Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 31th July, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

Current Affairs & Hindu Analysis: Daily, Weekly & Monthly

Current Affairs : Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 31th July, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 31 July 2020
 
 1) A long road: On National Education Policy 2020-
  
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Education
 
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   The National Education Policy 2020 announced by the Ministry of
  Human Resource Development sets for itself the goal of transforming
 the system to meet the needs of 21st Century India.
2.   In a federal system, any educational reform can be implemented only
  with support from the States, and the Centre has the giant task of
 building a consensus on the many ambitious plans.
3.   The policy aims to eliminate(end) problems of pedagogy(teaching),
  structural inequities, access asymmetries and rampant(excessive)
 commercialisation.
  
 
Page 2


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 31 July 2020
 
 1) A long road: On National Education Policy 2020-
  
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Education
 
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   The National Education Policy 2020 announced by the Ministry of
  Human Resource Development sets for itself the goal of transforming
 the system to meet the needs of 21st Century India.
2.   In a federal system, any educational reform can be implemented only
  with support from the States, and the Centre has the giant task of
 building a consensus on the many ambitious plans.
3.   The policy aims to eliminate(end) problems of pedagogy(teaching),
  structural inequities, access asymmetries and rampant(excessive)
 commercialisation.
  
 
 
 
  
 REFORMS:
1.   The NEP 2020 is the ?rst policy after the one issued in 1986, and it
 has to contend with multiple crises in the system.
2.   It is no secret that primary schools record shockingly poor literacy
  and numeracy outcomes, dropout levels in middle and secondary
 schools are signi?cant.
3.   And the higher education system has generally failed to meet the
 aspirations for multi-disciplinary programmes.
4. In structural terms, the NEP’s measures-
A) to introduce early childhood education from age 3,
  B) o?er school board examinations twice a year to help improve
performance,
C) move away from rote learning,
 
Page 3


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 31 July 2020
 
 1) A long road: On National Education Policy 2020-
  
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Education
 
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   The National Education Policy 2020 announced by the Ministry of
  Human Resource Development sets for itself the goal of transforming
 the system to meet the needs of 21st Century India.
2.   In a federal system, any educational reform can be implemented only
  with support from the States, and the Centre has the giant task of
 building a consensus on the many ambitious plans.
3.   The policy aims to eliminate(end) problems of pedagogy(teaching),
  structural inequities, access asymmetries and rampant(excessive)
 commercialisation.
  
 
 
 
  
 REFORMS:
1.   The NEP 2020 is the ?rst policy after the one issued in 1986, and it
 has to contend with multiple crises in the system.
2.   It is no secret that primary schools record shockingly poor literacy
  and numeracy outcomes, dropout levels in middle and secondary
 schools are signi?cant.
3.   And the higher education system has generally failed to meet the
 aspirations for multi-disciplinary programmes.
4. In structural terms, the NEP’s measures-
A) to introduce early childhood education from age 3,
  B) o?er school board examinations twice a year to help improve
performance,
C) move away from rote learning,
 
 
D) raise mathematical skills for everyone,
E) shift to a four-year undergraduate college degree system, and;
  F) create a Higher Education Commission of India represent major
 changes.
5.   Progress on these crucially depends on the will to spend the
 promised 6% of GDP as public expenditure on education.
6.   The policy also says that wherever possible, the medium of
  instruction in schools until at least Class 5, but preferably until Class
  8 and beyond, will be the home language or mother tongue or
 regional language.
7.   This is a long-held view, and has its merits, although in a large and
  diverse country where mobility is high, the student should have the
 option to study in the language that enables a transfer nationally.
8. English has performed that role due to historical factors.
  
