GMAT Study Strategy - Notes, GMAT Exam Preparation, Management Study GMAT Notes | EduRev

GMAT : GMAT Study Strategy - Notes, GMAT Exam Preparation, Management Study GMAT Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
GMAT Study Strategy Revised 4/25/05 
 
Authors: Daveformba, Ursula, GMAT Club, Stephen Bolton, Erin 
 
     I’ve searched all over the internet and read all the major books on preparing for the GMAT.   
The main thing that current GMAT prep books do well is to help identify what you’ll face on the 
test.  What they don’t do well is to help you to know how to actually study each type of question 
and how to apply the strategies effectively.  I’ve struggled to try and figure out how take a more 
active posture in studying such that information is not only retained, but efficiency improved.  I’m 
tired of hearing, “just do a lot of problems.”  That’s not useful.  That was what people were telling 
me.  One person, who attained a 740 on the GMAT at 46 years of age, the first time she took the 
test, stated how important it was to stay active and not be passive while studying.  The point of 
this whole guide is on how to become an active learner for the GMAT and avoid being passive. 
(Read her Story here) 
     As I was studying, I realized that I had to lay down some very specific strategies for myself to 
become more active in my learning process.  This was because of a GMAT practice test I took 
where I got a 600.  I had studied the Quant quite a bit, but not the verbal.  For verbal, I went 
mostly off of what sounded right to me.  I needed…. I wanted to come up with a way to approach 
the rest of my studying more effectively because there seemed to be too much memorization or 
gut reliance going on in my test taking skills.  I knew that just going by what sounded right wasn’t 
the best way approach the real GMAT. 
     This guide was created as a result of brutally asking myself specifics on how I could and would 
improve in each area of the GMAT.  How does one move from, “just do a lot of problems” or 
“study hard” to “studying effectively” and most importantly…. Getting results?  As this is a guide 
that is being refined and added to, I hope you’ll join me in letting me know what you feel needs to 
be re-worked or further explained by you or me to improve it.  This will be of great benefit to you 
and me as well as others that might need this in the near future.  Over time, I’ve received 
permission from several authors and teachers that have provided great strategy guidelines and 
have inserted them into this document. 
     I’m not sure how you have discovered this GMAT study guide as I have not advertised it 
anywhere.  In any case, I say good for you because it shows that you’re doing your homework.  
Hopefully, you weren’t just looking for the easy way out?  Trust me, no matter how much you 
look, you won’t find a study guide better than this on the internet.  It’s not that I searched myself 
and judged this guide to be the best.  Rather, anyone who’s creating anything that’s even close is 
trying to sell you something.  I’m not.  There’s no extended version of this guide that I sell.  This is 
Page 2


For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
GMAT Study Strategy Revised 4/25/05 
 
