CAT Past Year Question Paper - 1992 CAT Notes | EduRev

CAT Mock Test Series 2020

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CAT : CAT Past Year Question Paper - 1992 CAT Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


Page 1 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q1 to 7 : arrange the sentences A, B, C and D to form a logical sequence between sentences 1 and 6.
1. 1. Amount of published information available varies widely by industry.
A. Unfortunately for the researcher, many industries do not meet these criteria, and there may be
little published information available.
B. Generally, the problem the researcher will face in using published data for analysing an eco-
nomically meaningful industry is that they are too broad or too arranged to fit the industry.
C. However, it is always possible to gain some important information about an industry from pub-
lished sources and these sources should be aggressively pursued.
D. Larger the industry, the older it is, and the slower the rate of technological change, better is the
available published information.
6. If a researcher starts a searching for data with this reality in mind, the uselessness of broad data
will be better recognized and the tendency to give up will be avoided.
(a) ACBD (b) CBAD (c) DACB (d) BDAC
2. 1. The main source of power in industrial undertaking is electricity.
A. Electricity from water also requires enormous river valley projects involving huge expenditure.
B. In contrast, electricity from atomic power stations will result in a tremendous saving in expendi-
ture.
C. Besides, the mineral resources of the world required for generation of electricity are being rap-
idly depleted.
D. But the production of electricity needs huge quantities of coal.
6. The installation of atomic plants will help in meeting the shortage of these resources.
(a) ABDC (b) CBAD (c) DABC (d) BCAD
3. 1. Intensity of competition in an industry is neither a matter of coincidence nor bad luck.
A. The collective strength of these forces determines the ultimate profit potential in the industry
where profit potential is measured in terms of long run returns on invested capital.
B. Rather, competition in an industry is rooted in its underlying economic structure and goes well
beyond the behavior of current competitors.
C. Not all industries have the same potential.
D. The state of competition in an industry depends on five basic competitive forces.
6. They differ fundamentally in their ultimate profit potential as the collective strength of the forces
differ.
(a) CDBA (b) DCAB (c) BDAC (d) ABDC
	


	
Page 2


Page 1 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q1 to 7 : arrange the sentences A, B, C and D to form a logical sequence between sentences 1 and 6.
1. 1. Amount of published information available varies widely by industry.
A. Unfortunately for the researcher, many industries do not meet these criteria, and there may be
little published information available.
B. Generally, the problem the researcher will face in using published data for analysing an eco-
nomically meaningful industry is that they are too broad or too arranged to fit the industry.
C. However, it is always possible to gain some important information about an industry from pub-
lished sources and these sources should be aggressively pursued.
D. Larger the industry, the older it is, and the slower the rate of technological change, better is the
available published information.
6. If a researcher starts a searching for data with this reality in mind, the uselessness of broad data
will be better recognized and the tendency to give up will be avoided.
(a) ACBD (b) CBAD (c) DACB (d) BDAC
2. 1. The main source of power in industrial undertaking is electricity.
A. Electricity from water also requires enormous river valley projects involving huge expenditure.
B. In contrast, electricity from atomic power stations will result in a tremendous saving in expendi-
ture.
C. Besides, the mineral resources of the world required for generation of electricity are being rap-
idly depleted.
D. But the production of electricity needs huge quantities of coal.
6. The installation of atomic plants will help in meeting the shortage of these resources.
(a) ABDC (b) CBAD (c) DABC (d) BCAD
3. 1. Intensity of competition in an industry is neither a matter of coincidence nor bad luck.
A. The collective strength of these forces determines the ultimate profit potential in the industry
where profit potential is measured in terms of long run returns on invested capital.
B. Rather, competition in an industry is rooted in its underlying economic structure and goes well
beyond the behavior of current competitors.
C. Not all industries have the same potential.
D. The state of competition in an industry depends on five basic competitive forces.
6. They differ fundamentally in their ultimate profit potential as the collective strength of the forces
differ.
