English Communicative Past Year Paper SA-1(Set-2) - 2014, Class 10, CBSE Class 10 Notes | EduRev

Past Year Papers For Class 10

Created by: Vinay Thomas

Class 10 : English Communicative Past Year Paper SA-1(Set-2) - 2014, Class 10, CBSE Class 10 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


 
 
 
 
Summative Assessment-1 Examination 2014-2015 
 English 
Class – IX 
 
 Time allowed: 3 hours                                Maximum Marks: 70 
 
 General Instructions: 
(i) The question paper is divided into Three sections. 
Section A:  Reading      20 marks 
Section B: Writing and Grammar   25 marks 
Section C: Literature and Long Reading Text  25 marks 
(ii) Please check that this question paper consists 11 questions. 
(iii) Attempt all questions. 
(iv) Read each question carefully and follow the instructions. 
(v) Strictly adhere to the word limit given with each question. 
 
 
Section A 
(Reading: 20 marks) 
 
1. a) Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:   8 
Resurrection of ‘dead language’ Sanskrit 
Disparaged as being commercially unviable and dubbed ‘a dead language’, Sanskrit is staging 
a quiet resurgence both at home and among NRIs. 
Statics illustrate the point, Twitter has a community of more than 200 Sanskrit users who 
like to post on current events in the language, the 2014 Union Budget being the latest. 
Spoken Sanskrit classes in the capital include IT professionals, enrolment has doubled over 
two years. In the US, memberships at Sanskrit camps have shot up 20 times over the past 
decade and-a-half, sources say. 
Fittingly, while the Sanskrit Week celebrations ended on Thursday, Manjul Bhargava, winner 
of the ‘Maths Nobel’, poetry. 
Meet Satyasekhar Chakka from Hyderabad, who is pursuing a PhD in nano technology form 
IIT Kanpur. He had taken Sanskrit lessons in school as his third language. He says a ‘literary 
love that transmuted into a keen desire to explore the history of Indian technology” in old 
texts prompted him to take up further study. 
Satryasekhar represents a phenomenon, says electronics engineer Laxminarasimhan, who 
helps create lessons on behalf of Sanskrit Promotion Foundation for CBSE. 
About 40-45% of his classes comprise IT workers and 30-35% are women homemakers. The 
rest are retirees. 
California-based biotechnologist Govinda Yelagalvadi, 56, is one such learner. His wife and 
college-going daughter too speak and teach Sanskrit. “For us, it’s a means to reconnect with 
our roots and history,” he says. 
Page 2


 
 
 
 
Summative Assessment-1 Examination 2014-2015 
 English 
Class – IX 
 
 Time allowed: 3 hours                                Maximum Marks: 70 
 
 General Instructions: 
(i) The question paper is divided into Three sections. 
Section A:  Reading      20 marks 
Section B: Writing and Grammar   25 marks 
Section C: Literature and Long Reading Text  25 marks 
(ii) Please check that this question paper consists 11 questions. 
(iii) Attempt all questions. 
(iv) Read each question carefully and follow the instructions. 
(v) Strictly adhere to the word limit given with each question. 
 
 
Section A 
(Reading: 20 marks) 
 
1. a) Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:   8 
Resurrection of ‘dead language’ Sanskrit 
Disparaged as being commercially unviable and dubbed ‘a dead language’, Sanskrit is staging 
a quiet resurgence both at home and among NRIs. 
Statics illustrate the point, Twitter has a community of more than 200 Sanskrit users who 
like to post on current events in the language, the 2014 Union Budget being the latest. 
Spoken Sanskrit classes in the capital include IT professionals, enrolment has doubled over 
two years. In the US, memberships at Sanskrit camps have shot up 20 times over the past 
decade and-a-half, sources say. 
Fittingly, while the Sanskrit Week celebrations ended on Thursday, Manjul Bhargava, winner 
of the ‘Maths Nobel’, poetry. 
Meet Satyasekhar Chakka from Hyderabad, who is pursuing a PhD in nano technology form 
IIT Kanpur. He had taken Sanskrit lessons in school as his third language. He says a ‘literary 
love that transmuted into a keen desire to explore the history of Indian technology” in old 
texts prompted him to take up further study. 
Satryasekhar represents a phenomenon, says electronics engineer Laxminarasimhan, who 
helps create lessons on behalf of Sanskrit Promotion Foundation for CBSE. 
About 40-45% of his classes comprise IT workers and 30-35% are women homemakers. The 
rest are retirees. 
California-based biotechnologist Govinda Yelagalvadi, 56, is one such learner. His wife and 
college-going daughter too speak and teach Sanskrit. “For us, it’s a means to reconnect with 
our roots and history,” he says. 
 
