All India CAT Group

In this type of questions, a statement is given followed by two courses of action numbered I and II. The candidate is required to grasp the statement, analyse the problem or policy it mentions and then decide which of the courses of action logically follows.
Statement: A large cache of live ammunition has been found in the scrap yard of a local steel factory.
Courses of action:
I. The steel factory should immediately be closed down till all these ammunitions are located and shifted to safe places.
II. The Government should immediately set up an enquiry to unearth the details and take corrective measures to avoid such incidence in future.
  • a)
    if only I follows
  • b)
    if only II follows
  • c)
    if either I or II follows
  • d)
    if neither I nor II follows
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Analysis:
The statement highlights a serious security concern as a large cache of live ammunition has been found in the scrap yard of a local steel factory. This poses a significant risk to the safety of the workers and the surrounding community.

Courses of Action:

I. The steel factory should immediately be closed down till all these ammunitions are loca
... more
- This course of action is logical as the safety of the workers and the general public is of utmost importance.
- Closing down the steel factory will prevent any potential accidents or mishaps until the ammunition is safely located and removed.
- This action will also ensure that no further danger is posed by the presence of live ammunition on the premises.

II. The Government should immediately set up an enquiry to unearth the details and take corrective measures to avoid such incidence in future:
- This course of action is also necessary to investigate how live ammunition ended up in the scrap yard of a steel factory.
- Setting up an inquiry will help identify any lapses in security protocols or potential negligence that led to this situation.
- Taking corrective measures based on the findings of the inquiry will help prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future.

Conclusion:
Both courses of action are important in addressing the security threat posed by the presence of live ammunition in the scrap yard of the steel factory. Therefore, either I or II follows logically in this situation.

Which number will come next in the following series?
1, 4, 4, 16, 64, _______
  • a)
    216
  • b)
    1024
  • c)
    128
  • d)
    1026
Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Explanation:

Pattern Analysis:
- The series starts with 1.
- Then each subsequent number is the square of the previous number.
- 1^2 = 1
- 4^2 = 4
- 4^2 = 16
- 16^2 = 64

Calculation for the Next Number:
- To find the next number, we need to square the last number in the series.
- 64^2 = 4096

Therefore,
... more

During the frigid season...if s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm. The temperature difference between the blanket and the air outside is so palpable that we often have trouble leaving our warm refuge. Many plants and animals similarly hunker down, relying on snow cover for safety from winter's harsh conditions. The small area between the snowpack and the ground, called the subnivium...might be the most important ecosystem that you have never heard of.
The subnivium is so well-insulated and stable that its temperature holds steady at around 32 degree Fahrenheit (0 degree Celsius). Although that might still sound cold, a constant temperature of 32 degree Fahrenheit can often be 30 to 40 degrees warmer than the air temperature during the peak of winter. Because of this large temperature difference, a wide variety of species...depend on the subnivium for winter protection.
For many organisms living in temperate and Arctic regions, the difference between being under the snow or outside it is a matter of life and death. Consequently, disruptions to the subnivium brought about by climate change will affect everything from population dynamics to nutrient cycling through the ecosystem.
The formation and stability of the subnivium requires more than a few flurries. Winter ecologists have suggested that eight inches of snow is necessary to develop a stable layer of insulation. Depth is not the only factor, however. More accurately, the stability of the subnivium depends on the interaction between snow depth and snow density. Imagine being under a stack of blankets that are all flattened and pressed together. When compressed, the blankets essentially form one compacted layer. In contrast, when they are lightly placed on top of one another, their insulative capacity increases because the air pockets between them trap heat. Greater depths of low-density snow are therefore better at insulating the ground.
Both depth and density of snow are sensitive to temperature. Scientists are now beginning to explore how climate change will affect the subnivium, as well as the species that depend on it. At first glance, warmer winters seem beneficial for species that have difficulty surviving subzero temperatures; however, as with most ecological phenomena, the consequences are not so straightforward. Research has shown that the snow season (the period when snow is more likely than rain) has become shorter since 1970. When rain falls on snow, it increases the density of the snow and reduces its insulative capacity. Therefore, even though winters are expected to become warmer overall from future climate change, the subnivium will tend to become colder and more variable with less protection from the above-ground temperatures.
The effects of a colder subnivium are complex...For example, shrubs such as crowberry and alpine azalea that grow along the forest floor tend to block the wind and so retain higher depths of snow around them. This captured snow helps to keep soils insulated and in turn increases plant decomposition and nutrient release. In field experiments, researchers removed a portion of the snow cover to investigate the importance of the subnivium's insulation. They found that soil frost in the snow-free area resulted in damage to plant roots and sometimes even the death of the plant.
Q.
The purpose of this passage is to
... more

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Introduction to the subnivium ecosystem
The passage aims to introduce readers to a relatively unknown ecosystem called the subnivium. This ecosystem plays a crucial role in providing winter protection for various species living in temperate and Arctic regions.

Explaining the workings of the subnivium
The subnivium is a well-insulated layer between the snowpack an
... more

I ---- (play) football with my friends.
Correct answer is 'had played'. Can you explain this answer?

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Explanation:

Verb Tense:
- The original sentence is in the present tense "I play football with my friends."
- The correct answer "had played" is in the past perfect tense.

Past Perfect Tense:
- The past perfect tense is used to show an action that happened before another action in the past.
- In this case, "had played" indicates that
... more
Rashi Sarkar asked a question

Refer to the data below and answer the questions that follow.
In a year prior to the Olympics, all the participating athletes were required to undergo dope tests conducted by the Anti-Doping Association.
The tests of the athletes were done five times. The first test was done in February, the second in April, the third in August, the fourth in October, and the fifth in December. Only the athletes who passed the test in February were eligible for the test in April. Only those who passed the test in April were eligible for the test in August and those who passed in August were tested in October, and so on so forth.
During a test, an athlete was tested for the presence of exactly one of the five banned substances - A, B, C, D or E. An athlete already tested for the presence of a particular substance was not tested for the presence of the same substance in subsequent test(s) during the year.
The table given below shows the number of athletes tested in each of the five months for the different banned substances. Finally, only 91 athletes passed the tests, and were cleared to participate in the Olympics. An athlete is said to pass the test conducted for the presence of a banned substance, when that particular banned substance is not detected in the blood sample of the athlete.
Q. At least how many athletes definitely passed the test conducted in December for the presence of banned substance B?
... more

