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 Page 1


2
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After studying this chapter
you will be able to:
• Explain the concept of
reconstitution of a partnership
firm;
• Identify the matters that need
adjustments in the books of
firm when a new partner is
admitted;
• Determine the new profit
sharing ratio and calculate
the sacrificing ratio;
•Define goodwill and
enumerate the factors that
affect it;
• Explain the methods of
valuation of goodwill;
• Describe how goodwill will
be treated under different
situations when a new
partner is admitted;
• Make necessary adjustments
for revaluation of assets and
reassessment of liabilities;
• Make necessary adjustments
for accumulated profits and
losses;
• Determine the capital of each
partner , if required according
to the new profit sharing ratio
and make necessary
adjustments;
• Make necessary adjustments
on change in the profit
sharing ratio among the
existing partners.
P 
artnership is an agreement between two or more
 persons (called partners) for sharing the profits
of a business carried on by all or any of them acting
for all. Any change in the existing agreement
amounts to reconstitution of the partnership firm.
This results in an end of the existing agreement and
a new agreement comes into being with a changed
relationship among the members of the partnership
firm and/or their composition. However, the firm
continues. The partners often resort to reconstitution
of the firm in various ways such as admission of a
new partner, change in profit sharing ratio,
retirement of a partner, death or insolvence of a
partner. In this chapter we shall have a brief idea
about all these and in detail about the accounting
implications of admission of a new partner or an on
change in the profit sharing ratio.
2.1 Modes of Reconstitution of a Partnership
Firm
Reconstitution of a partnership firm usually takes
place in any of the following ways:
Admission of a new partner: A new partner may be
admitted when the firm needs additional capital or
managerial help. According to the provisions of
Partnership Act 1932 unless it is otherwise provided
in the partnership deed a new partner can be
admitted only when the existing partners
unanimously agree for it. For example, Hari and
Haqque are partners sharing profits in the ratio of
Reconstitution of a Partnership Firm –
Admission of a Partner
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 2


2
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After studying this chapter
you will be able to:
• Explain the concept of
reconstitution of a partnership
firm;
• Identify the matters that need
adjustments in the books of
firm when a new partner is
admitted;
• Determine the new profit
sharing ratio and calculate
the sacrificing ratio;
•Define goodwill and
enumerate the factors that
affect it;
• Explain the methods of
valuation of goodwill;
• Describe how goodwill will
be treated under different
situations when a new
partner is admitted;
• Make necessary adjustments
for revaluation of assets and
reassessment of liabilities;
• Make necessary adjustments
for accumulated profits and
losses;
• Determine the capital of each
partner , if required according
to the new profit sharing ratio
and make necessary
adjustments;
• Make necessary adjustments
on change in the profit
sharing ratio among the
existing partners.
P 
artnership is an agreement between two or more
 persons (called partners) for sharing the profits
of a business carried on by all or any of them acting
for all. Any change in the existing agreement
amounts to reconstitution of the partnership firm.
This results in an end of the existing agreement and
a new agreement comes into being with a changed
relationship among the members of the partnership
firm and/or their composition. However, the firm
continues. The partners often resort to reconstitution
of the firm in various ways such as admission of a
new partner, change in profit sharing ratio,
retirement of a partner, death or insolvence of a
partner. In this chapter we shall have a brief idea
about all these and in detail about the accounting
implications of admission of a new partner or an on
change in the profit sharing ratio.
2.1 Modes of Reconstitution of a Partnership
Firm
Reconstitution of a partnership firm usually takes
place in any of the following ways:
Admission of a new partner: A new partner may be
admitted when the firm needs additional capital or
managerial help. According to the provisions of
Partnership Act 1932 unless it is otherwise provided
in the partnership deed a new partner can be
admitted only when the existing partners
unanimously agree for it. For example, Hari and
Haqque are partners sharing profits in the ratio of
Reconstitution of a Partnership Firm –
Admission of a Partner
Rationalised 2023-24
49 Admission of a Partner
3:2.  On April 1, 2017 they admitted John as a new partner with 1/6 share in
profits of the firm. With this change now there are three partners of the firm and
it stands reconstituted.
Change in the profit sharing ratio among the existing partners: Sometimes the
partners of a firm may decide to change their existing profit sharing ratio. This
may happen an account of a change in the existing partners’ role in the firm. For
example, Ram, Mohan and Sohan are partners in a firm sharing profits in the
ratio of 3:2:1. With effect from April 1,2017 they decided to share profits equally
as Sohan brings in additional capital. This results in a  change in the existing
agreement leading to reconstitution of the firm.