Authors: Daveformba, Ursula, GMAT Club, Stephen Bolton, Erin 
 
     I’ve searched all over the internet and read all the major books on preparing for the GMAT.   
The main thing that current GMAT prep books do well is to help identify what you’ll face on the 
test.  What they don’t do well is to help you to know how to actually study each type of question 
and how to apply the strategies effectively.  I’ve struggled to try and figure out how take a more 
active posture in studying such that information is not only retained, but efficiency improved.  I’m 
tired of hearing, “just do a lot of problems.”  That’s not useful.  That was what people were telling 
me.  One person, who attained a 740 on the GMAT at 46 years of age, the first time she took the 
test, stated how important it was to stay active and not be passive while studying.  The point of 
this whole guide is on how to become an active learner for the GMAT and avoid being passive. 
(Read her Story here) 
     As I was studying, I realized that I had to lay down some very specific strategies for myself to 
become more active in my learning process.  This was because of a GMAT practice test I took 
where I got a 600.  I had studied the Quant quite a bit, but not the verbal.  For verbal, I went 
mostly off of what sounded right to me.  I needed…. I wanted to come up with a way to approach 
the rest of my studying more effectively because there seemed to be too much memorization or 
gut reliance going on in my test taking skills.  I knew that just going by what sounded right wasn’t 
the best way approach the real GMAT. 
     This guide was created as a result of brutally asking myself specifics on how I could and would 
improve in each area of the GMAT.  How does one move from, “just do a lot of problems” or 
“study hard” to “studying effectively” and most importantly…. Getting results?  As this is a guide 
that is being refined and added to, I hope you’ll join me in letting me know what you feel needs to 
be re-worked or further explained by you or me to improve it.  This will be of great benefit to you 
and me as well as others that might need this in the near future.  Over time, I’ve received 
permission from several authors and teachers that have provided great strategy guidelines and 
have inserted them into this document. 
     I’m not sure how you have discovered this GMAT study guide as I have not advertised it 
anywhere.  In any case, I say good for you because it shows that you’re doing your homework.  
Hopefully, you weren’t just looking for the easy way out?  Trust me, no matter how much you 
look, you won’t find a study guide better than this on the internet.  It’s not that I searched myself 
and judged this guide to be the best.  Rather, anyone who’s creating anything that’s even close is 
trying to sell you something.  I’m not.  There’s no extended version of this guide that I sell.  This is 
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
just me helping others.  I do only ask for two things as you use this guide.  1) I have included links 
to books and study guides where I do receive very small referral fees.  Therefore, I ask that you 
use the links in this document to purchase the GMAT books you’ll be buying used or new to help 
support this web site you found this document on.  (By the way, I have and always will only 
suggest resources that have been their weight in gold.  I don’t work for or receive kickbacks ever 
and never well.  As you progress through this document and the associated links, I think you’ll 
see that I’ve put in a significant amount of time into putting this all together) 2) Provide me with 
feedback on how to improve this document such as information you may want to submit to me.  
For example, I have received some feedback that they would like to see more specifics on Math 
prep.  As this is a lot of work, I’m taking my time on that, but have included some information in 
this latest revision.  
     I have compiled a web page of various resources to file my research and organize it for easy 
browsing.  You can find it at Future MBA Resources (FMR) .  I have created one specific page 
just for GMAT resources. This will be where you’ll find a wealth of resources and free tests to help 
you on your journey.  For example, I compiled a spreadsheet that lists the difficulty of every 
question in the GMAT Official Guide from GMAC the creator of the test.   
 
Dave 
daveformba@gmail.com 
My Blog 
 
Erin 
http://www.sentencecorrection.com/forums/index.php?act=Mail&CODE=00&MID=2 
 
Dave’s Editorial Corner 
As I’ve received quite a bit of e-mail asking me questions about the GMAT and managing 
difficulties in progress, I’ve decided to add this new section that includes my responses. 
 
GMAT Question Answered  
Dear Dave,  
 
Thank you very much for putting your GMAT strategy guide on the net, it's the best so far! I am 
not a native speaker, I am struggling with my preparation. I feel like I am not progressing, can you 
please advise something on this regard? I really appreicated it.  
Page 3


For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
GMAT Study Strategy Revised 4/25/05 
 
