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 Page 1


 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
CAT 2022 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
Stories concerning the Undead have always been with us. From out of the primal darkness of Mankind’s 
earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a way which we can understand), 
yet not quite dead either. These may have been ancient and primitive deities who dwelt deep in the 
surrounding forests and in remote places, or simply those deceased who refused to remain in their tombs 
and who wandered about the countryside, physically tormenting and frightening those who were still alive. 
Mostly they were ill-defined—strange sounds in the night beyond the comforting glow of the fire, or a shape, 
half-glimpsed in the twilight along the edge of an encampment. They were vague and indistinct, but they 
were always there with the power to terrify and disturb. They had the power to touch the minds of our early 
ancestors and to fill them with dread. Such fear formed the basis of the earliest tales although the source and 
exact nature of such terrors still remained very vague. 
And as Mankind became more sophisticated, leaving the gloom of their caves and forming themselves into 
recognizable communities—towns, cities, whole cultures—so the Undead travelled with them, inhabiting 
their folklore just as they had in former times. Now they began to take on more definite shapes. They 
became walking cadavers; the physical embodiment of former deities and things which had existed alongside 
Man since the Creation. Some still remained vague and ill-defined but, as Mankind strove to explain the 
horror which it felt towards them, such creatures emerged more readily into the light. 
In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which defied 
the natural order of things—the power to transform themselves into other shapes, the ability to sustain 
themselves by drinking human blood, and the ability to influence human minds across a distance. Such 
powers—described as supernatural—only [lent] an added dimension to the terror that humans felt regarding 
them. 
And it was only natural, too, that the Undead should become connected with the practice of magic. From 
very early times, Shamans and witchdoctors had claimed at least some power and control over the spirits of 
departed ancestors, and this has continued down into more “civilized” times. Formerly, the invisible spirits 
and forces that thronged around men’s earliest encampments, had spoken “through” the tribal Shamans but 
now, as entities in their own right, they were subject to magical control and could be physically summoned 
by a competent sorcerer. However, the relationship between the magician and an Undead creature was 
often a very tenuous and uncertain one. Some sorcerers might have even become Undead entities once they 
died, but they might also have been susceptible to the powers of other magicians when they did. 
From the Middle Ages and into the Age of Enlightenment, theories of the Undead continued to grow and 
develop. Their names became more familiar—werewolf, vampire, ghoul—each one certain to strike fear into 
the hearts of ordinary humans. 
Page 2


 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
CAT 2022 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
Stories concerning the Undead have always been with us. From out of the primal darkness of Mankind’s 
earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a way which we can understand), 
yet not quite dead either. These may have been ancient and primitive deities who dwelt deep in the 
surrounding forests and in remote places, or simply those deceased who refused to remain in their tombs 
and who wandered about the countryside, physically tormenting and frightening those who were still alive. 
Mostly they were ill-defined—strange sounds in the night beyond the comforting glow of the fire, or a shape, 
half-glimpsed in the twilight along the edge of an encampment. They were vague and indistinct, but they 
were always there with the power to terrify and disturb. They had the power to touch the minds of our early 
ancestors and to fill them with dread. Such fear formed the basis of the earliest tales although the source and 
exact nature of such terrors still remained very vague. 
And as Mankind became more sophisticated, leaving the gloom of their caves and forming themselves into 
recognizable communities—towns, cities, whole cultures—so the Undead travelled with them, inhabiting 
their folklore just as they had in former times. Now they began to take on more definite shapes. They 
became walking cadavers; the physical embodiment of former deities and things which had existed alongside 
Man since the Creation. Some still remained vague and ill-defined but, as Mankind strove to explain the 
horror which it felt towards them, such creatures emerged more readily into the light. 
In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which defied 
the natural order of things—the power to transform themselves into other shapes, the ability to sustain 
themselves by drinking human blood, and the ability to influence human minds across a distance. Such 
powers—described as supernatural—only [lent] an added dimension to the terror that humans felt regarding 
them. 
And it was only natural, too, that the Undead should become connected with the practice of magic. From 
very early times, Shamans and witchdoctors had claimed at least some power and control over the spirits of 
departed ancestors, and this has continued down into more “civilized” times. Formerly, the invisible spirits 
and forces that thronged around men’s earliest encampments, had spoken “through” the tribal Shamans but 
now, as entities in their own right, they were subject to magical control and could be physically summoned 
by a competent sorcerer. However, the relationship between the magician and an Undead creature was 
often a very tenuous and uncertain one. Some sorcerers might have even become Undead entities once they 
died, but they might also have been susceptible to the powers of other magicians when they did. 
