Gmat Vocabulary List GMAT Notes | EduRev

GMAT : Gmat Vocabulary List GMAT Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


GMAT Vocabulary List
MovieHONG
abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
The passengers moved abaft of the ship so as to escape the fire in the 
front of the ship.
abandon
(v.; n) to leave behind; to give something up; freedom; enthusiasm; 
impetuosity
After failing for several years, he abandoned his dream of starting a 
grocery business.
Lucy embarked on her new adventure with abandon.
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
The mother's public reprimand abased the girl.
The insecure father, after failing to achieve his own life-long goals, 
abased his children whenever they failed.
abbreviate
(v.) to shorten; compress; diminish
His vacation to Japan was abbreviated when he acquired an illness 
treatable only in the United States.
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
Due to his poor payment record, it may be necessary to abdicate our 
relationship with the client.
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
The aberrant flight pattern of the airplane alarmed the air traffic 
controllers.
His aberrant behavior led his friends to worry the divorce had taken its 
toll.
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
Since the power failure, the town has been in abeyance.
abhor
(v.) to hate
By the way her jaw tensed when he walked in, it is easy to see that she 
abhors him.
Page 2


GMAT Vocabulary List
MovieHONG
abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
The passengers moved abaft of the ship so as to escape the fire in the 
front of the ship.
abandon
(v.; n) to leave behind; to give something up; freedom; enthusiasm; 
impetuosity
After failing for several years, he abandoned his dream of starting a 
grocery business.
Lucy embarked on her new adventure with abandon.
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
The mother's public reprimand abased the girl.
The insecure father, after failing to achieve his own life-long goals, 
abased his children whenever they failed.
abbreviate
(v.) to shorten; compress; diminish
His vacation to Japan was abbreviated when he acquired an illness 
treatable only in the United States.
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
Due to his poor payment record, it may be necessary to abdicate our 
relationship with the client.
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
The aberrant flight pattern of the airplane alarmed the air traffic 
controllers.
His aberrant behavior led his friends to worry the divorce had taken its 
toll.
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
Since the power failure, the town has been in abeyance.
abhor
(v.) to hate
By the way her jaw tensed when he walked in, it is easy to see that she 
abhors him.
The dog abhorred cats, chasing and growling at them whenever he had 
the opportunity.
abject
(adj.) of the worst or lowest degree
The Haldemans lived in abject poverty, with barely a roof over their 
heads.
abjure
(v.) to give up
The losing team may abjure to the team that is winning.
abnegation
(n.) a denial
The woman's abnegation of her loss was apparent when she began to 
laugh.
abominate
(v.) to loathe; to hate
Randall abominated all the traffic he encountered on every morning 
commute.
Please do not abominate the guilty person until you hear the complete 
explanation.
abridge
(v.) to shorten; to limit
The editor abridged the story to make the book easier to digest.
abrogate
(v.) to cancel by authority
The judge would not abrogate the law.
abrupt
(adj.) happening or ending unexpectedly
The abrupt end to their marriage was a shock to everyone.
abscond
(v.) to go away hastily or secretly; to hide
The newly wed couple will abscond from the reception to leave on the 
honeymoon.
absolve
(v.) to forgive; to acquit
The judge will absolve the person of all charges.
After feuding for many years, the brothers absolved each other for the 
many arguments they had.
abstemious
(adj.) sparing in use of food or drinks
If we become stranded in the snow storm, we will have to be abstemious 
Page 3