Authors: Daveformba, Ursula, GMAT Club, Stephen Bolton, Erin 
 
     I’ve searched all over the internet and read all the major books on preparing for the GMAT.   
The main thing that current GMAT prep books do well is to help identify what you’ll face on the 
test.  What they don’t do well is to help you to know how to actually study each type of question 
and how to apply the strategies effectively.  I’ve struggled to try and figure out how take a more 
active posture in studying such that information is not only retained, but efficiency improved.  I’m 
tired of hearing, “just do a lot of problems.”  That’s not useful.  That was what people were telling 
me.  One person, who attained a 740 on the GMAT at 46 years of age, the first time she took the 
test, stated how important it was to stay active and not be passive while studying.  The point of 
this whole guide is on how to become an active learner for the GMAT and avoid being passive. 
(Read her Story here) 
     As I was studying, I realized that I had to lay down some very specific strategies for myself to 
become more active in my learning process.  This was because of a GMAT practice test I took 
where I got a 600.  I had studied the Quant quite a bit, but not the verbal.  For verbal, I went 
mostly off of what sounded right to me.  I needed…. I wanted to come up with a way to approach 
the rest of my studying more effectively because there seemed to be too much memorization or 
gut reliance going on in my test taking skills.  I knew that just going by what sounded right wasn’t 
the best way approach the real GMAT. 
     This guide was created as a result of brutally asking myself specifics on how I could and would 
improve in each area of the GMAT.  How does one move from, “just do a lot of problems” or 
“study hard” to “studying effectively” and most importantly…. Getting results?  As this is a guide 
that is being refined and added to, I hope you’ll join me in letting me know what you feel needs to 
be re-worked or further explained by you or me to improve it.  This will be of great benefit to you 
and me as well as others that might need this in the near future.  Over time, I’ve received 
permission from several authors and teachers that have provided great strategy guidelines and 
have inserted them into this document. 
     I’m not sure how you have discovered this GMAT study guide as I have not advertised it 
anywhere.  In any case, I say good for you because it shows that you’re doing your homework.  
Hopefully, you weren’t just looking for the easy way out?  Trust me, no matter how much you 
look, you won’t find a study guide better than this on the internet.  It’s not that I searched myself 
and judged this guide to be the best.  Rather, anyone who’s creating anything that’s even close is 
trying to sell you something.  I’m not.  There’s no extended version of this guide that I sell.  This is 
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
just me helping others.  I do only ask for two things as you use this guide.  1) I have included links 
to books and study guides where I do receive very small referral fees.  Therefore, I ask that you 
use the links in this document to purchase the GMAT books you’ll be buying used or new to help 
support this web site you found this document on.  (By the way, I have and always will only 
suggest resources that have been their weight in gold.  I don’t work for or receive kickbacks ever 
and never well.  As you progress through this document and the associated links, I think you’ll 
see that I’ve put in a significant amount of time into putting this all together) 2) Provide me with 
feedback on how to improve this document such as information you may want to submit to me.  
For example, I have received some feedback that they would like to see more specifics on Math 
prep.  As this is a lot of work, I’m taking my time on that, but have included some information in 
this latest revision.  
     I have compiled a web page of various resources to file my research and organize it for easy 
browsing.  You can find it at Future MBA Resources (FMR) .  I have created one specific page 
just for GMAT resources. This will be where you’ll find a wealth of resources and free tests to help 
you on your journey.  For example, I compiled a spreadsheet that lists the difficulty of every 
question in the GMAT Official Guide from GMAC the creator of the test.   
 
Dave 
daveformba@gmail.com 
My Blog 
 
Erin 
http://www.sentencecorrection.com/forums/index.php?act=Mail&CODE=00&MID=2 
 
Dave’s Editorial Corner 
As I’ve received quite a bit of e-mail asking me questions about the GMAT and managing 
difficulties in progress, I’ve decided to add this new section that includes my responses. 
 
GMAT Question Answered  
Dear Dave,  
 
Thank you very much for putting your GMAT strategy guide on the net, it's the best so far! I am 
not a native speaker, I am struggling with my preparation. I feel like I am not progressing, can you 
please advise something on this regard? I really appreicated it.  
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
Best Regards, "T" 
 
Answer: 
That’s a difficult question to answer. I’ll try my best. 
I’m hoping that you’re doing well in Math. If this is not the case.. then the answer may be in how 
you review and think through why you get the wrong answer and ESPECIALLY why you got the 
right answer. You have to do your best to commit to daily reviews of the ones you got wrong from 
the previous day. OG is the best book for practice questions. Review all the answers in it. 
Moreover, you should review all the ones you’ve been getting wrong at least once a week. If you 
keep getting them wrong.. then you’re approach has been to just solve the problem.. rather than 
understand the concepts. If you're interested in which questions are difficult, medium or easy, you 
can check out the spreadsheet that I pulled from GMAC to help you. 
     For English.. If you think about it… verbal is a math skill too. There are rules and guidelines 
and many ways to approach the answer. You have to understand the basics. I started to do that 
in my study guide. You have to make sure you memorize the basics. Then it comes down to 
repetition and practice. Don’t just try to do as many problems as you can when it comes to 
English. Understand not just why you got the question right.. buy exactly why the other choices 
were poor. Don’t just say.. makes sense or sounds right. It's better to figure out which rule it broke 
or which concept the wrong answer didn’t adhere too. 
     By the way… take a practice full exam… not just verbal or math… but a full exam at least 1 
per week or every other week. Find any test you can get your hands on. It doesn’t matter if the 
test is adaptive or not. And put yourself under the same time pressures of both the test taking 
time and the length of breaks. This part is crucial. 
     What I described is the big picture approach for the GMAT. When it comes to discipline… 
there are two things that I would suggest. 
1) Take a class, but quit the class if the teacher sucks. They should blow your socks off 
otherwise, it’s a waste of your time. 
2) Whether you take the class or not… get to a place where you can focus and study with little or 
no distractions. I study at universities myself. For example, while I wrote my Business School 
application essays and studied for the GMAT, I went to Stanford at their 24 hour study center and 
took some drinks and sandwiches everyday. It was not unusual for me to get there by 6pm and 
Page 4