From the Middle Ages and into the Age of Enlightenment, theories of the Undead continued to grow and 
develop. Their names became more familiar—werewolf, vampire, ghoul—each one certain to strike fear into 
the hearts of ordinary humans. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
Q.1) 
All of the following statements, if false, could be seen as being in accordance with the passage, EXCEPT: 
[1] the transition from the Middle Ages to the Age of Enlightenment saw new theories of the Undead. 
[2] the Undead remained vague and ill-defined, even as Mankind strove to understand the horror they 
inspired. 
[3] the relationship between Shamans and the Undead was believed to be a strong and stable one. 
[4] the growing sophistication of Mankind meant that humans stopped believing in the Undead. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following observations is a valid conclusion to draw from the statement, “From out of the 
primal darkness of Mankind’s earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a 
way which we can understand), yet not quite dead either.”? 
[1] Mankind’s primal years were marked by creatures alive with eerie whispers, but seen only in the 
darkness. 
[2] We can understand the lives of the eerie creatures in Mankind’s early years through their whispers in the 
darkness. 
[3] Mankind’s early years were marked by a belief in the existence of eerie creatures that were neither quite 
alive nor dead. 
[4] Long ago, eerie creatures used to whisper in the primal darkness that they were not quite dead. 
Q.3) 
Which one of the following statements best describes what the passage is about? 
[1] The passage describes the failure of human beings to fully comprehend their environment. 
[2] The writer discusses the transition from primitive thinking to the Age of Enlightenment. 
[3] The passage discusses the evolution of theories of the Undead from primitive thinking to the Age of 
Enlightenment. 
[4] The writer describes the ways in which the Undead come to be associated with Shamans and the practice 
of magic. 
[MARKS] 
Q.4) 
“In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which 
defied the natural order of things . . .” Which one of the following best expresses the claim made in this 
statement? 
[1] The Undead are deified in nature’s order by giving them divine attributes. 
[2] Human beings conceptualise the Undead as possessing abnormal features. 
[3] According the Undead an abnormal status is to reject the natural order of things. 
[4] The natural attributes of the Undead are rendered abnormal by changing their status. 
Page 3


 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
CAT 2022 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
Stories concerning the Undead have always been with us. From out of the primal darkness of Mankind’s 
earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a way which we can understand), 
yet not quite dead either. These may have been ancient and primitive deities who dwelt deep in the 
surrounding forests and in remote places, or simply those deceased who refused to remain in their tombs 
and who wandered about the countryside, physically tormenting and frightening those who were still alive. 
Mostly they were ill-defined—strange sounds in the night beyond the comforting glow of the fire, or a shape, 
half-glimpsed in the twilight along the edge of an encampment. They were vague and indistinct, but they 
were always there with the power to terrify and disturb. They had the power to touch the minds of our early 
ancestors and to fill them with dread. Such fear formed the basis of the earliest tales although the source and 
exact nature of such terrors still remained very vague. 
And as Mankind became more sophisticated, leaving the gloom of their caves and forming themselves into 
recognizable communities—towns, cities, whole cultures—so the Undead travelled with them, inhabiting 
their folklore just as they had in former times. Now they began to take on more definite shapes. They 
became walking cadavers; the physical embodiment of former deities and things which had existed alongside 
Man since the Creation. Some still remained vague and ill-defined but, as Mankind strove to explain the 
horror which it felt towards them, such creatures emerged more readily into the light. 
In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which defied 
the natural order of things—the power to transform themselves into other shapes, the ability to sustain 
themselves by drinking human blood, and the ability to influence human minds across a distance. Such 
powers—described as supernatural—only [lent] an added dimension to the terror that humans felt regarding 
them. 
And it was only natural, too, that the Undead should become connected with the practice of magic. From 
very early times, Shamans and witchdoctors had claimed at least some power and control over the spirits of 
departed ancestors, and this has continued down into more “civilized” times. Formerly, the invisible spirits 
and forces that thronged around men’s earliest encampments, had spoken “through” the tribal Shamans but 
now, as entities in their own right, they were subject to magical control and could be physically summoned 
by a competent sorcerer. However, the relationship between the magician and an Undead creature was 
often a very tenuous and uncertain one. Some sorcerers might have even become Undead entities once they 
died, but they might also have been susceptible to the powers of other magicians when they did. 