During the frigid season...if s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm. The temperature difference between the blanket and the air outside is so palpable that we often have trouble leaving our warm refuge. Many plants and animals similarly hunker down, relying on snow cover for safety from winter's harsh conditions. The small area between the snowpack and the ground, called the subnivium...might be the most important ecosystem that you have never heard of.
The subnivium is so well-insulated and stable that its temperature holds steady at around 32 degree Fahrenheit (0 degree Celsius). Although that might still sound cold, a constant temperature of 32 degree Fahrenheit can often be 30 to 40 degrees warmer than the air temperature during the peak of winter. Because of this large temperature difference, a wide variety of species...depend on the subnivium for winter protection.
For many organisms living in temperate and Arctic regions, the difference between being under the snow or outside it is a matter of life and death. Consequently, disruptions to the subnivium brought about by climate change will affect everything from population dynamics to nutrient cycling through the ecosystem.
The formation and stability of the subnivium requires more than a few flurries. Winter ecologists have suggested that eight inches of snow is necessary to develop a stable layer of insulation. Depth is not the only factor, however. More accurately, the stability of the subnivium depends on the interaction between snow depth and snow density. Imagine being under a stack of blankets that are all flattened and pressed together. When compressed, the blankets essentially form one compacted layer. In contrast, when they are lightly placed on top of one another, their insulative capacity increases because the air pockets between them trap heat. Greater depths of low-density snow are therefore better at insulating the ground.
Both depth and density of snow are sensitive to temperature. Scientists are now beginning to explore how climate change will affect the subnivium, as well as the species that depend on it. At first glance, warmer winters seem beneficial for species that have difficulty surviving subzero temperatures; however, as with most ecological phenomena, the consequences are not so straightforward. Research has shown that the snow season (the period when snow is more likely than rain) has become shorter since 1970. When rain falls on snow, it increases the density of the snow and reduces its insulative capacity. Therefore, even though winters are expected to become warmer overall from future climate change, the subnivium will tend to become colder and more variable with less protection from the above-ground temperatures.
The effects of a colder subnivium are complex...For example, shrubs such as crowberry and alpine azalea that grow along the forest floor tend to block the wind and so retain higher depths of snow around them. This captured snow helps to keep soils insulated and in turn increases plant decomposition and nutrient release. In field experiments, researchers removed a portion of the snow cover to investigate the importance of the subnivium's insulation. They found that soil frost in the snow-free area resulted in damage to plant roots and sometimes even the death of the plant.
Q.
In paragraph 1, the author uses blankets as a device to​
... more

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Explanation:

Analogy between blankets and the snowpack:
- In paragraph 1, the author uses blankets as a device to draw an analogy between blankets and the snowpack.
- By describing how we nestle under a blanket to stay warm during the frigid season, the author is highlighting the role of the snowpack in providing insulation to plants and animals during winter.... more

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow: 
[The] Indian government [has] announced an international competition to design a National War Memorial in New Delhi, to honour all of the Indian soldiers who served in the various wars and counterinsurgency campaigns from 1947 onwards. The terms of the competition also specified that the new structure would be built adjacent to the India Gate - a memorial to the Indian soldiers who died in the First World War. Between the old imperialist memorial and the proposed nationalist one, India’s contribution to the Second World War is airbrushed out of existence.
The Indian government’s conception of the war memorial was not merely absent-minded. Rather, it accurately reflected the fact that both academic history and popular memory have yet to come to terms with India’s Second World War, which continues to be seen as little more than mood music in the drama of India’s advance towards independence and partition in 1947. Further, the political trajectory of the postwar subcontinent has militate against popular remembrance of the war. With partition and the onset of the India-Pakistan rivalry, both of the new nations needed fresh stories for self-legitimation rather than focusing on shared wartime experiences.
The Indian army recruited, trained and deployed some 2.5 million men, almost 90,000 of which were killed and many more injured. Even at the time, it was recognised as the largest volunteer force in the war. . . . India’s material and financial contribution to the war was equally significant. India emerged as a major military-industrial and logistical base for Allied operations in south-east Asia and the Middle East. This led the United States to take considerable interest in the country’s future and ensured that this was no longer the preserve of the British government.
However, the Second World War played a crucial role in both the independence and partition of India and wartime developments pointed in the direction of India’s independence. In a stunning reversal of its long-standing financial relationship with Britain, India finished the war as one of the largest creditors to the imperial power. Such extraordinary mobilization for war was achieved at a great human cost, with the Bengal famine the most extreme manifestation of widespread wartime deprivation. The costs on India’s home front must be counted in millions of lives. Indians signed up to serve on the war and home fronts for a variety of reasons. . . . [M]any were convinced that their contribution would open the doors to India’s freedom. . . . The political and social churn triggered by the war was evident in the massive waves of popular protest and unrest that washed over rural and urban India in the aftermath of the conflict. This turmoil was crucial in persuading the Attlee government to rid itself of the incubus of ruling India. . . .
Seventy years on, it is time that India engaged with the complex legacies of the Second World War. Bringing the war into the ambit of the new national memorial would be a fitting - if not overdue - recognition that this was India’s War.
Q. The phrase “mood music” is used in the second paragraph to indicate that the Second World War is viewed as:
... more

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Explanation:

Backdrop to Independence and Partition:
The phrase "mood music" is used in the passage to convey that the Second World War is seen as a backdrop to the subsequent independence and partition of India. This means that the war is considered as a supporting element or a background theme in the narrative of India's journey towards freedom and the division of t
... more
Bhavya Mishra asked a question

Refer to the data below and answer the questions that follow.
In a year prior to the Olympics, all the participating athletes were required to undergo dope tests conducted by the Anti-Doping Association.
The tests of the athletes were done five times. The first test was done in February, the second in April, the third in August, the fourth in October, and the fifth in December. Only the athletes who passed the test in February were eligible for the test in April. Only those who passed the test in April were eligible for the test in August and those who passed in August were tested in October, and so on so forth.
During a test, an athlete was tested for the presence of exactly one of the five banned substances - A, B, C, D or E. An athlete already tested for the presence of a particular substance was not tested for the presence of the same substance in subsequent test(s) during the year.
The table given below shows the number of athletes tested in each of the five months for the different banned substances. Finally, only 91 athletes passed the tests, and were cleared to participate in the Olympics. An athlete is said to pass the test conducted for the presence of a banned substance, when that particular banned substance is not detected in the blood sample of the athlete.
Q. How many athletes were tested for the presence of exactly one banned substance?
... more

Instructions
Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:

