Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev

Machine Design

Mechanical Engineering : Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev

The document Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev is a part of the Mechanical Engineering Course Machine Design.
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Non-ferrous metals 

Metals containing elements other than iron as their chief constituents are usually referred to as non-ferrous metals. There is a wide variety of non-metals in practice. However, only a few exemplary ones are discussed below:

Aluminium- This is the white metal produced from Alumina. In its pure state it is weak and soft but addition of small amounts of Cu, Mn, Si and Magnesium makes it hard and strong. It is also corrosion resistant, low weight and non-toxic.

Duralumin- This is an alloy of 4% Cu, 0.5% Mn, 0.5% Mg and aluminium. It is widely used in automobile and aircraft components.

Y-alloy- This is an alloy of 4% Cu, 1.5% Mn, 2% Ni, 6% Si, Mg, Fe and the rest is Al. It gives large strength at high temperature. It is used for aircraft engine parts such as cylinder heads, piston etc.

Magnalium- This is an aluminium alloy with 2 to 10 % magnesium. It also contains 1.75% Cu. Due to its light weight and good strength it is used for aircraft and automobile components.

Copper alloys Copper is one of the most widely used non-ferrous metals in industry. It is soft, malleable and ductile and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. The following two important copper alloys are widely used in practice:

Brass (Cu-Zn alloy)- It is fundamentally a binary alloy with Zn upto 50% . As Zn percentage increases, ductility increases upto ~37% of Zn beyond which the ductility falls. This is shown in figure-1.2.4.1. Small amount of other elements viz. lead or tin imparts other properties to brass. Lead gives good machining quality and tin imparts strength. Brass is highly corrosion resistant, easily machinable and therefore a good bearing material.

 

Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev

Bronze (Cu-Sn alloy)-This is mainly a copper-tin alloy where tin percentage may vary between 5 to 25. It provides hardness but tin content also oxidizes resulting in brittleness. Deoxidizers such as Zn may be added. Gun metal is one such alloy where 2% Zn is added as deoxidizing agent and typical compositions are 88% Cu, 10% Sn, 2% Zn. This is suitable for working in cold state. It was originally made for casting guns but used now for boiler fittings, bushes, glands and other such uses.

Non-metals

Non-metallic materials are also used in engineering practice due to principally their low cost, flexibility and resistance to heat and electricity. Though there are many suitable non-metals, the following are important few from design point of view:

Timber- This is a relatively low cost material and a bad conductor of heat and electricity. It has also good elastic and frictional properties and is widely used in foundry patterns and as water lubricated bearings.

Leather- This is widely used in engineering for its flexibility and wear resistance. It is widely used for belt drives, washers and such other applications.

Rubber- It has high bulk modulus and is used for drive elements, sealing, vibration isolation and similar applications.

Plastics
These are synthetic materials which can be moulded into desired shapes under pressure with or without application of heat. These are now extensively used in various industrial applications for their corrosion resistance, dimensional stability and relatively low cost. There are two main types of plastics:

(a) Thermosetting plastics- Thermosetting plastics are formed under heat and pressure. It initially softens and with increasing heat and pressure, polymerisation takes place. This results in hardening of the material. These plastics cannot be deformed or remoulded again under heat and pressure. Some examples of thermosetting plastics are phenol formaldehyde (Bakelite), phenol-furfural (Durite), epoxy resins, phenolic resins etc.

(b) Thermoplastics- Thermoplastics do not become hard with the application of heat and pressure and no chemical change takes place. They remain soft at elevated temperatures until they are hardened by cooling. These can be re-melted and remoulded by application of heat and pressure. Some examples of thermoplastics are cellulose nitrate (celluloid), polythene, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl chloride ( PVC) etc.
 

Mechanical properties of common engineering materials 
The important properties from design point of view are:

(a) Elasticity- This is the property of a material to regain its original shape after deformation when the external forces are removed. All materials are plastic to some extent but the degree varies, for example, both mild steel and rubber are elastic materials but steel is more elastic than rubber.

(b) Plasticity- This is associated with the permanent deformation of material when the stress level exceeds the yield point. Under plastic conditions materials ideally deform without any increase in stress. A typical stressstrain diagram for an elastic-perfectly plastic material is shown in the figure-1.2.6.1. Mises-Henky criterion gives a good starting point for plasticity analysis. The criterion is given as Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev where σ1, σ2, σ3 and σy are the three principal stresses at a point for any given loading and the stress at the tensile yield point respectively. A typical example of plastic flow is the indentation test where a spherical ball is pressed in a semi-infinite body where 2a is the indentation diameter. In a simplified model we may write that if Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev plastic flow occurs where, pm is the flow pressure. This is also shown in figure 1.2.6.1.

Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev
1.2.6.1F- Stress-strain diagram of an elastic-perfectly plastic material and the plastic indentation.

(c) Hardness- Property of the material that enables it to resist permanent deformation, penetration, indentation etc. Size of indentations by various types of indenters are the measure of hardness e.g. Brinnel hardness test, Rockwell hardness test, Vickers hardness (diamond pyramid) test. These tests give hardness numbers which are related to yield pressure (MPa).

(d) Ductility- This is the property of the material that enables it to be drawn out or elongated to an appreciable extent before rupture occurs. The percentage elongation or percentage reduction in area before rupture of a test specimen is the measure of ductility. Normally if percentage elongation exceeds 15% the material is ductile and if it is less than 5% the material is brittle. Lead, copper, aluminium, mild steel are typical ductile materials.

(e) Malleability- It is a special case of ductility where it can be rolled into thin sheets but it is not necessary to be so strong. Lead, soft steel, wrought iron, copper and aluminium are some materials in order of diminishing malleability.

(f) Brittleness- This is opposite to ductility. Brittle materials show little deformation before fracture and failure occur suddenly without any warning. Normally if the elongation is less than 5% the material is considered to be brittle. E.g. cast iron, glass, ceramics are typical brittle materials.

(g) Resilience- This is the property of the material that enables it to resist shock and impact by storing energy. The measure of resilience is the strain energy absorbed per unit volume. For a rod of length L subjected to tensile load P, a linear load-deflection plot is shown in figure-1.2.6.2. Strain energy ( energy stored)  Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev Strain energy/unit volume  Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev

Engineering Materials (Part - 2) Mechanical Engineering Notes | EduRev

(h) Toughness- This is the property which enables a material to be twisted, bent or stretched under impact load or high stress before rupture. It may be considered to be the ability of the material to absorb energy in the plastic zone. The measure of toughness is the amount of energy absorbed after being stressed upto the point of fracture.

(i) Creep- When a member is subjected to a constant load over a long period of time it undergoes a slow permanent deformation and this is termed as “creep”. This is dependent on temperature. Usually at elevated temperatures creep is high.

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