levels. So for example, in 2016, 50% of store's revenue came from its Electronics department while 40% of its costs were incurred in the Produce department.
In this setup, Profit is computed as (Revenue - Cost) and Percentage Profit as Profit/Cost × 100%.
It is known that 
1. The percentage profit for the store in 2016 was 100%. 
2. The store’s revenue doubled from 2016 to 2017, and its cost doubled from 2016 to 2018. 
3. There was no profit from the Electronics department in 2017. 
4. In 2018, the revenue from the Clothing department was the same as the cost incurred in the Produce department.
Q. What was the ratio of revenue generated from the Produce department in 2017 to that in 2018?
... more

Mn M Wonder Series answered  •  10 hours ago
We can make the following table from the web chart given in the question
If we consider the total cost in the year 2016 as 100, then according to Statement 1, the total revenue in 2016 must be 200.
The store’s revenue doubled from 2016 to 2017, thus the total revenue in the year 2017 = 400.
We can find the revenue for the individual department in the year 2017, from the table.
There was no profit from the Electronics department in 2017, thus, we can find the total cost in 2017= 300
Considering the statement 4, we can find the total revenue in 2018 and tabulate the following table.
The ratio of revenue generated from the Produce department in 2017 to that in 2018 = 160:100= 8:5

Which of the below pendulums will move the slowest, if each one of them is displaced by an angle of from the center?
  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)
Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?

Ruchika Chandi answered  •  10 hours ago
The time period of a pendulum(T) =
The time period is directly proportional to the length of the pendulum.
More the time period, lesser will be the speed of the pendulum.
So, Option B is correct.

Analyse the following caselet and answer the questions that follow:
Nicky, Manoj and Benita are graduates from a top ranked B-school. They joined ABC corporation a year ago. ABC is known for its performance-oriented culture. This is the first time the organization recruited from a top ranked Bschool. They are part of a five-member team with two others from lower ranked B-schools. Nicky, Manoj and Benita draw 40 per cent higher salaries than other team members. This team reports to Amelia Ganeshmurthi, a senior executive.
'Nicky's performance on the job is disappointing though she is considered a very helpful person outside the workplace helping her teammates and others in the organization with their personal needs e.g., finding a place to rent, a good place to get homely food etc. On the other hand, Manoj and Benita are performing well in their respective jobs and are perceived by their teammates as important to the team. But they are not interested in helping outside the workplace. Amelia has to decide the future of the trio. She has the following options:
1. Inform the higher authorities about Nicky's poor performance and ask them to take a call.
2. Send Nicky for a one-month training earmarked for top performing employees.
3. Serve Nicky an ultimatum to improve within the next six months or get fired.
4. Even though they performed well, give Manoj and Benita average ratings because of their disinterest in helping outside workplace.
5. Give Manoj and Benita high ratings based on their performance.
Q. Which of the following combination of above options will be the MOST APPROPRIATE?
... more

Pioneer Academy answered  •  23 hours ago
ABC is a performance focused organization, punishing poor performance and rewarding good. Among the combination of decisions that are appropriate for the given situation, one decision from 1, 2 and 3 and one from 4 and 5 have to be chosen (1, 2 and 3 are about Nicky and 4 and 5 are about Manoj and Benita). Action 1: Amelia is running away from her responsibility with this action. Action 2: This decision rewards Nicky for non-performance. Action 3: Amelia is asking Nicky to focus on performance and gives her an ultimatum. This is a better decision compared to the actions 1 and 2. Action 4: This decision is wrong because Amelia is punishing Manoj and Benita for their behaviour outside workplace. Action 5: This decision rewards Manoj and Benita for their performance and is the right thing to do. Based on this rationale, the best combination would be 3 and 5 therefore Option E is the right answer.