(a) CDBA (b) DCAB (c) BDAC (d) ABDC
	


	
Page 2
CAT 1992 Actual Paper
4. 1. The general enemy of mankind, as people have discovered, is not science, but war.
A. It is found that there is peace, science is constructive; when there is war science is perverted to
destructive ends.
B. Science merely reflects the social forces by which it is surrounded.
C. Until now, they have brought us to the doorstep of doom.
D. The weapon which science gives us do not necessarily create war, these make war increasingly
more terrible.
6. Our main problem, therefore, is not to curb science, but to stop war, to substitute law for force
and international governments for anarchy in the relations between nations.
(a) ADBC (b) BADC (c) CDAB (d) DABC
5. 1. It will be foolish to deny that the countryside has many attractions to offer.
A. One soon gets tired of the same old scenes and creatures day in and day out.
B. But there is another side of the picture.
C. The honesty and frankness of the country-folk, too, is a refreshing change from the dishonesty
and selfishness we find in so many urban people.
D. There is the lovely scenery, the interesting and varied wildlife, the long rambles through the
woods and fields and the clean, healthy air.
6. The loneliness and monotony in the countryside soon begin to make themselves felt and we
long for the familiar sidewalks and street corners of the town.
(a) ABCD (b) DCAB (c) DABC (d) DCBA
6. 1. A welfare state in the attainment of its objective must avoid coercion and violence.
A. But communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimen-
tation of life.
B. Communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimenta-
tion of life.
C. There are all serious disadvantages which perhaps outweigh the economic gains.
D. Communism aims at the welfare state and perhaps the completest form of the welfare state in
most respects.
6. A true welfare state can develop only by following the path of peace and democracy.
(a) CADB (b) ACDB (c) DCAB (d) DABC
7. 1. Human experience tends to show that the more we mix with a man, the more we come to dislike
him.
A. When the acquaintance with him ripens into intimacy, we are likely to become very keenly
aware of his defects and imperfections.
B. In the beginning, we may feel greatly attracted by someone because of certain qualities that we
find in him.
C. But on closer acquaintance we will begin to perceive his faults and shortcomings.
D. The truth is that nobody is free from faults and weaknesses.
6. But while a man makes a show of his strong points and his good qualities, he generally tries to
conceal or cover his faults and defects.
(a) ACBD (b) BCAD (c) CDBA (d) DCAB
Page 3


Page 1 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q1 to 7 : arrange the sentences A, B, C and D to form a logical sequence between sentences 1 and 6.
1. 1. Amount of published information available varies widely by industry.
A. Unfortunately for the researcher, many industries do not meet these criteria, and there may be
little published information available.
B. Generally, the problem the researcher will face in using published data for analysing an eco-
nomically meaningful industry is that they are too broad or too arranged to fit the industry.
C. However, it is always possible to gain some important information about an industry from pub-
lished sources and these sources should be aggressively pursued.
D. Larger the industry, the older it is, and the slower the rate of technological change, better is the
available published information.
6. If a researcher starts a searching for data with this reality in mind, the uselessness of broad data
will be better recognized and the tendency to give up will be avoided.
(a) ACBD (b) CBAD (c) DACB (d) BDAC
2. 1. The main source of power in industrial undertaking is electricity.
A. Electricity from water also requires enormous river valley projects involving huge expenditure.
B. In contrast, electricity from atomic power stations will result in a tremendous saving in expendi-
ture.
C. Besides, the mineral resources of the world required for generation of electricity are being rap-
idly depleted.
D. But the production of electricity needs huge quantities of coal.
6. The installation of atomic plants will help in meeting the shortage of these resources.
(a) ABDC (b) CBAD (c) DABC (d) BCAD
3. 1. Intensity of competition in an industry is neither a matter of coincidence nor bad luck.
A. The collective strength of these forces determines the ultimate profit potential in the industry
where profit potential is measured in terms of long run returns on invested capital.
B. Rather, competition in an industry is rooted in its underlying economic structure and goes well
beyond the behavior of current competitors.
