Formula Sheet: Design of Machine Elements Notes | Study Formula Sheets of Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering: Formula Sheet: Design of Machine Elements Notes | Study Formula Sheets of Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering

The document Formula Sheet: Design of Machine Elements Notes | Study Formula Sheets of Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering is a part of the Mechanical Engineering Course Formula Sheets of Mechanical Engineering.
All you need of Mechanical Engineering at this link: Mechanical Engineering
 Page 1


Short Notes on Machine Design 
Static Load 
? A static load is a mechanical force applied slowly to an assembly or object.Load does not 
change in magnitude and direction and normally increases gradually to a steady value 
? This force is often applied to engineering structures on which peoples' safety depends on 
because engineers need to know the maximum force a structure can support before it will 
collapse. 
Dynamic load 
? A dynamic load, results when loading conditions change with time. Load may change 
in magnitude for example, traffic of varying weight passing a bridge. 
? Load may change in direction, for example, load on piston rod of a double acting cylinder. 
Vibration and shock are types of dynamic loading. 
Factor of safety (F.O.S):  
? The ratio of ultimate to allowable load or stress is known as factor of safety i.e. The factor of 
safety can be defined as the ratio of the material strength or failure stress to the allowable 
or working stress. 
? The factor of safety must be always greater than unity. It is easier to refer to the ratio of 
stresses since this applies to material properties. 
F.O.S = failure stress / working or allowable stress 
Static Failure Theories 
Maximum Principal Stress Theory (Rankine Theory): 
? The principal stresses s1 (maximum principal stress), s2 (minimum principal stress) or s3 
exceeds the yield stress, yielding would occur. 
? For two dimensional loading situation for a ductile material where tensile and compressive 
yield stress are nearly of same magnitude: 
 
Page 2


Short Notes on Machine Design 
Static Load 
? A static load is a mechanical force applied slowly to an assembly or object.Load does not 
change in magnitude and direction and normally increases gradually to a steady value 
? This force is often applied to engineering structures on which peoples' safety depends on 
because engineers need to know the maximum force a structure can support before it will 
collapse. 
Dynamic load 
? A dynamic load, results when loading conditions change with time. Load may change 
in magnitude for example, traffic of varying weight passing a bridge. 
? Load may change in direction, for example, load on piston rod of a double acting cylinder. 
Vibration and shock are types of dynamic loading. 
Factor of safety (F.O.S):  
? The ratio of ultimate to allowable load or stress is known as factor of safety i.e. The factor of 
safety can be defined as the ratio of the material strength or failure stress to the allowable 
or working stress. 
? The factor of safety must be always greater than unity. It is easier to refer to the ratio of 
stresses since this applies to material properties. 
F.O.S = failure stress / working or allowable stress 
Static Failure Theories 
Maximum Principal Stress Theory (Rankine Theory): 
? The principal stresses s1 (maximum principal stress), s2 (minimum principal stress) or s3 
exceeds the yield stress, yielding would occur. 
? For two dimensional loading situation for a ductile material where tensile and compressive 
yield stress are nearly of same magnitude: 
 
  
? Yielding occurs when the state of stress is at the boundary of the rectangle. 
Maximum Principal Strain Theory (St. Venant’s theory): 
? If e1 and e2 are maximum and minimum principal strains corresponding to s1 and s2, in the 
limiting case: 
 
 
  
  
  
? Boundary of a yield surface in Maximum Strain Energy Theory is given below 
 
Page 3


Short Notes on Machine Design 
Static Load 
? A static load is a mechanical force applied slowly to an assembly or object.Load does not 
change in magnitude and direction and normally increases gradually to a steady value 
? This force is often applied to engineering structures on which peoples' safety depends on 
because engineers need to know the maximum force a structure can support before it will 
collapse. 
Dynamic load 
? A dynamic load, results when loading conditions change with time. Load may change 
in magnitude for example, traffic of varying weight passing a bridge. 
? Load may change in direction, for example, load on piston rod of a double acting cylinder. 
Vibration and shock are types of dynamic loading. 
Factor of safety (F.O.S):  
? The ratio of ultimate to allowable load or stress is known as factor of safety i.e. The factor of 
safety can be defined as the ratio of the material strength or failure stress to the allowable 
or working stress. 
? The factor of safety must be always greater than unity. It is easier to refer to the ratio of 
stresses since this applies to material properties. 
F.O.S = failure stress / working or allowable stress 
Static Failure Theories 
Maximum Principal Stress Theory (Rankine Theory): 
? The principal stresses s1 (maximum principal stress), s2 (minimum principal stress) or s3 
exceeds the yield stress, yielding would occur. 
? For two dimensional loading situation for a ductile material where tensile and compressive 
yield stress are nearly of same magnitude: 
 