DIRECTIONS for questions: The passage given below is accompanied by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.
This is going to be awkward, but someone has to tell you, so it may as well be me: you're kind of a loser. You know that feeling you sometimes have that your friends have more friends than you? You're right. They do. And you know how almost everyone at the gym seems in better shape than you, and how everyone at your book club seems better read? Well, they are.
If you're single, it's probably a while since you dated – what with you being such a loser – but when you did, do you recall thinking the other person was more romantically experienced than you? I'm afraid it was probably true.
The only consolation in all this is that it's nothing personal: it's a bizarre statistical fact that almost all of us have fewer friends than our friends, more flab than our fellow gym-goers, and so on. In other words, you're a loser, but it's not your fault: it's just maths. (I mean, it's probably just maths. You might be a catastrophic failure as a human being, for all I know. But let's focus on the maths.)
To anyone not steeped in statistics, this seems crazy. Friendship is a two-way street, so you'd assume things would average out: any given person would be as likely to be more popular than their friends as less. But as the sociologist Scott Feld showed, in a 1991 paper bluntly entitled Why Your Friends Have More Friends Than You Do, this isn't true. If you list all your friends, and then ask them all how many friends they have, their average is very likely to be higher than your friend count.
The reason is bewilderingly simple: "You are more likely to be friends with someone who has more friends than with someone who has fewer friends," as the psychologist Satoshi Kanazawa puts it. You're more likely to know more popular people, and less likely to know less popular ones. Some people may be completely friendless, but you're not friends with any of them.
Researchers have since observed the so-called ‘Friendship Paradox’ in a wide variety of situations. The implications of this seeming paradox cascade through daily life. People at your gym tend to be fitter than you because you tend not to encounter the ones who rarely go; “If your lover only had one lover," Kanazawa writes, "you are probably not him or her." This is also why people think of certain beaches or museums or airports as usually busier than they actually are: by definition, most people aren't there when they're less crowded. So, if you’re an active Facebook user feeling inadequate and unhappy because your friends seem to be doing better than you are, remember that almost everybody else on the network is in a similar position.
This takes some mental gymnastics to appreciate, but it's deeply reassuring. We're often told that comparing yourself with others is a fast track to misery; but the usual explanation is that we choose to compare ourselves with the wrong people: we pick the happiest, wealthiest, most talented people, and ignore how much better off we are than most.
Feld's work, though, suggests that this is only half of the problem. When it comes to those people we know well, the field from which we're choosing our comparisons is statistically skewed against us to begin with. So next time you catch yourself feeling self-pityingly inferior to almost everyone you know, take heart: you're right, but then, it's the same for them, too.
Q. Which of the following reiterates the assumption in the line ‘Friendship is a two-way street, so you'd assume things would average out’?
... more

Imk Pathshala answered  •  23 hours ago
The assumption made by the author while saying this has actually been elaborated in the following line: any given person would be as likely to be more popular than their friends as less. In other words, the assumption is people are connected both ways and there is no pattern behind who is more popular and who isn’t (an idea the passage contradicts). In other words, if we compare the number of friends every individual has(X) with the average of the number of friends the individuals ‘friends have (Y), the author's initial assumption is that it will cancel out. In other words, the probability of X being more or less than Y is the same. A simple way of looking at this question is identifying whether an option strengthens the Friendship Paradox or goes against it. Since, the author’s initial assumption here was contradicting the Friendship Paradox, one can identify whether a particular option demonstrates the assumption or contradicts it.... more