From the Middle Ages and into the Age of Enlightenment, theories of the Undead continued to grow and 
develop. Their names became more familiar—werewolf, vampire, ghoul—each one certain to strike fear into 
the hearts of ordinary humans. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
Q.1) 
All of the following statements, if false, could be seen as being in accordance with the passage, EXCEPT: 
[1] the transition from the Middle Ages to the Age of Enlightenment saw new theories of the Undead. 
[2] the Undead remained vague and ill-defined, even as Mankind strove to understand the horror they 
inspired. 
[3] the relationship between Shamans and the Undead was believed to be a strong and stable one. 
[4] the growing sophistication of Mankind meant that humans stopped believing in the Undead. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following observations is a valid conclusion to draw from the statement, “From out of the 
primal darkness of Mankind’s earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a 
way which we can understand), yet not quite dead either.”? 
[1] Mankind’s primal years were marked by creatures alive with eerie whispers, but seen only in the 
darkness. 
[2] We can understand the lives of the eerie creatures in Mankind’s early years through their whispers in the 
darkness. 
[3] Mankind’s early years were marked by a belief in the existence of eerie creatures that were neither quite 
alive nor dead. 
[4] Long ago, eerie creatures used to whisper in the primal darkness that they were not quite dead. 
Q.3) 
Which one of the following statements best describes what the passage is about? 
[1] The passage describes the failure of human beings to fully comprehend their environment. 
[2] The writer discusses the transition from primitive thinking to the Age of Enlightenment. 
[3] The passage discusses the evolution of theories of the Undead from primitive thinking to the Age of 
Enlightenment. 
[4] The writer describes the ways in which the Undead come to be associated with Shamans and the practice 
of magic. 
[MARKS] 
Q.4) 
“In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which 
defied the natural order of things . . .” Which one of the following best expresses the claim made in this 
statement? 
[1] The Undead are deified in nature’s order by giving them divine attributes. 
[2] Human beings conceptualise the Undead as possessing abnormal features. 
[3] According the Undead an abnormal status is to reject the natural order of things. 
[4] The natural attributes of the Undead are rendered abnormal by changing their status. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
The Chinese have two different concepts of a copy. Fangzhipin . . . are imitations where the difference from 
the original is obvious. These are small models or copies that can be purchased in a museum shop, for 
example. The second concept for a copy is fuzhipin . . . They are exact reproductions of the original, which, 
for the Chinese, are of equal value to the original. It has absolutely no negative connotations. The 
discrepancy with regard to the understanding of what a copy is has often led to misunderstandings and 
arguments between China and Western museums. The Chinese often send copies abroad instead of originals, 
in the firm belief that they are not essentially different from the originals. The rejection that then comes 
from the Western museums is perceived by the Chinese as an insult. . . . 
The Far Eastern notion of identity is also very confusing to the Western observer. The Ise Grand Shrine [in 
Japan] is 1,300 years old for the millions of Japanese people who go there on pilgrimage every year. But in 
reality this temple complex is completely rebuilt from scratch every 20 years. . . . 
The cathedral of Freiburg Minster in southwest Germany is covered in scaffolding almost all year round. The 
sandstone from which it is built is a very soft, porous material that does not withstand natural erosion by rain 
and wind. After a while, it crumbles. As a result, the cathedral is continually being examined for damage, and 
eroded stones are replaced. And in the cathedral’s dedicated workshop, copies of the damaged sandstone 
figures are constantly being produced. Of course, attempts are made to preserve the stones from the Middle 
Ages for as long as possible. But at some point they, too, are removed and replaced with new stones. 
Fundamentally, this is the same operation as with the Japanese shrine, except in this case the production of a 
replica takes place very slowly and over long periods of time. . . . In the field of art as well, the idea of an 
unassailable original developed historically in the Western world. Back in the 17th century [in the West], 
excavated artworks from antiquity were treated quite differently from today. They were not restored in a 
way that was faithful to the original. Instead, there was massive intervention in these works, changing their 
appearance. . . . 
It is probably this intellectual position that explains why Asians have far fewer scruples about cloning than 
Europeans. The South Korean cloning researcher Hwang Woo-suk, who attracted worldwide attention with 
his cloning experiments in 2004, is a Buddhist. He found a great deal of support and followers among 
Buddhists, while Christians called for a ban on human cloning. . . . Hwang legitimised his cloning experiments 
with his religious affiliation: ‘I am Buddhist, and I have no philosophical problem with cloning. And as you 
know, the basis of Buddhism is that life is recycled through reincarnation. In some ways, I think, therapeutic 
cloning restarts the circle of life.’ 
