Class 6 Exam  >  Class 6 Notes  >  English Class 6 (Honeysuckle)  >  NCERT Textbook: Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance, English, Class 6

NCERT Textbook: Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance, English, Class 6 | English Class 6 (Honeysuckle) PDF Download

Download, print and study this document offline
Please wait while the PDF view is loading
 Page 1


96 HONEYSUCKLE
Notes for the Teacher Notes for the Teacher
UNITS 8–10
8. A Game of Chance
l Indian festival – rational thinking/
scientific temper.  Let children
read the story individually or in
pairs.  Then ask them to fill in the
blanks individually without
referring to the text.
l While doing the comprehension questions, let them read and
re-read the text.
l ‘Working with Language’ has an exercise using the same word
as noun and verb. Draw children’s attention to changes, if
any, in the sentence when a noun functions as a verb or vice-
versa.
l The use of ‘there’ and ‘it’ as empty subject to be clarified through
examples.
l In ‘Speaking and Reading Aloud’, organise the first activity in
such a manner that every child gets a chance to speak,
describing his/her visit to the fair. In the next activity help them
with words, phrases and reformulated sentences.
Vocation
l This poem, when recited with feeling, will have an impact on
children by drawing their attention to the importance of every
job or piece of work.
l The child’s curiosity and desire to be left alone sometimes may
also be expressed in discussions. It would be fun to answer
their questions in this regard with understanding and
sympathy.
2022-23
Page 2


96 HONEYSUCKLE
Notes for the Teacher Notes for the Teacher
UNITS 8–10
8. A Game of Chance
l Indian festival – rational thinking/
scientific temper.  Let children
read the story individually or in
pairs.  Then ask them to fill in the
blanks individually without
referring to the text.
l While doing the comprehension questions, let them read and
re-read the text.
l ‘Working with Language’ has an exercise using the same word
as noun and verb. Draw children’s attention to changes, if
any, in the sentence when a noun functions as a verb or vice-
versa.
l The use of ‘there’ and ‘it’ as empty subject to be clarified through
examples.
l In ‘Speaking and Reading Aloud’, organise the first activity in
such a manner that every child gets a chance to speak,
describing his/her visit to the fair. In the next activity help them
with words, phrases and reformulated sentences.
Vocation
l This poem, when recited with feeling, will have an impact on
children by drawing their attention to the importance of every
job or piece of work.
l The child’s curiosity and desire to be left alone sometimes may
also be expressed in discussions. It would be fun to answer
their questions in this regard with understanding and
sympathy.
2022-23
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER 97
l In the “I wish I were…….” activity, suggest vocations/callings
if children have difficulty doing it.  “I wish I had two eyes at the
back of my head also…”  “I wish I wasn’t a kid…….” can lead to
interesting explanations and accounts.
l The last activity will make children use their hand, heart and
head together. To understand the dignity of labour, children
should be taken out to visit places of work and talk to workers.
Making cards with pictures will follow naturally.  This may be
clubbed with a craft activity.
9. Desert Animals
l Wildlife — this lesson presents the lifestyle of
animals in the desert, and how they survive under
very harsh conditions. If possible, connect it with
biology portions which deal with animals and their
habits. Enlist the help of  the science teacher.
l Speaking activity in this lesson focuses on the
superlative form of adjectives. Extend the activity including
other forms also. ‘Thinking about Language’ is not a writing
task, though it involves writing five sentences. The aim is to
enable children to see the use of the given phrases in different
contexts.  Create other exercises to enable children to use
phrases like  ‘some...any’ ‘so much so’  ‘more than’, etc.
l Talk about desert areas in India.
l Deserts are hot, but they can be very cold.  Familiarise children
with Ladakh and people who live there.
Whatif
l Let children compare the word ‘whatifs’ with the phrases ‘No I
thinks’ ‘No buts’ in ‘What Happened to the Reptiles’ in the
Supplementary Reader. Discuss what they mean. Whatif is a
word invented out of the phrase ‘what if’, which means
‘suppose’; the other phrases echo other speakers’ words, and
are used to cut them short.
2022-23
Page 3