C. Not all industries have the same potential.
D. The state of competition in an industry depends on five basic competitive forces.
6. They differ fundamentally in their ultimate profit potential as the collective strength of the forces
differ.
(a) CDBA (b) DCAB (c) BDAC (d) ABDC
	


	
Page 2
CAT 1992 Actual Paper
4. 1. The general enemy of mankind, as people have discovered, is not science, but war.
A. It is found that there is peace, science is constructive; when there is war science is perverted to
destructive ends.
B. Science merely reflects the social forces by which it is surrounded.
C. Until now, they have brought us to the doorstep of doom.
D. The weapon which science gives us do not necessarily create war, these make war increasingly
more terrible.
6. Our main problem, therefore, is not to curb science, but to stop war, to substitute law for force
and international governments for anarchy in the relations between nations.
(a) ADBC (b) BADC (c) CDAB (d) DABC
5. 1. It will be foolish to deny that the countryside has many attractions to offer.
A. One soon gets tired of the same old scenes and creatures day in and day out.
B. But there is another side of the picture.
C. The honesty and frankness of the country-folk, too, is a refreshing change from the dishonesty
and selfishness we find in so many urban people.
D. There is the lovely scenery, the interesting and varied wildlife, the long rambles through the
woods and fields and the clean, healthy air.
6. The loneliness and monotony in the countryside soon begin to make themselves felt and we
long for the familiar sidewalks and street corners of the town.
(a) ABCD (b) DCAB (c) DABC (d) DCBA
6. 1. A welfare state in the attainment of its objective must avoid coercion and violence.
A. But communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimen-
tation of life.
B. Communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimenta-
tion of life.
C. There are all serious disadvantages which perhaps outweigh the economic gains.
D. Communism aims at the welfare state and perhaps the completest form of the welfare state in
most respects.
6. A true welfare state can develop only by following the path of peace and democracy.
(a) CADB (b) ACDB (c) DCAB (d) DABC
7. 1. Human experience tends to show that the more we mix with a man, the more we come to dislike
him.
A. When the acquaintance with him ripens into intimacy, we are likely to become very keenly
aware of his defects and imperfections.
B. In the beginning, we may feel greatly attracted by someone because of certain qualities that we
find in him.
C. But on closer acquaintance we will begin to perceive his faults and shortcomings.
D. The truth is that nobody is free from faults and weaknesses.
6. But while a man makes a show of his strong points and his good qualities, he generally tries to
conceal or cover his faults and defects.
(a) ACBD (b) BCAD (c) CDBA (d) DCAB
Page 3 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q8 to 15 : A number of sentences are given below which, when properly sequenced, form a coherent
paragraph, Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from
among the four given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.
8. A. It is turning off the tap.
B. And with no consensus of the exit policy, the government is damned if it supports loss making
units and damned if it doesn’t.
C. The private sector did the same in the past because securing legal sanction for closure was
virtually impossible.
D. After years of funding the losses of public sector companies, the government is doing the
unthinkable.
(a) DACB (b) CADB (c) DCAB (d) BDAC
9. A. Trade protocols were signed, the dollar as the medium of exchange was ignored, trade was
denominated in rupees and the exchange rate between the two countries was to be fixed out-
side the ambit of free markets.
B. A young India, some years after independence fashioning her foreign policy of nonalignment,
found it prudent to stay close to the former Soviet Union.
C. Once upon a time there was a super power named Soviet Union that attracted nations apprehen-
sive of the global aspirations of the other superpower, the U.S.A.
D. One way of doing this was to evolve a bilateral relations in trade that could be called upon provide
a buffer against the arm-twisting by the U.S.A.
(a) CBAD (b) BADC (c) BCAD (d) CBDA
10. A. I had heard that sort of thing before.
B. He said that his generation was the first to believe that it had no future.
C. A young American made earthling stopped by my house the other day to talk about some book
of mine he had read.
D. He was the son of a Boston man who had died an alcoholic vagrant.
(a) CDBA (b) ABCD (c) CBAD (d) ABDC
11. A. This is probably one of the reasons why the number of women and men remain roughly equal in
most societies.