Instructions: Please read the following information and answer the questions.
There are 12 seats in total which are arranged as 6 in a row facing each other. Ten people have occupied the seats in such a way that 5 are seated in each row and there is equal distance between adjacent seats. In row 1, Sadhana, David, Lakshmi, Sonal and Anu are seated and all of them are facing south. In row 2, Lily, Suresh, Deepika, Mahesh and Arvind are sitting and all of them are facing north. One seat is vacant in each row. In the given seating arrangement described above, each person seated in a row faces another member of the other row or a vacant seat. Each member likes only one activity or sport namely, kabaddi, Cricket, Baseball, Chess, Wrestling, Boating, walking, Running, Swimming and Skating. Mahesh sits third to the right of Deepika and likes Chess. Only 2 people sit between Suresh and the vacant seat. Suresh sits at one of the extreme end. Deepika does not like Kabbadi and Running. Suresh does not like Wrestling and Baseball. Ann is not an immediate neighbor of Lakshmi. David likes Skating. The one who likes Baseball faces the other one who likes Running. Vacant seat of row 1 does not face Mahesh and he does not sit at any extreme ends. The one who likes baseball sits opposite to the one, who sits third right of the one, who sits opposite to Mahesh. Lakshmi is not an immediate neighbor of Sonal. Arvind, who neither likes Wrestling nor Boating does not face vacant seat and sits opposite to the person who likes Kabaddi. Deepika does not sit at extreme ends. Sonal faces Deepika. Vacant seats are not opposite to each other. Two seats are there between Lakshmi and David. David sits third right of the one who likes Walking. The one who likes swimming faces the one who likes chess. The person who likes kabaddi and running are adjacent to each other. Vacant seat of the row 1 is not an immediate neighbor of Sonal. Lakshmi is located at an extreme end.
Q. Who face vacant seats?
... more

Deepti Jindal answered  •  23 hours ago
We have the following details of Row 2.
1. Mahesh sits third to the right of Deepika and likes Chess.
2. Only 2 people sit between Suresh and the vacant seat.
3. Suresh sits at one of the extreme ends.
4. The vacant seat of row 1 does not face Mahesh and he does not sit at any extreme ends.
5. Arvind, who neither likes Wrestling nor Boating does not face vacant seat and sits opposite to the person who likes Kabaddi.
6. Deepika does not sit at extreme ends.
7. The one who likes baseball sits opposite to the one, who sits third right of the one, who sits opposite to Mahesh.
8.Vacant seats are not opposite to each other.
9.Sonal faces Deepika.
Thus, we can make the following arrangement:
Further information:
Ann is not an immediate neighbour of Lakshmi.
Lakshmi is not an immediate neighbour of Sonal.
Two seats are there between Lakshmi and David.
The vacant seat of row 1 is not an immediate neighbour of Sonal. Lakshmi is located at an extreme end.
David likes Skating. David sits third right of the one who likes Walking.
The person who likes kabaddi and running are adjacent to each other.
The one who likes Baseball faces the other one who likes Running.
Deepika does not like Kabbadi and Running.
Suresh does not like Wrestling and Baseball.
The one who likes swimming faces the one who likes chess.
We can make the following table:
Correct Option B

Analyse the following caselet and answer the questions that follow:
Geetha Gawde can cultivate up to 6 crops a year. Crop A and B arc ready for harvest in 2 months; crop C and D in 3 months, and crop E and F in 4 months. Crop A can be cultivated from January to June; crop B can be cultivated from April1 to September; crop C can be cultivated from May to December; crops D as well as E can be cultivated from August to December, and crop F from November to Mgy. If Geetha plans a change of crop the soil should be left fallow for one month; however, if the same crop is sown no fallow time is needed. Sowing takes place only at the beginning of a month. Geetha can only harvest a maximum of 1000 units of any crop at any point in time. The production cost per unit (incurred at the time of sowing) andpriceper unit of crop are as follows:
For Geetha soil preparation does not incur any cost. If a crop is abandoned before the scheduled harvesting, she gets no money. Geetha is preparing a cropping schedule to maximize her annual profits (i.e., price- cost). She plans to replicate the schedule in the coming years.
Q. Which of the following would DEFINITELY be a part of the ideal schedule?
... more

Nipun Tuteja answered  •  23 hours ago
Though crop E generates the same profit, we cannot produce E from Sep to Dec because in that case, crop A cannot be cultivated from Jan. Hence, the correct answer is Option C.
Tamanna Jain asked   •  2 hours ago