GMAT Vocabulary List
MovieHONG
abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
The passengers moved abaft of the ship so as to escape the fire in the 
front of the ship.
abandon
(v.; n) to leave behind; to give something up; freedom; enthusiasm; 
impetuosity
After failing for several years, he abandoned his dream of starting a 
grocery business.
Lucy embarked on her new adventure with abandon.
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
The mother's public reprimand abased the girl.
The insecure father, after failing to achieve his own life-long goals, 
abased his children whenever they failed.
abbreviate
(v.) to shorten; compress; diminish
His vacation to Japan was abbreviated when he acquired an illness 
treatable only in the United States.
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
Due to his poor payment record, it may be necessary to abdicate our 
relationship with the client.
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
The aberrant flight pattern of the airplane alarmed the air traffic 
controllers.
His aberrant behavior led his friends to worry the divorce had taken its 
toll.
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
Since the power failure, the town has been in abeyance.
abhor
(v.) to hate
By the way her jaw tensed when he walked in, it is easy to see that she 
abhors him.
The dog abhorred cats, chasing and growling at them whenever he had 
the opportunity.
abject
(adj.) of the worst or lowest degree
The Haldemans lived in abject poverty, with barely a roof over their 
heads.
abjure
(v.) to give up
The losing team may abjure to the team that is winning.
abnegation
(n.) a denial
The woman's abnegation of her loss was apparent when she began to 
laugh.
abominate
(v.) to loathe; to hate
Randall abominated all the traffic he encountered on every morning 
commute.
Please do not abominate the guilty person until you hear the complete 
explanation.
abridge
(v.) to shorten; to limit
The editor abridged the story to make the book easier to digest.
abrogate
(v.) to cancel by authority
The judge would not abrogate the law.
abrupt
(adj.) happening or ending unexpectedly
The abrupt end to their marriage was a shock to everyone.
abscond
(v.) to go away hastily or secretly; to hide
The newly wed couple will abscond from the reception to leave on the 
honeymoon.
absolve
(v.) to forgive; to acquit
The judge will absolve the person of all charges.
After feuding for many years, the brothers absolved each other for the 
many arguments they had.
abstemious
(adj.) sparing in use of food or drinks
If we become stranded in the snow storm, we will have to be abstemious 
with our food supply.
In many abstemious cultures the people are so thin due to the belief that 
too much taken into the body leads to contamination of the soul.
abstinence
(n.) the act or process of voluntarily refraining from any action or 
practice; self-control; chastity
In preparation for the Olympic games, the athletes practiced abstinence 
from red meat and junk food, adhering instead to a menu of pasta and 
produce.
abstruse
(adj.) hard to understand; deep; recondite
The topic was so abstruse the student was forced to stop reading.
The concept was too abstruse for the average student to grasp.
abysmal
(adj.) very deep
The abysmal waters contained little plant life.
accede
(v.) to comply with; to consent to
With defeat imminent, the rebel army acceded to hash out a peace treaty.
acclaim
(n.) loud approval; applause
Edward Albee's brilliantly written Broadway revival of A Delicate 
Balance received wide acclaim.
accolade
(n.) approving or praising mention; a sign of approval or respect
Rich accolades were bestowed on the returning hero.
Accolades flowed into her dressing room following the opening-night 
triumph.
accomplice
(n.) co-conspirator; partner; partner-in-crime
The bank robber's accomplice drove the get- away car.
accretion
(n.)growth by addition; a growing together by parts
With the accretion of the new members, the club doubled its original size.
The addition of the new departments accounts for the accretion of the 
company.
accrue
(v.) a natural growth; a periodic increase
Over the course of her college career, she managed to accrue a great 
deal of knowledge.
Page 4