B. Fortunately or unfortunately, individual couples cannot really be concerned about this overall
‘error’.
C. Population growth then can be considered the error of this central process.
D. Purely at the human level, it appears that most couples like to have at least one living daughter
and one living son when they are in the middle ages.
(a) CBDA (b) DACB (c) DCBA (d) CDAB
12. A. Against this background, the current target of 12.8 percent does not seem that high a figure.
B. A better vantage point to evaluate the 12.8 percent target for export growth is our performance in
the ‘golden years’ between 1986 – 87 and 1990 – 91, during which time exports in dollar terms
increased by 17.1 percent.
C. In fact, the rate of growth would have to increase still further if we are to achieve the eighth plan
target of export growth in value terms of 13.6 percent per annum.
D. Even in 1990 – 91, the year of the Gulf War, exports went up by 9 percent.
(a) BDAC (b) BCAD (c) DABC (d) ACBD
Page 4


Page 1 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q1 to 7 : arrange the sentences A, B, C and D to form a logical sequence between sentences 1 and 6.
1. 1. Amount of published information available varies widely by industry.
A. Unfortunately for the researcher, many industries do not meet these criteria, and there may be
little published information available.
B. Generally, the problem the researcher will face in using published data for analysing an eco-
nomically meaningful industry is that they are too broad or too arranged to fit the industry.
C. However, it is always possible to gain some important information about an industry from pub-
lished sources and these sources should be aggressively pursued.
D. Larger the industry, the older it is, and the slower the rate of technological change, better is the
available published information.
6. If a researcher starts a searching for data with this reality in mind, the uselessness of broad data
will be better recognized and the tendency to give up will be avoided.
(a) ACBD (b) CBAD (c) DACB (d) BDAC
2. 1. The main source of power in industrial undertaking is electricity.
A. Electricity from water also requires enormous river valley projects involving huge expenditure.
B. In contrast, electricity from atomic power stations will result in a tremendous saving in expendi-
ture.
C. Besides, the mineral resources of the world required for generation of electricity are being rap-
idly depleted.
D. But the production of electricity needs huge quantities of coal.
6. The installation of atomic plants will help in meeting the shortage of these resources.
(a) ABDC (b) CBAD (c) DABC (d) BCAD
3. 1. Intensity of competition in an industry is neither a matter of coincidence nor bad luck.
A. The collective strength of these forces determines the ultimate profit potential in the industry
where profit potential is measured in terms of long run returns on invested capital.
B. Rather, competition in an industry is rooted in its underlying economic structure and goes well
beyond the behavior of current competitors.
C. Not all industries have the same potential.
D. The state of competition in an industry depends on five basic competitive forces.
6. They differ fundamentally in their ultimate profit potential as the collective strength of the forces
differ.
(a) CDBA (b) DCAB (c) BDAC (d) ABDC
	


	
Page 2
CAT 1992 Actual Paper
4. 1. The general enemy of mankind, as people have discovered, is not science, but war.
A. It is found that there is peace, science is constructive; when there is war science is perverted to
destructive ends.
B. Science merely reflects the social forces by which it is surrounded.
C. Until now, they have brought us to the doorstep of doom.
D. The weapon which science gives us do not necessarily create war, these make war increasingly
more terrible.
6. Our main problem, therefore, is not to curb science, but to stop war, to substitute law for force
and international governments for anarchy in the relations between nations.
(a) ADBC (b) BADC (c) CDAB (d) DABC
5. 1. It will be foolish to deny that the countryside has many attractions to offer.
A. One soon gets tired of the same old scenes and creatures day in and day out.
B. But there is another side of the picture.
C. The honesty and frankness of the country-folk, too, is a refreshing change from the dishonesty
and selfishness we find in so many urban people.
D. There is the lovely scenery, the interesting and varied wildlife, the long rambles through the
woods and fields and the clean, healthy air.
6. The loneliness and monotony in the countryside soon begin to make themselves felt and we
long for the familiar sidewalks and street corners of the town.