Directions: These questions are based on the following information
IT School of Management is a management institute involved in teaching,training and research. Currently it has 37 faculty members. They are involved in three jobs: teaching, training and research. Each faculty member working with IT School of Management has to be involved in at least one of the three jobs mentioned above:
  • A maximum number of faculty members are involved in training. Among them, a number of faculty members are having additional involvement in the research.
  • The number of faculty members in research alone is double the number of faculty members involved in all the three jobs.
  • 17 faculty members are involved in teaching. The number of faculty members involved in teaching alone is less than the number of faculty members involved in research alone.
  • The faculty members involved in the teaching are also involved in at least one more job.
(2011)
Q. After sometime,the faculty members who were involved in all the three tasks were asked to withdraw from one task. As a result, one of the faculty members each opted out of teaching and research, while remaining ones involved in all the three tasks opted out of training. Which one of the following statements, then necessarily follows:
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Analyse the following caselet and answer the questions that follow:
Mrs Biswas was to retire in one year after serving in the construction department of the Gujarat government for more than thirty years. After retirement, she wanted to spend her retired life along with Mr Biswas, a retired school teacher in a small town in Kerala. They had two children, both studying in Bengaluru. The Biswas' wished to construct a house in Kerala with their life savings. The couple gathered information about owning a house in Kerala. They had four options:
1. Buy a fully furnished house from a big developer and furnish it.
2. Buy a semi-furnished house from a big developer and furnish it.
3. Get a local unregistered contractor to construct a house and furnish it.
4. Mr Biswas with inputs from the family could supervise the construction of a house back in Kerala by employing the best material, engineers, masons and labourers.
Q. Which of the following additional information, IF TRUE, would improve the chances of the third option being preferred?
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Talent Skill Learning answered  •  23 hours ago
Option C makes first and second options (in the caselet) less attractive, but does not make third option (in the caselet) as attractive as option B does. Option D makes first option (in the caselet) and second option (in the caselet) attractive but does not improve the chances of preferring the third option (in the caselet). Option E makes first option (in the caselet) less attractive and second option most attractive. Based on arguments presented in the previous question, it is clear that third option (in the caselet) was not the best. Hence, A is not the right answer. If the builder had good reputation among the local house owners, it means that the builder has been constructing houses to the satisfaction of the local house owners which probably would mean that the builder should be able to assure good quality. Hence, B is the answer.
Mayank Barthwal asked   •  3 hours ago

Exhibit I as under provides the data of India's Merchandize Imports (Billion US Dollar) on left axis  and Percentage of Food: Fuel, Manufactures and Ores & Metals lmports of India's on the right axis. Similarly; Exhibit 2 provides data of India's Merchandize Exports (Billion US Dollar) on left axis and Percentage exports of Food, Fuel, Manufactures and Ores & Metals on the right axis. Attempt the questions in the context of information provided as under:
A.Trade Balance = Import Minus Exports
B:Trade Decit If Imports are more than Exports
C:TradeSurplus= If Exports are more than Imports
Exhibit 1: India's Total Merchandize Imports (US Dollar in Billion) and Percentage Imports of Food, Fuel, Manufacturers and Ores and Metals (2012 - 2016)
Exhibit 2: India's Total Merchandize Exports (US Dollar in Billion) and Percentage Exports of Food, Fuel, Manufacturers and Ores and Metals (2012 - 2016)
Q. Assuming India's absolute trade decit grows by S4 Billion USDollar and exportSbecome 324 Billion US Dollar in the year 2017. What shall be India's absolute importSoffood and fuel in 2017 if sectoral composition of food, fuel, manufactures, ores and metals remain· same as that of2016?
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The number of APs with 5 distinct terms that can be formed from the first 50 natural numbers is
(2014)
  • a)
    325
  • b)
    300
  • c)
    375
  • d)
    288
Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?

Bakliwal Institute answered  •  23 hours ago
For d = 1, Total = 46
(1, 2, 3, 4, 5), (2, 3, 4, 5, 6) ............(46, 47, 48, 49, 50)
For d = 2, total = 42
(1, 3, 5, 7, 9), (2, 4,6, 8, 10)......... (42, 44, 46, 48, 50)
For d = 3, total = 38
(1, 4, 7, 10, 13) (2, 5, 8, 11, 14) ........ (38, 41, 44, 47, 50)
For d = 12, total = 2
(1, 13, 25, 37, 49) (2, 14, 26, 38, 50)
So total = 46 + 42 + 38 ..........2
Possible APs = 12/2 (2 + 46) = 288.

Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
The idea that plants can behave intelligently, let alone learn or form memories, was a fringe notion until quite recently. Memory requires a brain, and plants lack even the rudimentary nervous systems of bugs and worms. However, over the past decade or so this view has been forcefully challenged.
Plants are not simply organic, passive automata. We now know that they can sense and integrate information about dozens of different environmental variables, and that they use this knowledge to guide flexible, adaptive behaviour. Plants also mount complex, targeted defences in response to recognising specific predators. Plants communicate with one another and other organisms, such as parasites and microbes, using a variety of channels – including ‘mycorrhizal networks’ of fungus that link up the root systems of multiple plants, like some kind of subterranean internet. Perhaps it’s not really so surprising then that plants learn and use memories for prediction and decision-making.
What does learning and memory involve for a plant? An example that’s front and centre of the debate is vernalisation, a process in which certain plants must be exposed to the cold before they can flower in the spring. The ‘memory of winter’ is what helps plants to distinguish between spring (when pollinators, such as bees, are busy) and autumn (when they are not, and when the decision to flower at the wrong time of year could be reproductively disastrous). This involves what’s called epigenetic memory.
But is this really memory? Plant scientists who study ‘epigenetic memory’ will be the first to admit that it’s fundamentally different from the sort of thing studied by cognitive scientists. Both epigenetic and ‘brainy’ memories have one thing in common: a persistent change in the behaviour or state of a system, caused by an environmental stimulus that’s no longer present. Yet this description seems too broad, since it would also capture processes such as tissue damage, wounding or metabolic changes. Perhaps the interesting question isn’t really whether or not memories are needed for cognition, but rather which types of memories indicate the existence of underlying cognitive processes, and whether these processes exist in plants.
One form of learning that’s been studied extensively is habituation, in which creatures exposed to an unexpected but harmless stimulus (a noise, a flash of light) will have a cautionary response that slowly diminishes over time.
But what about more complex learning?  In 2016, Gagliano and colleagues tested whether Pisum sativum, or the garden pea, could link the movement of air with the availability of light. They placed seedlings at the base of a Y-maze, to be buffeted by air coming from only one of the forks – the brighter one. The plants were then allowed to grow into either fork of the Y-maze, to test whether they had learned the association. The results were positive – showing that the plants learned the conditioned response in a situationally relevant manner.
Why has it taken so long to figure this out? Plant blindness - A tendency to overlook plant capacities, behaviour, and the unique and active environmental roles that they play. We treat them as part of the background, not as active agents in an ecosystem.
Particularities of the way our bodies work – our perceptual, attentional and cognitive systems – contribute to plant blindness and biases. Plants don’t usually jump out at us suddenly, present an imminent threat, or behave in ways that obviously impact upon us. Furthermore, plant behaviour frequently involves chemical and structural changes that are simply too small, too fast or too slow for us to perceive without equipment.
Also, there’s a concern that we’re defining memory so broadly as to be meaningless, or that things such as habituation are not, in themselves, cognitive mechanisms. However, by pushing ourselves, we might end up expanding the concepts – such as ‘memory’, ‘learning’ and ‘thought’ – that initially motivated our enquiry.
Q. A suitable title for this passage is
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Mn M Wonder Series answered  •  23 hours ago
Option 1. It is best suited as entire passage revolves around the theme.
Option 2. This is very vague – one is not clear what about the plant cognitive capacities does the passage want to talk about and no comparison or mention of animals.
Option 3. Plant memory is an aspect talked about, but there is no mention of what would happen if we ignore to accept.
Option 4. Plant cognitive capacities and not the actual adaptation is what is important.
Lakshmi Prasad asked   •  11 hours ago

Group Question
Answer the following question based on the information given below.

