Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 12th May, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

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Current Affairs : Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 12th May, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


The need for a second chamber
Consensus, not confusion
A welcome change
Target WTO
Legal but not appropriate
Equal freedom and forced labour
Page 2


The need for a second chamber
Consensus, not confusion
A welcome change
Target WTO
Legal but not appropriate
Equal freedom and forced labour
The need for a second chamber
?The Rajya Sabha came into being on April 3, 1952
and held its first session on May 13 the same year.
?The second chamber underwent severe prenatal
scrutiny in the Constituent Assembly.
?Discussed at length between proponents and
opponents.
?The central legislature that came into being under
the Government of India Act, 1919 was bicameral
with a Council of States comprising 60 members and a
Legislative Assembly comprising 145 members.
?The membership and voting norms for the Council of
States were restrictive.
Page 3


The need for a second chamber
Consensus, not confusion
A welcome change
Target WTO
Legal but not appropriate
Equal freedom and forced labour
The need for a second chamber
?The Rajya Sabha came into being on April 3, 1952
and held its first session on May 13 the same year.
?The second chamber underwent severe prenatal
scrutiny in the Constituent Assembly.
?Discussed at length between proponents and
opponents.
?The central legislature that came into being under
the Government of India Act, 1919 was bicameral
with a Council of States comprising 60 members and a
Legislative Assembly comprising 145 members.
?The membership and voting norms for the Council of
States were restrictive.
?The Government of India Act, 1935 proposed an
elaborate and improved version of the second
chamber, but this never materialised.
?The Constituent Assembly, which was formed in
1947, after adoption of the Constitution became
the Provisional Parliament and made laws till
1952.
Bicameralism and federalism
?This principle came into operation in 1787 with
the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Its appeal
grew in strength from time to time.
?At present, 79 Parliaments of the world (41% of
the total number) are bicameral.
Page 4


The need for a second chamber
Consensus, not confusion
A welcome change
Target WTO
Legal but not appropriate
Equal freedom and forced labour
The need for a second chamber
?The Rajya Sabha came into being on April 3, 1952
and held its first session on May 13 the same year.
?The second chamber underwent severe prenatal
scrutiny in the Constituent Assembly.
?Discussed at length between proponents and
opponents.
?The central legislature that came into being under
the Government of India Act, 1919 was bicameral
with a Council of States comprising 60 members and a
Legislative Assembly comprising 145 members.
?The membership and voting norms for the Council of
States were restrictive.
?The Government of India Act, 1935 proposed an
elaborate and improved version of the second
chamber, but this never materialised.
?The Constituent Assembly, which was formed in
1947, after adoption of the Constitution became
the Provisional Parliament and made laws till
1952.
Bicameralism and federalism
?This principle came into operation in 1787 with
the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Its appeal
grew in strength from time to time.
?At present, 79 Parliaments of the world (41% of
the total number) are bicameral.
?Federalism has been in vogue since ancient times when some
states got together to confer the power of law-making on a central
authority.
?In The Federalist, the famous essays written in 1787-88 by James
Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay to explain the U.S.
Constitution, it was stated that the second chamber
?Enables a second and reflective expression of representative opinion
?Besides checking the propensity to yield to the impulse of sudden and
violent passions
?Montesquieu: “T he legislative body being composed of two parts,
they check one another by the mutual privilege of rejecting ”.
Page 5


The need for a second chamber
Consensus, not confusion
A welcome change
Target WTO
Legal but not appropriate
Equal freedom and forced labour
The need for a second chamber
?The Rajya Sabha came into being on April 3, 1952
and held its first session on May 13 the same year.
?The second chamber underwent severe prenatal
scrutiny in the Constituent Assembly.
?Discussed at length between proponents and
opponents.
?The central legislature that came into being under
the Government of India Act, 1919 was bicameral
with a Council of States comprising 60 members and a
Legislative Assembly comprising 145 members.
?The membership and voting norms for the Council of
States were restrictive.
?The Government of India Act, 1935 proposed an
elaborate and improved version of the second
chamber, but this never materialised.
?The Constituent Assembly, which was formed in
1947, after adoption of the Constitution became
the Provisional Parliament and made laws till
1952.
Bicameralism and federalism
?This principle came into operation in 1787 with
the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Its appeal
grew in strength from time to time.
?At present, 79 Parliaments of the world (41% of
the total number) are bicameral.
?Federalism has been in vogue since ancient times when some
states got together to confer the power of law-making on a central
authority.
?In The Federalist, the famous essays written in 1787-88 by James
Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay to explain the U.S.
Constitution, it was stated that the second chamber
?Enables a second and reflective expression of representative opinion
?Besides checking the propensity to yield to the impulse of sudden and
violent passions
?Montesquieu: “T he legislative body being composed of two parts,
they check one another by the mutual privilege of rejecting ”.
?Federalism and bicameralism are linked because the federal
character of a nation comprising constituent units can be reflected
in, and secured by, a bicameral legislature.
Constituent Assembly debates
?Mohd. Tahir: Upper House was not essential and viewed it as a
creation of imperialism.
?Professor Shibban Lal Saksena: “clog in the wheel of progress ”
?Naziruddin Ahmad: it would introduce an element of sobriety and
second thought besides lending voice to the constituent units in the
legislative scheme of things.
?M. Ananthasayanam Ayyangar: would enable the genius of the
people to have full play besides checking hasty legislation.
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