(a) ABCD (b) DCAB (c) DABC (d) DCBA
6. 1. A welfare state in the attainment of its objective must avoid coercion and violence.
A. But communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimen-
tation of life.
B. Communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimenta-
tion of life.
C. There are all serious disadvantages which perhaps outweigh the economic gains.
D. Communism aims at the welfare state and perhaps the completest form of the welfare state in
most respects.
6. A true welfare state can develop only by following the path of peace and democracy.
(a) CADB (b) ACDB (c) DCAB (d) DABC
7. 1. Human experience tends to show that the more we mix with a man, the more we come to dislike
him.
A. When the acquaintance with him ripens into intimacy, we are likely to become very keenly
aware of his defects and imperfections.
B. In the beginning, we may feel greatly attracted by someone because of certain qualities that we
find in him.
C. But on closer acquaintance we will begin to perceive his faults and shortcomings.
D. The truth is that nobody is free from faults and weaknesses.
6. But while a man makes a show of his strong points and his good qualities, he generally tries to
conceal or cover his faults and defects.
(a) ACBD (b) BCAD (c) CDBA (d) DCAB
Page 3 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q8 to 15 : A number of sentences are given below which, when properly sequenced, form a coherent
paragraph, Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from
among the four given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.
8. A. It is turning off the tap.
B. And with no consensus of the exit policy, the government is damned if it supports loss making
units and damned if it doesn’t.
C. The private sector did the same in the past because securing legal sanction for closure was
virtually impossible.
D. After years of funding the losses of public sector companies, the government is doing the
unthinkable.
(a) DACB (b) CADB (c) DCAB (d) BDAC
9. A. Trade protocols were signed, the dollar as the medium of exchange was ignored, trade was
denominated in rupees and the exchange rate between the two countries was to be fixed out-
side the ambit of free markets.
B. A young India, some years after independence fashioning her foreign policy of nonalignment,
found it prudent to stay close to the former Soviet Union.
C. Once upon a time there was a super power named Soviet Union that attracted nations apprehen-
sive of the global aspirations of the other superpower, the U.S.A.
D. One way of doing this was to evolve a bilateral relations in trade that could be called upon provide
a buffer against the arm-twisting by the U.S.A.
(a) CBAD (b) BADC (c) BCAD (d) CBDA
10. A. I had heard that sort of thing before.
B. He said that his generation was the first to believe that it had no future.
C. A young American made earthling stopped by my house the other day to talk about some book
of mine he had read.
D. He was the son of a Boston man who had died an alcoholic vagrant.
(a) CDBA (b) ABCD (c) CBAD (d) ABDC
11. A. This is probably one of the reasons why the number of women and men remain roughly equal in
most societies.
B. Fortunately or unfortunately, individual couples cannot really be concerned about this overall
‘error’.
C. Population growth then can be considered the error of this central process.
D. Purely at the human level, it appears that most couples like to have at least one living daughter
and one living son when they are in the middle ages.
(a) CBDA (b) DACB (c) DCBA (d) CDAB
12. A. Against this background, the current target of 12.8 percent does not seem that high a figure.
B. A better vantage point to evaluate the 12.8 percent target for export growth is our performance in
the ‘golden years’ between 1986 – 87 and 1990 – 91, during which time exports in dollar terms
increased by 17.1 percent.
C. In fact, the rate of growth would have to increase still further if we are to achieve the eighth plan
target of export growth in value terms of 13.6 percent per annum.
D. Even in 1990 – 91, the year of the Gulf War, exports went up by 9 percent.
(a) BDAC (b) BCAD (c) DABC (d) ACBD
Page 4
CAT 1992 Actual Paper
13. A. Their growing costs and a growing economy-must be reckoned with realistically.
B. Central programmes persist and in some cases grow.
C. As demand expands, programmes expand.
D. It is extremely difficult to curtail them.
(a) CDAB (b) BCDA (c) DABC (d) ACBD
14. A. It was never denied and seemed to be integrated into the city life.
B. The poverty was there right in the open in all the streets.
C. But, somehow it did not depress me as much as I had feared.
D. Indian society is associated with great poverty, and indeed I saw a lot of poverty in Bombay.
(a) ADBC (b) BCAD (c) BCDA (d) DCBA
15. A. This has been going on now for nearly 200 years.
B. They haven’t even been noticed much by central, state, or local governments, no matter how
insolent or blasphemous or treasonous those writers may be.