GMAT Vocabulary List
MovieHONG
abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
The passengers moved abaft of the ship so as to escape the fire in the 
front of the ship.
abandon
(v.; n) to leave behind; to give something up; freedom; enthusiasm; 
impetuosity
After failing for several years, he abandoned his dream of starting a 
grocery business.
Lucy embarked on her new adventure with abandon.
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
The mother's public reprimand abased the girl.
The insecure father, after failing to achieve his own life-long goals, 
abased his children whenever they failed.
abbreviate
(v.) to shorten; compress; diminish
His vacation to Japan was abbreviated when he acquired an illness 
treatable only in the United States.
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
Due to his poor payment record, it may be necessary to abdicate our 
relationship with the client.
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
The aberrant flight pattern of the airplane alarmed the air traffic 
controllers.
His aberrant behavior led his friends to worry the divorce had taken its 
toll.
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
Since the power failure, the town has been in abeyance.
abhor
(v.) to hate
By the way her jaw tensed when he walked in, it is easy to see that she 
abhors him.
The dog abhorred cats, chasing and growling at them whenever he had 
the opportunity.
abject
(adj.) of the worst or lowest degree
The Haldemans lived in abject poverty, with barely a roof over their 
heads.
abjure
(v.) to give up
The losing team may abjure to the team that is winning.
abnegation
(n.) a denial
The woman's abnegation of her loss was apparent when she began to 
laugh.
abominate
(v.) to loathe; to hate
Randall abominated all the traffic he encountered on every morning 
commute.
Please do not abominate the guilty person until you hear the complete 
explanation.
abridge
(v.) to shorten; to limit
The editor abridged the story to make the book easier to digest.
abrogate
(v.) to cancel by authority
The judge would not abrogate the law.
abrupt
(adj.) happening or ending unexpectedly
The abrupt end to their marriage was a shock to everyone.
abscond
(v.) to go away hastily or secretly; to hide
The newly wed couple will abscond from the reception to leave on the 
honeymoon.
absolve
(v.) to forgive; to acquit
The judge will absolve the person of all charges.
After feuding for many years, the brothers absolved each other for the 
many arguments they had.
abstemious
(adj.) sparing in use of food or drinks
If we become stranded in the snow storm, we will have to be abstemious 
with our food supply.
In many abstemious cultures the people are so thin due to the belief that 
too much taken into the body leads to contamination of the soul.
abstinence
(n.) the act or process of voluntarily refraining from any action or 
practice; self-control; chastity
In preparation for the Olympic games, the athletes practiced abstinence 
from red meat and junk food, adhering instead to a menu of pasta and 
produce.
abstruse
(adj.) hard to understand; deep; recondite
The topic was so abstruse the student was forced to stop reading.
The concept was too abstruse for the average student to grasp.
abysmal
(adj.) very deep
The abysmal waters contained little plant life.
accede
(v.) to comply with; to consent to
With defeat imminent, the rebel army acceded to hash out a peace treaty.
acclaim
(n.) loud approval; applause
Edward Albee's brilliantly written Broadway revival of A Delicate 
Balance received wide acclaim.
accolade
(n.) approving or praising mention; a sign of approval or respect
Rich accolades were bestowed on the returning hero.
Accolades flowed into her dressing room following the opening-night 
triumph.
accomplice
(n.) co-conspirator; partner; partner-in-crime
The bank robber's accomplice drove the get- away car.
accretion
(n.)growth by addition; a growing together by parts
With the accretion of the new members, the club doubled its original size.
The addition of the new departments accounts for the accretion of the 
company.
accrue
(v.) a natural growth; a periodic increase
Over the course of her college career, she managed to accrue a great 
deal of knowledge.
The savings were able to accrue a sizable amount of interest each year.
During his many years of collecting stamps, he was able to accrue a 
large collection of valuable items.
acerbic
(adj.) tasting sour; harsh in language or temper
Too much Bay Leaf will make the eggplant acerbic.
The baby's mouth puckered when she was given the acerbic medicine.
The columnist's acerbic comments about the First Lady drew a strong 
denunciation from the President.
acquiesce
(v.) to agree without protest
The group acquiesced to the new regulations even though they were 
opposed to them.
After a hard-fought battle, the retailers finally acquiesced to the draft 
regulations.
acrid
(adj.) sharp; bitter; foul smelling
Although the soup is a healthy food choice, it is so acrid not many people 
choose to eat it.
The fire at the plastics factory caused an acrid odor to be emitted 
throughout the surrounding neighborhood.
acrimony
(n.) sharpness or bitterness in language or manner.
The acrimony of her response was shocking.
adage
(n.) an old saying now accepted as being truthful
The adage "do unto others as you wish them to do unto you" is still 
widely practiced.
adamant
(adj.) not yielding, firm
After taking an adamant stand to sell the house, the man called the real 
estate agency.
The girl's parents were adamant about not allowing her to go on a 
dangerous backpacking trip.
addled
(adj.) rotten
The egg will become addled if it is left unrefrigerated.
adept
(adj.) skilled; practiced
The skilled craftsman was quite adept at creating beautiful vases and 
candleholders.
Page 5


