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Extra Questions Answers - Lord Ullin's Daughter Notes | Study English Class 9 - Class 9

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Q1. "Now, who be ye, would cross Lochgyle, This dark and stormy weather?" "O, Pm the chief of Ulva's isle, And this, Lord Ullin's daughter". 
(a) Who does the speaker interrogate and why? 
(b) Who were the two daring to cross the Lochgyle? 
(c) What is Lochgyle? Why was it unusual to cross Lochgyle?

Ans. (a) The speaker interrogates the Chief of Diva because the latter is asking him to hurry to ferry them in the dark and stormy night. 
(b)The two who dared to cross Lochgyle were the Chieftain of Diva Isle and his lover, Lord Ullin's daughter. 
(c) Lochgyle is a sea loch which separates  Gribun from Diva. It was unsafe to cross Lochgyle because it was dark and stormy over the dangerous loch. 


Q2. A Chieftain, to the highlands bound, Cries, "Boatman, do not tarry! And I'll give, thee a silver pound To row us o'er the ferry!" 
(a) Who is 'highland bound'?
(b) What does the Chieftain offer the boatman for rowing his lover and him over the ferry? 
(c) Why is the Chieftain shouting at the boatman?

Ans. (a) The Chieftain and his lover are in the highland bound.
(b) The Chieftain offers the boatman a silver pound.
(c) The Chieftain was shouting at the boatman because he and his lover were fleeing from the wrath of the girl's father and his cruel soldiers, having their enemies on their heels and the boatman asking questions only caused a delay.


Q3. 'And fast before her father's men Three days we've fled together, For should he find us in the glen, My blood would stain the heather.' 
(a) From whom were the lovers fleeing? Why? that follows. 
(b) What could have happened if the lovers were caught by the girl's father?
(c) The above lines have been said by ...... to .......

Ans. (a) The lovers were fleeing from the men sent by Lord Ullin to kill the Chieftain and to redeem his daughter.
(b) If the two lovers were caught by the Lord's men, they would have killed the Chieftain and have taken the girl back to her father.
(c) The given lines have been said by the Chieftain to the boatman.


Q4. "His horsemen hard behind us ride; Should they our steps discover, Then who will cheer my bonny-bride When they have slain her lover"? 
(a) Who is 'his' in line I? Who does 'us' refer to? 
(b) Explain 'cheer my bonny bride'. Why would the lover be slain?

Ans. (a) 'His' refers to Lord Ullin and 'us' refers to Lord Ullin's daughter and her beloved.
(b) 'Bonny bride' means 'attractive bride'. The Chieftain is worried that if he dies, then who will look after his beloved.
(c) He would be slain because he had eloped with Lord Ullin's daughter. Lord Ullin was against their relationship and did not give permission to his daughter to marry her lover. He wanted to punish the Chieftain,


Q5. Out spoke the hardy Highland wight, I'll go, my Chief-I'm ready, It is not for your silver bright, But for your winsome lady. 
(a) Who is the Highland wight? 
(b) Was the boatman greedy for money? How do you think so? 
(c) What does the line ' I'll go, my Chief, .... I'm ready' signify?

Ans. (a) The boatman is the Highland wight.
(b) No, the boatman was not greedy at all, The lines-"it's not for your silver bright, But for your winsome lady" explains that he agreed for the sake of the attractive lady.
(c) It suggests that the boatman after hearing the lovers, wrath, agreed to row them over the ferry.


Q6. And by my word! the bonny bird In danger shall not tarry; So, though the waves are raging white, I'll row you o'er the ferry". 
(a) Who is the 'bonny bird' referred to in these lines?
(b) Do you think that the boatman was brave? What makes you think so? 
(c) Explain-'the waves are raging white'.

Ans. (a) The bonny bird referred to is the boatman himself.
(b) Certainly, the boatman was a brave man. He was, more than anyone else, aware of the danger he would get into by helping the lovers, yet decided to take them to safety as a mark of his bravery.
(c) The line means that the waves were rising to the skies, giving rise to white foam as they fall on the beach.