 RESOURCING:
1.   There are some good elements to the NEP 2020 that will generate
 little friction, and need only adequate resourcing.
2.   Provision of an energy-?lled breakfast, in addition to the nutritious
  mid-day meal, to help children achieve better learning outcomes, is
 one.
3.   Creation of ‘inclusion funds’ to help socially and educationally
 disadvantaged children pursue education is another.
4.   Where the policy fails to show rigour, however, is on universalisation
  of access, both in schools and higher education; the Right to
 Education needs speci?c measures to succeed.
5.   Moreover, fee regulations exist in some States even now, but the
  regulatory process is unable to rein(control) in pro?teering in the
 form of unaccounted donations.
6.   The idea of a National Higher Education Regulatory Council as an
 
Page 4


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 31 July 2020
 
 1) A long road: On National Education Policy 2020-
  
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Education
 
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   The National Education Policy 2020 announced by the Ministry of
  Human Resource Development sets for itself the goal of transforming
 the system to meet the needs of 21st Century India.
2.   In a federal system, any educational reform can be implemented only
  with support from the States, and the Centre has the giant task of
 building a consensus on the many ambitious plans.
3.   The policy aims to eliminate(end) problems of pedagogy(teaching),
  structural inequities, access asymmetries and rampant(excessive)
 commercialisation.
  
 
 
 
  
 REFORMS:
1.   The NEP 2020 is the ?rst policy after the one issued in 1986, and it
 has to contend with multiple crises in the system.
2.   It is no secret that primary schools record shockingly poor literacy
  and numeracy outcomes, dropout levels in middle and secondary
 schools are signi?cant.
3.   And the higher education system has generally failed to meet the
 aspirations for multi-disciplinary programmes.
4. In structural terms, the NEP’s measures-
A) to introduce early childhood education from age 3,
  B) o?er school board examinations twice a year to help improve
performance,
C) move away from rote learning,
 
 
D) raise mathematical skills for everyone,
E) shift to a four-year undergraduate college degree system, and;
  F) create a Higher Education Commission of India represent major
 changes.
5.   Progress on these crucially depends on the will to spend the
 promised 6% of GDP as public expenditure on education.
6.   The policy also says that wherever possible, the medium of
  instruction in schools until at least Class 5, but preferably until Class
  8 and beyond, will be the home language or mother tongue or
 regional language.
7.   This is a long-held view, and has its merits, although in a large and
  diverse country where mobility is high, the student should have the
 option to study in the language that enables a transfer nationally.
8. English has performed that role due to historical factors.
  
 RESOURCING:
1.   There are some good elements to the NEP 2020 that will generate
 little friction, and need only adequate resourcing.
2.   Provision of an energy-?lled breakfast, in addition to the nutritious
  mid-day meal, to help children achieve better learning outcomes, is
 one.
3.   Creation of ‘inclusion funds’ to help socially and educationally
 disadvantaged children pursue education is another.
4.   Where the policy fails to show rigour, however, is on universalisation
  of access, both in schools and higher education; the Right to
 Education needs speci?c measures to succeed.
5.   Moreover, fee regulations exist in some States even now, but the
  regulatory process is unable to rein(control) in pro?teering in the
 form of unaccounted donations.
6.   The idea of a National Higher Education Regulatory Council as an
 
 
  apex control organisation is bound to be resented(opposed) by
 States.
7.   Similarly, a national body for aptitude tests would have to convince
 the States of its merits.
8.   Among the many imperatives, the deadline to achieve universal
  literacy and numeracy by 2025 should be a top priority as a goal that
 will crucially determine progress at higher levels.
  
 CONCLUSION:
  The Centre     will     have     to     convince     States that the National Education Policy
 bene?ts all.
  
  
  
 2) Banking on serology: On seroprevalence studies-
  
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Health
  
 What is a serological survey?
  A  serological  survey  is  an  antibody      test      conducted      on      a      sample      of      the
 
Page 5


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 31 July 2020
 
 1) A long road: On National Education Policy 2020-
  
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Education
 
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   The National Education Policy 2020 announced by the Ministry of
  Human Resource Development sets for itself the goal of transforming
 the system to meet the needs of 21st Century India.
2.   In a federal system, any educational reform can be implemented only
  with support from the States, and the Centre has the giant task of
 building a consensus on the many ambitious plans.
3.   The policy aims to eliminate(end) problems of pedagogy(teaching),
  structural inequities, access asymmetries and rampant(excessive)
 commercialisation.
  
