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Introduction to intersection control
(Objectives)
Understand why some sort of control is
essential to allocate ROW at intersections
Understand there is hierarchy of intersection
control (Traffic signal is NOT a cure-all)
Learn how to check sight distances available
at an intersection
Learn about the warrants for stop and yield
controls
Learn how to check traffic signal warrants
(No need to read pages 389-392 because it
will not be in the 2000 MUTCD.)
Page 2


Introduction to intersection control
(Objectives)
Understand why some sort of control is
essential to allocate ROW at intersections
Understand there is hierarchy of intersection
control (Traffic signal is NOT a cure-all)
Learn how to check sight distances available
at an intersection
Learn about the warrants for stop and yield
controls
Learn how to check traffic signal warrants
(No need to read pages 389-392 because it
will not be in the 2000 MUTCD.)
Conflict points at unsignalized intersections
T intersection
Crossing = 3
Merging = 3
Diverging = 3
Total = 9
4-leg intersection
Total = 32
Page 3


Introduction to intersection control
(Objectives)
Understand why some sort of control is
essential to allocate ROW at intersections
Understand there is hierarchy of intersection
control (Traffic signal is NOT a cure-all)
Learn how to check sight distances available
at an intersection
Learn about the warrants for stop and yield
controls
Learn how to check traffic signal warrants
(No need to read pages 389-392 because it
will not be in the 2000 MUTCD.)
Conflict points at unsignalized intersections
T intersection
Crossing = 3
Merging = 3
Diverging = 3
Total = 9
4-leg intersection
Total = 32
Hierarchy of intersection control
Intersection Control Options: How much judgment can drivers safely
exercise to avoid collisions? Three levels of control are available.
Level I Passive control – basic rules of the road apply
Ø No control
Ø Guide signs only
Ø Warning sings with or without guide signs
Level II Assignment of ROW to major street or rotational ROW
Ø YIELD control (roundabouts are in this category)
Ø Two-way STOP control
Ø All-way STOP control
Level III Positive alternate assignment of exclusive ROW
Ø Traffic signals: 2-phase, multiphase
Ø Traffic control agent/officer
Page 4


Introduction to intersection control
(Objectives)
Understand why some sort of control is
essential to allocate ROW at intersections
Understand there is hierarchy of intersection
control (Traffic signal is NOT a cure-all)
Learn how to check sight distances available
at an intersection
Learn about the warrants for stop and yield
controls
Learn how to check traffic signal warrants
(No need to read pages 389-392 because it
will not be in the 2000 MUTCD.)
Conflict points at unsignalized intersections
T intersection
Crossing = 3
Merging = 3
Diverging = 3
Total = 9
4-leg intersection
Total = 32
Hierarchy of intersection control
Intersection Control Options: How much judgment can drivers safely
exercise to avoid collisions? Three levels of control are available.
Level I Passive control – basic rules of the road apply
Ø No control
Ø Guide signs only
Ø Warning sings with or without guide signs
Level II Assignment of ROW to major street or rotational ROW
Ø YIELD control (roundabouts are in this category)
Ø Two-way STOP control
Ø All-way STOP control
Level III Positive alternate assignment of exclusive ROW
Ø Traffic signals: 2-phase, multiphase
Ø Traffic control agent/officer
Assessing the viability of basic rules-
of-the-road
Primary prerequisite for safety under basic rules-of-the-road: Sight distance
must be adequate for the driver before he is accountable for full responsibility for
his action. è The first thing you want to check is whether adequate SSD is
available at the intersection. This must be satisfied before traffic volume concerns
come into consideration.
a
b d
a d
b
A
B
-
=
-
From the similarity of triangles:
b d
ad
d
A
A
B
-
=
Page 5