 
 
 
In India, it is a different story. Most of those who study Sanskrit are driven by family 
tradition. Few get hooked to its linguistic are literary aspects. In India, membership at 3,000 
centres of the Samskrita Bharti trust an offspring of a movement by the same name that 
began in Bangalore in 1981 has almost doubled from 1 lakh in 2012, says Dr. P Nandakumar 
its general secretary. 
i) What change is visible in the status of Sanskrit in present time? 
ii) Write one point which the statistics illustrate. 
iii) What do the spoken Sanskrit classes include? 
iv) Name the organisations which are working to promote Sanskrit. 
v) Why does Govinda Yelagalavadi wish to learn Sanskrit? 
vi) Why do people in India take up the study of Sanskrit? 
vii) Who is Dr. P Nanda Kumar? 
viii) How can we say that popularity of Sanskrit is rising? 
 
2. b) Read the following passage carefully. 
Mind your language 
A. CHANGE is often met with suspicion and the rapidly raging SMS culture is no 
exception. As the world and its children went ‘mobile’, the cell phone’s most loved 
feature – short message service (SMS) – became the handiest tool of communication. 
Beside convenient templates like I’ll be late’, ‘I’m busy right now’ and even I’m sorry’ 
SMS alerts., news and entertainment information. The language, which converted ‘too’ 
to ‘2’, ‘you are’ to ‘ur’ ‘take care’ to ‘tc’, among the million other sms’ isms, may well 
have begun to save time, space and cost. However, the riddle of figuring out newly 
coined short forms caught on with such fervor that despite the rapidly declining rates 
offered by phone companies, the trend continues. 
B. Students and young professionals often employ this ‘half baked’ language to almost all 
aspects of their lives. ‘five out of 10 resumes I see are peppered with SMS language’, 
reveals and HR executive, adding, ‘besides coming across as highly unprofessional, 
these CVs are instantly rejected, even though the qualifications may be upto the mark.’ 
C. SMS lingo has also invaded the usually meticulous examination system, with students 
of all 250 classes almost subconsciously using short forms in their answer papers. 
“We have made it a policy to cut half a mark per short form in class and unit tests. 
Children have failed but the trend continues laments an English teacher at a suburban 
school. 
D. But are the youth in tune with these complaints? “I don’t see any harm in using short 
forms, as long as the message is clear and these days everyone does understand the 
commonly used SMS language”, claims a 22 year old young professional. 
E. Most English words are twice as long as they need to be, staggering under a weight or 
unvoiced vowels and surplus consonants. Surely pupils are saving paper and helping 
examiners with their brevity. All change must start somewhere and already a million 
fingers are tapping out a revolution. 
Page 3


 
 
 
 
Summative Assessment-1 Examination 2014-2015 
 English 
Class – IX 
 
 Time allowed: 3 hours                                Maximum Marks: 70 
 
 General Instructions: 
(i) The question paper is divided into Three sections. 
Section A:  Reading      20 marks 
Section B: Writing and Grammar   25 marks 
Section C: Literature and Long Reading Text  25 marks 
(ii) Please check that this question paper consists 11 questions. 
(iii) Attempt all questions. 
(iv) Read each question carefully and follow the instructions. 
(v) Strictly adhere to the word limit given with each question. 
 