Q7. By this the storm grew loud apace, The water-wraith was shrieking, And in the scowl of heaven each face Grew dark as they were speaking. But still, as wilder blew the wind, And as the night grew drearer, Adown the glen rode armed men, Their trampling sounded nearer. 
(a) Where did the armed men come from? Who were they? 
(b) How did nature warn the lovers? 
(c) What does the darkness in the fourth line speak about the situation?

Ans. (a) The armed men had come from the palace of Lord Ullin. They were the soldiers sent by Lord Ullin to bring his daughter back.
(b) Nature gave the lovers a terrible warning by appearing as terrifying as possible. Storms grew ever stronger and the weather grew more murky. Lochgyle itself assumed a dreadful appearance and the waves lashed the shores ever fiercely.
(c) It tells about the weather getting worse.


Q8. On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions by ticking the correct choice. 
Lord Ullin's daughter and her lover are trying to 
(i) escape the wrath of her father 
(ii) settle in a distant land 
(iii) challenge the storm in the lake 
(iv) trying to prove their love for each other

Ans. (i) escape the wrath of her father. 


Q9. On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions by ticking the correct choice.
The boatman agrees to ferry them across because 
(i) he has fallen in love with Lord Ullin's daughter 
(ii) he wants to avenge Lord Ullin 
(iii) he has lost his love he is sorry for the childlike innocence of the lady m

Ans. (iv) he is sorry for the childlike innocence of the lady.    


Q10. On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions by ticking the correct choice.
The mood changes in the poem. It transforms from .............. 
(i) happiness to fear 
(ii) anxiety to grief 
(iii) fear to happiness 
(iv) love to pain

Ans. (ii) anxiety to grief.    


Q11. On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions by ticking the correct choice.
The shore of Lochgyle has been referred to as 'fatal shore'! The poetic device used here is.......... 
(i) metaphor 
(ii) simile 
(iii) transferred epithet 
(iv) onomatopoeia

Ans. (i) metaphor 


Q12. In stanza 10, the poet says The boat has left a stormy land, A stormy sea before her, ............ 
(a) In both lines, the word 'stormy' assumes different connotations. What are they? 
(b) The lady faces a dilemma here. What is it? What choice does she finally make?

Ans. (a) The land was 'stormy' because of the angry father, whereas the sea was stormy due to the stormy weather. The girl had to either face the storm of father's rage or the stormy weather in the loch.
(b) The dilemma is that the lady has a 'storm' on both sides. She has to make a choice between her father and her lover. She cannot return as there is 'storm' at home. She is not able to go forward, as there is a terrible sea storm too. Finally, she chooses to face the sea storm as she thinks it better to be killed with her lover than to live without him.


Q13. And still, they row'd amidst the roar Of waters fast prevailing............... : Lord Ullin reached that fatal shore............., His wrath was changed to wailing.
(a) What does 'water fast prevailing' mean? 
(b) Why is the shore said to be fatal? 
(c) Why does Lord Ullin's wrath change into wailing on seeing his daughter?

Ans. (a) The line means that the sea was raging, the waves rose higher and higher. Lord Ullin's daughter and the Chieftain were trapped in the stormy sea.
(b) The shore of Lochgyle deserves to be called the fatal shore for many reasons. It was fatal because it was destiny that decided the fate of a love affair. It was here that two lovers drowned along with the benevolent boatman, Again, it was here the wrathful Lord Ullin's fury and stubbornness died.
(c) Lord Ullin's wrath changed into wailing due to love and affection for his daughter. His daughter was stretching her arm towards him for aid but he was unable to help or save his daughter. 


Q14. For, sore dismay'd through storm and shade, His child he did discover...................:- One lovely hand she stretched for aid, And one was round her lover. 
(a) In what state did Lord Ullin find his daughter? 
(b) "One lovely hand she stretched for aid". Do you think Lord Ullin's daughter wanted to reach out to her father?

Ans. (a) In a very miserable condition, fighting with fate.
(b) Yes, she wanted to reach out to her father but she also wanted her lover. Thus, the girl stretched one arm towards her father and had one arm round her lover. It shows that the girl neither wanted to die nor wanted to leave her lover.