96 HONEYSUCKLE
Notes for the Teacher Notes for the Teacher
UNITS 8–10
8. A Game of Chance
l Indian festival – rational thinking/
scientific temper.  Let children
read the story individually or in
pairs.  Then ask them to fill in the
blanks individually without
referring to the text.
l While doing the comprehension questions, let them read and
re-read the text.
l ‘Working with Language’ has an exercise using the same word
as noun and verb. Draw children’s attention to changes, if
any, in the sentence when a noun functions as a verb or vice-
versa.
l The use of ‘there’ and ‘it’ as empty subject to be clarified through
examples.
l In ‘Speaking and Reading Aloud’, organise the first activity in
such a manner that every child gets a chance to speak,
describing his/her visit to the fair. In the next activity help them
with words, phrases and reformulated sentences.
Vocation
l This poem, when recited with feeling, will have an impact on
children by drawing their attention to the importance of every
job or piece of work.
l The child’s curiosity and desire to be left alone sometimes may
also be expressed in discussions. It would be fun to answer
their questions in this regard with understanding and
sympathy.
2022-23
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER 97
l In the “I wish I were…….” activity, suggest vocations/callings
if children have difficulty doing it.  “I wish I had two eyes at the
back of my head also…”  “I wish I wasn’t a kid…….” can lead to
interesting explanations and accounts.
l The last activity will make children use their hand, heart and
head together. To understand the dignity of labour, children
should be taken out to visit places of work and talk to workers.
Making cards with pictures will follow naturally.  This may be
clubbed with a craft activity.
9. Desert Animals
l Wildlife — this lesson presents the lifestyle of
animals in the desert, and how they survive under
very harsh conditions. If possible, connect it with
biology portions which deal with animals and their
habits. Enlist the help of  the science teacher.
l Speaking activity in this lesson focuses on the
superlative form of adjectives. Extend the activity including
other forms also. ‘Thinking about Language’ is not a writing
task, though it involves writing five sentences. The aim is to
enable children to see the use of the given phrases in different
contexts.  Create other exercises to enable children to use
phrases like  ‘some...any’ ‘so much so’  ‘more than’, etc.
l Talk about desert areas in India.
l Deserts are hot, but they can be very cold.  Familiarise children
with Ladakh and people who live there.
Whatif
l Let children compare the word ‘whatifs’ with the phrases ‘No I
thinks’ ‘No buts’ in ‘What Happened to the Reptiles’ in the
Supplementary Reader. Discuss what they mean. Whatif is a
word invented out of the phrase ‘what if’, which means
‘suppose’; the other phrases echo other speakers’ words, and
are used to cut them short.
2022-23
98 HONEYSUCKLE
l Let children arrange ‘whatifs’ in the poem as probable, less
probable and improbable.
l Encourage every child to make a short poem of the ‘whatifs’
she/he has listed, as suggested. Edit their compositions and
put up some on the wall.
10. The Banyan Tree
l Adventure, wildlife — the photographs at the
beginning are crucial to understanding the
text. Help children deal with the text that goes
with the photographs.
l Any reason children can think of why the
mongoose should always be so keen on
fighting the cobra!
l Read aloud short excerpts from Treasure Island, Tom Sawyer
and Huckleberry Finn in story reading sessions.
2022-23
Page 4


