Chapter-9 : Network-Theorems; Introductory-Circuit-Analysis Notes | EduRev

: Chapter-9 : Network-Theorems; Introductory-Circuit-Analysis Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


Chapter 9 – Network Theorems 
Introductory Circuit Analysis 
Robert L. Boylestad 
Page 2


Chapter 9 – Network Theorems 
Introductory Circuit Analysis 
Robert L. Boylestad 
9.1 – Introduction 
? This chapter introduces important fundamental 
theorems of network analysis. They are the 
?Superposition theorem 
?Thévenin’s theorem 
?Norton’s theorem 
?Maximum power transfer theorem  
?Substitution Theorem 
?Millman’s theorem 
?Reciprocity theorem 
Page 3


Chapter 9 – Network Theorems 
Introductory Circuit Analysis 
Robert L. Boylestad 
9.1 – Introduction 
? This chapter introduces important fundamental 
theorems of network analysis. They are the 
?Superposition theorem 
?Thévenin’s theorem 
?Norton’s theorem 
?Maximum power transfer theorem  
?Substitution Theorem 
?Millman’s theorem 
?Reciprocity theorem 
9.2 – Superposition Theorem 
? Used to find the solution to networks with two or more 
sources that are not in series or parallel. 
? The current through, or voltage across, an element in a 
network is equal to the algebraic sum of the currents or 
voltages produced independently by each source. 
? Since the effect of each source will be determined 
independently, the number of networks to be analyzed will 
equal the number of sources. 
 
Page 4


Chapter 9 – Network Theorems 
Introductory Circuit Analysis 
Robert L. Boylestad 
9.1 – Introduction 
? This chapter introduces important fundamental 
theorems of network analysis. They are the 
?Superposition theorem 
?Thévenin’s theorem 
?Norton’s theorem 
?Maximum power transfer theorem  
?Substitution Theorem 
?Millman’s theorem 
?Reciprocity theorem 
9.2 – Superposition Theorem 
? Used to find the solution to networks with two or more 
sources that are not in series or parallel. 
? The current through, or voltage across, an element in a 
network is equal to the algebraic sum of the currents or 
voltages produced independently by each source. 
? Since the effect of each source will be determined 
independently, the number of networks to be analyzed will 
equal the number of sources. 
 
Superposition Theorem 
?The total power delivered to a resistive element must 
be determined using the total current through or the 
total voltage across the element and cannot be 
determined by a simple sum of the power levels 
established by each source. 
Page 5


Chapter 9 – Network Theorems 
Introductory Circuit Analysis 
Robert L. Boylestad 
9.1 – Introduction 
? This chapter introduces important fundamental 
theorems of network analysis. They are the 
?Superposition theorem 
?Thévenin’s theorem 
?Norton’s theorem 
?Maximum power transfer theorem  
?Substitution Theorem 
?Millman’s theorem 
?Reciprocity theorem 
9.2 – Superposition Theorem 
? Used to find the solution to networks with two or more 
sources that are not in series or parallel. 
? The current through, or voltage across, an element in a 
network is equal to the algebraic sum of the currents or 
voltages produced independently by each source. 
? Since the effect of each source will be determined 
independently, the number of networks to be analyzed will 
equal the number of sources. 
 
Superposition Theorem 
?The total power delivered to a resistive element must 
be determined using the total current through or the 
total voltage across the element and cannot be 
determined by a simple sum of the power levels 
established by each source. 
9.3 – Thévenin’s Theorem 
?Any two-terminal dc network can be replaced by an 
equivalent circuit consisting of a voltage source and a 
series resistor. 
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