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NCERT Textbook: Chapter 5 - A Different Kind of School, English, Class 6 | English Class 6 (Honeysuckle) PDF Download

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54 HONEYSUCKLE
1. I HAD heard a great deal about Miss
Beam’s school, but not till last week did
the chance come to visit it.
2. When I arrived there was no one in
sight but a girl of about twelve. Her eyes
were covered with a bandage and she
in sight: to be seen
Before you read
l l l l l
Do you know these words? If you don’t, find
out their meanings: bandage, crutch, cripple,
honour, misfortune, system.
l l l l l Look at the pictures in this unit and guess in
what way this school may be different from
other schools.
5
A Different Kind
of School
A Different Kind
of School
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 2


54 HONEYSUCKLE
1. I HAD heard a great deal about Miss
Beam’s school, but not till last week did
the chance come to visit it.
2. When I arrived there was no one in
sight but a girl of about twelve. Her eyes
were covered with a bandage and she
in sight: to be seen
Before you read
l l l l l
Do you know these words? If you don’t, find
out their meanings: bandage, crutch, cripple,
honour, misfortune, system.
l l l l l Look at the pictures in this unit and guess in
what way this school may be different from
other schools.
5
A Different Kind
of School
A Different Kind
of School
Rationalised 2023-24
A DIFFERENT KIND OF SCHOOL 55
was being led carefully between the
flower-beds by a little boy, who was
about four years younger. She stopped,
and it looked like she asked him who
had come. He seemed to be describing
me to her. Then they passed on.
3. Miss Beam was all that I had
expected— middle-aged, full of authority,
yet kindly and understanding. Her hair
was beginning to turn grey, and she had
the kind of plump figure that is likely
to be comforting to a homesick child. I
asked her some questions about her
teaching methods, which I had heard
were simple.
4. “No more than is needed to help them
to learn how to do things — simple
spelling, adding, subtracting, multiplying
and writing. The rest is done by reading
to them and by interesting talks, during
which they have to sit still and keep
their hands quiet. There are practically
no other lessons.”
5. “The real aim of this school is not so
much to teach thought as to teach
thoughtfulness — kindness to others,
and being responsible citizens. Look out
of the window a minute, will you?”
6. I went to the window which
overlooked a large garden and a
playground at the back. “What do you
see?” Miss Beam asked.
kindly: friendly
plump: stout,
pleasantly fat
responsible:
aware of their
duties
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 3


54 HONEYSUCKLE
1. I HAD heard a great deal about Miss
Beam’s school, but not till last week did
the chance come to visit it.
2. When I arrived there was no one in
sight but a girl of about twelve. Her eyes
were covered with a bandage and she
in sight: to be seen
Before you read
l l l l l
Do you know these words? If you don’t, find
out their meanings: bandage, crutch, cripple,
honour, misfortune, system.
l l l l l Look at the pictures in this unit and guess in
what way this school may be different from
other schools.
5
A Different Kind
of School
A Different Kind
of School
Rationalised 2023-24
A DIFFERENT KIND OF SCHOOL 55
was being led carefully between the
flower-beds by a little boy, who was
about four years younger. She stopped,
and it looked like she asked him who
had come. He seemed to be describing
me to her. Then they passed on.
3. Miss Beam was all that I had
expected— middle-aged, full of authority,
yet kindly and understanding. Her hair
was beginning to turn grey, and she had
the kind of plump figure that is likely
to be comforting to a homesick child. I
asked her some questions about her
teaching methods, which I had heard
were simple.
4. “No more than is needed to help them
to learn how to do things — simple
spelling, adding, subtracting, multiplying
and writing. The rest is done by reading
to them and by interesting talks, during
which they have to sit still and keep
their hands quiet. There are practically
no other lessons.”
5. “The real aim of this school is not so
much to teach thought as to teach
thoughtfulness — kindness to others,
and being responsible citizens. Look out
of the window a minute, will you?”
6. I went to the window which
overlooked a large garden and a
playground at the back. “What do you
see?” Miss Beam asked.
kindly: friendly
plump: stout,
pleasantly fat
responsible:
aware of their
duties
Rationalised 2023-24
56 HONEYSUCKLE
7. “I see some very beautiful grounds,”
I said, “and a lot of jolly children. It
pains me, though, to see that they are
not all so healthy and active-looking.
