Culture: June 2021 Current Affair Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

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UPSC : Culture: June 2021 Current Affair Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


 
86                                                                                                                                                        
8. CULTURE 
8.1. OFFICIAL LANGUAGE STATUS 
Why in News? 
Recently, various 
organisations initiated a 
campaign demanding 
official language status to 
Tulu in Karnataka and 
Kerala and include it in the 
eighth schedule of the 
Constitution. 
What is an Official 
Language status? 
• Part XVII of the Indian 
Constitution deals with 
the official language in 
Articles 343 to 351. 
• Article 345 of the Constitution says that the Legislature of a State may by law adopt any one or more of the 
languages in use in the State or Hindi as the language or languages to be used for all or any of the official 
purposes of that State. 
o For example, Karnataka Official Language Act, 1963, provide for the adoption of Kannada as the 
languages to be used for the official purposes of the State of Karnatka. 
o It is provided that, until the Legislature of the State otherwise provides by law, the English language 
shall continue to be used for those official purposes within the State for which it was being used 
immediately before the commencement of this Constitution. 
Eighth Schedule of the constitution 
• The Constitutional provisions relating 
to the Eighth Schedule occur in 
article 344(1) and 351 of the 
Constitution.  
• The Eighth Schedule was intended to 
promote the progressive use of Hindi 
and for the enrichment and 
promotion of language.  
• Eighth Schedule recognises that 
India is a multilingual country.  
o However, it excludes large number of languages on non-linguistic grounds like absence of script, written 
literature and print media.  
• The Constitution does not mention any qualifying criterion for a language to be included in the Eighth 
Schedule.  
o When the National Commission for Linguistic Minorities 
(NCLM) recommends the inclusion of any language, the 
Union government includes it through an amendment to 
the Constitution.  
? NCLM is responsible to investigate all matters 
relating to safeguards provided for the linguistic 
minorities and report to the President. 
• Earlier in 2003, Sitakant Mohapatra Committee was set up to evolve a set of objective criteria for inclusion 
of more languages in the Eighth Schedule to the Constitution of India.  
o Committee submitted its report in 2004 which is still under consideration. 
22 languages in Eighth Schedule  
• Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, 
Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Malayalam, 
Manipuri, Marathi, Nepali, Oriya, 
Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu, 
Urdu, Bodo, Santhali, Maithili and Dogri. 
About Tulu language 
• Tulu is a Dravidian language spoken mainly in two coastal districts Dakshina 
Kannada and Udupi of Karnataka and Kasaragod district of Kerala.  
• As per the 2011 Census report, there are 18,46,427 Tulu-speaking people in 
India.  
• Some scholars suggest Tulu is among the earliest Dravidian languages with a 
history of 2000 years.  
• Robert Caldwell (1814-1891), in his book, A Comparative Grammar of the 
Dravidian or South-Indian Family of Languages, called Tulu as ‘one of the most 
highly developed languages of the Dravidian family’.  
• According to the Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger, published by 
UNESCO, Tulu is now considered a vulnerable language.  
• Tulu has a rich oral literature tradition with folk-song forms like paddana, and 
traditional folk theatre yakshagana.  
• Tulu also has an active tradition of cinema with around 5 to 7 Tulu language 
movies produced a year. 
Yuelu Proclamation 
• The Yuelu Proclamation is the first UNESCO document of its kind 
dedicated to the protection of linguistic diversity, and is also an 
important supporting document for the “UN International Year of 
Indigenous Languages 2019”.  
• It says that the protection and promotion of linguistic diversity 
helps to improve social inclusion and partnerships. 
o It helps to reduce the gender and social inequality between 
different native speakers. 
• It calls upon the international community to reach a consensus on 
the protection and promotion of linguistic diversity in the world.  
Page 2


