Fundamental Concepts Physics Notes | EduRev

Basic Physics for IIT JAM

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Physics : Fundamental Concepts Physics Notes | EduRev

The document Fundamental Concepts Physics Notes | EduRev is a part of the Physics Course Basic Physics for IIT JAM.
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Thermodynamic Equilibrium:

 A particularly important concept is thermodynamic equilibrium, in which there is no tendency for the state of a system to change spontaneously. For example, the gas in a cylinder with a movable piston will be at equilibrium if the temperature and pressure inside are uniform and if the restraining force on the piston is just sufficient to keep it from moving. The system can then be made to change to a new state only by an externally imposed change in one of the state functions, such as the temperature by adding heat or the volume by moving the piston. A sequence of one or more such steps connecting different states of the system is called a process. In general, a system is not in equilibrium as it adjusts to an abrupt change in its environment. For example, when a balloon bursts, the compressed gas inside is suddenly far from equilibrium, and it rapidly expands until it reaches a new equilibrium state. However, the same final state could be achieved by placing the same compressed gas in a cylinder with a movable piston and applying a sequence of many small increments in volume (and temperature), with the system being given time to come to equilibrium after each small increment. Such a process is said to be reversible because the system is at (or near) equilibrium at each step along its path, and the direction of change could be reversed at any point. This example illustrates how two different paths can connect the same initial and final states. The first is irreversible (the balloon bursts), and the second is reversible. The concept of reversible processes is something like motion without friction in mechanics. It represents an idealized limiting case that is very useful in discussing the properties of real systems. Many of the results of thermodynamics are derived from the properties of reversible processes.


Temperature:

The concept of temperature is fundamental to any discussion of thermodynamics, but its precise definition is not a simple matter. For example, a steel rod feels colder than a wooden rod at room temperature simply because steel is better at conducting heat away from the skin. It is therefore necessary to have an objective way of measuring temperature. In general, when two objects are brought into thermal contact, heat will flow between them until they come into equilibrium with each other. When the flow of heat stops, they are said to be at the same temperature. The zeroth law of thermodynamics formalizes this by asserting that if an object A is in simultaneous thermal equilibrium with two other objects B and C, then Band C will be in thermal equilibrium with each other if brought into thermal contact. Object A can then play the role of a thermometer through some change in its physical properties with temperature, such as its volume or its electrical resistance.
With the definition of equality of temperature in hand, it is possible to establish a temperature scale by assigning numerical values to certain easily reproducible fixed points. For example, in the Celsius (°C) temperature scale, the freezing point of pure water is arbitrarily assigned a temperature of 0 °C and the boiling point of water the value of 100 °C (in both cases at 1 standard atmosphere; see atmospheric pressure). In the Fahrenheit (°F) temperature scale, these same two points are assigned the values 32 °F and 212 °F, respectively. There are absolute temperature scales related to the second law of thermodynamics. The absolute scale related to the Celsius scale is called the Kelvin (K) scale, and that related to the Fahrenheit scale is called the Rankine (°R) scale. These scales are related by the equations K = °C + 273.15, °R = °F + 459.67, and °R = 1.8 K. Zero in both the Kelvin and Rankine scales is at absolute zero.


Total internal energy:

Although classical thermodynamics deals exclusively with the macroscopic properties of materials—such as temperaturepressure, and volume—thermal energy from the addition of heat can be understood at the microscopic level as an increase in the kinetic energy of motion of the molecules making up a substance. For example, gas molecules have translational kinetic energy that is proportional to the temperature of the gas: the molecules can rotate about their centre of mass, and the constituent atoms can vibrate with respect to each other (like masses connected by springs). Additionally, chemical energy is stored in the bonds holding the molecules together, and weaker long-range interactions between the molecules involve yet more energy. The sum total of all these forms of energy constitutes the total internal energy of the substance in a given thermodynamic state. The total energy of a system includes its internal energy plus any other forms of energy, such as kinetic energy due to motion of the system as a whole (e.g., water flowing through a pipe) and gravitational potential energy due to its elevation.

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