C. But writers of novels, plays, short stories or poems have never been hurt or hampered much.
D. Journalists and teachers are often bullied or fired in my country for saying this or that.
(a) DCBA (b) ABCD (c) BCDA (d) DCAB
Q16 to 24 : Each question contains six statements followed by four sets of combinations of three. Choose
the set in which the statements are logically related.
16. A. All boys are good.
B. Some girls are bad.
C. Good people are educated.
D. Boys are educated.
E. Ram is an educated boy.
F. Lata is an educated girl.
(a) BCF (b) ACD (c) DEF (d) ADC
17. A. All who are sincere are graduates.
B. Some graduates are not sincere.
C. All who are sincere are dull.
D. All graduates are dull.
E. Some who are dull are graduates.
F. No one who is dull is sincere.
(a) BEF (b) ADF (c) ABF (d) ADC
18. A. Sham won a lottery.
B. Sham lost in a chess game.
C. Sham is not intelligent.
D. One need not be intelligent to win a lottery.
E. One need not be intelligent to win a chess game.
F. Sham plays chess.
(a) BEF (b) ACD (c) BDE (d) BDF
Page 5


Page 1 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q1 to 7 : arrange the sentences A, B, C and D to form a logical sequence between sentences 1 and 6.
1. 1. Amount of published information available varies widely by industry.
A. Unfortunately for the researcher, many industries do not meet these criteria, and there may be
little published information available.
B. Generally, the problem the researcher will face in using published data for analysing an eco-
nomically meaningful industry is that they are too broad or too arranged to fit the industry.
C. However, it is always possible to gain some important information about an industry from pub-
lished sources and these sources should be aggressively pursued.
D. Larger the industry, the older it is, and the slower the rate of technological change, better is the
available published information.
6. If a researcher starts a searching for data with this reality in mind, the uselessness of broad data
will be better recognized and the tendency to give up will be avoided.
(a) ACBD (b) CBAD (c) DACB (d) BDAC
2. 1. The main source of power in industrial undertaking is electricity.
A. Electricity from water also requires enormous river valley projects involving huge expenditure.
B. In contrast, electricity from atomic power stations will result in a tremendous saving in expendi-
ture.
C. Besides, the mineral resources of the world required for generation of electricity are being rap-
idly depleted.
D. But the production of electricity needs huge quantities of coal.
6. The installation of atomic plants will help in meeting the shortage of these resources.
(a) ABDC (b) CBAD (c) DABC (d) BCAD
3. 1. Intensity of competition in an industry is neither a matter of coincidence nor bad luck.
A. The collective strength of these forces determines the ultimate profit potential in the industry
where profit potential is measured in terms of long run returns on invested capital.
B. Rather, competition in an industry is rooted in its underlying economic structure and goes well
beyond the behavior of current competitors.
C. Not all industries have the same potential.
D. The state of competition in an industry depends on five basic competitive forces.
6. They differ fundamentally in their ultimate profit potential as the collective strength of the forces
differ.
(a) CDBA (b) DCAB (c) BDAC (d) ABDC
	


	
Page 2
CAT 1992 Actual Paper
4. 1. The general enemy of mankind, as people have discovered, is not science, but war.
A. It is found that there is peace, science is constructive; when there is war science is perverted to
destructive ends.
B. Science merely reflects the social forces by which it is surrounded.
C. Until now, they have brought us to the doorstep of doom.
D. The weapon which science gives us do not necessarily create war, these make war increasingly
more terrible.
6. Our main problem, therefore, is not to curb science, but to stop war, to substitute law for force
and international governments for anarchy in the relations between nations.