For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
GMAT Study Strategy Revised 4/25/05 
 
Authors: Daveformba, Ursula, GMAT Club, Stephen Bolton, Erin 
 
     I’ve searched all over the internet and read all the major books on preparing for the GMAT.   
The main thing that current GMAT prep books do well is to help identify what you’ll face on the 
test.  What they don’t do well is to help you to know how to actually study each type of question 
and how to apply the strategies effectively.  I’ve struggled to try and figure out how take a more 
active posture in studying such that information is not only retained, but efficiency improved.  I’m 
tired of hearing, “just do a lot of problems.”  That’s not useful.  That was what people were telling 
me.  One person, who attained a 740 on the GMAT at 46 years of age, the first time she took the 
test, stated how important it was to stay active and not be passive while studying.  The point of 
this whole guide is on how to become an active learner for the GMAT and avoid being passive. 
(Read her Story here) 
     As I was studying, I realized that I had to lay down some very specific strategies for myself to 
become more active in my learning process.  This was because of a GMAT practice test I took 
where I got a 600.  I had studied the Quant quite a bit, but not the verbal.  For verbal, I went 
mostly off of what sounded right to me.  I needed…. I wanted to come up with a way to approach 
the rest of my studying more effectively because there seemed to be too much memorization or 
gut reliance going on in my test taking skills.  I knew that just going by what sounded right wasn’t 
the best way approach the real GMAT. 
     This guide was created as a result of brutally asking myself specifics on how I could and would 
improve in each area of the GMAT.  How does one move from, “just do a lot of problems” or 
“study hard” to “studying effectively” and most importantly…. Getting results?  As this is a guide 
that is being refined and added to, I hope you’ll join me in letting me know what you feel needs to 
be re-worked or further explained by you or me to improve it.  This will be of great benefit to you 
and me as well as others that might need this in the near future.  Over time, I’ve received 
permission from several authors and teachers that have provided great strategy guidelines and 
have inserted them into this document. 
     I’m not sure how you have discovered this GMAT study guide as I have not advertised it 
anywhere.  In any case, I say good for you because it shows that you’re doing your homework.  
Hopefully, you weren’t just looking for the easy way out?  Trust me, no matter how much you 
look, you won’t find a study guide better than this on the internet.  It’s not that I searched myself 
and judged this guide to be the best.  Rather, anyone who’s creating anything that’s even close is 
trying to sell you something.  I’m not.  There’s no extended version of this guide that I sell.  This is 
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
just me helping others.  I do only ask for two things as you use this guide.  1) I have included links 
to books and study guides where I do receive very small referral fees.  Therefore, I ask that you 
use the links in this document to purchase the GMAT books you’ll be buying used or new to help 
support this web site you found this document on.  (By the way, I have and always will only 
suggest resources that have been their weight in gold.  I don’t work for or receive kickbacks ever 
and never well.  As you progress through this document and the associated links, I think you’ll 
see that I’ve put in a significant amount of time into putting this all together) 2) Provide me with 
feedback on how to improve this document such as information you may want to submit to me.  
For example, I have received some feedback that they would like to see more specifics on Math 
prep.  As this is a lot of work, I’m taking my time on that, but have included some information in 
this latest revision.  
     I have compiled a web page of various resources to file my research and organize it for easy 
browsing.  You can find it at Future MBA Resources (FMR) .  I have created one specific page 
just for GMAT resources. This will be where you’ll find a wealth of resources and free tests to help 
you on your journey.  For example, I compiled a spreadsheet that lists the difficulty of every 
question in the GMAT Official Guide from GMAC the creator of the test.   
 