  
? Yielding occurs when the state of stress is at the boundary of the rectangle. 
Maximum Principal Strain Theory (St. Venant’s theory): 
? If e1 and e2 are maximum and minimum principal strains corresponding to s1 and s2, in the 
limiting case: 
 
 
  
  
  
? Boundary of a yield surface in Maximum Strain Energy Theory is given below 
 
  
Maximum Shear Stress Theory (Tresca Theory): 
? At the tensile yield point s2= s3 = 0 and thus maximum shear stress is sy/2. 
 
? Yield surface corresponding to maximum shear stress theory in biaxial stress situation is 
given below : 
 
Maximum strain energy theory ( Beltrami’s theory): 
? Failure would occur when the total strain energy absorbed at a point per unit volume 
exceeds the strain energy absorbed per unit volume at the tensile yield point. 
 
 
Page 4


Short Notes on Machine Design 
Static Load 
? A static load is a mechanical force applied slowly to an assembly or object.Load does not 
change in magnitude and direction and normally increases gradually to a steady value 
? This force is often applied to engineering structures on which peoples' safety depends on 
because engineers need to know the maximum force a structure can support before it will 
collapse. 
Dynamic load 
? A dynamic load, results when loading conditions change with time. Load may change 
in magnitude for example, traffic of varying weight passing a bridge. 
? Load may change in direction, for example, load on piston rod of a double acting cylinder. 
Vibration and shock are types of dynamic loading. 
Factor of safety (F.O.S):  
? The ratio of ultimate to allowable load or stress is known as factor of safety i.e. The factor of 
safety can be defined as the ratio of the material strength or failure stress to the allowable 
or working stress. 
? The factor of safety must be always greater than unity. It is easier to refer to the ratio of 
stresses since this applies to material properties. 
F.O.S = failure stress / working or allowable stress 
Static Failure Theories 
Maximum Principal Stress Theory (Rankine Theory): 
? The principal stresses s1 (maximum principal stress), s2 (minimum principal stress) or s3 
exceeds the yield stress, yielding would occur. 
? For two dimensional loading situation for a ductile material where tensile and compressive 
yield stress are nearly of same magnitude: 
 
  
? Yielding occurs when the state of stress is at the boundary of the rectangle. 
Maximum Principal Strain Theory (St. Venant’s theory): 
? If e1 and e2 are maximum and minimum principal strains corresponding to s1 and s2, in the 
limiting case: 
 
 
  
  
  
? Boundary of a yield surface in Maximum Strain Energy Theory is given below 
 
  
Maximum Shear Stress Theory (Tresca Theory): 
? At the tensile yield point s2= s3 = 0 and thus maximum shear stress is sy/2. 
 
? Yield surface corresponding to maximum shear stress theory in biaxial stress situation is 
given below : 
 
Maximum strain energy theory ( Beltrami’s theory): 
? Failure would occur when the total strain energy absorbed at a point per unit volume 
exceeds the strain energy absorbed per unit volume at the tensile yield point. 
 