[The] Indian government [has] announced an international competition to design a National War Memorial in New Delhi, to honour all of the Indian soldiers who served in the various wars and counter-insurgency campaigns from 1947 onwards. The terms of the competition also specified that the new structure would be built adjacent to the India Gate - a memorial to the Indian soldiers who died in the First World War. Between the old imperialist memorial and the proposed nationalist one, India’s contribution to the Second World War is airbrushed out of existence.
The Indian government’s conception of the war memorial was not merely absent-minded. Rather, it accurately reflected the fact that both academic history and popular memory have yet to come to terms with India’s Second World War, which continues to be seen as little more than mood music in the drama of India’s advance towards independence and partition in 1947. Further, the political trajectory of the postwar subcontinent has militated against popular remembrance of the war. With partition and the onset of the India-Pakistan rivalry, both of the new nations needed fresh stories for self-legitimisation rather than focusing on shared wartime experiences.
However, the Second World War played a crucial role in both the independence and partition of India. . . . The Indian army recruited, trained and deployed some 2.5 million men, almost 90,000 of which were killed and many more injured.
Even at the time, it was recognised as the largest volunteer force in the war. . . .
India’s material and financial contribution to the war was equally significant. India emerged as a major military-industrial and logistical base for Allied operations in south-east Asia and the Middle East. This led the United States to take considerable interest in the country’s future, and ensured that this was no longer the preserve of the British government.
Other wartime developments pointed in the direction of India’s independence. In a stunning reversal of its long-standing financial relationship with Britain, India finished the war as one of the largest creditors to the imperial power.
Such extraordinary mobilization for war was achieved at great human cost, with the Bengal famine the most extreme manifestation of widespread wartime deprivation. The costs on India’s home front must be counted in millions of lives.
Indians signed up to serve on the war and home fronts for a variety of reasons. . . . [M]any were convinced that their contribution would open the doors to India’s freedom. . . . The political and social churn triggered by the war was evident in the massive waves of popular protest and unrest that washed over rural and urban India in the aftermath of the conflict. This turmoil was crucial in persuading the Attlee government to rid itself of the incubus of ruling India. . . .
Seventy years on, it is time that India engaged with the complex legacies of the Second World War. Bringing the war into the ambit of the new national memorial would be a fitting - if not overdue - recognition that this was India’s War.
Q. The author suggests that a major reason why India has not so far acknowledged its role in the Second World War is that it:
... more

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Explanation:

Reason for India not acknowledging its role in the Second World War:
- India has been focused on building an independent, non-colonial political identity.
- The author suggests that India's postwar trajectory, marked by independence and partition, led to the need for fresh stories for self-legitimization.
- The political churn triggered by the
... more

During the frigid season...if s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm. The temperature difference between the blanket and the air outside is so palpable that we often have trouble leaving our warm refuge. Many plants and animals similarly hunker down, relying on snow cover for safety from winter's harsh conditions. The small area between the snowpack and the ground, called the subnivium...might be the most important ecosystem that you have never heard of.
The subnivium is so well-insulated and stable that its temperature holds steady at around 32 degree Fahrenheit (0 degree Celsius). Although that might still sound cold, a constant temperature of 32 degree Fahrenheit can often be 30 to 40 degrees warmer than the air temperature during the peak of winter. Because of this large temperature difference, a wide variety of species...depend on the subnivium for winter protection.
For many organisms living in temperate and Arctic regions, the difference between being under the snow or outside it is a matter of life and death. Consequently, disruptions to the subnivium brought about by climate change will affect everything from population dynamics to nutrient cycling through the ecosystem.
The formation and stability of the subnivium requires more than a few flurries. Winter ecologists have suggested that eight inches of snow is necessary to develop a stable layer of insulation. Depth is not the only factor, however. More accurately, the stability of the subnivium depends on the interaction between snow depth and snow density. Imagine being under a stack of blankets that are all flattened and pressed together. When compressed, the blankets essentially form one compacted layer. In contrast, when they are lightly placed on top of one another, their insulative capacity increases because the air pockets between them trap heat. Greater depths of low-density snow are therefore better at insulating the ground.
Both depth and density of snow are sensitive to temperature. Scientists are now beginning to explore how climate change will affect the subnivium, as well as the species that depend on it. At first glance, warmer winters seem beneficial for species that have difficulty surviving subzero temperatures; however, as with most ecological phenomena, the consequences are not so straightforward. Research has shown that the snow season (the period when snow is more likely than rain) has become shorter since 1970. When rain falls on snow, it increases the density of the snow and reduces its insulative capacity. Therefore, even though winters are expected to become warmer overall from future climate change, the subnivium will tend to become colder and more variable with less protection from the above-ground temperatures.
The effects of a colder subnivium are complex...For example, shrubs such as crowberry and alpine azalea that grow along the forest floor tend to block the wind and so retain higher depths of snow around them. This captured snow helps to keep soils insulated and in turn increases plant decomposition and nutrient release. In field experiments, researchers removed a portion of the snow cover to investigate the importance of the subnivium's insulation. They found that soil frost in the snow-free area resulted in damage to plant roots and sometimes even the death of the plant.
Q.
Eased on this extract, the author would support which one of the following actions?​
... more

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Government action to curb climate change
- The author emphasizes the importance of the subnivium ecosystem, which plays a crucial role in winter survival for many species.
- Climate change is identified as a significant threat to the subnivium, with potential negative impacts on species that rely on it for protection.
- Warmer winters and shorter snow seasons due to climate c
... more

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow: 
[The] Indian government [has] announced an international competition to design a National War Memorial in New Delhi, to honour all of the Indian soldiers who served in the various wars and counterinsurgency campaigns from 1947 onwards. The terms of the competition also specified that the new structure would be built adjacent to the India Gate - a memorial to the Indian soldiers who died in the First World War. Between the old imperialist memorial and the proposed nationalist one, India’s contribution to the Second World War is airbrushed out of existence.
The Indian government’s conception of the war memorial was not merely absent-minded. Rather, it accurately reflected the fact that both academic history and popular memory have yet to come to terms with India’s Second World War, which continues to be seen as little more than mood music in the drama of India’s advance towards independence and partition in 1947. Further, the political trajectory of the postwar subcontinent has militate against popular remembrance of the war. With partition and the onset of the India-Pakistan rivalry, both of the new nations needed fresh stories for self-legitimation rather than focusing on shared wartime experiences.
The Indian army recruited, trained and deployed some 2.5 million men, almost 90,000 of which were killed and many more injured. Even at the time, it was recognised as the largest volunteer force in the war. . . . India’s material and financial contribution to the war was equally significant. India emerged as a major military-industrial and logistical base for Allied operations in south-east Asia and the Middle East. This led the United States to take considerable interest in the country’s future and ensured that this was no longer the preserve of the British government.
However, the Second World War played a crucial role in both the independence and partition of India and wartime developments pointed in the direction of India’s independence. In a stunning reversal of its long-standing financial relationship with Britain, India finished the war as one of the largest creditors to the imperial power. Such extraordinary mobilization for war was achieved at a great human cost, with the Bengal famine the most extreme manifestation of widespread wartime deprivation. The costs on India’s home front must be counted in millions of lives. Indians signed up to serve on the war and home fronts for a variety of reasons. . . . [M]any were convinced that their contribution would open the doors to India’s freedom. . . . The political and social churn triggered by the war was evident in the massive waves of popular protest and unrest that washed over rural and urban India in the aftermath of the conflict. This turmoil was crucial in persuading the Attlee government to rid itself of the incubus of ruling India. . . .
Seventy years on, it is time that India engaged with the complex legacies of the Second World War. Bringing the war into the ambit of the new national memorial would be a fitting - if not overdue - recognition that this was India’s War.
Q. In the first paragraph, the author laments the fact that:
... more

Nilesh Dasgupta answered  •  4 hours ago
Explanation:

Lack of Recognition for Indian Soldiers in Second World War:
- The author laments the fact that there is no recognition of the Indian soldiers who served in the Second World War.
- The competition for the new war memorial in New Delhi focuses on honoring soldiers from wars and counterinsurgency campaigns from 1947 onwards, effectively airbrushing Ind
... more

In a locality, two-thirds of the people have Cable TV, one-fifth have VCR and one-tenth have both. What is the fraction of people having either Cable TV or VCR?
  • a)
    1/30
  • b)
    2/3
  • c)
    17/30
  • d)
    23/30
Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  6 hours ago
Understanding the Problem
- Let's assume that there are 100 people in the locality for easy calculation.
- Given that two-thirds of the people have Cable TV, which is (2/3) * 100 = 66.67 people.
- One-fifth have VCR, which is (1/5) * 100 = 20 people.
- And one-tenth have both Cable TV and VCR, which is (1/10) * 100 = 10 people.