 
Section A 
(Reading: 20 marks) 
 
1. a) Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:   8 
Resurrection of ‘dead language’ Sanskrit 
Disparaged as being commercially unviable and dubbed ‘a dead language’, Sanskrit is staging 
a quiet resurgence both at home and among NRIs. 
Statics illustrate the point, Twitter has a community of more than 200 Sanskrit users who 
like to post on current events in the language, the 2014 Union Budget being the latest. 
Spoken Sanskrit classes in the capital include IT professionals, enrolment has doubled over 
two years. In the US, memberships at Sanskrit camps have shot up 20 times over the past 
decade and-a-half, sources say. 
Fittingly, while the Sanskrit Week celebrations ended on Thursday, Manjul Bhargava, winner 
of the ‘Maths Nobel’, poetry. 
Meet Satyasekhar Chakka from Hyderabad, who is pursuing a PhD in nano technology form 
IIT Kanpur. He had taken Sanskrit lessons in school as his third language. He says a ‘literary 
love that transmuted into a keen desire to explore the history of Indian technology” in old 
texts prompted him to take up further study. 
Satryasekhar represents a phenomenon, says electronics engineer Laxminarasimhan, who 
helps create lessons on behalf of Sanskrit Promotion Foundation for CBSE. 
About 40-45% of his classes comprise IT workers and 30-35% are women homemakers. The 
rest are retirees. 
California-based biotechnologist Govinda Yelagalvadi, 56, is one such learner. His wife and 
college-going daughter too speak and teach Sanskrit. “For us, it’s a means to reconnect with 
our roots and history,” he says. 
 
 
 
 
In India, it is a different story. Most of those who study Sanskrit are driven by family 
tradition. Few get hooked to its linguistic are literary aspects. In India, membership at 3,000 
centres of the Samskrita Bharti trust an offspring of a movement by the same name that 
began in Bangalore in 1981 has almost doubled from 1 lakh in 2012, says Dr. P Nandakumar 
its general secretary. 
i) What change is visible in the status of Sanskrit in present time? 
ii) Write one point which the statistics illustrate. 
iii) What do the spoken Sanskrit classes include? 
iv) Name the organisations which are working to promote Sanskrit. 
v) Why does Govinda Yelagalavadi wish to learn Sanskrit? 
vi) Why do people in India take up the study of Sanskrit? 
vii) Who is Dr. P Nanda Kumar? 
viii) How can we say that popularity of Sanskrit is rising? 
 
2. b) Read the following passage carefully. 
Mind your language 
A. CHANGE is often met with suspicion and the rapidly raging SMS culture is no 
exception. As the world and its children went ‘mobile’, the cell phone’s most loved 
feature – short message service (SMS) – became the handiest tool of communication. 
Beside convenient templates like I’ll be late’, ‘I’m busy right now’ and even I’m sorry’ 
SMS alerts., news and entertainment information. The language, which converted ‘too’ 
to ‘2’, ‘you are’ to ‘ur’ ‘take care’ to ‘tc’, among the million other sms’ isms, may well 
have begun to save time, space and cost. However, the riddle of figuring out newly 
coined short forms caught on with such fervor that despite the rapidly declining rates 
offered by phone companies, the trend continues. 
B. Students and young professionals often employ this ‘half baked’ language to almost all 
aspects of their lives. ‘five out of 10 resumes I see are peppered with SMS language’, 
reveals and HR executive, adding, ‘besides coming across as highly unprofessional, 
these CVs are instantly rejected, even though the qualifications may be upto the mark.’ 
C. SMS lingo has also invaded the usually meticulous examination system, with students 
of all 250 classes almost subconsciously using short forms in their answer papers. 
“We have made it a policy to cut half a mark per short form in class and unit tests. 
Children have failed but the trend continues laments an English teacher at a suburban 
school. 
D. But are the youth in tune with these complaints? “I don’t see any harm in using short 
forms, as long as the message is clear and these days everyone does understand the 
commonly used SMS language”, claims a 22 year old young professional. 
E. Most English words are twice as long as they need to be, staggering under a weight or 
unvoiced vowels and surplus consonants. Surely pupils are saving paper and helping 
examiners with their brevity. All change must start somewhere and already a million 
fingers are tapping out a revolution. 
 