Dave 
daveformba@gmail.com 
My Blog 
 
Erin 
http://www.sentencecorrection.com/forums/index.php?act=Mail&CODE=00&MID=2 
 
Dave’s Editorial Corner 
As I’ve received quite a bit of e-mail asking me questions about the GMAT and managing 
difficulties in progress, I’ve decided to add this new section that includes my responses. 
 
GMAT Question Answered  
Dear Dave,  
 
Thank you very much for putting your GMAT strategy guide on the net, it's the best so far! I am 
not a native speaker, I am struggling with my preparation. I feel like I am not progressing, can you 
please advise something on this regard? I really appreicated it.  
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
Best Regards, "T" 
 
Answer: 
That’s a difficult question to answer. I’ll try my best. 
I’m hoping that you’re doing well in Math. If this is not the case.. then the answer may be in how 
you review and think through why you get the wrong answer and ESPECIALLY why you got the 
right answer. You have to do your best to commit to daily reviews of the ones you got wrong from 
the previous day. OG is the best book for practice questions. Review all the answers in it. 
Moreover, you should review all the ones you’ve been getting wrong at least once a week. If you 
keep getting them wrong.. then you’re approach has been to just solve the problem.. rather than 
understand the concepts. If you're interested in which questions are difficult, medium or easy, you 
can check out the spreadsheet that I pulled from GMAC to help you. 
     For English.. If you think about it… verbal is a math skill too. There are rules and guidelines 
and many ways to approach the answer. You have to understand the basics. I started to do that 
in my study guide. You have to make sure you memorize the basics. Then it comes down to 
repetition and practice. Don’t just try to do as many problems as you can when it comes to 
English. Understand not just why you got the question right.. buy exactly why the other choices 
were poor. Don’t just say.. makes sense or sounds right. It's better to figure out which rule it broke 
or which concept the wrong answer didn’t adhere too. 
     By the way… take a practice full exam… not just verbal or math… but a full exam at least 1 
per week or every other week. Find any test you can get your hands on. It doesn’t matter if the 
test is adaptive or not. And put yourself under the same time pressures of both the test taking 
time and the length of breaks. This part is crucial. 
     What I described is the big picture approach for the GMAT. When it comes to discipline… 
there are two things that I would suggest. 
1) Take a class, but quit the class if the teacher sucks. They should blow your socks off 
otherwise, it’s a waste of your time. 
2) Whether you take the class or not… get to a place where you can focus and study with little or 
no distractions. I study at universities myself. For example, while I wrote my Business School 
application essays and studied for the GMAT, I went to Stanford at their 24 hour study center and 
took some drinks and sandwiches everyday. It was not unusual for me to get there by 6pm and 
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
leave by 1am.  Most Universities like Stanford don’t require a parking permit after 5pm weekdays 
and no permit is required on the weekends.  I called and e-mailed my friends that I wouldn’t be 
around much because of my studies and I canceled a lot of appointments and activities in my life. 
I gave myself permission once a week to go see a movie after taking a practice test because my 
brain was fried anyway. 
     I'm definitely not an expert at the GMAT, but in my humble opinion... I've written what I believe 
to be a good approach to studying for the GMAT. Not all ways work for everyone. I hope you find 
what works the best for you. But trying various methods such as what I've outlined will hopefully 
get you there. 
 