Q.5) 
Which one of the following scenarios is unlikely to follow from the arguments in the passage? 
[1] A 21st century Christian scientist is likely to oppose cloning because of his philosophical orientation. 
Page 4


 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
CAT 2022 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
Stories concerning the Undead have always been with us. From out of the primal darkness of Mankind’s 
earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a way which we can understand), 
yet not quite dead either. These may have been ancient and primitive deities who dwelt deep in the 
surrounding forests and in remote places, or simply those deceased who refused to remain in their tombs 
and who wandered about the countryside, physically tormenting and frightening those who were still alive. 
Mostly they were ill-defined—strange sounds in the night beyond the comforting glow of the fire, or a shape, 
half-glimpsed in the twilight along the edge of an encampment. They were vague and indistinct, but they 
were always there with the power to terrify and disturb. They had the power to touch the minds of our early 
ancestors and to fill them with dread. Such fear formed the basis of the earliest tales although the source and 
exact nature of such terrors still remained very vague. 
And as Mankind became more sophisticated, leaving the gloom of their caves and forming themselves into 
recognizable communities—towns, cities, whole cultures—so the Undead travelled with them, inhabiting 
their folklore just as they had in former times. Now they began to take on more definite shapes. They 
became walking cadavers; the physical embodiment of former deities and things which had existed alongside 
Man since the Creation. Some still remained vague and ill-defined but, as Mankind strove to explain the 
horror which it felt towards them, such creatures emerged more readily into the light. 
In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which defied 
the natural order of things—the power to transform themselves into other shapes, the ability to sustain 
themselves by drinking human blood, and the ability to influence human minds across a distance. Such 
powers—described as supernatural—only [lent] an added dimension to the terror that humans felt regarding 
them. 
And it was only natural, too, that the Undead should become connected with the practice of magic. From 
very early times, Shamans and witchdoctors had claimed at least some power and control over the spirits of 
departed ancestors, and this has continued down into more “civilized” times. Formerly, the invisible spirits 
and forces that thronged around men’s earliest encampments, had spoken “through” the tribal Shamans but 
now, as entities in their own right, they were subject to magical control and could be physically summoned 
by a competent sorcerer. However, the relationship between the magician and an Undead creature was 
often a very tenuous and uncertain one. Some sorcerers might have even become Undead entities once they 
died, but they might also have been susceptible to the powers of other magicians when they did. 
From the Middle Ages and into the Age of Enlightenment, theories of the Undead continued to grow and 
develop. Their names became more familiar—werewolf, vampire, ghoul—each one certain to strike fear into 
the hearts of ordinary humans. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
Q.1) 
All of the following statements, if false, could be seen as being in accordance with the passage, EXCEPT: 
[1] the transition from the Middle Ages to the Age of Enlightenment saw new theories of the Undead. 
[2] the Undead remained vague and ill-defined, even as Mankind strove to understand the horror they 
inspired. 
[3] the relationship between Shamans and the Undead was believed to be a strong and stable one. 
[4] the growing sophistication of Mankind meant that humans stopped believing in the Undead. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following observations is a valid conclusion to draw from the statement, “From out of the 
primal darkness of Mankind’s earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a 
way which we can understand), yet not quite dead either.”? 
[1] Mankind’s primal years were marked by creatures alive with eerie whispers, but seen only in the 
darkness. 
[2] We can understand the lives of the eerie creatures in Mankind’s early years through their whispers in the 
darkness. 
[3] Mankind’s early years were marked by a belief in the existence of eerie creatures that were neither quite 
alive nor dead. 
[4] Long ago, eerie creatures used to whisper in the primal darkness that they were not quite dead. 
Q.3) 
Which one of the following statements best describes what the passage is about? 
[1] The passage describes the failure of human beings to fully comprehend their environment. 
[2] The writer discusses the transition from primitive thinking to the Age of Enlightenment. 
[3] The passage discusses the evolution of theories of the Undead from primitive thinking to the Age of 
Enlightenment. 
[4] The writer describes the ways in which the Undead come to be associated with Shamans and the practice 
of magic. 
[MARKS] 
Q.4) 
“In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which 
defied the natural order of things . . .” Which one of the following best expresses the claim made in this 
statement? 
[1] The Undead are deified in nature’s order by giving them divine attributes. 
[2] Human beings conceptualise the Undead as possessing abnormal features. 
[3] According the Undead an abnormal status is to reject the natural order of things. 