96 HONEYSUCKLE
Notes for the Teacher Notes for the Teacher
UNITS 8–10
8. A Game of Chance
l Indian festival – rational thinking/
scientific temper.  Let children
read the story individually or in
pairs.  Then ask them to fill in the
blanks individually without
referring to the text.
l While doing the comprehension questions, let them read and
re-read the text.
l ‘Working with Language’ has an exercise using the same word
as noun and verb. Draw children’s attention to changes, if
any, in the sentence when a noun functions as a verb or vice-
versa.
l The use of ‘there’ and ‘it’ as empty subject to be clarified through
examples.
l In ‘Speaking and Reading Aloud’, organise the first activity in
such a manner that every child gets a chance to speak,
describing his/her visit to the fair. In the next activity help them
with words, phrases and reformulated sentences.
Vocation
l This poem, when recited with feeling, will have an impact on
children by drawing their attention to the importance of every
job or piece of work.
l The child’s curiosity and desire to be left alone sometimes may
also be expressed in discussions. It would be fun to answer
their questions in this regard with understanding and
sympathy.
2022-23
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER 97
l In the “I wish I were…….” activity, suggest vocations/callings
if children have difficulty doing it.  “I wish I had two eyes at the
back of my head also…”  “I wish I wasn’t a kid…….” can lead to
interesting explanations and accounts.
l The last activity will make children use their hand, heart and
head together. To understand the dignity of labour, children
should be taken out to visit places of work and talk to workers.
Making cards with pictures will follow naturally.  This may be
clubbed with a craft activity.
9. Desert Animals
l Wildlife — this lesson presents the lifestyle of
animals in the desert, and how they survive under
very harsh conditions. If possible, connect it with
biology portions which deal with animals and their
habits. Enlist the help of  the science teacher.
l Speaking activity in this lesson focuses on the
superlative form of adjectives. Extend the activity including
other forms also. ‘Thinking about Language’ is not a writing
task, though it involves writing five sentences. The aim is to
enable children to see the use of the given phrases in different
contexts.  Create other exercises to enable children to use
phrases like  ‘some...any’ ‘so much so’  ‘more than’, etc.
l Talk about desert areas in India.
l Deserts are hot, but they can be very cold.  Familiarise children
with Ladakh and people who live there.
Whatif
l Let children compare the word ‘whatifs’ with the phrases ‘No I
thinks’ ‘No buts’ in ‘What Happened to the Reptiles’ in the
Supplementary Reader. Discuss what they mean. Whatif is a
word invented out of the phrase ‘what if’, which means
‘suppose’; the other phrases echo other speakers’ words, and
are used to cut them short.
2022-23
98 HONEYSUCKLE
l Let children arrange ‘whatifs’ in the poem as probable, less
probable and improbable.
l Encourage every child to make a short poem of the ‘whatifs’
she/he has listed, as suggested. Edit their compositions and
put up some on the wall.
10. The Banyan Tree
l Adventure, wildlife — the photographs at the
beginning are crucial to understanding the
text. Help children deal with the text that goes
with the photographs.
l Any reason children can think of why the
mongoose should always be so keen on
fighting the cobra!
l Read aloud short excerpts from Treasure Island, Tom Sawyer
and Huckleberry Finn in story reading sessions.
2022-23
A GAME OF CHANCE 99
1. EVERY year on the occasion of Eid, there
was a fair in our village. Eid was
celebrated only one day but the fair lasted
many days. Tradesmen from far and
wide came there with all kinds of goods
Before you read
Have you ever won anything in a ‘lucky dip’ or
other such game of chance? Do you like such
games?
8
tradesmen:
shopkeepers or
people who have
goods to sell
A Game of Chance
A Game of Chance
2022-23
Page 5


96 HONEYSUCKLE
Notes for the Teacher Notes for the Teacher
UNITS 8–10
8. A Game of Chance
l Indian festival – rational thinking/
scientific temper.  Let children
read the story individually or in
pairs.  Then ask them to fill in the
blanks individually without
referring to the text.
l While doing the comprehension questions, let them read and
re-read the text.
l ‘Working with Language’ has an exercise using the same word
as noun and verb. Draw children’s attention to changes, if
any, in the sentence when a noun functions as a verb or vice-
versa.
l The use of ‘there’ and ‘it’ as empty subject to be clarified through
examples.
l In ‘Speaking and Reading Aloud’, organise the first activity in
such a manner that every child gets a chance to speak,
describing his/her visit to the fair. In the next activity help them
with words, phrases and reformulated sentences.
Vocation
l This poem, when recited with feeling, will have an impact on
children by drawing their attention to the importance of every
job or piece of work.
l The child’s curiosity and desire to be left alone sometimes may
also be expressed in discussions. It would be fun to answer
their questions in this regard with understanding and
sympathy.
2022-23
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER 97
l In the “I wish I were…….” activity, suggest vocations/callings
if children have difficulty doing it.  “I wish I had two eyes at the
back of my head also…”  “I wish I wasn’t a kid…….” can lead to
interesting explanations and accounts.
l The last activity will make children use their hand, heart and
head together. To understand the dignity of labour, children
should be taken out to visit places of work and talk to workers.
Making cards with pictures will follow naturally.  This may be
clubbed with a craft activity.
9. Desert Animals
l Wildlife — this lesson presents the lifestyle of
animals in the desert, and how they survive under
very harsh conditions. If possible, connect it with
biology portions which deal with animals and their
habits. Enlist the help of  the science teacher.
l Speaking activity in this lesson focuses on the
superlative form of adjectives. Extend the activity including
other forms also. ‘Thinking about Language’ is not a writing
task, though it involves writing five sentences. The aim is to
enable children to see the use of the given phrases in different
contexts.  Create other exercises to enable children to use
phrases like  ‘some...any’ ‘so much so’  ‘more than’, etc.
l Talk about desert areas in India.
l Deserts are hot, but they can be very cold.  Familiarise children
with Ladakh and people who live there.
Whatif
l Let children compare the word ‘whatifs’ with the phrases ‘No I
thinks’ ‘No buts’ in ‘What Happened to the Reptiles’ in the
Supplementary Reader. Discuss what they mean. Whatif is a
word invented out of the phrase ‘what if’, which means
‘suppose’; the other phrases echo other speakers’ words, and
are used to cut them short.
2022-23
98 HONEYSUCKLE
l Let children arrange ‘whatifs’ in the poem as probable, less
probable and improbable.
l Encourage every child to make a short poem of the ‘whatifs’
she/he has listed, as suggested. Edit their compositions and
put up some on the wall.
10. The Banyan Tree
l Adventure, wildlife — the photographs at the
beginning are crucial to understanding the
text. Help children deal with the text that goes
with the photographs.
l Any reason children can think of why the
mongoose should always be so keen on
fighting the cobra!
l Read aloud short excerpts from Treasure Island, Tom Sawyer
and Huckleberry Finn in story reading sessions.
2022-23
A GAME OF CHANCE 99
1. EVERY year on the occasion of Eid, there
was a fair in our village. Eid was
celebrated only one day but the fair lasted
many days. Tradesmen from far and
wide came there with all kinds of goods
Before you read
Have you ever won anything in a ‘lucky dip’ or
other such game of chance? Do you like such
games?
8
tradesmen:
shopkeepers or
people who have
goods to sell
A Game of Chance
A Game of Chance
2022-23
100 HONEYSUCKLE
to sell. You could buy anything from a
small pin to a big buffalo.
2. Uncle took me to the fair. Bhaiya, who
worked for us at home, came with us.
There was a big crowd at the fair. Uncle
was leading us through the crowd when
he met a few of his friends. They wanted
him to spend some time with them.
3. Uncle asked me whether I would like
to look around the fair with Bhaiya till
he came back. I was happy to do that.
Uncle warned me neither to buy anything
nor to go too far out while he was away. I
promised that I would wait for him.
4. Bhaiya and I went from shop to shop.
There were many things I would have
liked to buy, but I waited for Uncle to
return. Then we came to what was called
the Lucky Shop. The shopkeeper was
neither young nor old. He was a middle-
aged man. He seemed neither too smart
nor too lazy. He wanted everybody to try
their luck. There were discs on the table
with numbers from one to ten facing
down. All you had to do was to pay
50 paise, pick up any six discs, add up
the numbers on the discs and find the
total. The article marked with that
number  was yours.
5. An old man paid 50 paise and
selected six discs. He added up the
numbers on them and found the total
was 15. He was given the article marked
2022-23
Read More
32 videos|138 docs|56 tests