Introduction to intersection control
(Objectives)
Understand why some sort of control is
essential to allocate ROW at intersections
Understand there is hierarchy of intersection
control (Traffic signal is NOT a cure-all)
Learn how to check sight distances available
at an intersection
Learn about the warrants for stop and yield
controls
Learn how to check traffic signal warrants
(No need to read pages 389-392 because it
will not be in the 2000 MUTCD.)
Conflict points at unsignalized intersections
T intersection
Crossing = 3
Merging = 3
Diverging = 3
Total = 9
4-leg intersection
Total = 32
Hierarchy of intersection control
Intersection Control Options: How much judgment can drivers safely
exercise to avoid collisions? Three levels of control are available.
Level I Passive control – basic rules of the road apply
Ø No control
Ø Guide signs only
Ø Warning sings with or without guide signs
Level II Assignment of ROW to major street or rotational ROW
Ø YIELD control (roundabouts are in this category)
Ø Two-way STOP control
Ø All-way STOP control
Level III Positive alternate assignment of exclusive ROW
Ø Traffic signals: 2-phase, multiphase
Ø Traffic control agent/officer
Assessing the viability of basic rules-
of-the-road
Primary prerequisite for safety under basic rules-of-the-road: Sight distance
must be adequate for the driver before he is accountable for full responsibility for
his action. è The first thing you want to check is whether adequate SSD is
available at the intersection. This must be satisfied before traffic volume concerns
come into consideration.
a
b d
a d
b
A
B
-
=
-
From the similarity of triangles:
b d
ad
d
A
A
B
-
=
Rule 1: Both vehicles have at least
one safe SSD to the collision point
Step 1: Assume that Vehicle A is located one safe SSD from the collision
point.
Step 2: Based on the assumed position, determine the location of Vehicle B
when it first becomes visible. Call it d
B(act)
Step 3: Rule 1 requires Vehicle B to have one safe SSD. Call it d
B(min)
.
Step 4: If d
B(act)
/ d
B(min)
, then adequate SSD for basic rules-of-the-rule has been
provided. Otherwise, violated and under Rule 1, not safe.
( ) G f
S
t S d
A
A A
±
+ =
30
468 . 1
2
b d
ad
d
A
A
B
-
=
( ) G f
S
t S d
B
B B
±
+ =
30
468 . 1
2
(min)
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FAQs on PPT: Introduction to Intersection Control - Transportation Engineering - Civil Engineering (CE)

1. What is intersection control in civil engineering?
Ans. Intersection control in civil engineering refers to the management and regulation of traffic movements at the intersection of two or more roads. It involves the design and implementation of various control measures to ensure the safe and efficient flow of vehicles, pedestrians, and other modes of transportation.
2. What are the different types of intersection control?
Ans. There are several types of intersection control used in civil engineering, including traffic signals (also known as traffic lights), stop signs, yield signs, roundabouts, and various types of traffic control devices. Each type of control is designed to manage the right-of-way and prioritize the movement of vehicles and pedestrians.
3. How are traffic signals used for intersection control?
Ans. Traffic signals are one of the most common forms of intersection control. They use a system of colored lights (red, yellow, and green) to regulate the flow of traffic. Typically, traffic signals are programmed to provide specific time intervals for each direction of travel, allowing vehicles and pedestrians to safely cross or turn.
4. What are the advantages of using roundabouts for intersection control?
Ans. Roundabouts are circular intersections with yield control, where traffic flows counterclockwise around a central island. They offer several advantages over traditional intersections, such as reduced congestion, improved safety, and better traffic flow. Roundabouts also eliminate the need for signal maintenance and can accommodate a higher volume of traffic with fewer delays.
5. How is intersection control designed and implemented in civil engineering?
Ans. The design and implementation of intersection control in civil engineering involve several factors, including traffic volume, road geometry, pedestrian movements, and safety considerations. Engineers use traffic studies, computer simulations, and traffic modeling techniques to determine the most suitable control measures for a specific intersection. The implementation process includes the installation of signs, signals, markings, and other control devices according to the approved design plans.
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