(a) ADBC (b) BADC (c) CDAB (d) DABC
5. 1. It will be foolish to deny that the countryside has many attractions to offer.
A. One soon gets tired of the same old scenes and creatures day in and day out.
B. But there is another side of the picture.
C. The honesty and frankness of the country-folk, too, is a refreshing change from the dishonesty
and selfishness we find in so many urban people.
D. There is the lovely scenery, the interesting and varied wildlife, the long rambles through the
woods and fields and the clean, healthy air.
6. The loneliness and monotony in the countryside soon begin to make themselves felt and we
long for the familiar sidewalks and street corners of the town.
(a) ABCD (b) DCAB (c) DABC (d) DCBA
6. 1. A welfare state in the attainment of its objective must avoid coercion and violence.
A. But communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimen-
tation of life.
B. Communism implies the loss of freedom of expression and action and introduces a regimenta-
tion of life.
C. There are all serious disadvantages which perhaps outweigh the economic gains.
D. Communism aims at the welfare state and perhaps the completest form of the welfare state in
most respects.
6. A true welfare state can develop only by following the path of peace and democracy.
(a) CADB (b) ACDB (c) DCAB (d) DABC
7. 1. Human experience tends to show that the more we mix with a man, the more we come to dislike
him.
A. When the acquaintance with him ripens into intimacy, we are likely to become very keenly
aware of his defects and imperfections.
B. In the beginning, we may feel greatly attracted by someone because of certain qualities that we
find in him.
C. But on closer acquaintance we will begin to perceive his faults and shortcomings.
D. The truth is that nobody is free from faults and weaknesses.
6. But while a man makes a show of his strong points and his good qualities, he generally tries to
conceal or cover his faults and defects.
(a) ACBD (b) BCAD (c) CDBA (d) DCAB
Page 3 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
Q8 to 15 : A number of sentences are given below which, when properly sequenced, form a coherent
paragraph, Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from
among the four given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.
8. A. It is turning off the tap.
B. And with no consensus of the exit policy, the government is damned if it supports loss making
units and damned if it doesn’t.
C. The private sector did the same in the past because securing legal sanction for closure was
virtually impossible.
D. After years of funding the losses of public sector companies, the government is doing the
unthinkable.
(a) DACB (b) CADB (c) DCAB (d) BDAC
9. A. Trade protocols were signed, the dollar as the medium of exchange was ignored, trade was
denominated in rupees and the exchange rate between the two countries was to be fixed out-
side the ambit of free markets.
B. A young India, some years after independence fashioning her foreign policy of nonalignment,
found it prudent to stay close to the former Soviet Union.
C. Once upon a time there was a super power named Soviet Union that attracted nations apprehen-
sive of the global aspirations of the other superpower, the U.S.A.
D. One way of doing this was to evolve a bilateral relations in trade that could be called upon provide
a buffer against the arm-twisting by the U.S.A.
(a) CBAD (b) BADC (c) BCAD (d) CBDA
10. A. I had heard that sort of thing before.
B. He said that his generation was the first to believe that it had no future.
C. A young American made earthling stopped by my house the other day to talk about some book
of mine he had read.
D. He was the son of a Boston man who had died an alcoholic vagrant.
(a) CDBA (b) ABCD (c) CBAD (d) ABDC
11. A. This is probably one of the reasons why the number of women and men remain roughly equal in
most societies.
B. Fortunately or unfortunately, individual couples cannot really be concerned about this overall
‘error’.
C. Population growth then can be considered the error of this central process.
D. Purely at the human level, it appears that most couples like to have at least one living daughter
and one living son when they are in the middle ages.
(a) CBDA (b) DACB (c) DCBA (d) CDAB
12. A. Against this background, the current target of 12.8 percent does not seem that high a figure.
B. A better vantage point to evaluate the 12.8 percent target for export growth is our performance in
the ‘golden years’ between 1986 – 87 and 1990 – 91, during which time exports in dollar terms
increased by 17.1 percent.