Finding the Fraction of Peopl
... more
- To find the fraction of people having either Cable TV or VCR, we need to add the number of people with Cable TV and VCR, and then subtract the number of people with both.
- Number of people with either Cable TV or VCR = Number of people with Cable TV + Number of people with VCR - Number of people with both
- = 66.67 + 20 - 10
- = 76.67
- Therefore, the fraction of people having either Cable TV or VCR is 76.67/100 = 23/30.
So, the correct answer is option 'D) 23/30'.

State Financial Corporation Act encourages in establishing
  • a)
    industrial estates
  • b)
    small and medium size industries
  • c)
    agricultural farms
  • d)
    All of the above
Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  6 hours ago
Explanation:

State Financial Corporation Act:
The State Financial Corporation Act was enacted to provide financial assistance to small and medium-sized industries in India.

Encourages establishment of small and medium size industries:
- One of the main objectives of the State Financial Corporation Act is to encourage the establishment of small a
... more

Directions: Teachers were invited from across the globe to present their paper on different research subjects. The meeting was scheduled in Australia. There were 2 teachers each from India, England, New Zealand, Zimbawe and Kenya while the hosts had 3 teachers. 4 presentations were to be presented on the subject of numerology and fractions (NF), statistics (S), mathematical research (MR) and quantitative analysis (QA) in groups of 3 and 1 in group of 4 not necessarily in the same order. The groups had exactly one presenter of a country and none of the teacher presented more than 1 subject.
(i) There was no Australian teacher presenting MR.
(ii) The teachers from Zimbawe did not have knowledge of QA.
(iii) One of Teachers from India was with teacher from New Zealand while the other teacher presented on NF.
(iv) Kenyan teachers did not like the Indian teachers and therefore presented topics in separate groups. Only one of the Kenyan teachers could present with an Australian teacher.
(v) Statistics was not presented by teachers from England or New Zealand.
(vi) One Teacher from Zimbawe was expert in MR while one teacher from England was expert in NF.
Based on the above information, answer the following -
Q. Which subjects are taught by teachers from England?
... more

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  6 hours ago
Explanation:
Teachers from England presented on the subjects of NF and MR. Here's how we reach this conclusion:
- Teachers from England:
- One teacher from England was an expert in NF.
- Therefore, the other teacher from England must be an expert in MR.
- Subjects taught by teachers from England:
- NF and MR.
Hence, the correct answer is o
... more

Directions: In the sentence given below, replace the underlined part with its alternate meaning. If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (d) i.e. “None of these” as the answer.
Q. Kiran was in high spirits, when he was called upon the stage to deliver his speech.
  • a)
    was very cheerful
  • b)
    was highly depressed
  • c)
    was deeply engrossed in thoughts
  • d)
    None of these
Correct answer is option 'A'. Can you explain this answer?

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  6 hours ago
Explanation:

Alternate Meanings:
- "Kiran was very cheerful" is the alternate meaning of "Kiran was in high spirits."

Explanation:
- When someone is in high spirits, it means that they are very cheerful and excited.
- So, in this context, the sentence is conveying that Kiran was very happy and enthusiastic when he was called upon the stage
... more

Instructions
Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given

Will a day come when India’s poor can access government services as easily as drawing cash from an ATM? . . . [N]o country in the world has made accessing education or health or policing or dispute resolution as easy as an ATM, because the nature of these activities requires individuals to use their discretion in a positive way. Technology can certainly facilitate this in a variety of ways if it is seen as one part of an overall approach, but the evidence so far in education, for instance, is that just adding computers alone doesn’t make education any better. . . .
The dangerous illusion of technology is that it can create stronger, top down accountability of service providers in implementation-intensive services within existing public sector organisations. One notion is that electronic management information systems (EMIS) keep better track of inputs and those aspects of personnel that are ‘EMIS visible’ can lead to better services. A recent study examined attempts to increase attendance of Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANMs) at clinics in Rajasthan, which involved high-tech time clocks to monitor attendance. The study’s title says it all: Band-Aids on a Corpse . . . e-governance can be just as bad as any other governance when the real issue is people and their motivation.
For services to improve, the people providing the services have to want to do a better job with the skills they have. A study of medical care in Delhi found that even though providers, in the public sector had much better skills than private sector providers their provision of care in actual practice was much worse.
In implementation-intensive services the key to success is face-to-face interactions between a teacher, a nurse, a policeman, an extension agent and a citizen. This relationship is about power. Amartya Sen’s . . . report on education in West Bengal had a supremely telling anecdote in which the villagers forced the teacher to attend school, but then, when the parents went off to work, the teacher did not teach, but forced the children to massage his feet. . . . As long as the system empowers providers over citizens, technology is irrelevant.
The answer to successfully providing basic services is to create systems that provide both autonomy and accountability.
In basic education for instance, the answer to poor teaching is not controlling teachers more . . . The key . . . is to hire teachers who want to teach and let them teach, expressing their professionalism and vocation as a teacher through autonomy in the classroom. This autonomy has to be matched with accountability for results—not just narrowly measured through test scores, but broadly for the quality of the education they provide.
A recent study in Uttar Pradesh showed that if, somehow, all civil service teachers could be replaced with contract teachers, the state could save a billion dollars a year in revenue and double student learning. Just the additional autonomy and accountability of contracts through local groups—even without complementary system changes in information and empowerment—led to that much improvement. The first step to being part of the solution is to create performance information accessible to those outside of the government. . . .
Q. Which of the following, IF TRUE, would undermine the passage’s main argument?
... more

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  7 hours ago


Explanation:


Key Points:
- The main argument of the passage is that the real issue in improving government services is the motivation of the people providing those services.
- The passage emphasizes the importance of creating systems that provide both autonomy and accountability to service providers.


Anal
... more
The passage argues that the key to successfully providing basic services is to have service providers who want to do a better job with the skills they have. It states that technology alone cannot improve services if the people providing those services lack motivation. The passage also highlights the danger of technology creating top-down accountability without addressing the underlying issue of people and their motivation.