When I came in, I saw one poor little
girl being led about. She has some
trouble with her eyes. Now I can see
two more with the same difficulty. And
there’s a girl with a crutch watching
the others at play. She seems to be a
hopeless cripple.”
8. Miss Beam laughed. “Oh, no!” she
said. “She’s not really lame. This is only
her lame day. The others are not blind
either. It is only their blind day.”
I must have looked very surprised,
for she laughed again.
9. “This is a very important part of our
system. To make our children appreciate
and understand misfortune, we make
them share in misfortune too. Each term
every child has one blind day, one lame
day, one deaf  day, one injured day and
one dumb day. During the blind day their
eyes are bandaged absolutely and they
are on their honour not to peep. The
bandage is put on overnight so they wake
blind. This means that they need help
with everything. Other children are given
the duty of helping them and leading
them about. They all learn so much this
way — both the blind and the helpers.
at play: playing
hopeless:
unfortunate;
without hope
lame day: day
on which she
acts as if she
was lame
misfortune:
unfortunate
condition; bad
luck
their eyes are
bandaged: they
are blindfolded
are on their
honour: have
promised
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 4


54 HONEYSUCKLE
1. I HAD heard a great deal about Miss
Beam’s school, but not till last week did
the chance come to visit it.
2. When I arrived there was no one in
sight but a girl of about twelve. Her eyes
were covered with a bandage and she
in sight: to be seen
Before you read
l l l l l
Do you know these words? If you don’t, find
out their meanings: bandage, crutch, cripple,
honour, misfortune, system.
l l l l l Look at the pictures in this unit and guess in
what way this school may be different from
other schools.
5
A Different Kind
of School
A Different Kind
of School
Rationalised 2023-24
A DIFFERENT KIND OF SCHOOL 55
was being led carefully between the
flower-beds by a little boy, who was
about four years younger. She stopped,
and it looked like she asked him who
had come. He seemed to be describing
me to her. Then they passed on.
3. Miss Beam was all that I had
expected— middle-aged, full of authority,
yet kindly and understanding. Her hair
was beginning to turn grey, and she had
the kind of plump figure that is likely
to be comforting to a homesick child. I
asked her some questions about her
teaching methods, which I had heard
were simple.
4. “No more than is needed to help them
to learn how to do things — simple
spelling, adding, subtracting, multiplying
and writing. The rest is done by reading
to them and by interesting talks, during
which they have to sit still and keep
their hands quiet. There are practically
no other lessons.”
5. “The real aim of this school is not so
much to teach thought as to teach
thoughtfulness — kindness to others,
and being responsible citizens. Look out
of the window a minute, will you?”
6. I went to the window which
overlooked a large garden and a
playground at the back. “What do you
see?” Miss Beam asked.
kindly: friendly
plump: stout,
pleasantly fat
responsible:
aware of their
duties
Rationalised 2023-24
56 HONEYSUCKLE
7. “I see some very beautiful grounds,”
I said, “and a lot of jolly children. It
pains me, though, to see that they are
not all so healthy and active-looking.
When I came in, I saw one poor little
girl being led about. She has some
trouble with her eyes. Now I can see
two more with the same difficulty. And
there’s a girl with a crutch watching
the others at play. She seems to be a
hopeless cripple.”
8. Miss Beam laughed. “Oh, no!” she
said. “She’s not really lame. This is only
her lame day. The others are not blind
either. It is only their blind day.”
I must have looked very surprised,
for she laughed again.
9. “This is a very important part of our
system. To make our children appreciate
and understand misfortune, we make
them share in misfortune too. Each term
every child has one blind day, one lame
day, one deaf  day, one injured day and
one dumb day. During the blind day their
eyes are bandaged absolutely and they
are on their honour not to peep. The
bandage is put on overnight so they wake
blind. This means that they need help
with everything. Other children are given
the duty of helping them and leading
them about. They all learn so much this
way — both the blind and the helpers.
at play: playing
hopeless:
unfortunate;
without hope
lame day: day
on which she
acts as if she
was lame
misfortune:
unfortunate
condition; bad
luck
their eyes are
bandaged: they
are blindfolded
are on their
honour: have
promised
Rationalised 2023-24
A DIFFERENT KIND OF SCHOOL 57
10. “There is no misery about it,” Miss
Beam continued. “Everyone is very kind,
and it is really something of a game.