[4] The natural attributes of the Undead are rendered abnormal by changing their status. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
The Chinese have two different concepts of a copy. Fangzhipin . . . are imitations where the difference from 
the original is obvious. These are small models or copies that can be purchased in a museum shop, for 
example. The second concept for a copy is fuzhipin . . . They are exact reproductions of the original, which, 
for the Chinese, are of equal value to the original. It has absolutely no negative connotations. The 
discrepancy with regard to the understanding of what a copy is has often led to misunderstandings and 
arguments between China and Western museums. The Chinese often send copies abroad instead of originals, 
in the firm belief that they are not essentially different from the originals. The rejection that then comes 
from the Western museums is perceived by the Chinese as an insult. . . . 
The Far Eastern notion of identity is also very confusing to the Western observer. The Ise Grand Shrine [in 
Japan] is 1,300 years old for the millions of Japanese people who go there on pilgrimage every year. But in 
reality this temple complex is completely rebuilt from scratch every 20 years. . . . 
The cathedral of Freiburg Minster in southwest Germany is covered in scaffolding almost all year round. The 
sandstone from which it is built is a very soft, porous material that does not withstand natural erosion by rain 
and wind. After a while, it crumbles. As a result, the cathedral is continually being examined for damage, and 
eroded stones are replaced. And in the cathedral’s dedicated workshop, copies of the damaged sandstone 
figures are constantly being produced. Of course, attempts are made to preserve the stones from the Middle 
Ages for as long as possible. But at some point they, too, are removed and replaced with new stones. 
Fundamentally, this is the same operation as with the Japanese shrine, except in this case the production of a 
replica takes place very slowly and over long periods of time. . . . In the field of art as well, the idea of an 
unassailable original developed historically in the Western world. Back in the 17th century [in the West], 
excavated artworks from antiquity were treated quite differently from today. They were not restored in a 
way that was faithful to the original. Instead, there was massive intervention in these works, changing their 
appearance. . . . 
It is probably this intellectual position that explains why Asians have far fewer scruples about cloning than 
Europeans. The South Korean cloning researcher Hwang Woo-suk, who attracted worldwide attention with 
his cloning experiments in 2004, is a Buddhist. He found a great deal of support and followers among 
Buddhists, while Christians called for a ban on human cloning. . . . Hwang legitimised his cloning experiments 
with his religious affiliation: ‘I am Buddhist, and I have no philosophical problem with cloning. And as you 
know, the basis of Buddhism is that life is recycled through reincarnation. In some ways, I think, therapeutic 
cloning restarts the circle of life.’ 
Q.5) 
Which one of the following scenarios is unlikely to follow from the arguments in the passage? 
[1] A 21st century Christian scientist is likely to oppose cloning because of his philosophical orientation. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
[2] A 17th century British painter would have no problem adding personal touches when restoring an ancient 
Roman painting. 
[3] A 17th century French artist who adhered to a Christian worldview would need to be completely true to 
the original intent of a painting when restoring it. 
[4] A 20th century Japanese Buddhist monk would value a reconstructed shrine as the original. 
Q.6) 
The value that the modern West assigns to “an unassailable original” has resulted in all of the following 
EXCEPT: 
[1] it allows regular employment for certain craftsmen. 
[2] it discourages them from carrying out human cloning. 
[3] it discourages them from making interventions in ancient art. 
[4] it discourages them from simultaneous displays of multiple copies of a painting. 
Q.7) 
Which one of the following statements does not correctly express the similarity between the Ise Grand 
Shrine and the cathedral of Freiburg Minster? 
[1] Both can be regarded as very old structures. 
[2] Both are continually undergoing restoration. 
[3] Both were built as places of worship. 
[4] Both will one day be completely rebuilt. 
Q.8) 
Based on the passage, which one of the following copies would a Chinese museum be unlikely to consider as 
having less value than the original? 
[1] Pablo Picasso’s painting of Vincent van Gogh’s original painting, bearing Picasso’s signature. 
[2] Pablo Picasso’s miniaturised, but otherwise faithful and accurate painting of Vincent van Gogh’s original 
painting. 
[3] Pablo Picasso’s photograph of Vincent van Gogh’s original painting, printed to exactly the same scale. 
[4] Pablo Picasso’s painting of Vincent van Gogh’s original painting, identical in every respect. 
respect.  
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
Critical theory of technology is a political theory of modernity with a normative dimension. It belongs to a 
tradition extending from Marx to Foucault and Habermas according to which advances in the formal claims 
of human rights take center stage while in the background centralization of ever more powerful public 
institutions and private organizations imposes an authoritarian social order. 