Retirement of an existing partner: It means withdrawal by a partner from the
business of the firm which may be due to his bad health, old age or change in
business interests. In fact a partner can retire any time if the partnership is at
will. For example, Roy, Ravi and Rao are partners in the firm sharing profits in
the ratio of 2:2:1.  On account of illness, Ravi retired from the firm on March 31,
2017.  This results in reconstitution of the firm now having only two partners.
Death of a partner: Partnership may also stand reconstituted on death of a
partner, if the remaining partners decide to continue the business of the firm as
usual. For example, X,Y and Z are partners in a firm sharing profits in the ratio
3:2:1. X died on March 31, 2017. Y and Z decide to carry on the business sharing
future profits equally. The continuity of business by Y and Z sharing future
profits equally leads to reconstitution of the firm.
2.2 Admission of a New Partner
When firm requires additional capital or managerial help or both for the
expansion of its business a new partner may be admitted to supplement its
existing resources.  According to the Partnership Act 1932, a new partner can
be admitted into the firm only with the consent of all the existing partners unless
otherwise agreed upon. With the admission of a new partner, the partnership
firm is reconstituted and a new agreement is entered into to carry on the business
of the firm.
A newly admitted partner acquires two main rights in the firm–
1. Right to share the assets of the partnership firm; and
2. Right to share the profits of the partnership firm.
For the right to acquire share in the assets and profits of the partnership
firm, the partner brings an agreed amount of capital either in cash or in kind.
Moreover, in the case of an established firm which may be earning more profits
than the normal rate of return on its capital the new partner is required to
contribute some additional amount known as premium or goodwill. This is done
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 3


2
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After studying this chapter
you will be able to:
• Explain the concept of
reconstitution of a partnership
firm;
• Identify the matters that need
adjustments in the books of
firm when a new partner is
admitted;
• Determine the new profit
sharing ratio and calculate
the sacrificing ratio;
•Define goodwill and
enumerate the factors that
affect it;
• Explain the methods of
valuation of goodwill;
• Describe how goodwill will
be treated under different
situations when a new
partner is admitted;
• Make necessary adjustments
for revaluation of assets and
reassessment of liabilities;
• Make necessary adjustments
for accumulated profits and
losses;
• Determine the capital of each
partner , if required according
to the new profit sharing ratio
and make necessary
adjustments;
• Make necessary adjustments
on change in the profit
sharing ratio among the
existing partners.
P 
artnership is an agreement between two or more
 persons (called partners) for sharing the profits
of a business carried on by all or any of them acting
for all. Any change in the existing agreement
amounts to reconstitution of the partnership firm.
This results in an end of the existing agreement and
a new agreement comes into being with a changed
relationship among the members of the partnership
firm and/or their composition. However, the firm
continues. The partners often resort to reconstitution
of the firm in various ways such as admission of a
new partner, change in profit sharing ratio,
retirement of a partner, death or insolvence of a
partner. In this chapter we shall have a brief idea
about all these and in detail about the accounting
implications of admission of a new partner or an on
change in the profit sharing ratio.
2.1 Modes of Reconstitution of a Partnership
Firm
Reconstitution of a partnership firm usually takes
place in any of the following ways:
Admission of a new partner: A new partner may be
admitted when the firm needs additional capital or
managerial help. According to the provisions of
Partnership Act 1932 unless it is otherwise provided
in the partnership deed a new partner can be
admitted only when the existing partners
unanimously agree for it. For example, Hari and
Haqque are partners sharing profits in the ratio of
Reconstitution of a Partnership Firm –
Admission of a Partner
Rationalised 2023-24
49 Admission of a Partner
3:2.  On April 1, 2017 they admitted John as a new partner with 1/6 share in
profits of the firm. With this change now there are three partners of the firm and
it stands reconstituted.
Change in the profit sharing ratio among the existing partners: Sometimes the
partners of a firm may decide to change their existing profit sharing ratio. This
may happen an account of a change in the existing partners’ role in the firm. For
example, Ram, Mohan and Sohan are partners in a firm sharing profits in the
ratio of 3:2:1. With effect from April 1,2017 they decided to share profits equally
as Sohan brings in additional capital. This results in a  change in the existing
agreement leading to reconstitution of the firm.