 
 
 
F. Sitting firmly on the other side of the fence, a journalist asserts, “that English is a 
funny language is the biggest cliché of all, but to lambast the rules of the spelling in 
the manner that SMS does, is immature and despicable. We already have more forms 
of English than we can account for. Here we are trying to confer a common language 
on the globalizing world in order to get all people to speak an understandable variety 
of the same basic language. And instead, we have to waste time and energy convincing 
people that further fragmentation of words would be taking a long step back and not 
forwards.” 
 
(i) Based on your reading of the passage answer the following questions. 
a) Why have the CVs of highly qualified people been rejected? 
b) What are the reasons that have developed the use of half-baked language in 
writing SMS? 
c) What policy have the teacher made and why? 
d) What are the journalists trying to do? 
(ii) Find words in the passage which convey similar meaning of the given words by 
choosing the correct option. 
a) Quickly _______________ 
i) Rapidly 
ii) Declining 
iii) Fast going 
iv) Alert 
b) Fashion _______________ 
i) Culture 
ii) Programme 
iii) Trend 
iv) Aspects 
c) Careful and correct ______________ 
i) Subconscious 
ii) Meticulous 
iii) Continuous 
iv) Sincere 
d) A person who writes for newspaper _____________ 
i) Reporter 
ii) Teacher 
iii) Journalist 
iv) Examiner 
 
Section – B 
(Writing and Grammar – 25 Marks) 
Page 4


 
 
 
 
Summative Assessment-1 Examination 2014-2015 
 English 
Class – IX 
 
 Time allowed: 3 hours                                Maximum Marks: 70 
 
 General Instructions: 
(i) The question paper is divided into Three sections. 
Section A:  Reading      20 marks 
Section B: Writing and Grammar   25 marks 
Section C: Literature and Long Reading Text  25 marks 
(ii) Please check that this question paper consists 11 questions. 
(iii) Attempt all questions. 
(iv) Read each question carefully and follow the instructions. 
(v) Strictly adhere to the word limit given with each question. 
 
 
Section A 
(Reading: 20 marks) 
 
1. a) Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:   8 
Resurrection of ‘dead language’ Sanskrit 
Disparaged as being commercially unviable and dubbed ‘a dead language’, Sanskrit is staging 
a quiet resurgence both at home and among NRIs. 
Statics illustrate the point, Twitter has a community of more than 200 Sanskrit users who 
like to post on current events in the language, the 2014 Union Budget being the latest. 
Spoken Sanskrit classes in the capital include IT professionals, enrolment has doubled over 
two years. In the US, memberships at Sanskrit camps have shot up 20 times over the past 
decade and-a-half, sources say. 
Fittingly, while the Sanskrit Week celebrations ended on Thursday, Manjul Bhargava, winner 
of the ‘Maths Nobel’, poetry. 
Meet Satyasekhar Chakka from Hyderabad, who is pursuing a PhD in nano technology form 
IIT Kanpur. He had taken Sanskrit lessons in school as his third language. He says a ‘literary 
love that transmuted into a keen desire to explore the history of Indian technology” in old 
texts prompted him to take up further study. 
Satryasekhar represents a phenomenon, says electronics engineer Laxminarasimhan, who 
helps create lessons on behalf of Sanskrit Promotion Foundation for CBSE. 
About 40-45% of his classes comprise IT workers and 30-35% are women homemakers. The 
rest are retirees. 
California-based biotechnologist Govinda Yelagalvadi, 56, is one such learner. His wife and 
college-going daughter too speak and teach Sanskrit. “For us, it’s a means to reconnect with 
our roots and history,” he says. 
 
 
 
 
In India, it is a different story. Most of those who study Sanskrit are driven by family 
tradition. Few get hooked to its linguistic are literary aspects. In India, membership at 3,000 
centres of the Samskrita Bharti trust an offspring of a movement by the same name that 
began in Bangalore in 1981 has almost doubled from 1 lakh in 2012, says Dr. P Nandakumar 
its general secretary. 
i) What change is visible in the status of Sanskrit in present time? 
ii) Write one point which the statistics illustrate. 
iii) What do the spoken Sanskrit classes include? 
iv) Name the organisations which are working to promote Sanskrit. 
v) Why does Govinda Yelagalavadi wish to learn Sanskrit? 
vi) Why do people in India take up the study of Sanskrit? 
vii) Who is Dr. P Nanda Kumar? 
viii) How can we say that popularity of Sanskrit is rising? 
 
