Color Illusion - Color Theory Notes | EduRev

: Color Illusion - Color Theory Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_1.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
The Lecture Contains:
Color Illusion
Bezold effect
Color Transparency
Equiluminant (ambiguous) colors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 2


Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_1.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
The Lecture Contains:
Color Illusion
Bezold effect
Color Transparency
Equiluminant (ambiguous) colors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_2.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
Color Illusion
Color perceived by normal human eyes may not visualize correctly. It is often shows that human
eyes may see illusionistic images that can create dimension. Following are some of the examples
that would illustrate the illusionistic images-
The Bezold effect is an optical illusion, named after a German professor of meteorology,
Wilhelm von Bezold (1837-1907), who discovered that a color may appear different depending
on its relation to adjacent colors. The eyes play a variety of tricks on the brain that are
common to most human experience. Some of them are useful to the artist/ designer or
problems for the artist/ designer. Designer while creating 2-D design may take advantage of
the illusionistic expression.
Plate 18 A & B Color Illusion
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
hl=en&q=Color%20illusion&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=qXHAT7eaFMjsrAeIz7HHCQ ; May 26, 2012
Illusion is an optical illusion illustrating the fact that the same target luminance can elicit different
perceptions of brightness in different color combinations. Note, that although the blue and gray
rectangles are all of equal luminance, the ones seen in the context with the dark stripes appear
brighter than the ones seen in the context with the bright stripes. Piet Mondrian in his theory of Pure
Plastic Art demonstrated the quality of such dimensions (Plate19) without using the conventional light
and shade. Thus, he produced the elasticity of colors by combining them against Pure Colors
(Yellow, Blue, Red and Black and White). He demonstrated that the same color may create different
dimensional effect against another color.
Plate19. A & B Piet Mondrian
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3


Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_1.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
The Lecture Contains:
Color Illusion
Bezold effect
Color Transparency
Equiluminant (ambiguous) colors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_2.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
Color Illusion
Color perceived by normal human eyes may not visualize correctly. It is often shows that human
eyes may see illusionistic images that can create dimension. Following are some of the examples
that would illustrate the illusionistic images-
The Bezold effect is an optical illusion, named after a German professor of meteorology,
Wilhelm von Bezold (1837-1907), who discovered that a color may appear different depending
on its relation to adjacent colors. The eyes play a variety of tricks on the brain that are
common to most human experience. Some of them are useful to the artist/ designer or
problems for the artist/ designer. Designer while creating 2-D design may take advantage of
the illusionistic expression.
Plate 18 A & B Color Illusion
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
hl=en&q=Color%20illusion&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=qXHAT7eaFMjsrAeIz7HHCQ ; May 26, 2012
Illusion is an optical illusion illustrating the fact that the same target luminance can elicit different
perceptions of brightness in different color combinations. Note, that although the blue and gray
rectangles are all of equal luminance, the ones seen in the context with the dark stripes appear
brighter than the ones seen in the context with the bright stripes. Piet Mondrian in his theory of Pure
Plastic Art demonstrated the quality of such dimensions (Plate19) without using the conventional light
and shade. Thus, he produced the elasticity of colors by combining them against Pure Colors
(Yellow, Blue, Red and Black and White). He demonstrated that the same color may create different
dimensional effect against another color.
Plate19. A & B Piet Mondrian
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_2.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
hl=en&q=piet%20mondrian%20paintings&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=ZXLAT-6vLMjlrAfnp63PCQ ; May 26, 2012
 
Page 4


Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_1.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
The Lecture Contains:
Color Illusion
Bezold effect
Color Transparency
Equiluminant (ambiguous) colors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_2.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
Color Illusion
Color perceived by normal human eyes may not visualize correctly. It is often shows that human
eyes may see illusionistic images that can create dimension. Following are some of the examples
that would illustrate the illusionistic images-
The Bezold effect is an optical illusion, named after a German professor of meteorology,
Wilhelm von Bezold (1837-1907), who discovered that a color may appear different depending
on its relation to adjacent colors. The eyes play a variety of tricks on the brain that are
common to most human experience. Some of them are useful to the artist/ designer or
problems for the artist/ designer. Designer while creating 2-D design may take advantage of
the illusionistic expression.
Plate 18 A & B Color Illusion
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
hl=en&q=Color%20illusion&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=qXHAT7eaFMjsrAeIz7HHCQ ; May 26, 2012
Illusion is an optical illusion illustrating the fact that the same target luminance can elicit different
perceptions of brightness in different color combinations. Note, that although the blue and gray
rectangles are all of equal luminance, the ones seen in the context with the dark stripes appear
brighter than the ones seen in the context with the bright stripes. Piet Mondrian in his theory of Pure
Plastic Art demonstrated the quality of such dimensions (Plate19) without using the conventional light
and shade. Thus, he produced the elasticity of colors by combining them against Pure Colors
(Yellow, Blue, Red and Black and White). He demonstrated that the same color may create different
dimensional effect against another color.
Plate19. A & B Piet Mondrian
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_2.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
hl=en&q=piet%20mondrian%20paintings&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=ZXLAT-6vLMjlrAfnp63PCQ ; May 26, 2012
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_3.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
The Blue against the strip of black (thickness is also considered) and against white would produce
different dimension. Red against white and blue with a border of black would have different
dimensional effect. There by it is proved that the eyes may read different elasticity effect because of
the contrast of colors.
Bellow are examples of a few common illusion that human beings experience-
Fig. 2 A Fig. B
In Fig. 2 A both the arrows (X & Y) are of the same length. However the ‘X’ seems longer than ‘Y’.
In the Fig. 2 B all the three parallel lines- a, b & c are of the same length. However, it appears ‘a’ is
longer compared to ‘b’ and ‘c’. Therefore, it seems we cannot trust our own eyes. Artist and design
have utilized the deficiency of human eyes and applied in their creative work to achieve certain
effect.
Following are further more examples that are popularly shown to illustrate human illusionistic views-
Fig. 3A Fig. 3B
Fig. 4 A Fig. 4 B
Height-Width Illusion- an upright line segment appears longer nearby equal horizontal line segments
(Fig 4. A) 
Illusion of Contour- An open or empty figure appears to have greater area or capacity than an equal
closed or filled figure (Fig. 4. B).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 5


Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_1.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
The Lecture Contains:
Color Illusion
Bezold effect
Color Transparency
Equiluminant (ambiguous) colors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_2.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
Color Illusion
Color perceived by normal human eyes may not visualize correctly. It is often shows that human
eyes may see illusionistic images that can create dimension. Following are some of the examples
that would illustrate the illusionistic images-
The Bezold effect is an optical illusion, named after a German professor of meteorology,
Wilhelm von Bezold (1837-1907), who discovered that a color may appear different depending
on its relation to adjacent colors. The eyes play a variety of tricks on the brain that are
common to most human experience. Some of them are useful to the artist/ designer or
problems for the artist/ designer. Designer while creating 2-D design may take advantage of
the illusionistic expression.
Plate 18 A & B Color Illusion
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
hl=en&q=Color%20illusion&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=qXHAT7eaFMjsrAeIz7HHCQ ; May 26, 2012
Illusion is an optical illusion illustrating the fact that the same target luminance can elicit different
perceptions of brightness in different color combinations. Note, that although the blue and gray
rectangles are all of equal luminance, the ones seen in the context with the dark stripes appear
brighter than the ones seen in the context with the bright stripes. Piet Mondrian in his theory of Pure
Plastic Art demonstrated the quality of such dimensions (Plate19) without using the conventional light
and shade. Thus, he produced the elasticity of colors by combining them against Pure Colors
(Yellow, Blue, Red and Black and White). He demonstrated that the same color may create different
dimensional effect against another color.
Plate19. A & B Piet Mondrian
Source:http://www.google.co.in/search?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_2.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
hl=en&q=piet%20mondrian%20paintings&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=ZXLAT-6vLMjlrAfnp63PCQ ; May 26, 2012
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_3.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
 Module 2: "Color Theory"
 Lecture 5: "Color Illusion"
 
The Blue against the strip of black (thickness is also considered) and against white would produce
different dimension. Red against white and blue with a border of black would have different
dimensional effect. There by it is proved that the eyes may read different elasticity effect because of
the contrast of colors.
Bellow are examples of a few common illusion that human beings experience-
Fig. 2 A Fig. B
In Fig. 2 A both the arrows (X & Y) are of the same length. However the ‘X’ seems longer than ‘Y’.
In the Fig. 2 B all the three parallel lines- a, b & c are of the same length. However, it appears ‘a’ is
longer compared to ‘b’ and ‘c’. Therefore, it seems we cannot trust our own eyes. Artist and design
have utilized the deficiency of human eyes and applied in their creative work to achieve certain
effect.
Following are further more examples that are popularly shown to illustrate human illusionistic views-
Fig. 3A Fig. 3B
Fig. 4 A Fig. 4 B
Height-Width Illusion- an upright line segment appears longer nearby equal horizontal line segments
(Fig 4. A) 
Illusion of Contour- An open or empty figure appears to have greater area or capacity than an equal
closed or filled figure (Fig. 4. B).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Objectives_template
file:///E|/color_in_design/lecture5/5_3.htm[8/17/2012 1:33:39 PM]
Fig. 5 A Illusion in Depth
(Ant’s Eye View/ Bird’s Eye View)
Fig. B. Illusion in Color Contrast
(Primary- Secondary Color)
Fig. C Illusion flat & convex surface
Source; http://www.google.co.in/search?
hl=en&q=illusion&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1272&bih=577&um=1&ie=UTF-
8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=b3fAT42OB4OurAegpMzpCQ ; May 26, 2012
 
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