Retirement of an existing partner: It means withdrawal by a partner from the
business of the firm which may be due to his bad health, old age or change in
business interests. In fact a partner can retire any time if the partnership is at
will. For example, Roy, Ravi and Rao are partners in the firm sharing profits in
the ratio of 2:2:1.  On account of illness, Ravi retired from the firm on March 31,
2017.  This results in reconstitution of the firm now having only two partners.
Death of a partner: Partnership may also stand reconstituted on death of a
partner, if the remaining partners decide to continue the business of the firm as
usual. For example, X,Y and Z are partners in a firm sharing profits in the ratio
3:2:1. X died on March 31, 2017. Y and Z decide to carry on the business sharing
future profits equally. The continuity of business by Y and Z sharing future
profits equally leads to reconstitution of the firm.
2.2 Admission of a New Partner
When firm requires additional capital or managerial help or both for the
expansion of its business a new partner may be admitted to supplement its
existing resources.  According to the Partnership Act 1932, a new partner can
be admitted into the firm only with the consent of all the existing partners unless
otherwise agreed upon. With the admission of a new partner, the partnership
firm is reconstituted and a new agreement is entered into to carry on the business
of the firm.
A newly admitted partner acquires two main rights in the firm–
1. Right to share the assets of the partnership firm; and
2. Right to share the profits of the partnership firm.
For the right to acquire share in the assets and profits of the partnership
firm, the partner brings an agreed amount of capital either in cash or in kind.
Moreover, in the case of an established firm which may be earning more profits
than the normal rate of return on its capital the new partner is required to
contribute some additional amount known as premium or goodwill. This is done
Rationalised 2023-24
50 Accountancy – Not-for-Profit Organisation and Partnership Accounts
primarily to compensate the sacrificing partners for loss of their share in super
profits of the firm.
Following are the other important points which require attention at the time
of admission of a new partner:
1. New profit sharing ratio;
2. Sacrificing ratio;
3. Valuation and adjustment of goodwill;
4. Revaluation of assets and Reassessment of liabilities;
5. Distribution of accumulated profits (reserves); and
6. Adjustment of partners’ capitals.
2.3 New Profit Sharing Ratio
When new partner is admitted he acquires his share in profits from the old partners.
In other words, on the admission of a new partner, the old partners sacrifice a
share of their profit in favour of the new partner.  But, what will be the share of
new partner and how he will acquire it from the existing partners is decided
mutually among the old partners and the new partner. However, if nothing is
specified as to how does the new partner acquire his share from the old partners;
it may be assumed that he gets it from them in their profit sharing ratio. In any
case, on admission of a new partner, the profit sharing ratio among the old
partners will change keeping in view their respective contribution to the profit
sharing ratio of the incoming partner.  Hence, there is a need to ascertain the new
profit sharing ratio among all the partners. This depends upon how does the
new partner acquires his share from the old partners for which there are many
possibilities. Let us understand it with the help of the following illustrations.
Illustration 1
Anil and Vishal are partners sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2.  They admitted
Sumit as a new partner for 1/5 share in the future profits of the firm.  Calculate
new profit sharing ratio of Anil, Vishal and Sumit.
Solution
Sumit’s share =
1
5
Remaining share =
1
1
5
?
=
4
5
Anil’s new share =
3
5
  of
4
5
=
12
25
Vishal’s new share =
2
5
  of
4
5
=
8
25
New profit sharing ratio of Anil, Vishal and Sumit will be 12:8:5.
Note: It has been assumed that the new partner acquired his share from old partners in
old ratio.
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 4


2
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After studying this chapter
you will be able to:
• Explain the concept of
reconstitution of a partnership
firm;
• Identify the matters that need
adjustments in the books of
firm when a new partner is
admitted;
• Determine the new profit
sharing ratio and calculate
the sacrificing ratio;
•Define goodwill and
enumerate the factors that
affect it;
• Explain the methods of
valuation of goodwill;
• Describe how goodwill will
be treated under different
situations when a new
partner is admitted;
• Make necessary adjustments
for revaluation of assets and
reassessment of liabilities;
• Make necessary adjustments
for accumulated profits and
losses;
• Determine the capital of each
partner , if required according
to the new profit sharing ratio
and make necessary
adjustments;
• Make necessary adjustments
on change in the profit
sharing ratio among the
existing partners.