Marx attributed this trajectory to the capitalist rationalization of production. Today it marks many 
Page 5


 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
CAT 2022 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
Stories concerning the Undead have always been with us. From out of the primal darkness of Mankind’s 
earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a way which we can understand), 
yet not quite dead either. These may have been ancient and primitive deities who dwelt deep in the 
surrounding forests and in remote places, or simply those deceased who refused to remain in their tombs 
and who wandered about the countryside, physically tormenting and frightening those who were still alive. 
Mostly they were ill-defined—strange sounds in the night beyond the comforting glow of the fire, or a shape, 
half-glimpsed in the twilight along the edge of an encampment. They were vague and indistinct, but they 
were always there with the power to terrify and disturb. They had the power to touch the minds of our early 
ancestors and to fill them with dread. Such fear formed the basis of the earliest tales although the source and 
exact nature of such terrors still remained very vague. 
And as Mankind became more sophisticated, leaving the gloom of their caves and forming themselves into 
recognizable communities—towns, cities, whole cultures—so the Undead travelled with them, inhabiting 
their folklore just as they had in former times. Now they began to take on more definite shapes. They 
became walking cadavers; the physical embodiment of former deities and things which had existed alongside 
Man since the Creation. Some still remained vague and ill-defined but, as Mankind strove to explain the 
horror which it felt towards them, such creatures emerged more readily into the light. 
In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which defied 
the natural order of things—the power to transform themselves into other shapes, the ability to sustain 
themselves by drinking human blood, and the ability to influence human minds across a distance. Such 
powers—described as supernatural—only [lent] an added dimension to the terror that humans felt regarding 
them. 
And it was only natural, too, that the Undead should become connected with the practice of magic. From 
very early times, Shamans and witchdoctors had claimed at least some power and control over the spirits of 
departed ancestors, and this has continued down into more “civilized” times. Formerly, the invisible spirits 
and forces that thronged around men’s earliest encampments, had spoken “through” the tribal Shamans but 
now, as entities in their own right, they were subject to magical control and could be physically summoned 
by a competent sorcerer. However, the relationship between the magician and an Undead creature was 
often a very tenuous and uncertain one. Some sorcerers might have even become Undead entities once they 
died, but they might also have been susceptible to the powers of other magicians when they did. 
From the Middle Ages and into the Age of Enlightenment, theories of the Undead continued to grow and 
develop. Their names became more familiar—werewolf, vampire, ghoul—each one certain to strike fear into 
the hearts of ordinary humans. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
Q.1) 
All of the following statements, if false, could be seen as being in accordance with the passage, EXCEPT: 
[1] the transition from the Middle Ages to the Age of Enlightenment saw new theories of the Undead. 
[2] the Undead remained vague and ill-defined, even as Mankind strove to understand the horror they 
inspired. 
[3] the relationship between Shamans and the Undead was believed to be a strong and stable one. 
[4] the growing sophistication of Mankind meant that humans stopped believing in the Undead. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following observations is a valid conclusion to draw from the statement, “From out of the 
primal darkness of Mankind’s earliest years, come whispers of eerie creatures, not quite alive (or alive in a 
way which we can understand), yet not quite dead either.”? 
[1] Mankind’s primal years were marked by creatures alive with eerie whispers, but seen only in the 
darkness. 
[2] We can understand the lives of the eerie creatures in Mankind’s early years through their whispers in the 
darkness. 
[3] Mankind’s early years were marked by a belief in the existence of eerie creatures that were neither quite 
alive nor dead. 
[4] Long ago, eerie creatures used to whisper in the primal darkness that they were not quite dead. 
Q.3) 
Which one of the following statements best describes what the passage is about? 
[1] The passage describes the failure of human beings to fully comprehend their environment. 
[2] The writer discusses the transition from primitive thinking to the Age of Enlightenment. 
[3] The passage discusses the evolution of theories of the Undead from primitive thinking to the Age of 
Enlightenment. 
[4] The writer describes the ways in which the Undead come to be associated with Shamans and the practice 
of magic. 
[MARKS] 
Q.4) 
“In order to confirm their abnormal status, many of the Undead were often accorded attributes, which 
defied the natural order of things . . .” Which one of the following best expresses the claim made in this 
statement? 
[1] The Undead are deified in nature’s order by giving them divine attributes. 
[2] Human beings conceptualise the Undead as possessing abnormal features. 
[3] According the Undead an abnormal status is to reject the natural order of things. 
