Digits Integers GMAT Notes | EduRev

Created by: Wizius Careers

GMAT : Digits Integers GMAT Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


PS  WC	
WC  PD 
	
digits 
 
There are a total of 10 digits – 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. These are the fundamental 
blocks to create any number.  
 
place value 
 
Every number created with the help of these digits follows a rule for the place value 
to make it easier to understand the numbers.  
For example: 123 is different from 321 even when the two numbers use the same 
digits. This is because of the place values assigned to each digit in the numbers.  
 
1   2   3 = (1*100) + (2*10) + (3*1) 
Hundreds  Tens   Units 
 
3   2   1 
Hundreds  Tens   Units = (3*100) + (2*10) + (1*1) 
 
The commonly used place values are: 
 
Units/Ones = (x*1) 
Tens        = (x*10) 
Hundreds   = (x*100) 
Thousands = (x*1000) and so on for numbers on the left of the decimal point in any 
number. 
 
For the digits on the right side of the decimal point, use: 
 
Tenths  = (x*1/10) 
Hundredths = (x*1/100) 
Thousandths = (x*1/1000) 
Ten thousandths = (x*1/10000) and so on. 
 
2     3  4 .         5  6  7 
Hundreds        Tens         Units   Decimal      Tenths   Hundredths   Thousandths 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 2


PS  WC	
WC  PD 
	
digits 
 
There are a total of 10 digits – 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. These are the fundamental 
blocks to create any number.  
 
place value 
 
Every number created with the help of these digits follows a rule for the place value 
to make it easier to understand the numbers.  
For example: 123 is different from 321 even when the two numbers use the same 
digits. This is because of the place values assigned to each digit in the numbers.  
 
1   2   3 = (1*100) + (2*10) + (3*1) 
Hundreds  Tens   Units 
 
3   2   1 
Hundreds  Tens   Units = (3*100) + (2*10) + (1*1) 
 
The commonly used place values are: 
 
Units/Ones = (x*1) 
Tens        = (x*10) 
Hundreds   = (x*100) 
Thousands = (x*1000) and so on for numbers on the left of the decimal point in any 
number. 
 
For the digits on the right side of the decimal point, use: 
 
Tenths  = (x*1/10) 
Hundredths = (x*1/100) 
Thousandths = (x*1/1000) 
Ten thousandths = (x*1/10000) and so on. 
 
2     3  4 .         5  6  7 
Hundreds        Tens         Units   Decimal      Tenths   Hundredths   Thousandths 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PS  WC	
WC  PD 
	
integers 
 
All Whole Numbers and their negatives are included in this.  
For example: ………-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3……….. 
 
Few definitions to be kept in mind: 
 
Negative Integers: All whole numbers less than 0. They are indicated by the symbol ‘-‘. 
-101, -23, -4 etc. 
 
Positive Integers: All whole numbers more than 0. They don’t necessarily use a symbol 
with them.  
101, 23, 4 etc. 
 
Non-negative Integers: All whole numbers except the negative integers. 
0, 12, 345 etc. 
 
Non-positive Integers: All whole numbers except the positive integers. 
0, -12, -345 etc.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
fractions 
 
All numbers with a decimal point in them are known as fractions.  
For example: 123.45, 67.891 etc. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3


PS  WC	
WC  PD 
	
digits 
 
There are a total of 10 digits – 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. These are the fundamental 
blocks to create any number.  
 
place value 
 
Every number created with the help of these digits follows a rule for the place value 
to make it easier to understand the numbers.  
For example: 123 is different from 321 even when the two numbers use the same 
digits. This is because of the place values assigned to each digit in the numbers.  
 
1   2   3 = (1*100) + (2*10) + (3*1) 
Hundreds  Tens   Units 
 
3   2   1 
Hundreds  Tens   Units = (3*100) + (2*10) + (1*1) 
 
The commonly used place values are: 
 
Units/Ones = (x*1) 
Tens        = (x*10) 
Hundreds   = (x*100) 
Thousands = (x*1000) and so on for numbers on the left of the decimal point in any 
number. 
 
For the digits on the right side of the decimal point, use: 
 
Tenths  = (x*1/10) 
Hundredths = (x*1/100) 
Thousandths = (x*1/1000) 
Ten thousandths = (x*1/10000) and so on. 
 
2     3  4 .         5  6  7 
Hundreds        Tens         Units   Decimal      Tenths   Hundredths   Thousandths 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PS  WC	
WC  PD 
	
integers 
 
All Whole Numbers and their negatives are included in this.  
For example: ………-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3……….. 
 
Few definitions to be kept in mind: 
 
Negative Integers: All whole numbers less than 0. They are indicated by the symbol ‘-‘. 
-101, -23, -4 etc. 
 
Positive Integers: All whole numbers more than 0. They don’t necessarily use a symbol 
with them.  
101, 23, 4 etc. 
 
Non-negative Integers: All whole numbers except the negative integers. 
0, 12, 345 etc. 
 
Non-positive Integers: All whole numbers except the positive integers. 
0, -12, -345 etc.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
fractions 
 
All numbers with a decimal point in them are known as fractions.  
For example: 123.45, 67.891 etc. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PS  WC	
WC  PD 
	
rounding off rules 
 
Sometimes we need to round off (approximate) some numbers. We have to use the 
following rules for the same: 
 
1. To round of a fraction, always look at the next digit to the digit to which the 
number needs to be rounded off and keep the previous digit the same if the 
next digit is less than 5 (0, 1, 2, 3, 4) and increase the value of the previous digit 
by 1, if the next digit is more than equal to 5 (5, 6, 7, 8, 9) 
Example 1: Round off 132.345 to one decimal point. 
Steps to follow: The first digit after the decimal is 3 (the number has to be 
rounded off till this point) 
Consider the next digit to 3. The next digit is 4, so the previous digit has to be 
kept the same. So, the answer would be 132.3.  
 
Example 2: Round off 132.345 to two decimal points. 
Steps to follow: The first and the second digit after the decimal are 3 and 4, 
respectively (the number has to be rounded off till this point) 
Consider the next digit to 4. The next digit is 5, so the previous digit has to be 
increased by 1. So, the answer would be 132.35. 
 
2. To round off an integer to be a multiple of an integer.  
Example 1: Round off 13234 to the closest multiple of 10. 
Steps to follow: A multiple of 10 ends in 0. Consider the last digit of the number 
given and check whether it is closer to bring it down to 0 or bring it up to 0.  
Here, the last digit is 4, so it is easy to bring it down to 0. The answer is 13230. 
 
Example 2: Round off 132345 to the closest multiple of 10. 
Steps to follow: A multiple of 10 ends in 0. Consider the last digit of the number 
given and check whether it is closer to bring it down to 0 or bring it up to 0.  
Here, the last digit is 5, so it is easy to bring it up to 0. The answer is 132350. 
 
 
 
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