Before the day is over, though, even the
most thoughtless child realises what
misfortune is.
11. “The blind day is, of course, really
the worst, but some of the children tell
me that the dumb day is the most
difficult. We cannot bandage the
children’s mouths, so they really have
to exercise their will-power. Come into
the garden and see for yourself how the
children feel about it.”
12. Miss Beam led me to one of the
bandaged girls. “Here’s a gentleman
come to talk to you,” said Miss Beam,
and left us.
13. “Don’t you ever peep?” I asked the girl.
“Oh, no!” she exclaimed. “That would
be cheating! But I had no idea it was so
awful to be blind. You can’t see a thing.
You feel you are going to be hit by
something every moment. It’s such a
relief just to sit down.”
“Are your helpers kind to you?” I asked.
14. “Fairly. But they are not as careful
as I shall be when it is my turn. Those
that have been blind already are the best
helpers. It’s perfectly ghastly not to see.
I wish you’d try.”
“Shall I lead you anywhere?” I asked.
misery: difficulty;
unpleasantness
thoughtless:
careless
come to talk: who
has come to talk
awful: bad
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 5


54 HONEYSUCKLE
1. I HAD heard a great deal about Miss
Beam’s school, but not till last week did
the chance come to visit it.
2. When I arrived there was no one in
sight but a girl of about twelve. Her eyes
were covered with a bandage and she
in sight: to be seen
Before you read
l l l l l
Do you know these words? If you don’t, find
out their meanings: bandage, crutch, cripple,
honour, misfortune, system.
l l l l l Look at the pictures in this unit and guess in
what way this school may be different from
other schools.
5
A Different Kind
of School
A Different Kind
of School
Rationalised 2023-24
A DIFFERENT KIND OF SCHOOL 55
was being led carefully between the
flower-beds by a little boy, who was
about four years younger. She stopped,
and it looked like she asked him who
had come. He seemed to be describing
me to her. Then they passed on.
3. Miss Beam was all that I had
expected— middle-aged, full of authority,
yet kindly and understanding. Her hair
was beginning to turn grey, and she had
the kind of plump figure that is likely
to be comforting to a homesick child. I
asked her some questions about her
teaching methods, which I had heard
were simple.
4. “No more than is needed to help them
to learn how to do things — simple
spelling, adding, subtracting, multiplying
and writing. The rest is done by reading
to them and by interesting talks, during
which they have to sit still and keep
their hands quiet. There are practically
no other lessons.”
5. “The real aim of this school is not so
much to teach thought as to teach
thoughtfulness — kindness to others,
and being responsible citizens. Look out
of the window a minute, will you?”
6. I went to the window which
overlooked a large garden and a
playground at the back. “What do you
see?” Miss Beam asked.
kindly: friendly
plump: stout,
pleasantly fat
responsible:
aware of their
duties
Rationalised 2023-24
56 HONEYSUCKLE
7. “I see some very beautiful grounds,”
I said, “and a lot of jolly children. It
pains me, though, to see that they are
not all so healthy and active-looking.
When I came in, I saw one poor little
girl being led about. She has some
trouble with her eyes. Now I can see
two more with the same difficulty. And
there’s a girl with a crutch watching
the others at play. She seems to be a
hopeless cripple.”
8. Miss Beam laughed. “Oh, no!” she
said. “She’s not really lame. This is only
her lame day. The others are not blind
either. It is only their blind day.”
I must have looked very surprised,
for she laughed again.