Undermining the Main Argument:
If it were proven that empowerment of service providers leads to increased complacency and rigged performance results, it would undermine the passage's main argument. This is because the passage advocates for autonomy and accountability for service providers to improve services. If empowerment leads to negative outcomes such as complacency and rigged performance results, it would contradict the passage's assertion that autonomy and accountability are essential for service improvement.
Therefore, option C - Empowerment of service providers leads to increased complacency and rigged performance results - undermines the main argument of the passage.

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow: 
[The] Indian government [has] announced an international competition to design a National War Memorial in New Delhi, to honour all of the Indian soldiers who served in the various wars and counterinsurgency campaigns from 1947 onwards. The terms of the competition also specified that the new structure would be built adjacent to the India Gate - a memorial to the Indian soldiers who died in the First World War. Between the old imperialist memorial and the proposed nationalist one, India’s contribution to the Second World War is airbrushed out of existence.
The Indian government’s conception of the war memorial was not merely absent-minded. Rather, it accurately reflected the fact that both academic history and popular memory have yet to come to terms with India’s Second World War, which continues to be seen as little more than mood music in the drama of India’s advance towards independence and partition in 1947. Further, the political trajectory of the postwar subcontinent has militate against popular remembrance of the war. With partition and the onset of the India-Pakistan rivalry, both of the new nations needed fresh stories for self-legitimation rather than focusing on shared wartime experiences.
The Indian army recruited, trained and deployed some 2.5 million men, almost 90,000 of which were killed and many more injured. Even at the time, it was recognised as the largest volunteer force in the war. . . . India’s material and financial contribution to the war was equally significant. India emerged as a major military-industrial and logistical base for Allied operations in south-east Asia and the Middle East. This led the United States to take considerable interest in the country’s future and ensured that this was no longer the preserve of the British government.
However, the Second World War played a crucial role in both the independence and partition of India and wartime developments pointed in the direction of India’s independence. In a stunning reversal of its long-standing financial relationship with Britain, India finished the war as one of the largest creditors to the imperial power. Such extraordinary mobilization for war was achieved at a great human cost, with the Bengal famine the most extreme manifestation of widespread wartime deprivation. The costs on India’s home front must be counted in millions of lives. Indians signed up to serve on the war and home fronts for a variety of reasons. . . . [M]any were convinced that their contribution would open the doors to India’s freedom. . . . The political and social churn triggered by the war was evident in the massive waves of popular protest and unrest that washed over rural and urban India in the aftermath of the conflict. This turmoil was crucial in persuading the Attlee government to rid itself of the incubus of ruling India. . . .
Seventy years on, it is time that India engaged with the complex legacies of the Second World War. Bringing the war into the ambit of the new national memorial would be a fitting - if not overdue - recognition that this was India’s War.
Q. The author lists all of the following as outcomes of the Second World War EXCEPT:
... more

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  7 hours ago


Explanation:
Large financial debt owed to Britain
- The author mentions that India finished the war as one of the largest creditors to the imperial power, Britain.
- This implies that India was not in debt to Britain after the war, but rather had financial claims against Britain.
Outcomes of the Second World War
- US recognition o
... more The author highlights that the United States took considerable interest in India's future due to its role in the war.
- Large-scale deaths in Bengal: The author mentions the Bengal famine as an extreme manifestation of wartime deprivation and its impact on the population.
- Independence of the subcontinent and partition: The author discusses how the war played a crucial role in India's independence and the subsequent partition into India and Pakistan.
Therefore, the outcome of a large financial debt owed to Britain is not listed as one of the outcomes of the Second World War in the passage.

Instructions
Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given

Will a day come when India’s poor can access government services as easily as drawing cash from an ATM? . . . [N]o country in the world has made accessing education or health or policing or dispute resolution as easy as an ATM, because the nature of these activities requires individuals to use their discretion in a positive way. Technology can certainly facilitate this in a variety of ways if it is seen as one part of an overall approach, but the evidence so far in education, for instance, is that just adding computers alone doesn’t make education any better. . . .
The dangerous illusion of technology is that it can create stronger, top down accountability of service providers in implementation-intensive services within existing public sector organisations. One notion is that electronic management information systems (EMIS) keep better track of inputs and those aspects of personnel that are ‘EMIS visible’ can lead to better services. A recent study examined attempts to increase attendance of Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANMs) at clinics in Rajasthan, which involved high-tech time clocks to monitor attendance. The study’s title says it all: Band-Aids on a Corpse . . . e-governance can be just as bad as any other governance when the real issue is people and their motivation.
For services to improve, the people providing the services have to want to do a better job with the skills they have. A study of medical care in Delhi found that even though providers, in the public sector had much better skills than private sector providers their provision of care in actual practice was much worse.
In implementation-intensive services the key to success is face-to-face interactions between a teacher, a nurse, a policeman, an extension agent and a citizen. This relationship is about power. Amartya Sen’s . . . report on education in West Bengal had a supremely telling anecdote in which the villagers forced the teacher to attend school, but then, when the parents went off to work, the teacher did not teach, but forced the children to massage his feet. . . . As long as the system empowers providers over citizens, technology is irrelevant.
The answer to successfully providing basic services is to create systems that provide both autonomy and accountability.
In basic education for instance, the answer to poor teaching is not controlling teachers more . . . The key . . . is to hire teachers who want to teach and let them teach, expressing their professionalism and vocation as a teacher through autonomy in the classroom. This autonomy has to be matched with accountability for results—not just narrowly measured through test scores, but broadly for the quality of the education they provide.
A recent study in Uttar Pradesh showed that if, somehow, all civil service teachers could be replaced with contract teachers, the state could save a billion dollars a year in revenue and double student learning. Just the additional autonomy and accountability of contracts through local groups—even without complementary system changes in information and empowerment—led to that much improvement. The first step to being part of the solution is to create performance information accessible to those outside of the government. . . .
Q. In the context of the passage, we can infer that the title “Band Aids on a Corpse” (in paragraph 2) suggests that:
... more

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  7 hours ago
Understanding the Title "Band Aids on a Corpse"

Explanation:
- The title "Band Aids on a Corpse" suggests that the electronic monitoring system implemented to increase attendance of Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs) at clinics in Rajasthan was a superficial solution to a serious problem.
- Just like putting a band-aid on a corpse would not revive the dead body, the
... more