 
86                                                                                                                                                        
8. CULTURE 
8.1. OFFICIAL LANGUAGE STATUS 
Why in News? 
Recently, various 
organisations initiated a 
campaign demanding 
official language status to 
Tulu in Karnataka and 
Kerala and include it in the 
eighth schedule of the 
Constitution. 
What is an Official 
Language status? 
• Part XVII of the Indian 
Constitution deals with 
the official language in 
Articles 343 to 351. 
• Article 345 of the Constitution says that the Legislature of a State may by law adopt any one or more of the 
languages in use in the State or Hindi as the language or languages to be used for all or any of the official 
purposes of that State. 
o For example, Karnataka Official Language Act, 1963, provide for the adoption of Kannada as the 
languages to be used for the official purposes of the State of Karnatka. 
o It is provided that, until the Legislature of the State otherwise provides by law, the English language 
shall continue to be used for those official purposes within the State for which it was being used 
immediately before the commencement of this Constitution. 
Eighth Schedule of the constitution 
• The Constitutional provisions relating 
to the Eighth Schedule occur in 
article 344(1) and 351 of the 
Constitution.  
• The Eighth Schedule was intended to 
promote the progressive use of Hindi 
and for the enrichment and 
promotion of language.  
• Eighth Schedule recognises that 
India is a multilingual country.  
o However, it excludes large number of languages on non-linguistic grounds like absence of script, written 
literature and print media.  
• The Constitution does not mention any qualifying criterion for a language to be included in the Eighth 
Schedule.  
o When the National Commission for Linguistic Minorities 
(NCLM) recommends the inclusion of any language, the 
Union government includes it through an amendment to 
the Constitution.  
? NCLM is responsible to investigate all matters 
relating to safeguards provided for the linguistic 
minorities and report to the President. 
• Earlier in 2003, Sitakant Mohapatra Committee was set up to evolve a set of objective criteria for inclusion 
of more languages in the Eighth Schedule to the Constitution of India.  
o Committee submitted its report in 2004 which is still under consideration. 
22 languages in Eighth Schedule  
• Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, 
Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Malayalam, 
Manipuri, Marathi, Nepali, Oriya, 
Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu, 
Urdu, Bodo, Santhali, Maithili and Dogri. 
About Tulu language 
• Tulu is a Dravidian language spoken mainly in two coastal districts Dakshina 
Kannada and Udupi of Karnataka and Kasaragod district of Kerala.  
• As per the 2011 Census report, there are 18,46,427 Tulu-speaking people in 
India.  
• Some scholars suggest Tulu is among the earliest Dravidian languages with a 
history of 2000 years.  
• Robert Caldwell (1814-1891), in his book, A Comparative Grammar of the 
Dravidian or South-Indian Family of Languages, called Tulu as ‘one of the most 
highly developed languages of the Dravidian family’.  
• According to the Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger, published by 
UNESCO, Tulu is now considered a vulnerable language.  
• Tulu has a rich oral literature tradition with folk-song forms like paddana, and 
traditional folk theatre yakshagana.  
• Tulu also has an active tradition of cinema with around 5 to 7 Tulu language 
movies produced a year. 
Yuelu Proclamation 
• The Yuelu Proclamation is the first UNESCO document of its kind 
dedicated to the protection of linguistic diversity, and is also an 
important supporting document for the “UN International Year of 
Indigenous Languages 2019”.  
• It says that the protection and promotion of linguistic diversity 
helps to improve social inclusion and partnerships. 
o It helps to reduce the gender and social inequality between 
different native speakers. 
• It calls upon the international community to reach a consensus on 
the protection and promotion of linguistic diversity in the world.  
 