Q15. . "Come back! come back!" he cried in grief 'Across this stormy water..............: And I'll forgive your Highland chief, My daughter! -0 my daughter!" 
(a) Who cried to whom to come back? 
(b) Do you think that Lord Ullin's promise was honest? Give reasons. 
(c) Who is the poet of the 'Lord Ullin's Daughter'?

Ans. (a) Lord Ullin's cried to his daughter to come back.
(b) Yes, Lord Ullin's promise was honest because on seeing his daughter in danger of death, because his wrath changed into wailing.
(c) Thomas Campbell is the poet of 'Lord Ullin's Daughter.' 


Q16. 'T was vain; the loud waves lashed the shore, Return or aid preventing The water wild went o'er his child, And he was left lamenting. 
(a) What was in vain? 
(b) What did the loud waves do? 
(c) Why was he left lamenting?  

Ans. (a) Lord Ullin's change in heart to forgive his daughter and her lover did not have any effect. It was 'vain' because the storm had claimed their lives.
(b) The loud waves lashed the shore and prevented any aid or the return of the Chieftain and his beloved.
(c) He was left lamenting because he saw his daughter drowning with her lover.  


Q17. "The water-wraith was shrieking". Is the symbolism, in this line a premonition of what happens at the end? Give reasons for your answer, (stanza 7)

Ans. (a) The speaker interrogates the Chief of Diva because the latter is asking him to hurry to ferry them in the dark and stormy night.
(b)The two who dared to cross Lochgyle were the Chieftain of Diva Isle and his lover, Lord Ullin's daughter.
(c) Lochgyle is a sea loch which separates  Gribun from Diva. It was unsafe to cross Lochgyle because it was dark and stormy over the dangerous loch. 


Q18. Describe the stormy lock that the boatman ferries the lovers across.

Ans. (a) The Chieftain and his lover are in the highland bound.
(b) The Chieftain offers the boatman a silver pound.
(c) The Chieftain was shouting at the boatman because he and his lover were fleeing from the wrath of the girl's father and his cruel soldiers, having their enemies on their heels and the boatman asking questions only caused a delay.


Q19. The poet uses words like 'adown' and 'rode' which contains harsh consonants. Why do you think the poet has done this? (stanza 8)

Ans. (a) The lovers were fleeing from the men sent by Lord Ullin to kill the Chieftain and to redeem his daughter.
(b) If the two lovers were caught by the Lord's men, they would have killed the Chieftain and have taken the girl back to her father.
(c) The given lines have been said by the Chieftain to the boatman.


Q20. Why does the poet use 'stormy land' and 'a stormy wave'? Explain the line 'too strong for human hand'.

Ans. (a) 'His' refers to Lord Ullin and 'us' refers to Lord Ullin's daughter and her beloved.
(b) 'Bonny bride' means 'attractive bride'. The Chieftain is worried that if he dies, then who will look after his beloved.
(c) He would be slain because he had eloped with Lord Ullin's daughter. Lord Ullin was against their relationship and did not give permission to his daughter to marry her lover. He wanted to punish the Chieftain, 


Q21. Lord Ullin's daughter faces a dilemma; what is it? What choice does she finally make?

Ans. (a) The boatman is the Highland wight.
(b) No, the boatman was not greedy at all, The lines-"it's not for your silver bright, But for your winsome lady" explains that he agreed for the sake of the attractive lady.
(c) It suggests that the boatman after hearing the lovers, wrath, agreed to row them over the ferry. 


Q22. Why does Lord Ullin's daughter defy her father and elope with her lover? (stanza 1)

Ans. (a) The bonny bird referred to is the boatman himself.
(b) Certainly, the boatman was a brave man. He was, more than anyone else, aware of the danger he would get into by helping the lovers, yet decided to take them to safety as a mark of his bravery.
(c) The line means that the waves were rising to the skies, giving rise to white foam as they fall on the beach. 


Q23. Give two characteristics of the boatman who ferries the couple across the sea.