There’s a poster on the wall of the gym I use, a place frequented by many aspiring British athletes. It says simply: “You lose 100% of the chances you don’t take.” No one likes to be rejected, to take a chance, to put in huge effort only to be rebuffed. But if you want to succeed at anything in life, you have to put yourself forward. You have to take the chance that you’ll be rejected.
There’s no choice - what it says on that poster is absolutely right. The alternative is to be 100% certain you’ll never realise your dreams.
It’s one thing to understand why you feel bad when you’ve been rejected. But why stop there? Why not take things a step further? Instead of thinking about rejection as something you hope to avoid, see if you can make it work for you rather than distress you. When you do this, rejection will actually help you create something even better than the offering that’s been cast aside. Here’s how.
Learning through failure is how rejection helps. It can spur you on to do it again, do it better.
Start by learning not to take a rejection personally. Instead of saying, “What’s wrong with me?”, step back. See if you can figure out what might be lacking in what you’ve created, or in the way you’ve gone about trying to achieve your dream. The artist Dexter Dalwood, speaking recently to creative arts students at their graduation ceremony, warned his audience: “If you want your ideas to succeed, be prepared to be rejected. Often, It comes with the territory.”
Anders Ericsson, a professor at the University of Colorado, observed the practice habits of violin students in Berlin from the age of five until they reached adulthood. He found that the most powerful predictor of success, of whether students became “elite” violinists, was how many hours of practice they put in and how determined they were to improve. The author Malcolm Gladwell popularised this idea, which has become known as the “10,000-hour rule”. It seems that it takes approximately 10,000 hours of dedication, of being criticised and reacting constructively to that criticism, to succeed and achieve true excellence.
 
 
Q. A thought like “What’s wrong with me?” implies that: 
A. You are reflecting on reasons for your rejection.
B. You are learning through failure.
C. You are open to feedback.   
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Nitya Santoo asked   •  13 hours ago

The communities of ants are sometimes very large ,numbering even up to 500, individuals and it is a lesson to us that no one has ever yet seen quarrel between any two ants belonging to the same community .On the other hand ,it must be admitted that they are in hostility not only with most other insects ,including ants of different species ,but even with those of the same species if belongs to different communities .I have over and over again introduced ants from one of my nests into another nest of the same species ; and they were in variable attacked , seized by a leg or an antenna and dragged out .It is evident therefore ,that the ants of each community all recognize one another ,which is very remarkable .But more than this ,I several times divided a nest into two halves and found that even after separation of a year and nine months they recognize one another and were perfectly friendly ,while they at once attacked ants from a different nest ,although of the same species. 

It has been suggested that the ant of each nest have some sign or password by which they recognize one another .To test this I made some of them insensible, first I tried chloroform; but this was fatal to them and I do not consider the test satisfactory .I decided therefore to intoxicate them. This was less easy then I had expected .None of my ants would voluntarily degrade themselves by getting drunk .However ,I got over the difficulty by putting them into whisky for a few moments .I took fifty specimens –25 percent from one nest and 25 percent from another made them dead drunk ,marked each with a spot of paint ,and put them on a table close to where other ants from one of the nests were feeding .The table was surrounded as usual with a most of water to prevent them from straying .The ants ,which were feeding soon noticed those ,which I had made drunk .They seemed quite astonished to find their comrades in such a disgraceful condition ,and as much at loss to know what to do with their drunkards as we were .After a while ,however ,they carried them all away the strangers they took to the edge of the moat and dropped into the water ,while they bore their friends home in the nest where by degrees they slept off the effects of the spirits .Thus it is evident that they know their friends even when incapable of giving any sign or password.
Q. Although the author is a scientist,his style of writing also exhibits a quality of:
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Yugandhar Katam asked   •  15 hours ago