2. b) Read the following passage carefully. 
Mind your language 
A. CHANGE is often met with suspicion and the rapidly raging SMS culture is no 
exception. As the world and its children went ‘mobile’, the cell phone’s most loved 
feature – short message service (SMS) – became the handiest tool of communication. 
Beside convenient templates like I’ll be late’, ‘I’m busy right now’ and even I’m sorry’ 
SMS alerts., news and entertainment information. The language, which converted ‘too’ 
to ‘2’, ‘you are’ to ‘ur’ ‘take care’ to ‘tc’, among the million other sms’ isms, may well 
have begun to save time, space and cost. However, the riddle of figuring out newly 
coined short forms caught on with such fervor that despite the rapidly declining rates 
offered by phone companies, the trend continues. 
B. Students and young professionals often employ this ‘half baked’ language to almost all 
aspects of their lives. ‘five out of 10 resumes I see are peppered with SMS language’, 
reveals and HR executive, adding, ‘besides coming across as highly unprofessional, 
these CVs are instantly rejected, even though the qualifications may be upto the mark.’ 
C. SMS lingo has also invaded the usually meticulous examination system, with students 
of all 250 classes almost subconsciously using short forms in their answer papers. 
“We have made it a policy to cut half a mark per short form in class and unit tests. 
Children have failed but the trend continues laments an English teacher at a suburban 
school. 
D. But are the youth in tune with these complaints? “I don’t see any harm in using short 
forms, as long as the message is clear and these days everyone does understand the 
commonly used SMS language”, claims a 22 year old young professional. 
E. Most English words are twice as long as they need to be, staggering under a weight or 
unvoiced vowels and surplus consonants. Surely pupils are saving paper and helping 
examiners with their brevity. All change must start somewhere and already a million 
fingers are tapping out a revolution. 
 
 
 
 
F. Sitting firmly on the other side of the fence, a journalist asserts, “that English is a 
funny language is the biggest cliché of all, but to lambast the rules of the spelling in 
the manner that SMS does, is immature and despicable. We already have more forms 
of English than we can account for. Here we are trying to confer a common language 
on the globalizing world in order to get all people to speak an understandable variety 
of the same basic language. And instead, we have to waste time and energy convincing 
people that further fragmentation of words would be taking a long step back and not 
forwards.” 
 
(i) Based on your reading of the passage answer the following questions. 
a) Why have the CVs of highly qualified people been rejected? 
b) What are the reasons that have developed the use of half-baked language in 
writing SMS? 
c) What policy have the teacher made and why? 
d) What are the journalists trying to do? 
(ii) Find words in the passage which convey similar meaning of the given words by 
choosing the correct option. 
a) Quickly _______________ 
i) Rapidly 
ii) Declining 
iii) Fast going 
iv) Alert 
b) Fashion _______________ 
i) Culture 
ii) Programme 
iii) Trend 
iv) Aspects 
c) Careful and correct ______________ 
i) Subconscious 
ii) Meticulous 
iii) Continuous 
iv) Sincere 
d) A person who writes for newspaper _____________ 
i) Reporter 
ii) Teacher 
iii) Journalist 
iv) Examiner 
 
Section – B 
(Writing and Grammar – 25 Marks) 
 
 
 