Best wishes 
 
The Hard Facts About Your GMAT Score 
See how the chart below shows GMAT scores in 3 Tiers? I think people generally have a vague 
notion that 3 tiers exists, but with no hard evidence like this chart... who's to say otherwise 
 
 
 
Page 5


For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
GMAT Study Strategy Revised 4/25/05 
 
Authors: Daveformba, Ursula, GMAT Club, Stephen Bolton, Erin 
 
     I’ve searched all over the internet and read all the major books on preparing for the GMAT.   
The main thing that current GMAT prep books do well is to help identify what you’ll face on the 
test.  What they don’t do well is to help you to know how to actually study each type of question 
and how to apply the strategies effectively.  I’ve struggled to try and figure out how take a more 
active posture in studying such that information is not only retained, but efficiency improved.  I’m 
tired of hearing, “just do a lot of problems.”  That’s not useful.  That was what people were telling 
me.  One person, who attained a 740 on the GMAT at 46 years of age, the first time she took the 
test, stated how important it was to stay active and not be passive while studying.  The point of 
this whole guide is on how to become an active learner for the GMAT and avoid being passive. 
(Read her Story here) 
     As I was studying, I realized that I had to lay down some very specific strategies for myself to 
become more active in my learning process.  This was because of a GMAT practice test I took 
where I got a 600.  I had studied the Quant quite a bit, but not the verbal.  For verbal, I went 
mostly off of what sounded right to me.  I needed…. I wanted to come up with a way to approach 
the rest of my studying more effectively because there seemed to be too much memorization or 
gut reliance going on in my test taking skills.  I knew that just going by what sounded right wasn’t 
the best way approach the real GMAT. 
     This guide was created as a result of brutally asking myself specifics on how I could and would 
improve in each area of the GMAT.  How does one move from, “just do a lot of problems” or 
“study hard” to “studying effectively” and most importantly…. Getting results?  As this is a guide 
that is being refined and added to, I hope you’ll join me in letting me know what you feel needs to 
be re-worked or further explained by you or me to improve it.  This will be of great benefit to you 
and me as well as others that might need this in the near future.  Over time, I’ve received 
permission from several authors and teachers that have provided great strategy guidelines and 
have inserted them into this document. 
     I’m not sure how you have discovered this GMAT study guide as I have not advertised it 
anywhere.  In any case, I say good for you because it shows that you’re doing your homework.  
Hopefully, you weren’t just looking for the easy way out?  Trust me, no matter how much you 
look, you won’t find a study guide better than this on the internet.  It’s not that I searched myself 
and judged this guide to be the best.  Rather, anyone who’s creating anything that’s even close is 
trying to sell you something.  I’m not.  There’s no extended version of this guide that I sell.  This is 
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
just me helping others.  I do only ask for two things as you use this guide.  1) I have included links 
to books and study guides where I do receive very small referral fees.  Therefore, I ask that you 
use the links in this document to purchase the GMAT books you’ll be buying used or new to help 
support this web site you found this document on.  (By the way, I have and always will only 
suggest resources that have been their weight in gold.  I don’t work for or receive kickbacks ever 
and never well.  As you progress through this document and the associated links, I think you’ll 
see that I’ve put in a significant amount of time into putting this all together) 2) Provide me with 
feedback on how to improve this document such as information you may want to submit to me.  
For example, I have received some feedback that they would like to see more specifics on Math 
prep.  As this is a lot of work, I’m taking my time on that, but have included some information in 
this latest revision.  
     I have compiled a web page of various resources to file my research and organize it for easy 
browsing.  You can find it at Future MBA Resources (FMR) .  I have created one specific page 
just for GMAT resources. This will be where you’ll find a wealth of resources and free tests to help 
you on your journey.  For example, I compiled a spreadsheet that lists the difficulty of every 
question in the GMAT Official Guide from GMAC the creator of the test.   
 
Dave 
daveformba@gmail.com 
My Blog 
 
Erin 
http://www.sentencecorrection.com/forums/index.php?act=Mail&CODE=00&MID=2 
 
Dave’s Editorial Corner 
As I’ve received quite a bit of e-mail asking me questions about the GMAT and managing 
difficulties in progress, I’ve decided to add this new section that includes my responses. 
 