[4] The natural attributes of the Undead are rendered abnormal by changing their status. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
The Chinese have two different concepts of a copy. Fangzhipin . . . are imitations where the difference from 
the original is obvious. These are small models or copies that can be purchased in a museum shop, for 
example. The second concept for a copy is fuzhipin . . . They are exact reproductions of the original, which, 
for the Chinese, are of equal value to the original. It has absolutely no negative connotations. The 
discrepancy with regard to the understanding of what a copy is has often led to misunderstandings and 
arguments between China and Western museums. The Chinese often send copies abroad instead of originals, 
in the firm belief that they are not essentially different from the originals. The rejection that then comes 
from the Western museums is perceived by the Chinese as an insult. . . . 
The Far Eastern notion of identity is also very confusing to the Western observer. The Ise Grand Shrine [in 
Japan] is 1,300 years old for the millions of Japanese people who go there on pilgrimage every year. But in 
reality this temple complex is completely rebuilt from scratch every 20 years. . . . 
The cathedral of Freiburg Minster in southwest Germany is covered in scaffolding almost all year round. The 
sandstone from which it is built is a very soft, porous material that does not withstand natural erosion by rain 
and wind. After a while, it crumbles. As a result, the cathedral is continually being examined for damage, and 
eroded stones are replaced. And in the cathedral’s dedicated workshop, copies of the damaged sandstone 
figures are constantly being produced. Of course, attempts are made to preserve the stones from the Middle 
Ages for as long as possible. But at some point they, too, are removed and replaced with new stones. 
Fundamentally, this is the same operation as with the Japanese shrine, except in this case the production of a 
replica takes place very slowly and over long periods of time. . . . In the field of art as well, the idea of an 
unassailable original developed historically in the Western world. Back in the 17th century [in the West], 
excavated artworks from antiquity were treated quite differently from today. They were not restored in a 
way that was faithful to the original. Instead, there was massive intervention in these works, changing their 
appearance. . . . 
It is probably this intellectual position that explains why Asians have far fewer scruples about cloning than 
Europeans. The South Korean cloning researcher Hwang Woo-suk, who attracted worldwide attention with 
his cloning experiments in 2004, is a Buddhist. He found a great deal of support and followers among 
Buddhists, while Christians called for a ban on human cloning. . . . Hwang legitimised his cloning experiments 
with his religious affiliation: ‘I am Buddhist, and I have no philosophical problem with cloning. And as you 
know, the basis of Buddhism is that life is recycled through reincarnation. In some ways, I think, therapeutic 
cloning restarts the circle of life.’ 
Q.5) 
Which one of the following scenarios is unlikely to follow from the arguments in the passage? 
[1] A 21st century Christian scientist is likely to oppose cloning because of his philosophical orientation. 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
[2] A 17th century British painter would have no problem adding personal touches when restoring an ancient 
Roman painting. 
[3] A 17th century French artist who adhered to a Christian worldview would need to be completely true to 
the original intent of a painting when restoring it. 
[4] A 20th century Japanese Buddhist monk would value a reconstructed shrine as the original. 
Q.6) 
The value that the modern West assigns to “an unassailable original” has resulted in all of the following 
EXCEPT: 
[1] it allows regular employment for certain craftsmen. 
[2] it discourages them from carrying out human cloning. 
[3] it discourages them from making interventions in ancient art. 
[4] it discourages them from simultaneous displays of multiple copies of a painting. 
Q.7) 
Which one of the following statements does not correctly express the similarity between the Ise Grand 
Shrine and the cathedral of Freiburg Minster? 
[1] Both can be regarded as very old structures. 
[2] Both are continually undergoing restoration. 
[3] Both were built as places of worship. 
[4] Both will one day be completely rebuilt. 
Q.8) 
Based on the passage, which one of the following copies would a Chinese museum be unlikely to consider as 
having less value than the original? 
[1] Pablo Picasso’s painting of Vincent van Gogh’s original painting, bearing Picasso’s signature. 
[2] Pablo Picasso’s miniaturised, but otherwise faithful and accurate painting of Vincent van Gogh’s original 
painting. 
[3] Pablo Picasso’s photograph of Vincent van Gogh’s original painting, printed to exactly the same scale. 
[4] Pablo Picasso’s painting of Vincent van Gogh’s original painting, identical in every respect. 
respect.  
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question. 
Critical theory of technology is a political theory of modernity with a normative dimension. It belongs to a 
tradition extending from Marx to Foucault and Habermas according to which advances in the formal claims 
of human rights take center stage while in the background centralization of ever more powerful public 
institutions and private organizations imposes an authoritarian social order. 