 
3. You read the following news story and felt happy by thinking that you can use your mobiles 
and laptops in the market. You are also aware of the disadvantages. Write a letter to the 
editor of a local daily on the issue of increasing use of technology by the youth. (120 words) 
Khan Mkt finally gets Wi-Fi 
TIME NEWS NETWORK (18 August 2014) 
1. New Delhi: The ambitious Wi-Fi project of the New 
Delhi Municipal Council has taken off with Khan Market 
becoming the first area where visitors can avail the 
facility. Connaught place is soon to follow suit. 
2. Three arrested for cloning cards at petrol pumps. 
Your car is used at petrol pump 
to rob money from your account 
   Or 
We often complain that the government is not doing enough to solve the varying problems of 
our country. All of us expect the government to work for us. Recently you came across the 
news headlines of the address by PM on Independence Day. You think “what have I done for 
my country”. You want to express your views. Write an Article, highlighting the statement 
“Ask not what the country can do for you, ask what you can do for the country” by using 
information from the news clipping and taking hints from the clues that follow. 
PM Makes Strong Pitch To Involve People In National 
Reconstruction Project 
PM makes a clean break, ends plan era. Want to build TEAM 
INDIA 
Modi exhorted countrymen 
To rise to their full potential, 
Realize their responsibilities 
And shape their own destinies 
(TOI 16 August 2014) 
 
Developing – responsibility not of government alone – may 
help in doing small things like cleanliness of the surroundings 
– all must come forward – future in the hands of people. 
 
4. Write a story in about 150-200 words on the basis of the given outlines. 
Darious was the king of Persia; Hiren his only son fell seriously ill. The  
Worried – called all doctors – tried every medicine – didn’t get 
well – gave up all hopes – Hiren sure to die – gave alms – 
Darious walked round Hiren’s bed seven times – prayed to god 
– save my son and take my life – after some weeks Hiren got 
well – Darious died 
 
5. Fill in the blanks with one word only: 
Page 5


 
 
 
 
Summative Assessment-1 Examination 2014-2015 
 English 
Class – IX 
 
 Time allowed: 3 hours                                Maximum Marks: 70 
 
 General Instructions: 
(i) The question paper is divided into Three sections. 
Section A:  Reading      20 marks 
Section B: Writing and Grammar   25 marks 
Section C: Literature and Long Reading Text  25 marks 
(ii) Please check that this question paper consists 11 questions. 
(iii) Attempt all questions. 
(iv) Read each question carefully and follow the instructions. 
(v) Strictly adhere to the word limit given with each question. 
 
 
Section A 
(Reading: 20 marks) 
 
1. a) Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:   8 
Resurrection of ‘dead language’ Sanskrit 
Disparaged as being commercially unviable and dubbed ‘a dead language’, Sanskrit is staging 
a quiet resurgence both at home and among NRIs. 
Statics illustrate the point, Twitter has a community of more than 200 Sanskrit users who 
like to post on current events in the language, the 2014 Union Budget being the latest. 
Spoken Sanskrit classes in the capital include IT professionals, enrolment has doubled over 
two years. In the US, memberships at Sanskrit camps have shot up 20 times over the past 
decade and-a-half, sources say. 
Fittingly, while the Sanskrit Week celebrations ended on Thursday, Manjul Bhargava, winner 
of the ‘Maths Nobel’, poetry. 
Meet Satyasekhar Chakka from Hyderabad, who is pursuing a PhD in nano technology form 
IIT Kanpur. He had taken Sanskrit lessons in school as his third language. He says a ‘literary 
love that transmuted into a keen desire to explore the history of Indian technology” in old 
texts prompted him to take up further study. 
Satryasekhar represents a phenomenon, says electronics engineer Laxminarasimhan, who 
helps create lessons on behalf of Sanskrit Promotion Foundation for CBSE. 
About 40-45% of his classes comprise IT workers and 30-35% are women homemakers. The 
rest are retirees. 
California-based biotechnologist Govinda Yelagalvadi, 56, is one such learner. His wife and 
college-going daughter too speak and teach Sanskrit. “For us, it’s a means to reconnect with 
our roots and history,” he says. 
 
 
 
 
In India, it is a different story. Most of those who study Sanskrit are driven by family 
tradition. Few get hooked to its linguistic are literary aspects. In India, membership at 3,000 
centres of the Samskrita Bharti trust an offspring of a movement by the same name that 
began in Bangalore in 1981 has almost doubled from 1 lakh in 2012, says Dr. P Nandakumar 
its general secretary. 
i) What change is visible in the status of Sanskrit in present time? 
ii) Write one point which the statistics illustrate. 
iii) What do the spoken Sanskrit classes include? 
iv) Name the organisations which are working to promote Sanskrit. 
v) Why does Govinda Yelagalavadi wish to learn Sanskrit? 
vi) Why do people in India take up the study of Sanskrit? 
vii) Who is Dr. P Nanda Kumar? 
viii) How can we say that popularity of Sanskrit is rising? 
 