P 
artnership is an agreement between two or more
 persons (called partners) for sharing the profits
of a business carried on by all or any of them acting
for all. Any change in the existing agreement
amounts to reconstitution of the partnership firm.
This results in an end of the existing agreement and
a new agreement comes into being with a changed
relationship among the members of the partnership
firm and/or their composition. However, the firm
continues. The partners often resort to reconstitution
of the firm in various ways such as admission of a
new partner, change in profit sharing ratio,
retirement of a partner, death or insolvence of a
partner. In this chapter we shall have a brief idea
about all these and in detail about the accounting
implications of admission of a new partner or an on
change in the profit sharing ratio.
2.1 Modes of Reconstitution of a Partnership
Firm
Reconstitution of a partnership firm usually takes
place in any of the following ways:
Admission of a new partner: A new partner may be
admitted when the firm needs additional capital or
managerial help. According to the provisions of
Partnership Act 1932 unless it is otherwise provided
in the partnership deed a new partner can be
admitted only when the existing partners
unanimously agree for it. For example, Hari and
Haqque are partners sharing profits in the ratio of
Reconstitution of a Partnership Firm –
Admission of a Partner
Rationalised 2023-24
49 Admission of a Partner
3:2.  On April 1, 2017 they admitted John as a new partner with 1/6 share in
profits of the firm. With this change now there are three partners of the firm and
it stands reconstituted.
Change in the profit sharing ratio among the existing partners: Sometimes the
partners of a firm may decide to change their existing profit sharing ratio. This
may happen an account of a change in the existing partners’ role in the firm. For
example, Ram, Mohan and Sohan are partners in a firm sharing profits in the
ratio of 3:2:1. With effect from April 1,2017 they decided to share profits equally
as Sohan brings in additional capital. This results in a  change in the existing
agreement leading to reconstitution of the firm.
Retirement of an existing partner: It means withdrawal by a partner from the
business of the firm which may be due to his bad health, old age or change in
business interests. In fact a partner can retire any time if the partnership is at
will. For example, Roy, Ravi and Rao are partners in the firm sharing profits in
the ratio of 2:2:1.  On account of illness, Ravi retired from the firm on March 31,
2017.  This results in reconstitution of the firm now having only two partners.
Death of a partner: Partnership may also stand reconstituted on death of a
partner, if the remaining partners decide to continue the business of the firm as
usual. For example, X,Y and Z are partners in a firm sharing profits in the ratio
3:2:1. X died on March 31, 2017. Y and Z decide to carry on the business sharing
future profits equally. The continuity of business by Y and Z sharing future
profits equally leads to reconstitution of the firm.
2.2 Admission of a New Partner
When firm requires additional capital or managerial help or both for the
expansion of its business a new partner may be admitted to supplement its
existing resources.  According to the Partnership Act 1932, a new partner can
be admitted into the firm only with the consent of all the existing partners unless
otherwise agreed upon. With the admission of a new partner, the partnership
firm is reconstituted and a new agreement is entered into to carry on the business
of the firm.
A newly admitted partner acquires two main rights in the firm–
1. Right to share the assets of the partnership firm; and
2. Right to share the profits of the partnership firm.
For the right to acquire share in the assets and profits of the partnership
firm, the partner brings an agreed amount of capital either in cash or in kind.
Moreover, in the case of an established firm which may be earning more profits
than the normal rate of return on its capital the new partner is required to
contribute some additional amount known as premium or goodwill. This is done
Rationalised 2023-24
50 Accountancy – Not-for-Profit Organisation and Partnership Accounts
primarily to compensate the sacrificing partners for loss of their share in super
profits of the firm.
Following are the other important points which require attention at the time
of admission of a new partner:
1. New profit sharing ratio;
2. Sacrificing ratio;
3. Valuation and adjustment of goodwill;
4. Revaluation of assets and Reassessment of liabilities;
5. Distribution of accumulated profits (reserves); and
6. Adjustment of partners’ capitals.
2.3 New Profit Sharing Ratio
When new partner is admitted he acquires his share in profits from the old partners.
In other words, on the admission of a new partner, the old partners sacrifice a
share of their profit in favour of the new partner.  But, what will be the share of
new partner and how he will acquire it from the existing partners is decided
mutually among the old partners and the new partner. However, if nothing is
specified as to how does the new partner acquire his share from the old partners;
it may be assumed that he gets it from them in their profit sharing ratio. In any
case, on admission of a new partner, the profit sharing ratio among the old
partners will change keeping in view their respective contribution to the profit
sharing ratio of the incoming partner.  Hence, there is a need to ascertain the new
profit sharing ratio among all the partners. This depends upon how does the
new partner acquires his share from the old partners for which there are many
possibilities. Let us understand it with the help of the following illustrations.
