Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.
To the thinking man there are few things more disturbing than the realization that we are becoming a nation of minor poets. In the good old days poets were for the most part confined to garrets, which they left only for the purpose of being ejected from the offices of magazines and papers to which they attempted to sell their wares. Nobody ever thought of reading a book of poems unless accompanied by a guarantee from the publisher that the author had been dead at least a hundred years. Poetry, like wine, certain brands of cheese, and public buildings, was rightly considered to improve with age; and no connoisseur could have dreamed of filling himself with raw, indigestible verse, warm from the maker.
Today, however, editors are paying real money for poetry; publishers are making a profit on books of verse; and many a young man who, had he been born earlier, would have sustained life on a crust of bread, is now sending for the manager to find out how the restaurant dares try to sell a fellow champagne like this as genuine Pommery Brut. Naturally this is having a marked effect on the life of the community. Our children grow to adolescence with the feeling that they can become poets instead of working. Many an embryo bill clerk has been ruined by the heady knowledge that poems are paid for at the rate of a dollar a line. All over the country promising young plasterers and rising young motormen are throwing up steady jobs in order to devote themselves to the new profession.
On a sunny afternoon down in Washington Square one's progress is positively impeded by the swarms of young poets brought out by the warm weather. It is a horrible sight to see those unfortunate youths, who ought to be sitting happily at desks writing "Dear Sir, Your favor of the tenth inst. duly received and contents noted. In reply we beg to state..." wandering about with their fingers in their hair and their features distorted with the agony of composition, as they try to find rhymes to "cosmic" and "symbolism."
And, as if matters were not bad enough already, along comes Mr. Edgar Lee Masters and invents vers libre. It is too early yet to judge the full effects of this man's horrid discovery, but there is no doubt that he has taken the lid off and unleashed forces over which none can have any control. All those decent restrictions which used to check poets have vanished, and who shall say what will be the outcome?
The tone of the passage can best be described as:
  • a)
    Complaining
  • b)
    Disregardful
  • c)
    Blithe
  • d)
    Critical
  • e)
    Cynical
Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?

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Answers

Pioneer Academy
Feb 11, 2022
Option A is eliminated as the author is not simply offering a complaint about something he is unsatisfied with, he intends to criticize a trend in the society. Option B is eliminated, as the passage does not intend to disregard anyone as such. Option C is eliminated as the author is not only blithe and indifferent towards the issue, but very much involved and concerned. Option E is eliminated as the author is not cynical or embittered with the way things are; he is making a genuine effort to criticize them with the aim of improvement. Option D is the right answer, as it best encapsulates the tone of the passage.

Option A is eliminated as the author is not simply offering a complaint about something he is unsatisfied with, he intends to criticize a trend in the society. Option B is eliminated, as the passage does not intend to disregard anyone as such. Option C is eliminated as the author is not only blithe and indifferent towards the issue, but very much involved and concerned. Option E is eliminated as the author is not cynical or embittered with the way things are; he is making a genuine effort to criticize them with the aim of improvement. Option D is the right answer, as it best encapsulates the tone of the passage.
Option A is eliminated as the author is not simply offering a complaint about something he is unsatisfied with, he intends to criticize a trend in the society. Option B is eliminated, as the passage does not intend to disregard anyone as such. Option C is eliminated as the author is not only blithe and indifferent towards the issue, but very much involved and concerned. Option E is eliminated as the author is not cynical or embittered with the way things are; he is making a genuine effort to criticize them with the aim of improvement. Option D is the right answer, as it best encapsulates the tone of the passage.