2. b) Read the following passage carefully. 
Mind your language 
A. CHANGE is often met with suspicion and the rapidly raging SMS culture is no 
exception. As the world and its children went ‘mobile’, the cell phone’s most loved 
feature – short message service (SMS) – became the handiest tool of communication. 
Beside convenient templates like I’ll be late’, ‘I’m busy right now’ and even I’m sorry’ 
SMS alerts., news and entertainment information. The language, which converted ‘too’ 
to ‘2’, ‘you are’ to ‘ur’ ‘take care’ to ‘tc’, among the million other sms’ isms, may well 
have begun to save time, space and cost. However, the riddle of figuring out newly 
coined short forms caught on with such fervor that despite the rapidly declining rates 
offered by phone companies, the trend continues. 
B. Students and young professionals often employ this ‘half baked’ language to almost all 
aspects of their lives. ‘five out of 10 resumes I see are peppered with SMS language’, 
reveals and HR executive, adding, ‘besides coming across as highly unprofessional, 
these CVs are instantly rejected, even though the qualifications may be upto the mark.’ 
C. SMS lingo has also invaded the usually meticulous examination system, with students 
of all 250 classes almost subconsciously using short forms in their answer papers. 
“We have made it a policy to cut half a mark per short form in class and unit tests. 
Children have failed but the trend continues laments an English teacher at a suburban 
school. 
D. But are the youth in tune with these complaints? “I don’t see any harm in using short 
forms, as long as the message is clear and these days everyone does understand the 
commonly used SMS language”, claims a 22 year old young professional. 
E. Most English words are twice as long as they need to be, staggering under a weight or 
unvoiced vowels and surplus consonants. Surely pupils are saving paper and helping 
examiners with their brevity. All change must start somewhere and already a million 
fingers are tapping out a revolution. 
 
 
 
 
F. Sitting firmly on the other side of the fence, a journalist asserts, “that English is a 
funny language is the biggest cliché of all, but to lambast the rules of the spelling in 
the manner that SMS does, is immature and despicable. We already have more forms 
of English than we can account for. Here we are trying to confer a common language 
on the globalizing world in order to get all people to speak an understandable variety 
of the same basic language. And instead, we have to waste time and energy convincing 
people that further fragmentation of words would be taking a long step back and not 
forwards.” 
 
(i) Based on your reading of the passage answer the following questions. 
a) Why have the CVs of highly qualified people been rejected? 
b) What are the reasons that have developed the use of half-baked language in 
writing SMS? 
c) What policy have the teacher made and why? 
d) What are the journalists trying to do? 
(ii) Find words in the passage which convey similar meaning of the given words by 
choosing the correct option. 
a) Quickly _______________ 
i) Rapidly 
ii) Declining 
iii) Fast going 
iv) Alert 
b) Fashion _______________ 
i) Culture 
ii) Programme 
iii) Trend 
iv) Aspects 
c) Careful and correct ______________ 
i) Subconscious 
ii) Meticulous 
iii) Continuous 
iv) Sincere 
d) A person who writes for newspaper _____________ 
i) Reporter 
ii) Teacher 
iii) Journalist 
iv) Examiner 
 
Section – B 
(Writing and Grammar – 25 Marks) 
 
 
 