Illustration 1
Anil and Vishal are partners sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2.  They admitted
Sumit as a new partner for 1/5 share in the future profits of the firm.  Calculate
new profit sharing ratio of Anil, Vishal and Sumit.
Solution
Sumit’s share =
1
5
Remaining share =
1
1
5
?
=
4
5
Anil’s new share =
3
5
  of
4
5
=
12
25
Vishal’s new share =
2
5
  of
4
5
=
8
25
New profit sharing ratio of Anil, Vishal and Sumit will be 12:8:5.
Note: It has been assumed that the new partner acquired his share from old partners in
old ratio.
Rationalised 2023-24
51 Admission of a Partner
Illustration 2
Akshay and Bharati are partners sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2. They admit
Dinesh as a new partner for 1/5th share in the future profits of the firm which
he gets equally from Akshay and Bharati. Calculate new profit sharing ratio of
Akshay, Bharati and Dinesh.
Solution
Dinesh’s share =
1
5
 or  
2
10
Akshay’s share =
31 5
510 10
??
Bharati’s share =
21 3
510 10
??
New profit sharing ratio between Akshay, Bharati and Dinesh will be 5:3:2.
Illustration 3
Anshu and Nitu are partners sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2. They admitted
Jyoti as a new partner for 3/10 share which she acquired 2/10 from Anshu and
1/10 from Nitu.  Calculate the new profit sharing ratio of Anshu, Nitu and Jyoti.
Solution
Jyoti’s share =
3
10
Anshu’s new share =
32 4
510 10
??
Nitu’s new share = Old share – Share Surrendered
=
21 3
510 10
??
The new profit sharing ratio between
Anshu, Nitu and Jyoti will be  4 : 3 : 3.
Illustration 4
Ram and Shyam are partners in a firm sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2. They
admit Ghanshyam as a new partner. Ram sacrificed 1/4 of his share and Shyam
1/3 of his share in favour of Ghanshyam. Calculate new profit sharing ratio of
Ram, Shyam and Ghanshyam.
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 5


2
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After studying this chapter
you will be able to:
• Explain the concept of
reconstitution of a partnership
firm;
• Identify the matters that need
adjustments in the books of
firm when a new partner is
admitted;
• Determine the new profit
sharing ratio and calculate
the sacrificing ratio;
•Define goodwill and
enumerate the factors that
affect it;
• Explain the methods of
valuation of goodwill;
• Describe how goodwill will
be treated under different
situations when a new
partner is admitted;
• Make necessary adjustments
for revaluation of assets and
reassessment of liabilities;
• Make necessary adjustments
for accumulated profits and
losses;
• Determine the capital of each
partner , if required according
to the new profit sharing ratio
and make necessary
adjustments;
• Make necessary adjustments
on change in the profit
sharing ratio among the
existing partners.
P 
artnership is an agreement between two or more
 persons (called partners) for sharing the profits
of a business carried on by all or any of them acting
for all. Any change in the existing agreement
amounts to reconstitution of the partnership firm.
This results in an end of the existing agreement and
a new agreement comes into being with a changed
relationship among the members of the partnership
firm and/or their composition. However, the firm
continues. The partners often resort to reconstitution
of the firm in various ways such as admission of a
new partner, change in profit sharing ratio,
retirement of a partner, death or insolvence of a
partner. In this chapter we shall have a brief idea
about all these and in detail about the accounting
implications of admission of a new partner or an on
change in the profit sharing ratio.
2.1 Modes of Reconstitution of a Partnership
Firm
Reconstitution of a partnership firm usually takes
place in any of the following ways:
Admission of a new partner: A new partner may be
admitted when the firm needs additional capital or
managerial help. According to the provisions of
Partnership Act 1932 unless it is otherwise provided
in the partnership deed a new partner can be
admitted only when the existing partners
unanimously agree for it. For example, Hari and
Haqque are partners sharing profits in the ratio of
Reconstitution of a Partnership Firm –
Admission of a Partner
Rationalised 2023-24
49 Admission of a Partner
3:2.  On April 1, 2017 they admitted John as a new partner with 1/6 share in
profits of the firm. With this change now there are three partners of the firm and
it stands reconstituted.
