Conditions & Warranties (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

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CA CPT : Conditions & Warranties (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

The document Conditions & Warranties (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev is a part of the CA CPT Course Business Laws for CA Foundation.
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Implied Warranties: It is a warranty which the law implies into the contract of sale. In other words, it is the stipulation which has not been included in the contract of sale in express words. But the law presumes that the parties have incorporated it into their contract. It will be interesting to know that implied warranties are read into every contract of sale unless they are expressly excluded by the express agreement of the parties.
These may also be excluded by the course of dealings between the parties or by usage of trade (Section 62).
Conditions & Warranties (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

The examination of Sections 14 and 16 of the Sale of Goods Act, 1930 discloses the following implied warranties:
1. Warranty as to undisturbed possession [Section 14(b)]: An implied warranty that the buyer shall have and enjoy quiet possession of the goods. That is to say, if the buyer having got possession of the goods, is later on disturbed in his possession, he is entitled to sue the seller for the breach of the warranty.
2. Warranty as to non-existence of encumbrances [Section 14(c)]: An implied warranty that the goods shall be free from any charge or encumbrance in favour of any third party not declared or known to the buyer before or at the time the contract is entered into.

Example: A pledges his car with C for a loan of Rs. 15,000 and promises him to give its possession the next day. A, then sells the car immediately to B, who purchased it on good faith, without knowing the fact. B, may either ask A to clear the loan or himself may pay the money and then, file a suit against A for recovery of the money with interest.
3. Warranty as to quality or fitness by usage of trade [Section 16(3)]: An implied warranty as to quality or fitness for a particular purpose may be annexed or attached by the usage of trade.

Regarding implied condition or warranty as to the quality or fitness for any particular purpose of goods supplied, the rule is ‘let the buyer beware’ i.e., the seller is under no duty to reveal unattering truths about the goods sold, but this rule has certain exceptions.
4. Disclosure of dangerous nature of goods: Where the goods are dangerous in nature and the buyer is ignorant of the danger, the seller must warn the buyer of the probable danger. If there is a breach of warranty, the seller may be liable in damages.

CAVEAT EMPTOR:

In case of sale of goods, the doctrine ‘Caveat Emptor’ means ‘let the buyer beware’. When sellers display their goods in the open market, it is for the buyers to make a proper selection or choice of the goods. If the goods turn out to be defective he cannot hold the seller liable. The seller is in no way responsible for the bad selection of the buyer. The seller is not bound to disclose the defects in the goods which he is selling.
It is the duty of the buyer to satisfy himself before buying the goods that the goods will serve the purpose for which they are being bought. If the goods turn out to be defective or do not serve his purpose or if he depends on his own skill or judgment, the buyer cannot hold the seller responsible.

The rule of Caveat Emptor is laid down in the Section 16, which states that, “subject to the provisions of this Act or of any other law for the time being in force, there is no implied warranty or condition as to the quality or fitness for any particular purpose of goods supplied under a contract of sale”.

Following are the conditions to be satisfied:
- if the buyer had made known to the seller the purpose of his purchase, and
- the buyer relied on the seller’s skill and judgement, and
- seller’s business to supply goods of that description (Section 16).

Example 1: A sold pigs to B. These pigs being infected, caused typhoid to other healthy pigs of the buyer. It was held that the seller was not bound to disclose that the pigs were unhealthy. The rule of the law being “Caveat Emptor”.

Example 2: A purchases a horse from B. A needed the horse for riding but he did not mention this fact to B. The horse is not suitable for riding but is suitable only for being driven in the carriage. Caveat emptor rule applies here and so A can neither reject the horse nor can claim compensation from B.

Exceptions: The doctrine of Caveat Emptor is, however, subject to the following exceptions;
1. Fitness as to quality or use: Where the buyer makes known to the seller the particular purpose for which the goods are required, so as to show that he relies on the seller’s skill or judgment and the goods are of a description which is in the course of seller’s business to supply, it is the duty of the seller to supply such goods as are reasonably fit for that purpose [Section 16 (1)].

Example: An order was placed for some trucks to be used for heavy trac in a hilly country. The trucks supplied by the seller were unfit for this purpose and broke down. There is a breach of condition as to fitness.

In Priest vs. Last,
P, a draper, purchased a hot water bottle from a retail chemist, P asked the chemist if it would stand boiling water. The Chemist told him that the bottle was meant to hold hot water. The bottle burst when water was poured into it and injured his wife. It was held that the chemist shall be liable to pay damages to P, as he knew that the bottle was purchased for the purpose of being used as a hot water bottle.

Where the article can be used for only one particular purpose, the buyer need not tell the seller the purpose for which he required the goods. But where the article can be used for a number of purposes, the buyer should tell the seller the purpose for which he requires the goods, if he wants to make the seller responsible.

In Bombay Burma Trading Corporation Ltd. vs. Aga Muhammad, timber was purchased for the express purpose of using it as railways sleepers and when it was found to be unfit for the purpose, the Court held that the contract could be avoided.
2. Goods purchased under patent or brand name:  In case where the goods are purchased under its patent name or brand name, there is no implied condition that the goods shall be fit for any particular purpose [Section 16(1)].
3. Goods sold by description: Where the goods are sold by description there is an implied condition that the goods shall correspond with the description [Section 15]. If it is not so then seller is responsible.
4. Goods of Merchantable Quality: Where the goods are bought by description from a seller who deals in goods of that description there is an implied condition that the goods shall be of merchantable quality. The rule of Caveat Emptor is not applicable. But where the buyer has examined the goods this rule shall apply if the defects were such which ought to have not been revealed by ordinary examination [Section 16(2)].

5. Sale by sample: Where the goods are bought by sample, this rule of Caveat Emptor does not apply if the bulk does not correspond with the sample [Section 17].
6. Goods by sample as well as description: Where the goods are bought by sample as well as description, the rule of Caveat Emptor is not applicable in case the goods do not correspond with both the sample and description or either of the condition [Section 15].
7. Trade Usage: An implied warranty or condition as to quality or fitness for a particular purpose may be annexed by the usage of trade and if the seller deviates from that, this rule of Caveat Emptor is not applicable [Section 16(3)].

Example: In readymade garment business, there is an implied condition by usage of trade that the garments shall be reasonably fit on the buyer.
8. Seller actively conceals a defect or is guilty of fraud: Where the seller sells the goods by making some misrepresentation or fraud and the buyer relies on it or when the seller actively conceals some defect in the goods so that the same could not be discovered by the buyer on a reasonable examination, then the rule of Caveat Emptor will not apply. In such a case the buyer has a right to avoid the contract and claim damages.

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