GMAT Question Answered  
Dear Dave,  
 
Thank you very much for putting your GMAT strategy guide on the net, it's the best so far! I am 
not a native speaker, I am struggling with my preparation. I feel like I am not progressing, can you 
please advise something on this regard? I really appreicated it.  
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
Best Regards, "T" 
 
Answer: 
That’s a difficult question to answer. I’ll try my best. 
I’m hoping that you’re doing well in Math. If this is not the case.. then the answer may be in how 
you review and think through why you get the wrong answer and ESPECIALLY why you got the 
right answer. You have to do your best to commit to daily reviews of the ones you got wrong from 
the previous day. OG is the best book for practice questions. Review all the answers in it. 
Moreover, you should review all the ones you’ve been getting wrong at least once a week. If you 
keep getting them wrong.. then you’re approach has been to just solve the problem.. rather than 
understand the concepts. If you're interested in which questions are difficult, medium or easy, you 
can check out the spreadsheet that I pulled from GMAC to help you. 
     For English.. If you think about it… verbal is a math skill too. There are rules and guidelines 
and many ways to approach the answer. You have to understand the basics. I started to do that 
in my study guide. You have to make sure you memorize the basics. Then it comes down to 
repetition and practice. Don’t just try to do as many problems as you can when it comes to 
English. Understand not just why you got the question right.. buy exactly why the other choices 
were poor. Don’t just say.. makes sense or sounds right. It's better to figure out which rule it broke 
or which concept the wrong answer didn’t adhere too. 
     By the way… take a practice full exam… not just verbal or math… but a full exam at least 1 
per week or every other week. Find any test you can get your hands on. It doesn’t matter if the 
test is adaptive or not. And put yourself under the same time pressures of both the test taking 
time and the length of breaks. This part is crucial. 
     What I described is the big picture approach for the GMAT. When it comes to discipline… 
there are two things that I would suggest. 
1) Take a class, but quit the class if the teacher sucks. They should blow your socks off 
otherwise, it’s a waste of your time. 
2) Whether you take the class or not… get to a place where you can focus and study with little or 
no distractions. I study at universities myself. For example, while I wrote my Business School 
application essays and studied for the GMAT, I went to Stanford at their 24 hour study center and 
took some drinks and sandwiches everyday. It was not unusual for me to get there by 6pm and 
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
leave by 1am.  Most Universities like Stanford don’t require a parking permit after 5pm weekdays 
and no permit is required on the weekends.  I called and e-mailed my friends that I wouldn’t be 
around much because of my studies and I canceled a lot of appointments and activities in my life. 
I gave myself permission once a week to go see a movie after taking a practice test because my 
brain was fried anyway. 
     I'm definitely not an expert at the GMAT, but in my humble opinion... I've written what I believe 
to be a good approach to studying for the GMAT. Not all ways work for everyone. I hope you find 
what works the best for you. But trying various methods such as what I've outlined will hopefully 
get you there. 
 
Best wishes 
 
The Hard Facts About Your GMAT Score 
See how the chart below shows GMAT scores in 3 Tiers? I think people generally have a vague 
notion that 3 tiers exists, but with no hard evidence like this chart... who's to say otherwise 
 
 
 
For more material and information, please visit Tai Lieu Du Hoc at  
www.tailieuduhoc.org 
 
 
Here's a follow-up to the last chart. Again 3 tiers of applicants regarding GMAT scores.  
 
 
Here's an interesting graph from Kellogg's 2004 entering class. This is a good GMAT question 
possibility. If 5282 applied to the 2-year MBA class resulting in 469, what percentage of students 
were admitted with the various GMAT brackets of scores as shown in the graph? When you do 
the math (Taking into account that Kellogg admits 12% more than needed for instances where 
the applicant chooses another school), you get the following: 640 or less GMAT = 1056 apps with 
42 accepted at 4% acceptance. 650-690 GMAT = 1584 apps with 158 accepted at 10% 
acceptance. 700-740 GMAT = 2059 apps with 252 accepted at 12.2% acceptance. 750-780 
GMAT = 581 apps with 74 accepted at 12.7% acceptance. That means the 2004 class had 25% 
of all students who scored 700 or more accepted. However, the actual student population is 
actually 62% people who scored 700 or more. This is actually a great challenge and 
encouragement as I thought it was much worse. So 38% of the class scored 690 or less? That's 
cool. 700-740 is only 2% more likely to receive acceptance than those who had 650-690. Not 
much of a difference. I think this is why we ought not to kill ourselves for not getting 700 and for 
not killing our self if we do get 700 or more and don't get into a top Business School. That 2% 
can't hurt though. 
 
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