 
 
 
  
 REFORMS:
1.   The NEP 2020 is the ?rst policy after the one issued in 1986, and it
 has to contend with multiple crises in the system.
2.   It is no secret that primary schools record shockingly poor literacy
  and numeracy outcomes, dropout levels in middle and secondary
 schools are signi?cant.
3.   And the higher education system has generally failed to meet the
 aspirations for multi-disciplinary programmes.
4. In structural terms, the NEP’s measures-
A) to introduce early childhood education from age 3,
  B) o?er school board examinations twice a year to help improve
performance,
C) move away from rote learning,
 
 
D) raise mathematical skills for everyone,
E) shift to a four-year undergraduate college degree system, and;
  F) create a Higher Education Commission of India represent major
 changes.
5.   Progress on these crucially depends on the will to spend the
 promised 6% of GDP as public expenditure on education.
6.   The policy also says that wherever possible, the medium of
  instruction in schools until at least Class 5, but preferably until Class
  8 and beyond, will be the home language or mother tongue or
 regional language.
7.   This is a long-held view, and has its merits, although in a large and
  diverse country where mobility is high, the student should have the
 option to study in the language that enables a transfer nationally.
8. English has performed that role due to historical factors.
  
 RESOURCING:
1.   There are some good elements to the NEP 2020 that will generate
 little friction, and need only adequate resourcing.
2.   Provision of an energy-?lled breakfast, in addition to the nutritious
  mid-day meal, to help children achieve better learning outcomes, is
 one.
3.   Creation of ‘inclusion funds’ to help socially and educationally
 disadvantaged children pursue education is another.
4.   Where the policy fails to show rigour, however, is on universalisation
  of access, both in schools and higher education; the Right to
 Education needs speci?c measures to succeed.
5.   Moreover, fee regulations exist in some States even now, but the
  regulatory process is unable to rein(control) in pro?teering in the
 form of unaccounted donations.
6.   The idea of a National Higher Education Regulatory Council as an
 
 
  apex control organisation is bound to be resented(opposed) by
 States.
7.   Similarly, a national body for aptitude tests would have to convince
 the States of its merits.
8.   Among the many imperatives, the deadline to achieve universal
  literacy and numeracy by 2025 should be a top priority as a goal that
 will crucially determine progress at higher levels.
  
 CONCLUSION:
  The Centre     will     have     to     convince     States that the National Education Policy
 bene?ts all.
  
  
  
 2) Banking on serology: On seroprevalence studies-
  
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Health
  
 What is a serological survey?
  A  serological  survey  is  an  antibody      test      conducted      on      a      sample      of      the
 
 
  population     to     assess     how     many     people     have     been     a?ected. As it is di?cult
  to  determine  the  infection  rates  of  a  population  based  on  RT-PCR  and
  Rapid  antigen  tests,  serological  surveys  are  the  best  bet  for  the
 government to ready a response.
What  is  an  ELISA  antibody  test?
  The  ELISA  testing  kit  was  developed  by  National  Institute  of  Virology,
  Pune along with Zydus Cadila. The kit tests     for     IgG     and     IgM     antibodies     in
  the     population. It’s reliability is tested using two indicators: speci?city and
  sensitivity.  The  test,  according  to  literature,  has  a  97.7%  speci?city  and
 92.1% sensitivity.
  
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   Recent serology survey was undertaken in Mumbai. Scientists use
 this survey ?ndings to understand the spread of COVID-19.
2.   Survey found that nearly three in ?ve, or 57% of those tested in slums
  had been exposed to the virus and had developed antibodies against
 it as compared to only 16% of those tested in residential societies.
  
 
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Related Searches

study material

,

Objective type Questions

,

2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 31th July

,

Extra Questions

,

2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

,

past year papers

,

video lectures

,

mock tests for examination

,

pdf

,

Summary

,

2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

,

Free

,

ppt

,

Viva Questions

,

Sample Paper

,

Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 31th July

,

practice quizzes

,

Important questions

,

Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 31th July

,

Exam

,

MCQs

,

Semester Notes

,

shortcuts and tricks

;