Change in the profit sharing ratio among the existing partners: Sometimes the
partners of a firm may decide to change their existing profit sharing ratio. This
may happen an account of a change in the existing partners’ role in the firm. For
example, Ram, Mohan and Sohan are partners in a firm sharing profits in the
ratio of 3:2:1. With effect from April 1,2017 they decided to share profits equally
as Sohan brings in additional capital. This results in a  change in the existing
agreement leading to reconstitution of the firm.
Retirement of an existing partner: It means withdrawal by a partner from the
business of the firm which may be due to his bad health, old age or change in
business interests. In fact a partner can retire any time if the partnership is at
will. For example, Roy, Ravi and Rao are partners in the firm sharing profits in
the ratio of 2:2:1.  On account of illness, Ravi retired from the firm on March 31,
2017.  This results in reconstitution of the firm now having only two partners.
Death of a partner: Partnership may also stand reconstituted on death of a
partner, if the remaining partners decide to continue the business of the firm as
usual. For example, X,Y and Z are partners in a firm sharing profits in the ratio
3:2:1. X died on March 31, 2017. Y and Z decide to carry on the business sharing
future profits equally. The continuity of business by Y and Z sharing future
profits equally leads to reconstitution of the firm.
2.2 Admission of a New Partner
When firm requires additional capital or managerial help or both for the
expansion of its business a new partner may be admitted to supplement its
existing resources.  According to the Partnership Act 1932, a new partner can
be admitted into the firm only with the consent of all the existing partners unless
otherwise agreed upon. With the admission of a new partner, the partnership
firm is reconstituted and a new agreement is entered into to carry on the business
of the firm.
A newly admitted partner acquires two main rights in the firm–
1. Right to share the assets of the partnership firm; and
2. Right to share the profits of the partnership firm.
For the right to acquire share in the assets and profits of the partnership
firm, the partner brings an agreed amount of capital either in cash or in kind.
Moreover, in the case of an established firm which may be earning more profits
than the normal rate of return on its capital the new partner is required to
contribute some additional amount known as premium or goodwill. This is done
Rationalised 2023-24
50 Accountancy – Not-for-Profit Organisation and Partnership Accounts
primarily to compensate the sacrificing partners for loss of their share in super
profits of the firm.
Following are the other important points which require attention at the time
of admission of a new partner:
1. New profit sharing ratio;
2. Sacrificing ratio;
3. Valuation and adjustment of goodwill;
4. Revaluation of assets and Reassessment of liabilities;
5. Distribution of accumulated profits (reserves); and
6. Adjustment of partners’ capitals.
2.3 New Profit Sharing Ratio
When new partner is admitted he acquires his share in profits from the old partners.
In other words, on the admission of a new partner, the old partners sacrifice a
share of their profit in favour of the new partner.  But, what will be the share of
new partner and how he will acquire it from the existing partners is decided
mutually among the old partners and the new partner. However, if nothing is
specified as to how does the new partner acquire his share from the old partners;
it may be assumed that he gets it from them in their profit sharing ratio. In any
case, on admission of a new partner, the profit sharing ratio among the old
partners will change keeping in view their respective contribution to the profit
sharing ratio of the incoming partner.  Hence, there is a need to ascertain the new
profit sharing ratio among all the partners. This depends upon how does the
new partner acquires his share from the old partners for which there are many
possibilities. Let us understand it with the help of the following illustrations.
Illustration 1
Anil and Vishal are partners sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2.  They admitted
Sumit as a new partner for 1/5 share in the future profits of the firm.  Calculate
new profit sharing ratio of Anil, Vishal and Sumit.
Solution
Sumit’s share =
1
5
Remaining share =
1
1
5
?
=
4
5
Anil’s new share =
3
5
  of
4
5
=
12
25
Vishal’s new share =
2
5
  of
4
5
=
8
25
New profit sharing ratio of Anil, Vishal and Sumit will be 12:8:5.
Note: It has been assumed that the new partner acquired his share from old partners in
old ratio.
Rationalised 2023-24
51 Admission of a Partner
Illustration 2
Akshay and Bharati are partners sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2. They admit
Dinesh as a new partner for 1/5th share in the future profits of the firm which
he gets equally from Akshay and Bharati. Calculate new profit sharing ratio of
Akshay, Bharati and Dinesh.
Solution
Dinesh’s share =
1
5
 or  
2
10
Akshay’s share =
31 5
510 10
??