C. In fact, the rate of growth would have to increase still further if we are to achieve the eighth plan
target of export growth in value terms of 13.6 percent per annum.
D. Even in 1990 – 91, the year of the Gulf War, exports went up by 9 percent.
(a) BDAC (b) BCAD (c) DABC (d) ACBD
Page 4
CAT 1992 Actual Paper
13. A. Their growing costs and a growing economy-must be reckoned with realistically.
B. Central programmes persist and in some cases grow.
C. As demand expands, programmes expand.
D. It is extremely difficult to curtail them.
(a) CDAB (b) BCDA (c) DABC (d) ACBD
14. A. It was never denied and seemed to be integrated into the city life.
B. The poverty was there right in the open in all the streets.
C. But, somehow it did not depress me as much as I had feared.
D. Indian society is associated with great poverty, and indeed I saw a lot of poverty in Bombay.
(a) ADBC (b) BCAD (c) BCDA (d) DCBA
15. A. This has been going on now for nearly 200 years.
B. They haven’t even been noticed much by central, state, or local governments, no matter how
insolent or blasphemous or treasonous those writers may be.
C. But writers of novels, plays, short stories or poems have never been hurt or hampered much.
D. Journalists and teachers are often bullied or fired in my country for saying this or that.
(a) DCBA (b) ABCD (c) BCDA (d) DCAB
Q16 to 24 : Each question contains six statements followed by four sets of combinations of three. Choose
the set in which the statements are logically related.
16. A. All boys are good.
B. Some girls are bad.
C. Good people are educated.
D. Boys are educated.
E. Ram is an educated boy.
F. Lata is an educated girl.
(a) BCF (b) ACD (c) DEF (d) ADC
17. A. All who are sincere are graduates.
B. Some graduates are not sincere.
C. All who are sincere are dull.
D. All graduates are dull.
E. Some who are dull are graduates.
F. No one who is dull is sincere.
(a) BEF (b) ADF (c) ABF (d) ADC
18. A. Sham won a lottery.
B. Sham lost in a chess game.
C. Sham is not intelligent.
D. One need not be intelligent to win a lottery.
E. One need not be intelligent to win a chess game.
F. Sham plays chess.
(a) BEF (b) ACD (c) BDE (d) BDF
Page 5 CAT 1992 Actual Paper
19. A. Good managers are intuitive.
B. Some managers are women.
C. Supriya is a good manager.
D. Supriya is a woman.
E. Some women are intuitive.
F. Supriya is intuitive.
(a) BCE (b) ABD (c) ACF (d) ADF
20. A. Some college athletes are professionals.
B. No college athlete is a professional.
C. Some professionals are well paid.
D. All professionals are well paid.
E. All well – paid persons are professionals.
F. No well – paid person is a college athlete.
(a) BEF (b) ABF (c) BDF (d) ACF
21. A. Some intolerant are poor – thinkers.
B. Some poor – thinker is intolerant.
C. All people with high ideals are intolerant.
D. No poor thinker is intolerant.
E. No poor thinker has high ideals.
F. Some people with high ideals are not poor thinkers.
(a) CDE (b) CDF (c) ABD (d) BCF
22. A. All engineers can sing.
B. No music lover can sing.
C. All who can sing are music lovers.
D. All music lovers can sing.
E. Some who can sing are engineers.
F. All engineers are music lovers.
(a) ACE (b) ACF (c) ABF (d) ACD
23. A. Some well-dressed people are sociable.
B. All sociable people are well-dressed.
C. Some well dressed people are dull.
D. No dull person is well-dressed.
E. Some sociable people are dull.
F. Some dull ones are well-dressed.
(a) ACE (b) BCE (c) ADE (d) BEF
24. A. Iran and Iraq are members of the UN.
B. Iran and Iraq are not friends.
C. Iran and Iraq are neighbours.
D. Some UN members are friends.
E. Not all members of the UN are friends.
F. All neighbours are not friends.
(a) ABE (b) ABD (c) CDF (d) AEF
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