Creativity is at once our most precious resource and our most inexhaustible one. As anyone who has ever spent any time with children knows, every single human being is born creative; every human being is innately endowed with the ability to combine and recombine data, perceptions, materials and ideas, and devise new ways of thinking and doing. What fosters creativity? More than anything else: the presence of other creative people. The big myth is that creativity is the province of great individual geniuses. In fact creativity is a social process. Our biggest creative breakthroughs come when people learn from, compete with, and collaborate with other people.
Cities are the true fonts of creativity... With their diverse populations, dense social networks, and public spaces where people can meet spontaneously and serendipitously, they spark and catalyze new ideas. With their infrastructure for finance, organization and trade, they allow those ideas to be swiftly actualized.
As for what staunches creativity, that's easy, if ironic. It's the very institutions that we build to manage, exploit and perpetuate the fruits of creativity — our big bureaucracies, and sad to say, too many of our schools. Creativity is disruptive; schools and organizations are regimented, standardized and stultifying.
The education expert Sir Ken Robinson points to a 1968 study reporting on a group of 1,600 children who were tested over time for their ability to think in out-of-the-box ways. When the children were between 3 and 5 years old, 98 percent achieved positive scores. When they were 8 to 10, only 32 percent passed the same test, and only 10 percent at 13 to 15. When 280,000 25-year-olds took the test, just 2 percent passed. By the time we are adults, our creativity has been wrung out of us.
I once asked the great urbanist Jane Jacobs what makes some places more creative than others. She said, essentially, that the question was an easy one. All cities, she said, were filled with creative people; that's our default state as people. But some cities had more than their shares of leaders, people and institutions that blocked out that creativity. She called them "squelchers."
Creativity (or the lack of it) follows the same general contours of the great socio-economic divide - our rising inequality - that plagues us. According to my own estimates, roughly a third of us across the United States, and perhaps as much as half of us in our most creative cities - are able to do work which engages our creative faculties to some extent, whether as artists, musicians, writers, techies, innovators, entrepreneurs, doctors, lawyers, journalists or educators - those of us who work with our minds. That leaves a group that I term "the other 66 percent," who toil in low-wage rote and rotten jobs — if they have jobs at all — in which their creativity is subjugated, ignored or wasted.
Creativity itself is not in danger. It's flourishing is all around us - in science and technology, arts and culture, in our rapidly revitalizing cities. But we still have a long way to go if we want to build a truly creative society that supports and rewards the creativity of each and every one of us.
Q.
The author's conclusions about the most 'creative cities' in the US (paragraph 6) are based on his assumption that
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Maria Roshan M asked   •  15 hours ago

The communities of ants are sometimes very large ,numbering even up to 500, individuals and it is a lesson to us that no one has ever yet seen quarrel between any two ants belonging to the same community .On the other hand ,it must be admitted that they are in hostility not only with most other insects ,including ants of different species ,but even with those of the same species if belongs to different communities .I have over and over again introduced ants from one of my nests into another nest of the same species ; and they were in variable attacked , seized by a leg or an antenna and dragged out .It is evident therefore ,that the ants of each community all recognize one another ,which is very remarkable .But more than this ,I several times divided a nest into two halves and found that even after separation of a year and nine months they recognize one another and were perfectly friendly ,while they at once attacked ants from a different nest ,although of the same species. 

It has been suggested that the ant of each nest have some sign or password by which they recognize one another .To test this I made some of them insensible, first I tried chloroform; but this was fatal to them and I do not consider the test satisfactory .I decided therefore to intoxicate them. This was less easy then I had expected .None of my ants would voluntarily degrade themselves by getting drunk .However ,I got over the difficulty by putting them into whisky for a few moments .I took fifty specimens –25 percent from one nest and 25 percent from another made them dead drunk ,marked each with a spot of paint ,and put them on a table close to where other ants from one of the nests were feeding .The table was surrounded as usual with a most of water to prevent them from straying .The ants ,which were feeding soon noticed those ,which I had made drunk .They seemed quite astonished to find their comrades in such a disgraceful condition ,and as much at loss to know what to do with their drunkards as we were .After a while ,however ,they carried them all away the strangers they took to the edge of the moat and dropped into the water ,while they bore their friends home in the nest where by degrees they slept off the effects of the spirits .Thus it is evident that they know their friends even when incapable of giving any sign or password.
Q. The author's anecdotes of the inebriated ants would support all the following inductions except the statement that
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Bhanu Pratap asked   •  20 hours ago