9. “This is a very important part of our
system. To make our children appreciate
and understand misfortune, we make
them share in misfortune too. Each term
every child has one blind day, one lame
day, one deaf  day, one injured day and
one dumb day. During the blind day their
eyes are bandaged absolutely and they
are on their honour not to peep. The
bandage is put on overnight so they wake
blind. This means that they need help
with everything. Other children are given
the duty of helping them and leading
them about. They all learn so much this
way — both the blind and the helpers.
at play: playing
hopeless:
unfortunate;
without hope
lame day: day
on which she
acts as if she
was lame
misfortune:
unfortunate
condition; bad
luck
their eyes are
bandaged: they
are blindfolded
are on their
honour: have
promised
Rationalised 2023-24
A DIFFERENT KIND OF SCHOOL 57
10. “There is no misery about it,” Miss
Beam continued. “Everyone is very kind,
and it is really something of a game.
Before the day is over, though, even the
most thoughtless child realises what
misfortune is.
11. “The blind day is, of course, really
the worst, but some of the children tell
me that the dumb day is the most
difficult. We cannot bandage the
children’s mouths, so they really have
to exercise their will-power. Come into
the garden and see for yourself how the
children feel about it.”
12. Miss Beam led me to one of the
bandaged girls. “Here’s a gentleman
come to talk to you,” said Miss Beam,
and left us.
13. “Don’t you ever peep?” I asked the girl.
“Oh, no!” she exclaimed. “That would
be cheating! But I had no idea it was so
awful to be blind. You can’t see a thing.
You feel you are going to be hit by
something every moment. It’s such a
relief just to sit down.”
“Are your helpers kind to you?” I asked.
14. “Fairly. But they are not as careful
as I shall be when it is my turn. Those
that have been blind already are the best
helpers. It’s perfectly ghastly not to see.
I wish you’d try.”
“Shall I lead you anywhere?” I asked.
misery: difficulty;
unpleasantness
thoughtless:
careless
come to talk: who
has come to talk
awful: bad
Rationalised 2023-24
58 HONEYSUCKLE
troublesome: difficult
15. “Oh, yes”, she said. “Let’s go for a little
walk. Only you must tell me about
things. I shall be so glad when today is
over. The other bad days can’t be half
as bad as this. Having a leg tied up and
hopping about on a crutch is almost
fun, I guess. Having an arm tied up is a
bit more troublesome, because you can’t
eat without help, and things like that. I
don’t think I’ll mind being deaf for a
day—at least not much. But being blind
is so frightening. My head aches all the
time  just from worrying that I’ll get hurt.
Where are we now?”
16. “In the playground,” I said. “We’re
walking towards the house. Miss Beam
Rationalised 2023-24
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FAQs on NCERT Textbook: Chapter 5 - A Different Kind of School, English, Class 6 - English Class 6 (Honeysuckle)

1. What is the concept of a different kind of school mentioned in the article?
Ans. The concept of a different kind of school mentioned in the article refers to an innovative and alternative approach to education that focuses on experiential learning, student empowerment, and individualized instruction. It aims to provide a holistic education that goes beyond traditional classroom teaching and encourages students to explore their interests and talents.
2. How does a different kind of school promote experiential learning?
Ans. A different kind of school promotes experiential learning by providing hands-on activities, field trips, and practical learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to actively participate in their own learning process, engage in real-world experiences, and apply their knowledge to solve problems. This approach helps them develop critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and a deeper understanding of the subjects they are studying.
3. What is the significance of student empowerment in a different kind of school?
Ans. Student empowerment is significant in a different kind of school as it gives students a sense of ownership and responsibility for their education. They are encouraged to take active roles in decision-making, goal setting, and designing their learning experiences. This fosters independence, self-confidence, and a lifelong love for learning.
4. How does a different kind of school cater to individualized instruction?
Ans. A different kind of school caters to individualized instruction by recognizing that each student has unique learning needs, abilities, and interests. Teachers personalize their teaching methods, pace, and content to accommodate these differences. They provide one-on-one support, use various teaching strategies, and offer a flexible curriculum that allows students to learn at their own pace.
5. How does a different kind of school promote holistic education?
Ans. A different kind of school promotes holistic education by emphasizing the overall development of students. Along with academic subjects, it focuses on the development of social skills, emotional intelligence, creativity, physical fitness, and ethical values. This is achieved through a combination of academic lessons, extracurricular activities, sports, arts, and character-building programs. The aim is to nurture well-rounded individuals who are equipped to face the challenges of life.
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