Bharati’s share =
21 3
510 10
??
New profit sharing ratio between Akshay, Bharati and Dinesh will be 5:3:2.
Illustration 3
Anshu and Nitu are partners sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2. They admitted
Jyoti as a new partner for 3/10 share which she acquired 2/10 from Anshu and
1/10 from Nitu.  Calculate the new profit sharing ratio of Anshu, Nitu and Jyoti.
Solution
Jyoti’s share =
3
10
Anshu’s new share =
32 4
510 10
??
Nitu’s new share = Old share – Share Surrendered
=
21 3
510 10
??
The new profit sharing ratio between
Anshu, Nitu and Jyoti will be  4 : 3 : 3.
Illustration 4
Ram and Shyam are partners in a firm sharing profits in the ratio of 3:2. They
admit Ghanshyam as a new partner. Ram sacrificed 1/4 of his share and Shyam
1/3 of his share in favour of Ghanshyam. Calculate new profit sharing ratio of
Ram, Shyam and Ghanshyam.
Rationalised 2023-24
52 Accountancy – Not-for-Profit Organisation and Partnership Accounts
Solution
Ram’s old share =
3
5
Share sacrificed by Ram =
1
4
 of  
33
520
?
Ram’s new share =
33 9
520 20
??
Shyam’s old share =
2
5
Share sacrificed by Shyam =
1
3
of  
22
515
?
Shyam’s new share =
22 4
515 15
??
Ghanshyam’s new share = Ram’s sacrifice + Shyam’s Sacrifice
=
32 17
20 15 60
??
New profit sharing ratio among Ram, Shyam and Ghanshyam will be 27:16:17
Illustration 5
Das and Sinha are partners in a firm sharing profits in 4:1 ratio. They admitted
Pal as a new partner for 1/4 share in the profits, which he acquired wholly from
Das. Determine the new profit sharing ratio of the partners.
Solution
Pal’s share =
1
4
Das’s new share = Old Share – Share Surrendered
=
41
54
? =
11
20
Sinha’s new share =
1
5
The new profit sharing ratio among Das, Sinha and Pal will be 11:4:5.
2.4 Sacrificing Ratio
The ratio in which the old partners agree to sacrifice their share of profit in
favour of the incoming partner is called sacrificing ratio.  The sacrifice by a partner
is equal to :
Old Share of Profit – New Share of Profit
Rationalised 2023-24
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FAQs on NCERT Textbook - Reconstitution : Admission of a Partner - Accountancy Class 12 - Commerce

1. What is the meaning of reconstitution of a partnership firm?
Ans. Reconstitution of a partnership firm involves any change in the existing partnership agreement. It can happen due to the retirement or death of a partner, admission of a new partner, or any change in profit-sharing ratio among the existing partners.
2. What are the requirements for admitting a new partner in a partnership firm?
Ans. Before admitting a new partner in a partnership firm, the existing partners must mutually agree on the terms and conditions of the partnership. The new partner should also be willing to invest the required amount of capital and bring in relevant skills and experience that will benefit the firm.
3. What are the advantages of admitting a new partner in a partnership firm?
Ans. Admitting a new partner in a partnership firm can bring in several advantages such as: 1. Additional capital investment that can help in expanding the business. 2. Access to new skills and expertise that can help in improving the operations. 3. Sharing of responsibilities and workload among partners, leading to better efficiency and productivity. 4. Diversification of risk as the partnership firm can leverage the strengths of multiple partners.
4. What is the process of admitting a new partner in a partnership firm?
Ans. The process of admitting a new partner in a partnership firm typically involves the following steps: 1. Mutual agreement among existing partners on the terms and conditions of the partnership with the new partner. 2. Valuation of the firm's assets and liabilities to determine the new partner's share in the partnership. 3. Preparation of a new partnership agreement that includes the new partner's rights and responsibilities. 4. Signing of the new partnership agreement by all partners, including the new partner.
5. What are the tax implications of admitting a new partner in a partnership firm?
Ans. Admitting a new partner in a partnership firm can have tax implications, such as: 1. The firm may have to pay transfer taxes on the admission of the new partner. 2. The new partner's share of profits will be subject to income tax. 3. The firm may also have to pay capital gains tax if the admission of the new partner leads to a change in the firm's valuation. It is advisable to consult a tax expert to understand the tax implications of admitting a new partner in a partnership firm.
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