Answer the following question based on the information given below.Animals can habituate to environmental disturbances. What’s more, they can get very good at telling the difference between stimuli that are relevant to them, and those that aren’t. Tree frogs can tell the difference between vibration caused by a predator and vibration caused by rain, even though these cues are extremely similar. Similarly, caterpillars living on leaves can tell the difference between vibrations caused by other caterpillars, predators, wind and rain.Spiders build webs on human-built structures such as pipelines, fences, road signs and wire rods, all of which are made out of materials not present in their evolutionary history. This means that they will absorb vibrations from the environment differently to a more natural place a spider might build its web, for example a plant. If these human-built objects are anywhere near humans (which they are likely to be) they are also probably affected by human noise. For example, a spider that has built a web near a road will be subject to the vibration caused by cars driving by. This matters particularly to spiders because they use vibration so much in guiding their behaviour. Indeed, you can even imagine the web to be an extension of the spider itself, such that the vibrations on the very outside of the web travel down to the spider situated in the centre and tell it whether it’s being ‘touched’ by prey, a mate, wind or rain.
Q.
 
The italicised numbered words given below are be correctly represented by which of the following parts Of Speach?
I grew up on expeditions (1) — my first was when I was seven. It’s such a different world. It’s a place of magic and (2) mystery and beauty and danger. There’s always something new (3), every dive. So it’s more that it would be very difficult (4) to find a career that would trump that. I tried! I went (5) to school for environmental economics, and I went into international business and marketing afterwards (6). I did stints in different (7) places —I worked in graphic design, I worked in interior design. All those were very (8) short-lived careers for me, because at the end of the day, my mind and my soul kept driving me back to the ocean. To the thing that (9) really attracted me to this life — which is the adventure, the discovery.
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Divya Wilson asked   •  21 hours ago

Eight friends: Ajit, Byomkesh, Gargi, Jayanta, Kikira, Mamk, Prodosh and Tapesh are going to Delhi from Kolkata by a flight operated Py Cheap Air. In the flight, sitting is arranged in 30 rows, numbered 1 to 30, each consisting of 6 seats, marked by letters A to F from left to right, respectively. Seats A to C are to the left of the aisle (the passage running from the front of the aircraft to the back), and seats D to F are to the right of the aisle. Seats A and F are by the windows and referred to as Window seats, C and D are by the aisle and are referred to as Aisle seats while B and E are referred to as Middle seats. Seats marked by consecutive letters are called consecutive seats (or seats next to each other). A seat number is a combination of the row number, followed by the letter indicating the position in the row; e.g., 1A is the left window seat in the first row, while 12E is the right middle seat in the 12th row.
Cheap Air charges Rs. 1000 extra for any seats in Rows 1, 12 and 13 as those have extra legroom. For Rows 2­10, it charges Rs. 300 extra for Window seats and Rs. 300 extra for Aisle seats. For Rows 11 and 14 to 20, it charges Rs. 200 extra for Window seats and Rs. 400 extra for Aisle seats. All other seats are available at no extra charge.
The following are known:
  1. The eight friends were seated in six different rows.
  2. They occupied 3 Window seats, 4 Aisle seats and 1 Middle seat.
  3. Seven of them had to pay extra amounts, totaling to Rs. 4600, for their choices of seat. One of them did not pay any additional amount for his/her choice of seat.
  4. Jayanta, Ajit and Byomkesh were sitting in seats marked by the same letter, in consecutive rows in increasing order of row numbers; but all of them paid different amounts for their choices of seat. One of these amounts may be zero.
  5. Gargi was sitting next to Kikira, and Mamk was sitting next to Jayanta.
  6. Prodosh and Tapesh were sitting in seats marked by the same letter, in consecutive rows in increasing order of row numbers; but they paid different amounts for their choices of seat. One of these amounts may be zero.
Q.
How much extra did Jayanta pay for his choice of seat?​
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