Ans. (a) The armed men had come from the palace of Lord Ullin. They were the soldiers sent by Lord Ullin to bring his daughter back.
(b) Nature gave the lovers a terrible warning by appearing as terrifying as possible. Storms grew ever stronger and the weather grew more murky. Lochgyle itself assumed a dreadful appearance and the waves lashed the shores ever fiercely.
(c) It tells about the weather getting worse. 


Q24. Explain the conversation between the Chieftain and the boatman. What did the boatman finally decide?

Ans. Escape the wrath of her father. 


Q25. Why did Lord Ullin and his armed men give the lovers a hot chase?

Ans. He is sorry for the childlike innocence of the lady. 


Q26. Write a note on the change of Lord Ullin's mind.  

Ans.  Anxiety to grief.


Q27. Imagine you are one of the chiefs of the cavalry riding behind Lord Ullin. You and your men ride for three days, at the end of which you reach the loch shore. Narrate your experience as you witnessed a father lamenting the loss of his child, in the form of a diary entry.

Ans. April 26.1799 9:00 pm
Dear Diary
Today at last after three days, we reached the shore with great difficulty. The wind was blowing horribly. The sea was raging. The waves rose higher and higher. Lord Ullin's daughter was trapped in the stormy sea. She was calling her father for help. Her one hand was stretched toward her father and the other was round her lover. In spite of being so powerful, he wags unable to do anything. He was crying bitterly. Soon there was no sign of Lord Ullin's daughter and her lover. The scene was heart-moving. I became upset to see the wailing of a father for his poor child. 


Q28. Lord Ullin is shown in two different aspects. What are these?

Ans. Lord Ullin is the Chieftain of his tribe. His daughter has fallen in love with the chief of Ulva Isle. Both she and her lover have eloped. It is a great humiliation for Lord Ullin and his tribe. So, he orders his men to find out the lovers. The lovers try to cross the stormy lake. Lord Ullin also arrives at the shore when they are crossing the lake. He sees that his daughter is going to be drowned. There is a sudden change in him. He cries in grief and calls the lovers back. He forgives them and wants them alive. But within moments, the stormy sea-waves drown them and he is left lamenting at the tragedy.  


Q29. Imagine that you are Lord Ullin. You bemoan and lament on the tragic loss of your lovely daughter and curse yourself for having opposed her alliance with the Chieftain. Express your feelings of pain and anguish in a letter to your friend.

Ans. Invincible Castle Scotland
April 27, 1739
Dear Gen
You will be pained to know that my daughter is no more. I have no right to live anymore, as it was my fault to set my armed men to catch her and her lover. I should have given my assent for her marriage with her lover. I am the murderer of my bonny and beautiful daughter. She was drowned in the stormy sea in front of my eyes. She stretched out her arm for help, but I could not save her. I remember her innocent face crying for help. God will never forgive me. I am responsible for the tragic end of my daughter. I shall never forgive myself.
With regards Lord Ullin  


Q30. In pairs, argue in favour of or against the topic, 'Lord Ullin's daughter was right in her decision to defy her father'. Give logical and relevant reasons and present your point of view to the class.  

Ans.  For the Motion, Lord Ullin's daughter was right in her decision to defy her father.  For the Motion, Lord Ullin's daughter was right in her decision to defy her father. Love is very essential for life. It is a gift of God. It is not something that is at someone's command. She knew what was good for her. She loved the Chieftain very much. So, she eloped with her lover and nothing was wrong in their eloping as her father would have not slain them. Love is something that must not be denied at any cost, Lord Ullin could not understand the mood of the changing times. His daughter took the risk that her father would kill her lover. To me, nothing was wrong in Lord Ullin's daughter defying her father. If she had been wrong, her father would not have asked her to return. She thought it better to sacrifice her own life for her love. Against the Motion, Lord Ullin's daughter was not right in her decision to defy her father. Parents know what is good for their children and they love their children. She should have thought that her step would spoil the reputation of her family. In this kind of situation, a girl should always talk to her parents. The parents have got a better experience of life. It is the moral duty of the children to respect the feelings and emotions of their parents. But Lord Ullin's daughter did something wrong in defying her father. She also ruined their social status. She should have persuaded her father and sorted out the matter.

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