 
3. You read the following news story and felt happy by thinking that you can use your mobiles 
and laptops in the market. You are also aware of the disadvantages. Write a letter to the 
editor of a local daily on the issue of increasing use of technology by the youth. (120 words) 
Khan Mkt finally gets Wi-Fi 
TIME NEWS NETWORK (18 August 2014) 
1. New Delhi: The ambitious Wi-Fi project of the New 
Delhi Municipal Council has taken off with Khan Market 
becoming the first area where visitors can avail the 
facility. Connaught place is soon to follow suit. 
2. Three arrested for cloning cards at petrol pumps. 
Your car is used at petrol pump 
to rob money from your account 
   Or 
We often complain that the government is not doing enough to solve the varying problems of 
our country. All of us expect the government to work for us. Recently you came across the 
news headlines of the address by PM on Independence Day. You think “what have I done for 
my country”. You want to express your views. Write an Article, highlighting the statement 
“Ask not what the country can do for you, ask what you can do for the country” by using 
information from the news clipping and taking hints from the clues that follow. 
PM Makes Strong Pitch To Involve People In National 
Reconstruction Project 
PM makes a clean break, ends plan era. Want to build TEAM 
INDIA 
Modi exhorted countrymen 
To rise to their full potential, 
Realize their responsibilities 
And shape their own destinies 
(TOI 16 August 2014) 
 
Developing – responsibility not of government alone – may 
help in doing small things like cleanliness of the surroundings 
– all must come forward – future in the hands of people. 
 
4. Write a story in about 150-200 words on the basis of the given outlines. 
Darious was the king of Persia; Hiren his only son fell seriously ill. The  
Worried – called all doctors – tried every medicine – didn’t get 
well – gave up all hopes – Hiren sure to die – gave alms – 
Darious walked round Hiren’s bed seven times – prayed to god 
– save my son and take my life – after some weeks Hiren got 
well – Darious died 
 
5. Fill in the blanks with one word only: 
 
 
 
 
The questions a) _____________ English language comprehension skills (of class X level) 
contained in b) _______________ set of Test Booklets of Paper II (CSAT 2014) c) ____________ not to 
be attempted d) _____________ these questions shall not be evaluated for gradation e) ___________ 
merit. The candidates are, therefore advised not to attempt questions for which Hindi 
translation f) ______________ not been given. 
6. The following passage has not been edited. There is one error in each line. Write the 
incorrect word and the correction in your answer sheet. The first one has been done for you. 
Incorrect Correct 
Domestic flyers can soon be able  can  may 
to board there flights simply  a) ________ _________ 
of flashing their e-boarding cards at  
security checks.    b) ________ _________ 
The aviation ministry had asked  
airport operators    c) ________ _________ 
to procure an technology   d) ________ _________ 
for read bar coded e-boarding  e) ________ _________ 
cards because passengers can board f) ________ _________ 
planes just like they enters airports  
now      g) ________ _________ 
by showing their e-tickets on smart 
phones and tablets.    h) ________ _________ 
7. Rearrange the following jumbled words into meaningful sentences. 
a) Popularity/ Sanskrit/ day by day / gaining / is 
b) For many / the civil services / the favourite language / Sanskrit is / appearing for / 
examination / students 
c) Also made / in / a brief appearance / Sanskrit has / pop music 
 
Section – C 
(Literature – 25 Marks) 
8. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow. 
“Are we pinching it before Aunt Elizabeth comes”? 
a) What does ‘it’ refer to here? 
b) Who is the speaker and to whom she’s speaking? 
c) How did she conclude that her parents are pinching it? 
Or 
“Oh!” The nightingale confessed 
greatly flattered and impressed 
that a critic of such note 
had discussed her art and throat: 
“I don’t think the song’s divine. 
But – oh, well – at least its mine.” 
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Complete Syllabus of Class 10

Dynamic Test

Content Category

Related Searches

study material

,

practice quizzes

,

Class 10

,

Summary

,

CBSE Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

CBSE Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

past year papers

,

ppt

,

Important questions

,

Viva Questions

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Semester Notes

,

pdf

,

Exam

,

Class 10

,

Class 10

,

mock tests for examination

,

English Communicative Past Year Paper SA-1(Set-2) - 2014

,

English Communicative Past Year Paper SA-1(Set-2) - 2014

,

MCQs

,

CBSE Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

Objective type Questions

,

Sample Paper

,

Extra Questions

,

Free

,

video lectures

,

English Communicative Past Year Paper SA-1(Set-2) - 2014

;