87                                                                                                                                                        
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3


 
86                                                                                                                                                        
8. CULTURE 
8.1. OFFICIAL LANGUAGE STATUS 
Why in News? 
Recently, various 
organisations initiated a 
campaign demanding 
official language status to 
Tulu in Karnataka and 
Kerala and include it in the 
eighth schedule of the 
Constitution. 
What is an Official 
Language status? 
• Part XVII of the Indian 
Constitution deals with 
the official language in 
Articles 343 to 351. 
• Article 345 of the Constitution says that the Legislature of a State may by law adopt any one or more of the 
languages in use in the State or Hindi as the language or languages to be used for all or any of the official 
purposes of that State. 
o For example, Karnataka Official Language Act, 1963, provide for the adoption of Kannada as the 
languages to be used for the official purposes of the State of Karnatka. 
o It is provided that, until the Legislature of the State otherwise provides by law, the English language 
shall continue to be used for those official purposes within the State for which it was being used 
immediately before the commencement of this Constitution. 
Eighth Schedule of the constitution 
• The Constitutional provisions relating 
to the Eighth Schedule occur in 
article 344(1) and 351 of the 
Constitution.  
• The Eighth Schedule was intended to 
promote the progressive use of Hindi 
and for the enrichment and 
promotion of language.  
• Eighth Schedule recognises that 
India is a multilingual country.  
o However, it excludes large number of languages on non-linguistic grounds like absence of script, written 
literature and print media.  
• The Constitution does not mention any qualifying criterion for a language to be included in the Eighth 
Schedule.  
o When the National Commission for Linguistic Minorities 
(NCLM) recommends the inclusion of any language, the 
Union government includes it through an amendment to 
the Constitution.  
? NCLM is responsible to investigate all matters 
relating to safeguards provided for the linguistic 
minorities and report to the President. 
• Earlier in 2003, Sitakant Mohapatra Committee was set up to evolve a set of objective criteria for inclusion 
of more languages in the Eighth Schedule to the Constitution of India.  
o Committee submitted its report in 2004 which is still under consideration. 
22 languages in Eighth Schedule  
• Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, 
Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Malayalam, 
Manipuri, Marathi, Nepali, Oriya, 
Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu, 
Urdu, Bodo, Santhali, Maithili and Dogri. 
About Tulu language 
• Tulu is a Dravidian language spoken mainly in two coastal districts Dakshina 
Kannada and Udupi of Karnataka and Kasaragod district of Kerala.  
• As per the 2011 Census report, there are 18,46,427 Tulu-speaking people in 
India.  
• Some scholars suggest Tulu is among the earliest Dravidian languages with a 
history of 2000 years.  
• Robert Caldwell (1814-1891), in his book, A Comparative Grammar of the 
Dravidian or South-Indian Family of Languages, called Tulu as ‘one of the most 
highly developed languages of the Dravidian family’.  
• According to the Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger, published by 
UNESCO, Tulu is now considered a vulnerable language.  
• Tulu has a rich oral literature tradition with folk-song forms like paddana, and 
traditional folk theatre yakshagana.  
• Tulu also has an active tradition of cinema with around 5 to 7 Tulu language 
movies produced a year. 
Yuelu Proclamation 
• The Yuelu Proclamation is the first UNESCO document of its kind 
dedicated to the protection of linguistic diversity, and is also an 
important supporting document for the “UN International Year of 
Indigenous Languages 2019”.  
• It says that the protection and promotion of linguistic diversity 
helps to improve social inclusion and partnerships. 
o It helps to reduce the gender and social inequality between 
different native speakers. 
• It calls upon the international community to reach a consensus on 
the protection and promotion of linguistic diversity in the world.  
 
87                                                                                                                                                        
 
 
 
 
 
 
88                                                                                                                                                        
Conclusion  
The Government is conscious of the sentiments and requirements 
for inclusion of other languages in the Eighth Schedule and 
examines the requests keeping in mind the sentiments and other 
considerations such as evolution of dialects into language, 
widespread use of a language etc. A broad-minded and inclusive 
policy of encouraging the development and use of all Indian 
languages as well as English, is the way ahead. Giving all the major 
languages spoken in India equality of status will ensure that there 
will be no unhealthy sentiment against any language. The issue of 
any one language community holding linguistic advantage over 
others needs to be addressed. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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