 
 
? Above equation results in Elliptical yield surface which can be viewed as: 
 
  
Distortion energy theory (Von Mises yield criterion): 
? Yielding would occur when total distortion energy absorbed per unit volume due to applied 
loads exceeds the distortion energy absorbed per unit volume at the tensile yield point. 
Total strain energy E
T
 and strain energy for volume change E
V
 can be given as: 
 
 
At the tensile yield point, s1 = sy , s2 = s3 = 0 which gives, 
 
 The failure criterion is thus obtained by equating Ed and Edy , which gives 
 
In a 2-D situation if s3 = 0, so the equation reduces to, 
Page 5


Short Notes on Machine Design 
Static Load 
? A static load is a mechanical force applied slowly to an assembly or object.Load does not 
change in magnitude and direction and normally increases gradually to a steady value 
? This force is often applied to engineering structures on which peoples' safety depends on 
because engineers need to know the maximum force a structure can support before it will 
collapse. 
Dynamic load 
? A dynamic load, results when loading conditions change with time. Load may change 
in magnitude for example, traffic of varying weight passing a bridge. 
? Load may change in direction, for example, load on piston rod of a double acting cylinder. 
Vibration and shock are types of dynamic loading. 
Factor of safety (F.O.S):  
? The ratio of ultimate to allowable load or stress is known as factor of safety i.e. The factor of 
safety can be defined as the ratio of the material strength or failure stress to the allowable 
or working stress. 
? The factor of safety must be always greater than unity. It is easier to refer to the ratio of 
stresses since this applies to material properties. 
F.O.S = failure stress / working or allowable stress 
Static Failure Theories 
Maximum Principal Stress Theory (Rankine Theory): 
? The principal stresses s1 (maximum principal stress), s2 (minimum principal stress) or s3 
exceeds the yield stress, yielding would occur. 
? For two dimensional loading situation for a ductile material where tensile and compressive 
yield stress are nearly of same magnitude: 
 
  
? Yielding occurs when the state of stress is at the boundary of the rectangle. 
Maximum Principal Strain Theory (St. Venant’s theory): 
? If e1 and e2 are maximum and minimum principal strains corresponding to s1 and s2, in the 
limiting case: 
 
 
  
  
  
? Boundary of a yield surface in Maximum Strain Energy Theory is given below 
 
  
Maximum Shear Stress Theory (Tresca Theory): 
? At the tensile yield point s2= s3 = 0 and thus maximum shear stress is sy/2. 
 
? Yield surface corresponding to maximum shear stress theory in biaxial stress situation is 
given below : 
 
Maximum strain energy theory ( Beltrami’s theory): 
? Failure would occur when the total strain energy absorbed at a point per unit volume 
exceeds the strain energy absorbed per unit volume at the tensile yield point. 
 
 
 
? Above equation results in Elliptical yield surface which can be viewed as: 
 
  
Distortion energy theory (Von Mises yield criterion): 
? Yielding would occur when total distortion energy absorbed per unit volume due to applied 
loads exceeds the distortion energy absorbed per unit volume at the tensile yield point. 
Total strain energy E
T
 and strain energy for volume change E
V
 can be given as: 
 
 
At the tensile yield point, s1 = sy , s2 = s3 = 0 which gives, 
 
 The failure criterion is thus obtained by equating Ed and Edy , which gives 
 
In a 2-D situation if s3 = 0, so the equation reduces to, 
 
? This is an equation of ellipse and yield equation is an ellipse. 
? This theory is widely accepted for ductile materials 
 
Cotter and Knuckle Joints 
A cotter joint is a temporary fastening and is used to connect rigidly two co-axial road or bars which 
are subjected to axial tensile or compressive forces.  
Socket and Spigot Cotter Joints 
In a socket and spigot cotter joint, one end of the rods is provided with a socket type of end as 
shown in figure and the other end of the rod is inserted into a socket. The end of the rod which goes 
into a socket is also called spigot. 
Failures in Socket and Spigot Cotter Joints 
Read More

Related Searches

Free

,

Exam

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

video lectures

,

past year papers

,

pdf

,

Formula Sheet: Design of Machine Elements Notes | Study Formula Sheets of Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering

,

ppt

,

mock tests for examination

,

Semester Notes

,

study material

,

Extra Questions

,

Objective type Questions

,

MCQs

,

Formula Sheet: Design of Machine Elements Notes | Study Formula Sheets of Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering

,

Formula Sheet: Design of Machine Elements Notes | Study Formula Sheets of Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering

,

Sample Paper

,

practice quizzes

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Summary

,

Viva Questions

,

Important questions

;