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given 
Will a day come when India’s poor can access government services as easily as drawing cash from an ATM? . . . No country in the world has made accessing education or health or policing or dispute resolution as easy as an ATM, because the nature of these activities requires individuals to use their discretion in a positive way. Technology can certainly facilitate this in a variety of ways if it is seen as one part of an overall approach, but the evidence so far in education, for instance, is that just adding computers alone doesn’t make education any better. . . .
The dangerous illusion of technology is that it can create stronger, top down accountability of service providers in implementation intensive services within existing public sector organisations. One notion is that electronic management information systems (EMIS) keep better track of inputs and those aspects of personnel that are ‘EMIS visible’ can lead to better services. A recent study examined attempts to increase attendance of Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANMs) at clinics in Rajasthan, which involved high-tech time clocks to monitor attendance. The study’s title says it all: Band-Aids on a Corpse . . . e-governance can be just as bad as any other governance when the real issue is people and their motivation.
For services to improve, the people providing the services have to want to do a better job with the skills they have. A study of medical care in Delhi found that even though providers in the public sector had much better skills than private sector providers their provision of care in actual practice was much worse.
In implementation-intensive services the key to success is face-to-face interactions between a teacher, a nurse, a policeman, an extension agent and a citizen. This relationship is about power. Amartya Sen’s . . . report on education in West Bengal had a supremely telling anecdote in which the villagers forced the teacher to attend school, but then, when the parents went off to work, the teacher did not teach, but forced the children to massage his feet. . . . As long as the system empowers providers over citizens, technology is irrelevant.
The answer to successfully providing basic services is to create systems that provide both autonomy and accountability. In basic education for instance, the answer to poor teaching is not controlling teachers more . . . The key . . . is to hire teachers who want to teach and let them teach, expressing their professionalism and vocation as a teacher through autonomy in the classroom. This autonomy has to be matched with accountability for results—not just narrowly measured through test scores, but broadly for the quality of the education they provide.
A recent study in Uttar Pradesh showed that if, somehow, all civil service teachers could be replaced with contract teachers, the state could save a billion dollars a year in revenue and double student learning. Just the additional autonomy and accountability of contracts through local groups—even without complementary system changes in information and empowerment—led to that much improvement.
The first step to being part of the solution is to create performance information accessible to those outside of the government. . . .
Q. Which of the following, IF TRUE, would undermine the passage’s main argument?
... more

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  7 hours ago
Explanation:

Empowerment of service providers leads to increased complacency and rigged performance results:
- The passage argues that the key to improving services is creating systems that provide both autonomy and accountability.
- It emphasizes that empowerment of service providers should be balanced with accountability for results.
- If it were proven th
... more

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given 
Will a day come when India’s poor can access government services as easily as drawing cash from an ATM? . . . No country in the world has made accessing education or health or policing or dispute resolution as easy as an ATM, because the nature of these activities requires individuals to use their discretion in a positive way. Technology can certainly facilitate this in a variety of ways if it is seen as one part of an overall approach, but the evidence so far in education, for instance, is that just adding computers alone doesn’t make education any better. . . .
The dangerous illusion of technology is that it can create stronger, top down accountability of service providers in implementation intensive services within existing public sector organisations. One notion is that electronic management information systems (EMIS) keep better track of inputs and those aspects of personnel that are ‘EMIS visible’ can lead to better services. A recent study examined attempts to increase attendance of Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANMs) at clinics in Rajasthan, which involved high-tech time clocks to monitor attendance. The study’s title says it all: Band-Aids on a Corpse . . . e-governance can be just as bad as any other governance when the real issue is people and their motivation.
For services to improve, the people providing the services have to want to do a better job with the skills they have. A study of medical care in Delhi found that even though providers in the public sector had much better skills than private sector providers their provision of care in actual practice was much worse.
In implementation-intensive services the key to success is face-to-face interactions between a teacher, a nurse, a policeman, an extension agent and a citizen. This relationship is about power. Amartya Sen’s . . . report on education in West Bengal had a supremely telling anecdote in which the villagers forced the teacher to attend school, but then, when the parents went off to work, the teacher did not teach, but forced the children to massage his feet. . . . As long as the system empowers providers over citizens, technology is irrelevant.
The answer to successfully providing basic services is to create systems that provide both autonomy and accountability. In basic education for instance, the answer to poor teaching is not controlling teachers more . . . The key . . . is to hire teachers who want to teach and let them teach, expressing their professionalism and vocation as a teacher through autonomy in the classroom. This autonomy has to be matched with accountability for results—not just narrowly measured through test scores, but broadly for the quality of the education they provide.
A recent study in Uttar Pradesh showed that if, somehow, all civil service teachers could be replaced with contract teachers, the state could save a billion dollars a year in revenue and double student learning. Just the additional autonomy and accountability of contracts through local groups—even without complementary system changes in information and empowerment—led to that much improvement.
The first step to being part of the solution is to create performance information accessible to those outside of the government. . . .
Q. The author questions the use of monitoring systems in services that involve face-to-face interaction between service providers and clients because such systems:
... more

Gayatri Sarkar answered  •  7 hours ago
Explanation:

Monitoring systems in face-to-face services:
- The author questions the use of monitoring systems in services that involve face-to-face interaction between service providers and clients.
- These monitoring systems, such as high-tech time clocks to monitor attendance, are seen as ineffective in improving services that require committed service provide
... more

Five years ago, the average age of A,B and C was 25 years and that of B and C 10 years ago was 20 years.A's present age is?

Nishtha Khanna answered  •  10 hours ago
Given information:
Five years ago:
- Average age of A, B, and C was 25 years
- Average age of B and C 10 years ago was 20 years

Calculating Present Ages:
Let's assume the present age of A, B, and C to be A, B, and C years respectively.

Average age of A, B, and C five years ago:
- (A-5 + B-5 + C-5)/3 = 25
- A + B + C - 15 = 75
... more

Directions: Read the given passage and answer the question that follows.
"Vibrant salads, wholesome bites, vegan baking, all vegetarian!" Thus proclaimed a billboard on a stand placed just outside The Lighthouse Cafe. Well, well, well, I thought to myself, another one of those places designed to attract tourists; can't be genuine, can it? I couldn't have been more wrong. I'd embarked on a walking tour of Galway, a city facing the Atlantic, in the Republic of Ireland, and my guide was Billy Murray who told me at the outset that I would be the solitary walker – others had stayed away because of the dismal weather. The weather had indeed been unfriendly, with beating rain, thunder, poor visibility and of course, gray and cold, especially on the Wild Atlantic Way where I had braved the weather and carried on with a coach tour I'd booked earlier, after having spent the previous day driving down to Galway from Dublin.
But today the rains had stopped and the sky was clear but still gray and yet, I found the ambience rather romantic and full of promise.
"Of course, we'll go on that walking tour," I said to a surprised Billy who led me out of the Tourist Centre in downtown Galway and on to the rain-washed street. At the end of the rather comprehensive tour I asked Billy for advice – where should I eat my lunch? And he'd recommended the Lighthouse Cafe near Lynch's Castle (now a bank) when I specified that I was vegetarian.
It seems there are quite a few local residents who are vegetarian and more are exploring this choice, mainly because of health and environmental reasons. But the decor inside the restaurant suggested that the owner turned to this choice due to compassion. I remembered then that Billy did mention that Kerry Legh and her spouse, who run the place, practise Sahaj Marga meditation. The lotus flower was a dominant feature of the restaurant's interior. Be that as it may, my lunch turned out to be one of the best vegetarian ones I've ever had anywhere in the world. When I'd entered the restaurant, a large dog that answers to the name of 'Chieftain' was seated beside his owner, intently watching him eat, without begging even once. Maybe they too practise some kind of meditation, I figured.
Q. Why was just Lighthouse Cafe recommended to the author to have lunch at?
... more