Up next

FAQs on NCERT Textbook: Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance, English, Class 6 - English Class 6 (Honeysuckle)

1. What is the summary of Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance?
Ans. Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance is about a boy named Sanjay who gets a magic stone from a snake charmer. The stone grants him three wishes, but he uses them all in a game of chance and loses everything. The chapter teaches us about the dangers of gambling and the importance of making wise decisions.
2. How does Sanjay obtain the magic stone in Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance?
Ans. Sanjay obtains the magic stone from a snake charmer. The charmer gives him the stone as a gift after Sanjay expresses his interest in learning the tricks of the trade. The stone is said to grant three wishes, but it comes with a warning to use them wisely.
3. Why does Sanjay play the game of chance in Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance?
Ans. Sanjay plays the game of chance because he gets tempted by the possibility of winning more money. He initially wins a small amount and gets convinced that he can win more. His desire for instant wealth and the influence of his friends lead him to make poor decisions and gamble away everything.
4. What lesson does Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance teach us?
Ans. Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance teaches us the dangers of gambling and the importance of making wise decisions. It highlights the consequences of greed and impulsive behavior. The chapter encourages readers to think critically and consider the long-term effects of their actions.
5. How does Sanjay feel after losing all his money in Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance?
Ans. After losing all his money, Sanjay feels devastated and regretful. He realizes the foolishness of his actions and understands the importance of money and the consequences of gambling. Sanjay learns a valuable lesson about the dangers of taking risks without considering the potential outcomes.
32 videos|138 docs|56 tests
Download as PDF

Up next

Explore Courses for Class 6 exam
Signup for Free!
Signup to see your scores go up within 7 days! Learn & Practice with 1000+ FREE Notes, Videos & Tests.
10M+ students study on EduRev
Related Searches

Viva Questions

,

NCERT Textbook: Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance

,

English

,

English

,

NCERT Textbook: Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance

,

pdf

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Objective type Questions

,

English

,

study material

,

Sample Paper

,

NCERT Textbook: Chapter 8 - A Game of Chance

,

Class 6 | English Class 6 (Honeysuckle)

,

Class 6 | English Class 6 (Honeysuckle)

,

Extra Questions

,

Free

,

MCQs

,

Important questions

,

Semester Notes

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Class 6 | English Class 6 (Honeysuckle)

,

practice quizzes

,

past year papers

,

video lectures

,

Exam

,

ppt

,

mock tests for examination

,

Summary

;