GMAT Vocabulary List
MovieHONG
abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
The passengers moved abaft of the ship so as to escape the fire in the 
front of the ship.
abandon
(v.; n) to leave behind; to give something up; freedom; enthusiasm; 
impetuosity
After failing for several years, he abandoned his dream of starting a 
grocery business.
Lucy embarked on her new adventure with abandon.
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
The mother's public reprimand abased the girl.
The insecure father, after failing to achieve his own life-long goals, 
abased his children whenever they failed.
abbreviate
(v.) to shorten; compress; diminish
His vacation to Japan was abbreviated when he acquired an illness 
treatable only in the United States.
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
Due to his poor payment record, it may be necessary to abdicate our 
relationship with the client.
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
The aberrant flight pattern of the airplane alarmed the air traffic 
controllers.
His aberrant behavior led his friends to worry the divorce had taken its 
toll.
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
Since the power failure, the town has been in abeyance.
abhor
(v.) to hate
By the way her jaw tensed when he walked in, it is easy to see that she 
abhors him.
The dog abhorred cats, chasing and growling at them whenever he had 
the opportunity.
abject
(adj.) of the worst or lowest degree
The Haldemans lived in abject poverty, with barely a roof over their 
heads.
abjure
(v.) to give up
The losing team may abjure to the team that is winning.
abnegation
(n.) a denial
The woman's abnegation of her loss was apparent when she began to 
laugh.
abominate
(v.) to loathe; to hate
Randall abominated all the traffic he encountered on every morning 
commute.
Please do not abominate the guilty person until you hear the complete 
explanation.
abridge
(v.) to shorten; to limit
The editor abridged the story to make the book easier to digest.
abrogate
(v.) to cancel by authority
The judge would not abrogate the law.
abrupt
(adj.) happening or ending unexpectedly
The abrupt end to their marriage was a shock to everyone.
abscond
(v.) to go away hastily or secretly; to hide
The newly wed couple will abscond from the reception to leave on the 
honeymoon.
absolve
(v.) to forgive; to acquit
The judge will absolve the person of all charges.
After feuding for many years, the brothers absolved each other for the 
many arguments they had.
abstemious
(adj.) sparing in use of food or drinks
If we become stranded in the snow storm, we will have to be abstemious 
with our food supply.
In many abstemious cultures the people are so thin due to the belief that 
too much taken into the body leads to contamination of the soul.
abstinence
(n.) the act or process of voluntarily refraining from any action or 
practice; self-control; chastity
In preparation for the Olympic games, the athletes practiced abstinence 
from red meat and junk food, adhering instead to a menu of pasta and 
produce.
abstruse
(adj.) hard to understand; deep; recondite
The topic was so abstruse the student was forced to stop reading.
The concept was too abstruse for the average student to grasp.
abysmal
(adj.) very deep
The abysmal waters contained little plant life.
accede
(v.) to comply with; to consent to
With defeat imminent, the rebel army acceded to hash out a peace treaty.
acclaim
(n.) loud approval; applause
Edward Albee's brilliantly written Broadway revival of A Delicate 
Balance received wide acclaim.
accolade
(n.) approving or praising mention; a sign of approval or respect
Rich accolades were bestowed on the returning hero.
Accolades flowed into her dressing room following the opening-night 
triumph.
accomplice
(n.) co-conspirator; partner; partner-in-crime
The bank robber's accomplice drove the get- away car.
accretion
(n.)growth by addition; a growing together by parts
With the accretion of the new members, the club doubled its original size.
The addition of the new departments accounts for the accretion of the 
company.
accrue
(v.) a natural growth; a periodic increase
Over the course of her college career, she managed to accrue a great 
deal of knowledge.
The savings were able to accrue a sizable amount of interest each year.
During his many years of collecting stamps, he was able to accrue a 
large collection of valuable items.
acerbic
(adj.) tasting sour; harsh in language or temper
Too much Bay Leaf will make the eggplant acerbic.
The baby's mouth puckered when she was given the acerbic medicine.
The columnist's acerbic comments about the First Lady drew a strong 
denunciation from the President.
acquiesce
(v.) to agree without protest
The group acquiesced to the new regulations even though they were 
opposed to them.
After a hard-fought battle, the retailers finally acquiesced to the draft 
regulations.
acrid
(adj.) sharp; bitter; foul smelling
Although the soup is a healthy food choice, it is so acrid not many people 
choose to eat it.
The fire at the plastics factory caused an acrid odor to be emitted 
throughout the surrounding neighborhood.
acrimony
(n.) sharpness or bitterness in language or manner.
The acrimony of her response was shocking.
adage
(n.) an old saying now accepted as being truthful
The adage "do unto others as you wish them to do unto you" is still 
widely practiced.
adamant
(adj.) not yielding, firm
After taking an adamant stand to sell the house, the man called the real 
estate agency.
The girl's parents were adamant about not allowing her to go on a 
dangerous backpacking trip.
addled
(adj.) rotten
The egg will become addled if it is left unrefrigerated.
adept
(adj.) skilled; practiced
The skilled craftsman was quite adept at creating beautiful vases and 
candleholders.
adjure
(v.) solemnly ordered
The jurors were adjured by the judge to make a fair decision.
adroit
(adj.) expert or skillful
The repair was not difficult for the adroit craftsman.
The driver's adroit driving avoided a serious accident.
adulation
(n.) praise in excess
The adulation was in response to the heroic feat.
The adulation given to the movie star was sickening.
adulterate
(v.) to corrupt, debase, or make impure
The dumping of chemicals will adulterate the pureness of the lake.
adversary
(n.) an enemy; foe
The peace treaty united two countries that were historically great 
adversaries.
adverse
(adj.) negative; hostile; antagonistic; inimical
Contrary to the ski resort's expectations, the warm weather generated 
adverse conditions for a profitable weekend.
advocate
(v.; n.) to plead in favor of; supporter; defender
Amnesty International advocates the cause for human rights.
Martin Luther King, Jr. was a great advocate of civil rights.
aesthetic
(adj.) of beauty; pertaining to taste in art and beauty
She found that her aesthetic sense and that of the artist were at odds.
His review made one wonder what kind of aesthetic taste the critic had.
affable
(adj.) friendly; amiable; good-natured
Her affable puppy loved to play with children.
affiliate
(v.) to connect or associate with; to accept as a member
The hiking club affiliated with the bird-watching club.
affinity
(n.) a connection; similarity of structure
There is a strong emotional affinity between the two siblings.
It turns out that the elements bear a strong affinity to each other.
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Gmat Vocabulary List GMAT Notes | EduRev

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