Marx attributed this trajectory to the capitalist rationalization of production. Today it marks many 
 
 
CAT 2022 Question Paper (Slot 1) 
institutions besides the factory and every modern political system, including so-called socialist systems. This 
trajectory arose from the problems of command over a disempowered and deskilled labor force; but 
everywhere [that] masses are organized – whether it be Foucault’s prisons or Habermas’s public sphere – the 
same pattern prevails. Technological design and development is shaped by this pattern as the material base 
of a distinctive social order. Marcuse would later point to a “project” as the basis of what he called rather 
confusingly “technological rationality.” Releasing technology from this project is a democratic political task. 
In accordance with this general line of thought, critical theory of technology regards technologies as an 
environment rather than as a collection of tools. We live today with and even within technologies that 
determine our way of life. Along with the constant pressures to build centers of power, many other social 
values and meanings are inscribed in technological design. A hermeneutics of technology must make explicit 
the meanings implicit in the devices we use and the rituals they script. Social histories of technologies such as 
the bicycle, artificial lighting or firearms have made important contributions to this type of analysis. Critical 
theory of technology attempts to build a methodological approach on the lessons of these histories. 
As an environment, technologies shape their inhabitants. In this respect, they are comparable to laws and 
customs. Each of these institutions can be said to represent those who live under their sway through 
privileging certain dimensions of their human nature. Laws of property represent the interest in ownership 
and control. Customs such as parental authority represent the interest of childhood in safety and growth. 
Similarly, the automobile represents its users in so far as they are interested in mobility. Interests such as 
these constitute the version of human nature sanctioned by society. 
This notion of representation does not imply an eternal human nature. The concept of nature as non-identity 
in the Frankfurt School suggests an alternative. On these terms, nature is what lies at the limit of history, at 
the point at which society loses the capacity to imprint its meanings on things and control them effectively. 
The reference here is, of course, not to the nature of natural science, but to the lived nature in which we find 
ourselves and which we are. This nature reveals itself as that which cannot be totally encompassed by the 
machinery of society. For the Frankfurt School, human nature, in all its transcending force, emerges out of a 
historical context as that context is [depicted] in illicit joys, struggles and pathologies. We can perhaps admit 
a less romantic . . . conception in which those dimensions of human nature recognized by society are also 
granted theoretical legitimacy. 
Q.9) 
Which one of the following statements contradicts the arguments of the passage? 
[1] The problems of command over a disempowered and deskilled labour force gave rise to similar patterns 
of the capitalist rationalisation of production wherever masses were organised. 
[2] Marx’s understanding of the capitalist rationalisation of production and Marcuse’s understanding of a 
“project” of “technological rationality” share theoretical inclinations. 
[3] Paradoxically, the capitalist rationalisation of production is a mark of so-called socialist systems as well. 
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FAQs on CAT 2022 Slot 1: Past Year Question Paper with Answer key - CAT Mock Test Series 2024

1. What is CAT 2022?
Ans. CAT 2022 refers to the Common Admission Test, which is a national level entrance exam conducted in India for admission to various management programs offered by prestigious business schools. It is considered one of the most competitive exams for MBA aspirants in India.
2. What is the exam pattern for CAT 2022?
Ans. CAT 2022 follows a computer-based test format, consisting of three sections: Verbal Ability and Reading Comprehension (VARC), Data Interpretation and Logical Reasoning (DILR), and Quantitative Ability (QA). The exam duration is 180 minutes, with each section allocated 60 minutes. The number of questions and difficulty level may vary each year.
3. Can I access past year question papers for CAT 2022?
Ans. Yes, past year question papers for CAT 2022 can be accessed to get an idea about the exam pattern, types of questions, and level of difficulty. These papers can help in understanding the exam format and practicing for the actual test. However, it is important to note that the actual CAT 2022 question paper may differ from the past year papers.
4. Where can I find the answer key for CAT 2022 Slot 1?
Ans. The answer key for CAT 2022 Slot 1 can be found on the official website of the conducting body. It is typically released a few days after the exam. Candidates can download the answer key and compare their responses to get an estimate of their performance in the exam.
5. How can I prepare effectively for CAT 2022?
Ans. To prepare effectively for CAT 2022, it is important to have a structured study plan. Start by understanding the exam pattern and syllabus. Focus on strengthening your fundamentals in all the sections and practice solving a variety of questions. Take mock tests regularly to assess your progress and identify areas of improvement. Additionally, consider joining coaching institutes or online courses that provide guidance and expert tips for CAT preparation.
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