Saikat Desai answered  •  13 hours ago
Reason for recommendation:
- The author specified that they were vegetarian
- The restaurant serves vegetarian food only

Explanation:
- The author asked for a vegetarian restaurant, and since the Lighthouse Cafe serves only vegetarian food, it was recommended to them
- The local residents in Galway are increasingly exploring vegetarianism for health and
... more

Instructions: For the following questions answer them individually
Four sentences related to a topic are given below. Three of them can be put together to form a meaningful and coherent paragraph. Identify the odd one out.
A. This is nothing remotely like "nature fighting back." This is merely nature operating exactly the way we know it operates, the way it has been operating here for some three and a half billion years
B. Very simply, all too often we've acted as though we could make these small, fast breeding creatures extinct down to the very last member, the way we might do with elephants or pandas
C. We can say, "Yes, it's true that we drive a couple hundred species to extinction every day, but there are tens of millions --hundreds of millions--between us and catastrophe."
D. But of course this constitutes a fundamental misunderstanding of biological realities. What we've done in actual fact is make ourselves the chief agent of natural selection in these enemy species.
  • a)
    A
  • b)
    B
  • c)
    C
  • d)
    D
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Saikat Desai answered  •  13 hours ago
Explanation:
Identifying the Odd One Out
- A: This sentence talks about nature operating in a way that has been consistent for billions of years.
- B: This sentence discusses the human impact on small, fast-breeding creatures and how we have attempted to make them extinct.
- C: This sentence mentions the number of species being driven to extinction d
... more

In an AP, S4 = 28 and S8 = 48. Find S12.
  • a)
    20
  • b)
    40
  • c)
    60
  • d)
    68
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Dipika Basu answered  •  21 hours ago
Given Data:
S4 = 28
S8 = 48

Formula for the Sum of 'n' terms in an AP:
Sn = n/2 [2a + (n-1)d]

Finding the Common Difference (d):
S8 = 8/2 [2a + 7d] = 48
4a + 28d = 48
2a + 7d = 24 ----(i)
S4 = 4/2 [2a + 3d] = 28
2a + 3d = 14 ----(ii)
Subtracting equation (ii) from equation (i):
4d = 10
d = 10/4 = 2.5<
... more

If m = 1 + tan2θ and n = 1 + cot2θ, then m/n equals 
  • a)
    m + 1
  • b)
    m - 1
  • c)
    n - 1
  • d)
    n + 1
Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?

Dipika Basu answered  •  21 hours ago
Given Information:
The given expressions are:
m = 1 + tan^2θ
n = 1 + cot^2θ

To find m/n:
To find the value of m/n, we need to substitute the given expressions for m and n into the expression m/n and simplify it.

Substitute values:
m/n = (1 + tan^2θ)/(1 + cot^2θ)

Using trigonometric identities:
tan^2θ = sec^2
... more

Directions: The passage below is followed by a question based on its content. Answer the question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage.
Now, let us speak of one of the most prolific, writers of her times, Anne Silvia Spencer. Her writings and pieces of work very aptly reflect not only the social set–up of that age but also what she thought about the same. Her writings give us a clear view of what kind of a human being she was. The most famous of her works, her autobiography, “The story of a simple girl” presents to us the way she acquired great heights as an author.
Her father, Charles Spencer, was, as Anne later wrote, a very peculiar person.  "Heir to a fortune, educated at Harrow and Cambridge, he was nevertheless a complete domestic tyrant". After bearing him ten children, his gentle wife had little strength left for struggle against him, and the children never dared oppose his wishes.
Yet Anne’s childhood was happy. She romped and studied with her eldest brother, learnt Greek and French, read widely and wrote poetic tragedies. Her own tragedy began at fifteen with a cough and an injury to her back, which resulted in increasingly bad health.  Then her mother died.
Four years later, her father decided to sell the country home. The large family moved from house to house until her father bought No. 72 Deer Haven. There Anne's health grew worse, and she became a creature of the shadows and silence.
As the years passed, the family grew used to her withdrawn life. She had a certain independence, for an uncle had left her a small income. But her brothers and sisters were at the mercy of Mr. Spencer's harsh rules, which hung over the household like thunder in heavy weather.  Chief among them was the absolute refusal to let his daughters marry. He prevented the marriage of Anne’s gay, dance–loving sister, Helena, and the scenes that followed broke Anne’s heart. Yet she remained devoted to her father. It was a devotion that served to strengthen the walls of her prison.
She didn’t talk much to her siblings & definitely not to her father. Irrespective of her solitary existence, she was pretty fond of her brothers and siblings. As per her feelings for her father, she herself could not decide (as she writes in her autobiography) whether she had a feeling of loathe or veneration for her father.
Q. What broke Anne's heart?
... more

Dipika Basu answered  •  21 hours ago
Explanation:

Her fathers refusal to let her sister, Helena marry
- Anne's heart was broken by her father's refusal to let her sister, Helena, marry.
- Despite being a domestic tyrant, her father prevented his daughters from marrying, which led to a heartbreaking situation for Anne.
- This event deeply affected Anne as she witnessed her sister's desire to mar
... more

What is the digit in the units place of 10251?
  • a)
    2
  • b)
    4
  • c)
    6
  • d)
    8
  • e)
    None of these
Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?

Dipika Basu answered  •  21 hours ago
Explanation:

Given Number:
- The given number is 10251.

Finding the Digit in the Units Place:
- To find the digit in the units place, we need to look at the last digit of the number.
- The last digit of the number 10251 is 1.

Conclusion:
- The digit in the units place of the number 10251 is 1.
Therefore, the corr
... more

A word arrangement machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule as shown below. The following is the illustration of the input and the steps of arrangement. Analyse the inherent logic and answer the following questions.
Input: you miss 100% of the shots you never take.
Step 1: never miss you % 100 the of you shots take.
Step 2: never % you the 100 you of take shots miss.
Step 3: miss shots take of you 100 the you % never.
Step 4: shots miss you of you 100 the take never %.
Step 5: shots miss you you of the 100 take never %.
 
 
Q. If the step 4 generates, ‘rather live with a good question than a bad answer’, what is the Input?
... more

Dipika Basu answered  •  21 hours ago
Analysis of the Input:
- The given input is "you miss 100% of the shots you never take."
- The word arrangement machine rearranges the input in each step by taking the first word and placing it at the end of the sentence.

Logic behind the rearrangement:
- The machine follows a rule of moving the first word to the end of the sentence in each step.
- This
... more

Choose the option that is CLOSEST in meaning to the capitalized words.
TUMESCENT
  • a)
    Shrink
  • b)
    Annoy
  • c)
    Engorge
  • d)
    Enlighten
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Divyansh Shah answered  •  yesterday
Understanding the Meaning of TUMESCENT
Tumescent means swollen or engorged. It refers to something that is enlarged or swollen, especially due to an accumulation of fluid.

Closest Meaning to TUMESCENT

Engorged
- Engorged is the closest in meaning to tumescent.
- Both terms refer to something that is swollen or enlarged.
- Engorged s
... more

Choose the option that is CLOSEST in meaning to the capitalized words.
TWADDLE:
  • a)
    Smart
  • b)
    Indecisive
  • c)
    Obscene
  • d)
    Waffle
  • e)
    Humiliate
Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?

Divyansh Shah answered  •  yesterday
Understanding the Meaning of the Word "TWADDLE"
"Twaddle" is a term that refers to something that is considered trivial, silly, or nonsensical. It often conveys the idea of meaningless chatter or foolish talk.

Exploring the Closest Meaning

Option D: Waffle
- "Waffle" is a term that is often used to describe lengthy, vague, or rambling speech th
... more

Choose the option that is CLOSEST in meaning to the capitalized words.
TUMESCENT
  • a)
    Shrink
  • b)
    Annoy
  • c)
    Engorge
  • d)
    Enlighten
  • e)
    Fast
Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?

Divyansh Shah answered  •  yesterday
Meaning of TUMESCENT:
Tumescent means engorged or swollen.

Explanation:
When something is described as tumescent, it means that it is swollen or engorged with fluid or blood. This term is often used in medical contexts to describe body parts that have become enlarged due to increased fluid or blood flow.

Example:
- The patient's tumescent a
... more

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:
Q. If a policyholder is reported miss­ing for more than seven years:
  • a)
    Maturity claim is payable
  • b)
    Death claim is payable assuming non-accidental death
  • c)
    Ex-gratia benefit is payable
  • d)
    Either (1) or (2) 
  • e)
    None of these
Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?

Divyansh Shah answered  •  yesterday
Explanation:

Policyholder Missing for More Than Seven Years
- When a policyholder is reported missing for more than seven years, it is assumed that the individual is no longer alive.
- In such cases, the insurance company may consider the policyholder to be deceased.

Death Claim is Payable
- The correct option 'B' states that the death clai
... more

Read the passage carefully and answer the following questions 
NOT everything looks lovelier the longer and closer its inspection. But Saturn does. It is gorgeous through Earthly telescopes. However, the 13 years of close observation provided by Cassini, an American spacecraft, showed the planet, its moons and its remarkable rings off better and better, revealing finer structures, striking novelties and greater drama. . . .
By and large the big things in the solar system—planets and moons—are thought of as having been around since the beginning. The suggestion that rings and moons are new is, though, made even more interesting by the fact that one of those moons, Enceladus, is widely considered the most promising site in the solar system on which to look for alien life. If Enceladus is both young and bears life, that life must have come into being quickly. This is also believed to have been the case on Earth. Were it true on Enceladus, that would encourage the idea that life evolves easily when conditions are right.
One reason for thinking Saturn’s rings are young is that they are bright. The solar system is suffused with comet dust, and comet dust is dark. Leaving Saturn’s ring system (which Cassini has shown to be more than 90% water ice) out in such a mist is like leaving laundry hanging on a line downwind from a smokestack: it will get dirty. The lighter the rings are, the faster this will happen, for the less mass they contain, the less celestial pollution they can absorb before they start to discolour. . . . Jeff Cuzzi, a scientist at America’s space agency, NASA, who helped run Cassini, told the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Houston that combining the mass estimates with Cassini’s measurements of the density of comet-dust near Saturn suggests the rings are no older than the first dinosaurs, nor younger than the last of them—that is, they are somewhere between 200m and 70m years old.
That timing fits well with a theory put forward in 2016, by Matija Cuk of the SETI Institute, in California and his colleagues. They suggest that at around the same time as the rings came into being an old set of moons orbiting Saturn destroyed themselves, and from their remains emerged not only the rings but also the planet’s current suite of inner moons—Rhea, Dione, Tethys, Enceladus and Mimas. . . .
Dr Cuk and his colleagues used computer simulations of Saturn’s moons’ orbits as a sort of time machine. Looking at the rate at which tidal friction is causing these orbits to lengthen they extrapolated backwards to find out what those orbits would have looked like in the past. They discovered that about 100m years ago the orbits of two of them, Tethys and Dione, would have interacted in a way that left the planes in which they orbit markedly tilted. But their orbits are untitled. The obvious, if unsettling, conclusion was that this interaction never happened—and thus that at the time when it should have happened, Dione and Tethys were simply not there. They must have come into being later. . . .
Q. Based on information provided in the passage, we can conclude all of the following EXCEPT:
... more

Divyansh Shah answered  •  yesterday
Analysis of the Given Passage:

Detailing the Options:
- Option A suggests that none of Saturn's moons ever had suitable conditions for life to evolve.
- Option B states that Tethys and Dione are less than 100 million years old.
- Option C mentions that Saturn's lighter rings discolour faster than rings with greater mass.
- Option D implies that Saturn's
... more

In the figure given below, if AB || CD, then find the measure of ∠BGF.
  • a)
    60º
  • b)
    50º
  • c)
    70º
  • d)
    Data insufficient
Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?

Pioneer Academy answered  •  yesterday
It is given that AB∥CD.
∠AMN = 70°
⇒ ∠MND =70° [Alternate interior angles]
⇒∠END = 70°-30° = 40°
Now, ∠FEN + ∠END = 140° + 40° = 180°
∴ EF∥CD [∴ Sum of adjacent angles is 180°, it means lines are parallel]
⇒EF∥AB
∠GFE = 50°
∴ ∠BGF = 50° [Alternate interior angles]
Hence, the correct option is (B).

In each question below is given a statement followed by two conclusions numbered I and II. You have to assume everything in the statement to be true, then consider the two conclusions together and decide which of them logically follows beyond a reasonable doubt from the information given in the statement.
Statements: Applications of applicants who do no fulfil eligibility criteria and/or who do not submit applications before last date will be summarily rejected and will not be called for the written test.
Conclusions:
I. Those who are called for the written test are those who fulfil eligibility criteria and have submitted their applications before last date.
II. Written test will be held only after scrutiny of applications.
  • a)
    Only conclusion I follows
  • b)
    Only conclusion II follows
  • c)
    Either I or II follows
  • d)
    Both I and II follow
Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?

Manasa Sarkar answered  •  yesterday
Explanation:

Statement Analysis:
- Applications not meeting eligibility criteria or submitted after the last date will be rejected.
- Rejected applications will not be called for the written test.

Conclusion Analysis:
- Conclusion I: Those called for the written test fulfill eligibility criteria and submitted applications before the
... more
Fetching relevant content for you